Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS20090308907 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 12/137,571
Publication dateDec 17, 2009
Filing dateJun 12, 2008
Priority dateJun 12, 2008
Also published asCA2726523A1, CA2726527A1, CN102056553A, CN102056553B, CN102088916A, CN102088916B, EP2299914A1, EP2299914B1, US8007513, US20090308909, WO2009152307A1, WO2009152333A1
Publication number12137571, 137571, US 2009/0308907 A1, US 2009/308907 A1, US 20090308907 A1, US 20090308907A1, US 2009308907 A1, US 2009308907A1, US-A1-20090308907, US-A1-2009308907, US2009/0308907A1, US2009/308907A1, US20090308907 A1, US20090308907A1, US2009308907 A1, US2009308907A1
InventorsAnil K. Nalagatla, Sudhir B. Patel, Debasish Pradhan
Original AssigneeNalagatla Anil K, Patel Sudhir B, Debasish Pradhan
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Partially reusable surgical stapler
US 20090308907 A1
Abstract
A partially reusable surgical stapler for deploying staples into tissue. The stapler has a body with a distal end, a proximal end and a longitudinal axis therebetween. The proximal end includes a handle while the distal end includes a staple cartridge holder and an opposing anvil. The stapler also has an actuator module for deploying staples. The actuator module includes at least one longitudinally movable member for sequentially ejecting staples towards the anvil. The actuator module is readily removable and replaceable to and from the body. The components of the stapler body can be disassembled, reconditioned and reassembled for reuse in a different surgical procedure.
Images(17)
Previous page
Next page
Claims(21)
1. A surgical stapler for deploying staples into tissue, said stapler comprising:
a. a body having a distal end, a proximal end and a longitudinal axis therebetween, said proximal end comprising a handle and a distal end comprising a staple cartridge channel and an opposing anvil; and
b. an actuator module for deploying staples, said actuator module including at least one longitudinally moveable member for sequentially ejecting staples towards said anvil, said actuating module being readily removable and replaceable to and from said body.
2. The surgical stapler of claim 1, further including a staple cartridge containing a plurality of staples, said staple cartridge being disposed within said staple cartridge channel.
3. The surgical stapler of claim 2, wherein said stapler body comprises an upper jaw member and a lower jaw member each being formed as a single piece, said upper jaw member having a pair of stationary pins and said lower jaw member comprising a pair of alignment slots, said upper jaw pins being inserted into said lower jaw slots to align said jaw members.
4. The surgical stapler of claim 3, wherein said stapler further comprises a latching member for connecting said upper and lower jaw members together at an intermediate position along said longitudinal axis of said stapler, said latching member being moveable relative to said upper and lower jaw members.
5. The surgical stapler of claim 4, wherein said latching member is moveable relative to said upper and lower jaw members to place said stapler in a series of different locking states.
6. The surgical stapler of claim 5, wherein said latching member is formed as a single piece component that can be connected to said stapler in a closed locking state and disconnected from said stapler in an open locking state.
7. The surgical stapler of claim 6, wherein said latching member further comprises a latch pin, said latch pin being insertable into and removable from a slot on said stapler body for connecting and disconnecting said latching member to said stapler.
8. The surgical stapler of claim 7, wherein said stapler further comprises retaining means on said stapler body for retaining said latching member in said different locking states relative to said upper and lower jaw members.
9. The surgical stapler of claim 6, wherein said latching member is a single piece component, and wherein said upper jaw member, said lower jaw member and said latching member can be disassembled from said stapler and individually reconditioned for reuse in a different patient procedure.
10. The surgical stapler of claim 8, wherein said retaining means can hold said latching member in a pre-close locking state in which said upper jaw pins are prevented from disengaging from said lower jaw slots yet said staple cartridge can move relative to said anvil.
11. The surgical stapler of claim 8, wherein said retaining means can hold said latching member in a partially locked in state in which said latching member is connected to said lower jaw member, yet said upper jaw pins can disengage from said lower jaw slots to enable said upper and lower jaw members to be separated.
12. The surgical stapler of claim 8, wherein said latching member further comprises hook latch members moveable relative to opposing sidewalls of said lower jaw member, said hook latch members engaging said upper jaw pins in a closed locking state to fix said upper and lower jaw members together in an operative position.
13. The surgical stapler of claim 7, wherein said actuator module further comprises structure for facilitating mounting and removal of said module from said stapler body.
14. The surgical stapler of claim 13, wherein said actuator module structure comprises a channel-shaped pan holding said at least one longitudinally moveable member, said pan being insertable into and removable from a channel-shaped frame of said lower jaw member to permit said longitudinally moveable members to move between said pan and said staple cartridge.
15. The surgical stapler of claim 14, wherein said actuator module further comprises an opening aligned with said stapler body opening along said longitudinal stapler axis, said latch pin being insertable into and removable from said actuator module opening when said pin is connected to said stapler body to hold said actuator module within said stapler body.
16. The surgical stapler of claim 15, further comprising structure for connecting and disconnecting staple cartridges to said stapler body relative to said actuator module, wherein multiple staple cartridges may be used with a single actuator module within said stapler body.
17. The surgical stapler of claim 16, wherein said longitudinally moveable members comprise a cutting member and a pair of staple actuating bars, and said actuator module further includes a guide means for aligning said cutting member and staple actuating bars with a staple cartridge for reciprocal movement between said actuator module and said staple cartridge.
18. A surgical stapler for deploying staples into tissue, said stapler comprising:
a. an upper jaw member having a proximal end comprising a handle and a distal end comprising an anvil;
b. a lower jaw member having a proximal channel-shaped frame and a distal end comprising a staple cartridge channel;
c. an actuator module for deploying staples, said actuator module including at least one longitudinally moveable member for sequentially ejecting staples towards said anvil, said actuator module being readily removable and replaceable to and from said lower jaw channel;
d. a staple cartridge containing a plurality of staples disposed within said staple cartridge channel; and
e. a latching member for connecting said upper and lower jaw members together at an intermediate position along a longitudinal axis of said stapler, said latching member being moveable relative to said upper and lower jaw members to place said stapler in a series of different locking states.
19. The surgical stapler of claim 18, wherein said upper jaw member, said lower jaw member and said latching member are single piece components that can be disassembled from said stapler, separately reconditioned, and subsequently reassembled for reuse in a different tissue stapling procedure.
20. The surgical stapler of claim 18, further comprising retaining means on said latching member for holding said latching member to said lower jaw member in one or more of said different locking states.
21. The surgical stapler of claim 18, wherein said latching member is in an initial, open state for assembly to said upper and lower jaw members, and moves relative to said jaw members to a closed, locked state prior to operation of said stapler to prevent said latching member from disengaging from said upper and lower jaw members during use.
Description
    FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • [0001]
    The present invention relates generally to surgical stapling instruments and, more particularly, to a surgical stapler which can be disassembled and portions reconditioned and sterilized for reuse in subsequent surgical procedures, and which includes a removable actuating module that can be reused with multiple staple cartridges during a single patient procedure.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • [0002]
    Before surgical staplers were introduced, surgeons had to spend a great deal of time sewing the tissue of patients back together. This was the most time intensive aspect of a surgical procedure. Surgical staplers have decreased the amount of time that a user spends sewing tissue back together. Such surgical staplers are described in the following issued U.S. patents which are hereby incorporated herein by reference: U.S. Pat. No. 4,633,861 Chow et al.; U.S. Pat. No. 4,633,874 Chow et al.; and U.S. Pat. No. 5,129,570 Schulze et al.
  • [0003]
    One concern with surgical staplers has been assuring that the staplers used during a procedure are sterile. Reusable staplers have typically been relatively complicated mechanical instruments which are difficult to sterilize after use. Hence, it was once desired that surgical staplers be completely disposable. As more than one surgical stapler may be required in a surgical procedure, for economical reasons disposable surgical staplers having reloadable staple cartridges have been developed. These reloadable staple cartridges have comprised a combination of staples and a firing module for discharging the staples. Typically the cutting instrument is included in the firing module. Therefore, each time a stapler is reloaded with a new staple cartridge, a new knife and firing assembly is also inserted into the stapler. Numerous staple cartridges are normally used during a single patient procedure, resulting in the repeated replacement of the knife and firing elements for the same patient. Since a knife is usually not worn out after a staple cartridge has been emptied, the knife and firing assembly could be reused with additional staple cartridges within the same patient. Reusing the firing assembly within a single patient procedure would not require additional sterilizing and can decrease the costs incurred during the procedure. Recently, there has also been a desire to make portions of a surgical stapler reusable, so that a portion is disposable and a portion is reusable in subsequent procedures. Reusing portions of the stapler reduces the costs associated with surgical procedures, and also decreases the surgical waste.
  • [0004]
    Thus, to reduce the costs associated with surgical procedures, there is a need for a surgical stapler that can be disassembled and portions of the stapler reconditioned for subsequent use. In particular, there is a need for a surgical stapler in which the firing and cutting components may be reused with multiple staple cartridges within a single patient procedure in order to decrease the amount of materials utilized with the stapler. There is also a need for a surgical stapler that can be easily assembled and disassembled to allow reconditioning and reuse of some of the stapler parts. In addition, there is a need for a partially reusable stapler that incorporates a disposable firing module to allow the more complex cutting and stapling components to be easily replaced between surgical procedures. Further, there is a need for a partially reusable stapler in which the reusable parts have a simple, one-piece design to facilitate effective reconditioning of the parts between procedures. The present invention provides a partially reusable surgical stapler which achieves these objectives.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • [0005]
    In accordance with the present invention, a partially reusable surgical stapler is provided for deploying staples into tissue. The stapler has a body with a distal end, a proximal end and a longitudinal axis therebetween. The proximal end includes a handle while the distal end includes a staple cartridge holder and an opposing anvil. The stapler also has an actuator module for deploying staples. The actuator module includes at least one longitudinally movable member for sequentially ejecting staples towards the anvil. The actuator module is readily removable and replaceable to and from the body.
  • [0006]
    In another embodiment, the present invention provides a partially reusable surgical stapler having an upper jaw member with a proximal handle end and a distal anvil end. A lower jaw member having a proximal channel-shaped frame and a distal staple cartridge channel is aligned with the upper jaw. An actuator module, having at least one longitudinally moveable member for sequentially ejecting staples towards the anvil, is readily removable and replaceable to and from the lower jaw frame. A staple cartridge containing a plurality of staples is removably disposed within the staple cartridge channel. A latching member for connecting the upper and lower jaws together is provided at an intermediate position along a longitudinal axis of the stapler. The latching member is moveable relative to the upper and lower jaw members to place the stapler in a series of different locking states. The different locking states include an assembly state for connecting and disconnecting the latching member to the jaw members, and a closed, latched state in which the latching member is locked to the jaw members.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0007]
    FIG. 1 is an isometric view of an exemplary surgical stapler showing the stapler in a closed position;
  • [0008]
    FIG. 2 is a front view of the stapler in an open position;
  • [0009]
    FIG. 3 is an isometric view of the stapler in an open position;
  • [0010]
    FIG. 4 is an isometric bottom view of the reusable upper jaw member for the stapler;
  • [0011]
    FIG. 5 is an isometric top view of the stapler upper jaw member;
  • [0012]
    FIG. 6 is an isometric view of the reusable lower jaw member including the cartridge channel;
  • [0013]
    FIG. 7 is an isometric view of the disposable staple cartridge;
  • [0014]
    FIG. 8 is a bottom view of the disposable staple cartridge;
  • [0015]
    FIG. 9 is an isometric view of the reusable latching member;
  • [0016]
    FIG. 10 is a front view of the reusable latching member;
  • [0017]
    FIG. 11 is a detailed isometric view of the distal end of the latching member;
  • [0018]
    FIG. 12 is a partial front view of the stapler showing the latching member in a ready to assemble state;
  • [0019]
    FIG. 13 is a partial front view of the stapler showing the latching member in an initial inserted state;
  • [0020]
    FIG. 14 is a partial front view of the stapler showing the latching member in a rotated and partially locked-in state;
  • [0021]
    FIG. 15 is a partial front view of the stapler showing the relative positions of the latching and upper jaw members in a pre-close position;
  • [0022]
    FIG. 16 is a partial front view of the stapler showing the relative positions of the latching and upper jaw members in an open position during use;
  • [0023]
    FIG. 17 is an isometric view of the disposable actuating module;
  • [0024]
    FIG. 18 is another isometric view of the disposable actuating module looking forward from the proximal to the distal end;
  • [0025]
    FIG. 19 is an isometric view of the actuating module pan;
  • [0026]
    FIG. 20 is a detailed, isometric view of the proximal end of the actuating module;
  • [0027]
    FIG. 21 is a top view of the actuating module;
  • [0028]
    FIG. 22 is an isometric view of the actuating knob;
  • [0029]
    FIG. 23 is an isometric view of the guide block;
  • [0030]
    FIG. 24 is an isometric view of a pusher bar;
  • [0031]
    FIG. 25 is an isometric view of the knife support bar;
  • [0032]
    FIG. 26 is a close-up, isometric view of the distal end of the actuating module showing the protector cap;
  • [0033]
    FIG. 27 is a front view of the actuating module;
  • [0034]
    FIG. 28 is a sectional view of the actuating module proximal end, showing the relationship between the actuating knob and the detent spring in a full back position; and
  • [0035]
    FIG. 29 is a sectional view of the actuating module proximal end, showing the actuating knob moved forward during firing.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION
  • [0036]
    Referring now to the drawing figures, in which like numerals indicate like elements throughout the views, FIGS. 1 through 3 illustrate a first exemplary surgical stapler 20 of the present invention. The body of stapler 20 includes an upper jaw member 22, a lower jaw member 24, and a latching member 30. Latching member 30 is pivotable relative to the upper and lower jaws members 22, 24, as shown in FIGS. 2-3. Latching member 30 can be pivoted through a series of different latching states to lock the stapler closed for use or to open the stapler varying degrees to allow for adjustment of tissue within the stapler, the replacement of a staple cartridge, or disassembly of the stapler. Upon completion of a surgical procedure, latching member 30 can be pivoted to a fully open position to allow stapler 20 to be disassembled in preparation for the resterilization and reuse of portions of the stapler.
  • [0037]
    As shown in FIGS. 4 and 5, upper jaw 22 comprises a single piece, elongated channel-shaped frame having a pair of opposing sidewalls 32 a, 32 b connected by a top wall 36. Top wall 36 is suitably shaped on the outer surface to form a hand grip and includes an upper handle protrusion 40 to facilitate the handling and operation of the stapler by a surgeon. The distal end of upper jaw 22 comprises a pair of inwardly extending flanges 42 which define an anvil 44 of the stapler. Flanges 42 are separated by a central, longitudinal slot 46 which extends along the entire length of anvil 44. The inner surface of each flange 42 is provided with two longitudinal rows of uniformly spaced staple-forming pockets 50. Staple forming pockets 50 allow the fashioning of B-form staples when U-shaped staples are ejected against the anvil flanges during firing. Anvil 44 includes a tapered tip at the distal-most end for facilitating insertion of the stapler into hollow, tubular body organs. A pair of tissue stops 52 is provided on opposite sides of anvil 44 adjacent the proximal end of staple forming pockets 50. Tissue stops 52 are laterally aligned with the proximal end of staple forming pockets 50 to prevent tissue from being placed into the stapler beyond anvil 44. Blocking tissue at the proximal end of anvil 44 prevents the pinching or cutting of unstapled tissue.
  • [0038]
    Cylindrical pins 54 extend from opposite sides of upper jaw 22 proximal of tissue stops 52. Pins 54 fit inside vertical slots on lower jaw 24 to connect the upper and lower jaws together. Upper jaw 22 also includes a pair of curved notches 60 near the proximal end of channel sidewalls 32 a, 32 b. Notches 60 interact with projections 62 on lower jaw 24, as shown in FIG. 2, to provide a means for easily aligning the jaws during use. Upper jaw 22 is preferably comprised of a single piece of a biocompatible metal, such as, for example, stainless steel. Using a single piece of material for upper jaw 22 increases the structural integrity of the stapler. Alternatively, upper jaw 22 can be manufactured as two or more separate pieces that are joined together during the manufacturing process by known joining methods such as, for example, welding.
  • [0039]
    As shown in FIG. 6, lower jaw 24 comprises a single piece, elongated U-shaped frame having a pair of sidewalls 64 a, 64 b connected by a bottom wall 66. At the distal end of lower jaw 24, side walls 64 a, 64 b are reduced in size to form a cartridge channel 70 for supporting a single use staple cartridge within the stapler. Notches 72 are provided in sidewalls 64 a, 64 b adjacent the distal end of cartridge channel 70. Notches 72 engage side projections on the staple cartridge to hold the cartridge within the channel. Vertical alignment slots 56 are located proximal of cartridge channel 70 in the upper edge of sidewalls 64 a, 64 b. As mentioned above, pins 54 on upper jaw 22 interface with alignment slots 56 to align and connect the jaw members together. The width between upper jaw sidewalls 32 a, 32 b is slightly greater than the width between lower jaw sidewalls 64 a, 64 b to enable the upper jaw to fit over the lower jaw when pins 54 are inserted into alignment slots 56, and projections 62 into notches 60. Indentations 74 are formed in the outer surface of sidewalls 64 a, 64 b, distal of alignment slots 56. Indentations 74 facilitate the attachment of an actuating module to lower jaw member 24, as will be described in further detail below.
  • [0040]
    An opening 76 is formed through bottom wall 66 at an intermediate position along lower jaw 24. Sidewalls 64 a, 64 b extend downward on opposite sides of opening 76 to form distally angled projections 80. Along the distal edge of projections 80, sidewalls 64 a, 64 b are shaped to form a straight-sided slot 82 having a circular end 88. The diameter of circular end 88 is slightly larger than the width of the slot 82. Proximal of projections 80 the outer surfaces of sidewalls 64 a, 64 b include a latching member positioning feature. As shown in FIG. 6, the positioning feature can comprise a plurality of detent bumps 84, or other surface indentations, that are machined into the surface of the sidewalls 64 a, 64 b. FIG. 6 shows only a positioning feature on the front side of lower jaw 24, however, it should be understood that the back side of the lower jaw is fashioned in the same manner so that latching member 30 may be retained in a series of latching states by both sides of the lower jaw, as will be described below. A retention feature 86 is formed at the proximal end of lower jaw 24 at the junction between sidewalls 64 a, 64 b and bottom wall 66. Retention feature 86 can comprise an inward expansion of sidewalls 64 a, 64 b which facilitates a snap connection with an actuating module during assembly of stapler 20.
  • [0041]
    FIGS. 7 and 8 show an exemplary removable staple cartridge 90 for use in stapler 20 of the invention. Cartridge 90 is adapted to receive a plurality of surgical staples arranged in at least two laterally spaced longitudinal rows. Cartridge 90 has a body which includes opposite side walls 92 a, 92 b configured to be slidably received in the interior of lower jaw cartridge channel 70. Staple cartridge 90 is divided longitudinally by a central elongated slot 94 which extends from the proximal end of the cartridge toward its distal end. A plurality of staple openings 96, defined by the cartridge body, are disposed along the elongated center slot 94. In the illustrated embodiment, the staple openings are arranged in two laterally spaced, staggered rows, with each pair of rows disposed on opposite sides of central longitudinal slot 94. The staple openings in adjacent rows are staggered to provide more effective stapling of the tissue when the instrument is operated. Referring to FIG. 8, staple cartridge 90 includes a pair of longitudinal slots 100 located on opposite sides of elongated central slot 94 and disposed between the staggered rows of openings 96. Each longitudinal slot 100 extends from the proximal end of cartridge 90 towards the distal end. A plurality of staple drivers (not shown) are slidably mounted in staple openings 96 for actuating the staples which are loaded into staple cartridge 90. Each staple driver is designed to simultaneously actuate two staples located in the adjacent rows provided in staple cartridge 90. Thus, a first set of staple drivers is provided for actuating the staples in the staggered rows located on one side of central longitudinal slot 94, and a second set of staple drivers is provided for actuating the staples in the pair of adjacent rows located on the other side of the central longitudinal slot.
  • [0042]
    The distal end of staple cartridge 90 includes a tapered tip to facilitate the insertion of lower jaw member 24 into a hollow tubular body organ. Proximal of the tapered tip, staple cartridge 90 is provided with a pair of outwardly extending protrusions 102. A pair of spaced, parallel flanges 104 extends rearward from opposite sides of staple cartridge 90. Legs 110 extend downward from flanges 104 at the proximal end of the staple cartridge. Each leg 110 is provided with a rounded, downwardly facing notch 112. When cartridge 90 is assembled on lower jaw 24, protrusions 102 are loosely received in notches 72 in the lower jaw side walls, and legs 110 extend through opening 76 in the lower jaw bottom wall 66. Leg notches 112 engage a pin on latching member 30, as will be described below, to hold the cartridge within lower jaw channel 70. A pair of wings 114 extends upward and outward from sidewalls 92 a, 92 b at the proximal end of cartridge 90. Wings 114 function as finger grips which allow staple cartridge 90 to be manually inserted into and removed from lower jaw 24. Using wings 114, cartridge 90 can be lifted out of jaw opening 76 and notches 72, to remove the cartridge from lower jaw 24 following use. Additionally, wings 114 engage lower jaw sidewalls 64 a, 64 b at the proximal end of cartridge channel 70, as shown in FIG. 3, to lock the cartridge in place within lower jaw 24. A short extension 116 is formed at the rear of cartridge 90 and located between rearwardly projecting legs 110. Central knife slot 94 extends longitudinally through extension 116, which can be provided with inwardly sloped guide surfaces on its opposite sides at the proximal end of the slot. A lock out pin 106 is connected at one end to extension 116 and is pivotable about the connection point. Initially, when staple cartridge 90 is loaded into stapler 20, lock out pin 106 extends transversely across central knife slot 94.
  • [0043]
    As mentioned above, stapler 20 includes a latching member 30 for connecting the upper and lower jaws members together at an intermediate position along the longitudinal length of the stapler. Preferably, jaw members 22, 24 are connected together at a location adjacent to the proximal ends of anvil 44 and staple cartridge 90. In the preferred embodiment, shown in FIG. 9, latching member 30 comprises a single piece, channeled-shaped frame having opposing side walls 124 a, 124 b connected by a top wall 130. Latching member 30 further includes a latch pin 122 for pivotally connecting the latching member to lower jaw 24. Preferably, the latching member is comprised of a single piece of stainless steel, or another similar biocompatible metal. The distance between the opposing latching member side walls 124 a, 124 b is sufficient to span the sidewalls 64 a, 64 b of lower jaw 24. Side walls 124 a, 124 b include outwardly extending, elongated flanges 132 which serve as finger grips to enable latching arm 120 to be manually pivoted between latching positions. The outer surface of latching arm 120 includes a handle extension 134. When connected to lower jaw member 24, handle extension 134 combines with upper jaw handle extension 40 to form a hand grip for manipulation of the stapler by a surgeon.
  • [0044]
    Each side wall 124 a, 124 b of latching member 30 includes a distally-extending C-shaped hook member 140 provided with a forwardly facing notch 142 for engaging upper jaw pins 54. As shown in FIGS. 9 and 10, hook members 140 include an inner cam surface 144 extending rearward from the tip of the hook member into notch 142. When latching member 30 is moved to a closed, operative state, notches 142 engage upper jaw pins 54, acting as an over-center latch to maintain the latching member in the latched state. Below notches 142, each hook member 140 projects distally downward, beyond the end of latching member top wall 130. Latch pin 122 extends between the down turned ends of hook members 140, as shown in FIG. 11, across the end of latching member 30. Latch pin 122 has a cylindrical shape with flat surfaces 152 adjacent each end. The diameter of latch pin 122 is greater than the narrow opening for lower jaw slot 82. Latching member 30 is detachably connected to lower jaw 24 by inserting latch pin 122 into lower jaw slot 82. Latch pin 122 is inserted into slot 82 by orienting latching member 30 so that flat ends 152 lie in parallel with the straight sides of the slot. In this position, latch pin 122 can be inserted into slot 82 despite the pin diameter being greater than the slot width. With flat ends 152 aligned with the linear sides of slot 82, latch pin 122 is inserted into the slot, as shown in FIG. 12, until the pin rests within circular slot end 88, as shown in FIG. 13.
  • [0045]
    Stapler 20 also includes means for retaining the latching member in a series of different latching states. Referring to FIGS. 9 and 10, the retaining means includes a spring arm 150 extending from the top edge of each latching arm sidewall 124 a, 124 b. Spring arm 150 curves distally upward, following the upper contour of hook member 140, and includes a bulbous free end. With latching pin 122 assembled within slot 82, and latching member 30 angled distally, as shown in FIG. 13, stapler 20 is in an initial, open state. To close stapler 20, latching member 30 is rotated towards the proximal end of the stapler, to draw the latching member closer to the body of lower jaw member 24. As flat ends 152 rotate out of alignment with the sides of slot 82, the difference in width between pin 122 and slot 82 prevents the pin from slipping out of slot end 88. Pin 122 is thus fixed within slot end 88, locking latching member 30 to lower jaw member 24.
  • [0046]
    As latching member 30 rotates, hook members 140 are drawn along the sides of lower jaw member 24. As hook members 140 swing alongside lower jaw sidewalls 64 a, 64 b, the bulbous ends of spring arms 150 contact detent bumps 84 on the sidewalls. To move spring arms 150 between the detent bumps 84, additional force is applied to latching member 30 to cause the spring arms to flex towards the hook members 140, so that the ends of the spring arms can ride over the bumps. With spring arms 150 positioned between detent bumps 84, as shown in FIG. 14, latching member 30 is in a partially locked-in state. In the partially locked-in state, latching member 30 is attached to lower jaw 24 and alignment slots 56 are just distal of the tip of hook members 140. Upper jaw pins 54 can be freely inserted or removed from lower jaw slots 56, allowing the upper and lower jaw members to be separated and rejoined together.
  • [0047]
    As latch pin 122 continues to rotate within slot end 88, drawing latching member 30 closer to lower jaw member 24, hook member inner cam surfaces 144 rotate over the opening of alignment slots 56, blocking the slots and locking upper jaw pins 54 within the slots. Spring arms 150 also ride along detent bumps 84 to engage the concave outer edge of the top bump. In this pre-closed state, shown in FIG. 15, latching member 30 and upper and lower jaw members 22, 24 are connected together to form the body of stapler 20, but upper jaw pins 54 can slide within slots 56, between the bottom of the slot and cam surface 144, to allow some relative movement between the jaw members. Latching member 30 maintains the jaw members in a loosely latched position to permit relative movement between the staple cartridge and anvil. The relative movement at the distal end of jaw members 22, 24 allows for tissue adjustments without disconnecting the jaw members from each other.
  • [0048]
    When latching member 30 is rotated to a closed, operative state (shown in FIG. 1) the latching member surrounds lower jaw member 24, and pins 54 on upper jaw member 22 are lodged within hook member notches 142. Spring arms 150 advance distally upward along the sides of lower jaw member 24 beyond detent bumps 84. In this state, the upper and lower jaw members are locked together to compress tissue between the anvil and cartridge surfaces, and the stapler is ready for stapling and cutting tissue. In the closed state, a minimum spacing may be maintained between the anvil and cartridge surfaces by a spacer pin 160. To adjust the placement of tissue between the anvil and cartridge surfaces, latching member 30 can be rotated back to the pre-close state, as shown in FIG. 16, to dislodge pins 54 from hook member notches 142. As latching member 30 rotates back, spring arms 150 reengage with detent bumps 84 to hold the latching member in place. Returning to the pre-close state loosens the connection between hook members 140 and pins 52, to allow the pins to slide within slots 56 without disconnecting the upper and lower jaws.
  • [0049]
    To disassemble stapler 20, latching member 30 is rotated away from lower jaw member 24 to draw upper jaw pins 54 out of hook notches 142. Latching member 30 may be rotated away from upper and lower jaw members 22, 24 by pulling on the curved latching arm tip 162. As a counter rotating force continues on latching arm 120, spring arms 150 move through detent bumps 84, enabling hook members 140 to swing through and way from the lower jaw sidewalls 64 a, 64 b. Latching member 30 is rotated around in the direction of staple cartridge 90 until latching member 30 returns to the initial, open position shown in FIG. 13. With latching member 30 in the open state, flat ends 152 on latch pin 122 are again aligned in parallel with the straight sides of slot 82, enabling the latch pin to be withdrawn through slot 82 to separate the latching member from lower jaw member 24. With latching member 30 detached, stapler 20 can be disassembled into three separate, one-piece components, namely, upper jaw 22, lower jaw 24 and latching member 30. The one-piece channel-shaped construction of these reusable components provides for easy yet thorough reconditioning and sterilization of the components between uses.
  • [0050]
    Turning now to FIGS. 17 and 18, which show an actuator module 170 for stapling and cutting tissue clamped between the upper and lower jaw members 22, 24. Actuator module 170 comprises a U-shaped, longitudinal module pan 172 which provides the supporting structure for the actuator module components. Module pan 172 includes a pair of sidewalls 174 connected together by a bottom wall 176 (FIG. 19). The distance between module pan sidewalls 174 is less than the distance between lower jaw sidewalls 64 a, 64 b to enable the module pan to be slidably mounted within the proximal channel of lower jaw 24. As shown in FIGS. 19 and 20, the proximal end of module pan 170 includes one or more detent bumps 178 protruding from the outer surface of sidewalls 174. Detent bumps 178 engage retention features 86 on the inside channel of lower jaw member 24 when the actuator module 170 is slid proximally into the lower jaw channel. The interaction of detent bumps 178 with retention features 86 snaps and retains the actuator module in place within lower jaw member 24.
  • [0051]
    As shown in FIG. 21, a plurality of moveable actuating members are situated within module pan 172 for longitudinal movement within the pan relative to upper and lower jaw members 22, 24. The actuating members include a pusher block 180 which is disposed within module pan 172 for reciprocal, longitudinal movement within the pan. Pusher block 180 is attached to an actuator knob 182 by a lateral flange 184. When actuator module 170 is mounted within lower jaw 24, as shown in FIG. 3, flange 184 extends through an elongated guide slot 186 formed in a sidewall 64 of the lower jaw. Flange 184 positions knob 182 on the outside of jaw members 22, 24 to allow manual access of the knob. In FIG. 3, knob 182 is shown extending through a guide slot 186 in lower jaw sidewall 64 b. However, a guide slot could also be formed in the opposite lower jaw sidewall 64 a, in which case actuating knob 182 would extend out the opposite side of stapler 20. Flange 184 extends through and rides along guide slot 186 as knob 182 is manually moved along the outside of jaw members 22, 24.
  • [0052]
    Returning now to FIG. 21, actuator module 170 also includes a pair of longitudinally extending, parallel pusher bars 190. The proximal ends of pusher bars 190 are secured within laterally spaced pusher block slots 192 (shown in FIG. 22) to allow the pusher bars to move longitudinally with pusher block 180 through module pan 172. Pusher bars 190 extend distally from pusher block 180 and are slidably received in longitudinal slots 194 formed in a guide block 200, shown in FIG. 23. As shown in FIG. 18, guide block 200 is mounted at the distal end of module pan 172. The upper edges of module pan sidewalls 174 are bent inward over the side edges of guide block 200 to retain the guide block within the module pan. Additionally, tabs 202 extend from the sides of guide block 200 through openings 204 in module pan sidewalls 174 to secure the guide block within the pan. The distal end of guide block 200 extends beyond the end of module pan 172 and between rear flanges 104 of staple cartridge 90. Lateral slots 194 within guide block 200 align pusher bars 190 with the elongated staple driver slots 100 of staple cartridge 90. The distal ends of pusher bars 190 extend forward of guide slots 194 and are provided with a wedge-shaped tip 206, shown in FIG. 24, which defines an inclined cam surface for engaging the staple drivers within cartridge 90 as the pusher bars are moved distally through the cartridge. The longitudinal movement of the pusher bar tips 206 sequentially drives the staple drivers, through a camming action, to fire staplers from the cartridge.
  • [0053]
    Returning to FIG. 23, guide block 200 includes a depending center section 210 which extends downward through opening 76 in the lower jaw bottom wall 66. Center section 210 includes a distally angled, straight-sided slot 212 with a circular end 218. When stapler 20 is assembled, guide block slot 212 is longitudinally aligned with slot 82 in lower jaw sidewalls 64 a, 64 b to enable latch pin 122 to engage both lower jaw 24 and guide block 200 when latching member 30 is connected to the stapler. As latch pin 122 is inserted through slot 82 into slot end 88, the pin also passes through guide block slot 212 and lodges within circular end 218, locking the actuator module 170 and lower jaw 24 together.
  • [0054]
    As shown in FIGS. 18 and 21, actuator module 170 further comprises a knife support bar 214 positioned between pusher bars 190. Knife support bar 214 and pusher bars 190 are preferably manufactured as sheet metal components. The proximal end of knife support bar 214 is secured within a center slot 216 of pusher block 180 (FIG. 22) to connect the knife support bar to the pusher block for movement by firing knob 182. Distal of pusher block 180, knife support bar 214 is slidably received in a center slot 220 formed in guide block 200 (shown in FIG. 23) to align the knife support bar with the elongated center slot 94 of the staple cartridge. As shown in FIG. 25, an inclined knife blade 222 having a beveled cutting edge is located at the front end of knife support bar 214. The beveled cutting edge of knife blade 222 is oriented at an angle relative to jaw members 22, 24, and is slidably received in central longitudinal slot 220 of guide block 200. Proximal of knife blade 222, knife support bar 214 includes a cartridge locking notch 228 and a locking cut out section 224, which are part of a safety lockout mechanism described below. The proximal end of knife support bar 214 includes an offset section, indicated by reference number 226. Knife offset 226 is formed by cutting away a section of the knife support bar 214 near the proximal end, to produce two elevated points 230, 232 on the support bar.
  • [0055]
    As shown in FIGS. 26 and 27, a protector cap 234 covers the distal end of guide block 200. A center section 236 of cap 234 surrounds knife blade 222 and the wedged tips 206 of pusher bars 190. An inwardly directed lip 240 extends along the bottom edge of the cap. During assembly, downward pressure is applied to protector cap 234 to snap the distal end of the actuator module in place inside the lower jaw channel. As cap 234 is pressed downward, cap lip 240 snaps into indentations 74 on the outer surface of lower jaw 24.
  • [0056]
    A leaf spring 250, shown in FIG. 19, is integrated into module pan bottom wall 176 beneath guide block 200. Spring 250 provides a safety lockout feature by lifting knife support bar cut out 224 against guide block 200 after firing, to prevent re-firing of a used cartridge. A second spring 252 is integrated into module pan bottom wall 176 near the proximal end of the pan. This second spring 252 is a detent spring that interacts with a notch on pusher block 180 to prevent forward movement of actuator knob 182 during shipping, and to provide audible and tactile feedback when the actuator knob is returned to the proximal-most position in the module pan following firing. FIGS. 28 and 29 illustrate the operation of detent spring 252 in greater detail. In FIG. 28, spring 252 is shown engaging a notch 254 on pusher block 180 to prevent unintentional distal movement of the pusher block. FIG. 29 shows detent spring 252 disengaged from notch 254 by the application of an intentional, distally directed force on actuator knob 182. Pusher bars 190 and knife support bar 214 are advanced distally by applying sufficient force to actuator knob 182 to overcome the force of spring 252 against notch 254. After spring 252 is disengaged from notch 254, pusher block 180 can slide distally through module pan 172 to first advance pusher bars 190 and then advance knife support bar 214 from guide block 200 into staple cartridge 90.
  • [0057]
    In an initial firing position, shown in FIG. 28, a downwardly directed edge of pusher block 180 is in contact with knife support bar 214 at the proximal end point 232 of offset section 226. Actuating knob 182 is retracted to a fully proximal position within guide slot 186, thereby placing pusher bars 190 and knife blade 222 within slots 194 and 220 of guide block 200. When a distal pushing force is applied to actuating knob 182, spring 252 disengages from notch 254, enabling pusher block 180 to advance longitudinally within module pan 172. As pusher block 180 moves, the block advances pusher bars 190 distally, causing the inclined tips of the bars to advance into cartridge driver slots 100. During the initial movement of pusher block 180, the distal edge of the block moves through knife support bar offset 226, as shown in FIG. 29, thereby not making contact with the support bar itself. Knife support bar 214 thus remains stationary during the initial distal movement of the pusher bars 190 and block 180.
  • [0058]
    After pusher block 180 advances through knife offset section 226, the distal edge of the block contacts the distal end point 230 of knife support bar 214. This contact between pusher block 180 and knife support bar 214 causes the knife support bar to begin advancing distally, along with the pusher block and pusher bars 190, as knob 182 is advanced. As knife support bar 214 moves distally, knife blade 222 is guided by central slot 220 and rear cartridge extension 116 into central longitudinal slot 94 of staple cartridge 90 and central longitudinal slot 46 of anvil 44. As knife blade 222 advances through cartridge extension 116, the blade deflects lock out pin 106 out of the path of the advancing support bar. Knife blade 222 and pusher bar tips 206 advance simultaneously through staple cartridge 90 driving staples through openings 96 and cutting tissue. Knife blade 222 is advanced into staple cartridge 90 slightly behind pusher bars 190 so that staples are formed into the tissue gripped between the anvil and cartridge prior to the knife blade advancing and cutting the tissue between the staple rows.
  • [0059]
    After the knife and pusher bars have been fully advanced by knob 182 (or advanced to the desired forward position), pusher block 180 is retracted within module pan 172 by drawing the actuating knob back proximally through jaw guide slot 186. Initially, as pusher block 180 is drawn proximally, pusher bars 190 are drawn proximally while knife support bar 214 remains in a distal, stationary position due to the offset section 226 in the support bar. As the distal pusher block edge retracts into contact with proximal knife bar offset point 232, the knife support bar 214 begins to retract proximally with the pusher block and bars. As knife support bar 214 retracts within guide block 200, the support bar is lifted up by leaf spring 250 into contact with the guide block, until the knife locking cut out 224 catches a center post 256 (FIG. 23) of the guide block. Once knife cut out 224 engages guide block post 256, knife support bar 214 is prevented from further movement in conjunction with pusher block 180. Preferably, knife support bar 214 engages locking cut out section 224 as pusher block 180 and pusher bars 190 are reaching the fully proximal position.
  • [0060]
    After actuator knob 182 is fully retracted, as shown in FIG. 28, latching member 30 is pivoted relative to jaw members 22, 24 to separate the upper and lower jaws, as described above. With the jaw members separated, staple cartridge 90 can be removed and replaced with a new cartridge. The used cartridge can be removed by pulling up on cartridge wings 114 to dislodge cartridge legs 110 from lower jaw opening 76. As the proximal end of the staple cartridge is lifted out of lower jaw opening 76, cartridge leg notches 112 (FIG. 7) are drawn out of engagement with latch pin 122. After the proximal end of staple cartridge 90 is dislodged, the cartridge can be slid distally out of cartridge channel 70 and discarded.
  • [0061]
    A new staple cartridge 90 can be loaded into lower jaw 24 by pushing the flanged, distal end of the cartridge against the distal end of the lower jaw cartridge channel 70, and pushing down on wings 114 to lower legs 110 through jaw opening 76. Cartridge legs 110 are pushed through lower jaw opening 76 until leg notches 112 snap onto latch pin 122. As the proximal end of staple cartridge 90 is pushed down, lockout pin 106 on the cartridge depresses knife support bar 214 at locking notch 228 against the counter force of leaf spring 250. The force of lockout pin 106 pushes knife support bar cutout 224 down and out of contact with guide block center post 256. As knife support bar 214 is pushed down, the support bar is realigned with guide block center slot 220 to enable the support bar to pass distally through the slot and into the new cartridge. The safety lockout feature is thus reset during loading of a new staple cartridge. With a new cartridge loaded, the stapler can be reassembled by placing upper jaw 22 over lower jaw 24 and reinserting upper jaw pins 54 into lower jaw alignment slots 56. Latching hook members 140 are pivoted back over the opening of slots 56 until pins 54 are lodged within notches 142. With pins 54 locked within hook member notches 142, and latching member 30 pivoted into position about lower jaw 24, the stapler is closed and ready to fire staples from the new cartridge.
  • [0062]
    The reusable upper and lower jaw and latching member components described above are provided to a user in a non-sterile package. Prior to assembly of stapler 20, the components are cleaned with pH neutral enzymatic cleaners, and then steam autoclaved to sterilize the components. This conditioning procedure is also followed prior to each subsequent reuse of the components. Actuator module 170, due to it multiple movable components, is designed for single patient use to eliminate the complexity of cleaning the module. The actuator module is provided to the user in a sterile disposable package which is opened in the sterile field. Staple cartridge 90 is also delivered as a sterile disposable package that is opened in the sterile field.
  • [0063]
    To assemble stapler 20, actuator module 170 is removed from its packaging and inserted proximal end first into the proximal channel of lower jaw member 24. Actuator module 170 snaps into place when proximal detent bumps 178 engage lower jaw retention features 86. The distal end of the actuator module is then rotated down into the channel shaped frame of lower jaw 24. With actuator module 170 within the lower jaw channel, protector cap 234 is pushed down to snap cap lips 240 into indentations 74 on the lower jaw sidewalls 64 a, 64 b. Pushing down on protector cap 234 pushes guide block center section 212 through lower jaw opening 76, aligning guide block slot 212 with lower jaw slot 82, and locking the actuator module in place within the lower jaw member 24. With actuator module 170 loaded into lower jaw member 24, latching member 30 is attached to the lower jaw by inserting latch pin 122 into slots 82 and 212, as described above. Latching member 30 is rotated relative to lower jaw member 24 to the partial locked-in position shown in FIG. 14. In this position, latching member 30 is attached to lower jaw member 24, but upper jaw 22 is separable from the lower jaw. Protector cap 234 is removed from actuator module 170 by moving the cap in the distal direction, as indicated by the arrow on the cap shown in the Figures.
  • [0064]
    A new staple cartridge 90 is next inserted into lower jaw cartridge channel 70 in the manner described above. After a staple cartridge is loaded, upper jaw member 22 is placed over lower jaw member 24, with pins 54 inserted into alignment slots 56. Latching member 30 is pivoted relative to the upper and lower jaw members 22, 24 to place the stapler into the pre-close position (shown in FIG. 15), in which the hook member cam surfaces 144 extend over the openings to alignment slots 56 to prevent pins 54 from disengaging from the slots. The tissue to be transected is placed between the anvil 44 and staple cartridge 90 and adjusted to the desired position. Tissue stops 52 prevent the tissue from being positioned too far back into the stapler. With the tissue properly situated, the stapler is closed in preparation for firing by rotating latching member 30 into contact with lower jaw 24 to place hook member 140 over slots 56, and lock pins 54 inside hook member notches 142. In this state, the tissue is clamped within the device. If additional tissue adjustment is required, the stapler can be returned to the pre-close state, as shown in FIG. 16, in which the distal ends of the upper and lower jaw members can move slightly relative to each other to accommodate tissue repositioning. With the tissue properly clamped between the jaw members, and latching member 30 pivoted to the closed, operative position, the stapler can be fired by pushing actuator knob 182 forward through guide slot 186 until the knob stops. As the knob advances, the clamped tissue is stapled and cut. After actuator knob 182 reaches its distal stop, the knob is drawn back proximally through guide slot 186. At the proximal end of the knob path, the interaction of detent spring 252 and push block notch 254 provides tactile and audible feedback that the knob is fully retracted, signaling that the actuating components have been withdrawn from staple cartridge 90 back into module pan 172.
  • [0065]
    If additional stapling and cutting is desired to complete the procedure, latching member 30 is pivoted back to the partially locked-in state so that upper jaw 22 can be removed, and the used staple cartridge discarded and replaced with a new staple cartridge. After the new cartridge is in place, latching member 30 can be pivoted back through the pre-close and closed states to enable tissue to again be positioned, clamped and stapled using the new cartridge. Once all the required tissue is transected, latching member 30 is removed by rotating the member back to the open state (shown in FIG. 13), and sliding latch pin 122 out of slots 82 and 212. The actuating module 170 and staple cartridge 90 can then be removed from lower jaw member 24 and discarded. The remaining components (upper jaw, lower jaw, and latching member) can be cleaned and sterilized as separate components in preparation for reuse.
  • [0066]
    In the present invention, actuator module 170 is a separate component from staple cartridge 90, enabling spent staple cartridges to be replaced during a single patient procedure without replacing the actuator module. Accordingly, the actuator module may be used multiple times in the same patient with different staple cartridges. Using the single piece module pan 172 as a supporting structure for the actuator module components enables the actuator module to be easily assembled into and disassembled from the lower jaw channel. The reusable stapler components have a simple, single piece design to facilitate repeated reconditioning and reuse of the parts. The detachable design of the latching member facilitates easy disassembly and reassembly of the reusable components of the stapler. Further, once the stapler is assembled, the retaining and locking features of the latching and lower jaw members prevent accidental disassembly during a procedure.
  • [0067]
    The foregoing description of a preferred embodiment of the invention has been presented for purposes of illustration and description. It is not intended to be exhaustive or to limit the invention to the precise form disclosed. Obvious modifications or variations are possible in light of the above teachings. The embodiment was chosen and described in order to best illustrate the principles of the invention and its practical application to thereby enable one of ordinary skill in the art to best utilize the invention in various embodiments and with various modifications as are suited to the particular use contemplated. It is intended that the scope of the invention be defined by the claims appended hereto.
Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3494533 *Oct 10, 1966Feb 10, 1970United States Surgical CorpSurgical stapler for stitching body organs
US3692224 *Oct 15, 1970Sep 19, 1972Ozhgikhin Anatoly NikolaevichSurgical apparatus for suturing tissue with staples
US4241861 *Dec 20, 1977Dec 30, 1980Fleischer Harry NScissor-type surgical stapler
US4442964 *Dec 7, 1981Apr 17, 1984Senco Products, Inc.Pressure sensitive and working-gap controlled surgical stapling instrument
US4520817 *Mar 8, 1982Jun 4, 1985United States Surgical CorporationSurgical instruments
US4527724 *Jun 10, 1983Jul 9, 1985Senmed, Inc.Disposable linear surgical stapling instrument
US4591085 *Jul 16, 1984May 27, 1986Ethicon, Inc.Surgical instrument for applying fasteners, said instrument having an improved trigger interlocking mechanism (Case VI)
US4633861 *Oct 19, 1984Jan 6, 1987Senmed, Inc.Surgical stapling instrument with jaw clamping mechanism
US4633874 *Mar 15, 1985Jan 6, 1987Senmed, Inc.Surgical stapling instrument with jaw latching mechanism and disposable staple cartridge
US4892244 *Nov 7, 1988Jan 9, 1990Ethicon, Inc.Surgical stapler cartridge lockout device
US4955959 *May 26, 1989Sep 11, 1990United States Surgical CorporationLocking mechanism for a surgical fastening apparatus
US5364003 *May 5, 1993Nov 15, 1994Ethicon Endo-SurgeryStaple cartridge for a surgical stapler
US5366133 *Nov 24, 1992Nov 22, 1994United States Surgical CorporationSurgical fastening apparatus with shipping interlock
US5379933 *Jun 15, 1993Jan 10, 1995United States Surgical CorporationArcuate apparatus for applying two-part surgical fasteners
US5447265 *Apr 30, 1993Sep 5, 1995Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyLaparoscopic surgical instrument with a mechanism for preventing its entry into the abdominal cavity once it is depleted and removed from the abdominal cavity
US5458279 *Jul 1, 1994Oct 17, 1995Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanySurgical stapler with safety feature
US5462215 *Dec 9, 1994Oct 31, 1995United States Surgical CorporationLocking device for an apparatus for applying surgical fasteners
US5465896 *Jul 5, 1994Nov 14, 1995United States Surgical CorporationLinear surgical stapling instrument
US5470006 *Aug 11, 1992Nov 28, 1995United States Surgical CorporationSurgical fastening apparatus with locking mechanism
US5470008 *Dec 20, 1993Nov 28, 1995United States Surgical CorporationApparatus for applying surgical fasteners
US5636779 *Dec 13, 1994Jun 10, 1997United States Surgical CorporationApparatus for applying surgical fasteners
US5651491 *Oct 27, 1995Jul 29, 1997United States Surgical CorporationSurgical stapler having interchangeable loading units
US5718359 *Aug 14, 1995Feb 17, 1998United States Of America Surgical CorporationSurgical stapler with lockout mechanism
US5728110 *Feb 18, 1997Mar 17, 1998United States Surgical CorporationProcedure for use of laparoscopic surgical instruments
US5894979 *Jun 2, 1995Apr 20, 1999United States Surgical CorporationSurgical stapler with anvil sensor and lockout
US5919198 *Apr 17, 1997Jul 6, 1999Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Disposable cartridge with drivers
US5988479 *Jun 4, 1996Nov 23, 1999United States Surgical CorporationApparatus for applying surgical fasteners
US6131789 *Apr 25, 1994Oct 17, 2000Ethicon, Inc.Surgical stapler
US6155473 *May 5, 1999Dec 5, 2000United States Surgical CorporationLocking mechanism for a surgical fastening apparatus
US6202914 *Aug 4, 1999Mar 20, 2001United States Surgical CorporationSurgical stapler
US6325810 *Jun 30, 1999Dec 4, 2001Ethicon, Inc.Foam buttress for stapling apparatus
US7140527 *Dec 2, 2005Nov 28, 2006Tyco Healthcare Group LpSurgical fastener applying apparatus
US7293685 *Feb 16, 2006Nov 13, 2007Tyco Healthcare Group LpSurgical fastener applying apparatus
US7334717 *Mar 19, 2003Feb 26, 2008Tyco Healthcare Group LpSurgical fastener applying apparatus
US7419081 *Jan 29, 2007Sep 2, 2008Tyco Healthcare Group LpSurgical fastener applying apparatus
US20060144898 *Feb 24, 2006Jul 6, 2006Federico BilottiSurgical stapling instrument
USD576278 *Jul 16, 2007Sep 2, 2008Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical stapler
USD605762 *Dec 8, 2009Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical stapler cartridge
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7789283Jun 6, 2008Sep 7, 2010Tyco Healthcare Group LpKnife/firing rod connection for surgical instrument
US8074862Dec 13, 2011Tyco Healthcare Group LpKnife/firing rod connection for surgical instrument
US8132706Jun 5, 2009Mar 13, 2012Tyco Healthcare Group LpSurgical stapling apparatus having articulation mechanism
US8141762Nov 19, 2009Mar 27, 2012Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical stapler comprising a staple pocket
US8157153Apr 17, 2012Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical instrument with force-feedback capabilities
US8161977Apr 24, 2012Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Accessing data stored in a memory of a surgical instrument
US8167185May 1, 2012Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical instrument having recording capabilities
US8172124May 8, 2012Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical instrument having recording capabilities
US8186555Jan 31, 2006May 29, 2012Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Motor-driven surgical cutting and fastening instrument with mechanical closure system
US8186560May 29, 2012Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical stapling systems and staple cartridges for deploying surgical staples with tissue compression features
US8196795Aug 13, 2010Jun 12, 2012Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Disposable motor-driven loading unit for use with a surgical cutting and stapling apparatus
US8196796Jun 12, 2012Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Shaft based rotary drive system for surgical instruments
US8205781Jun 26, 2012Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical stapler with apparatus for adjusting staple height
US8267300Sep 18, 2012Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Dampening device for endoscopic surgical stapler
US8292155Jun 2, 2011Oct 23, 2012Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Motor-driven surgical cutting and fastening instrument with tactile position feedback
US8308040Nov 13, 2012Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical stapling instrument with an articulatable end effector
US8308041Nov 10, 2010Nov 13, 2012Tyco Healthcare Group LpStaple formed over the wire wound closure procedure
US8317070Feb 28, 2007Nov 27, 2012Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical stapling devices that produce formed staples having different lengths
US8322455Jun 27, 2006Dec 4, 2012Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Manually driven surgical cutting and fastening instrument
US8322589Dec 4, 2012Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical stapling instruments
US8328065Dec 11, 2012Covidien LpKnife/firing rod connection for surgical instrument
US8333313Dec 18, 2012Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical stapling instrument with a firing member return mechanism
US8342378Jan 1, 2013Covidien LpOne handed stapler
US8348127Apr 7, 2010Jan 8, 2013Covidien LpSurgical fastener applying apparatus
US8348129Jan 8, 2013Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical stapler having a closure mechanism
US8348131Sep 29, 2006Jan 8, 2013Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical stapling instrument with mechanical indicator to show levels of tissue compression
US8353437Feb 1, 2010Jan 15, 2013Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical stapling instrument with a geared return mechanism
US8360296Jan 29, 2013Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical stapling head assembly with firing lockout for a surgical stapler
US8360297Jan 29, 2013Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical cutting and stapling instrument with self adjusting anvil
US8365976Sep 29, 2006Feb 5, 2013Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical staples having dissolvable, bioabsorbable or biofragmentable portions and stapling instruments for deploying the same
US8397971Feb 5, 2009Mar 19, 2013Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Sterilizable surgical instrument
US8408439Apr 22, 2010Apr 2, 2013Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical stapling instrument with an articulatable end effector
US8414577Apr 9, 2013Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical instruments and components for use in sterile environments
US8418907Apr 16, 2013Covidien LpSurgical stapler having cartridge with adjustable cam mechanism
US8424740Nov 4, 2010Apr 23, 2013Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical instrument having a directional switching mechanism
US8453908Jun 4, 2013Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical stapling instrument with improved firing trigger arrangement
US8453914Jun 4, 2013Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Motor-driven surgical cutting instrument with electric actuator directional control assembly
US8459520Jun 11, 2013Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical instrument with wireless communication between control unit and remote sensor
US8459525Jun 11, 2013Ethicon Endo-Sugery, Inc.Motorized surgical cutting and fastening instrument having a magnetic drive train torque limiting device
US8479969Feb 9, 2012Jul 9, 2013Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Drive interface for operably coupling a manipulatable surgical tool to a robot
US8485412Sep 29, 2006Jul 16, 2013Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical staples having attached drivers and stapling instruments for deploying the same
US8499993Jun 12, 2012Aug 6, 2013Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical staple cartridge
US8517243Feb 14, 2011Aug 27, 2013Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical instrument with wireless communication between control unit and remote sensor
US8534528Mar 1, 2011Sep 17, 2013Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical instrument having a multiple rate directional switching mechanism
US8540128Jan 11, 2007Sep 24, 2013Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical stapling device with a curved end effector
US8540129Jul 26, 2010Sep 24, 2013Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical stapling instrument with improved firing trigger arrangement
US8540130Feb 8, 2011Sep 24, 2013Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Disposable motor-driven loading unit for use with a surgical cutting and stapling apparatus
US8540133Mar 17, 2010Sep 24, 2013Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Staple cartridge
US8561870Feb 28, 2011Oct 22, 2013Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical stapling instrument
US8567656Mar 28, 2011Oct 29, 2013Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Staple cartridges for forming staples having differing formed staple heights
US8573461Feb 9, 2012Nov 5, 2013Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical stapling instruments with cam-driven staple deployment arrangements
US8573465Feb 9, 2012Nov 5, 2013Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Robotically-controlled surgical end effector system with rotary actuated closure systems
US8584919Feb 14, 2008Nov 19, 2013Ethicon Endo-Sugery, Inc.Surgical stapling apparatus with load-sensitive firing mechanism
US8590762Jun 29, 2007Nov 26, 2013Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Staple cartridge cavity configurations
US8602287Jun 1, 2012Dec 10, 2013Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Motor driven surgical cutting instrument
US8602288Feb 9, 2012Dec 10, 2013Ethicon Endo-Surgery. Inc.Robotically-controlled motorized surgical end effector system with rotary actuated closure systems having variable actuation speeds
US8608044Feb 15, 2008Dec 17, 2013Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Feedback and lockout mechanism for surgical instrument
US8608045Oct 10, 2008Dec 17, 2013Ethicon Endo-Sugery, Inc.Powered surgical cutting and stapling apparatus with manually retractable firing system
US8608046Jan 7, 2010Dec 17, 2013Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Test device for a surgical tool
US8616431Feb 9, 2012Dec 31, 2013Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Shiftable drive interface for robotically-controlled surgical tool
US8622274Feb 14, 2008Jan 7, 2014Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Motorized cutting and fastening instrument having control circuit for optimizing battery usage
US8631987May 17, 2010Jan 21, 2014Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Pneumatically powered surgical cutting and fastening instrument with a variable control of the actuating rate of firing with mechanical power assist
US8636187Feb 3, 2011Jan 28, 2014Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical stapling systems that produce formed staples having different lengths
US8636736Feb 14, 2008Jan 28, 2014Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Motorized surgical cutting and fastening instrument
US8636766Nov 30, 2012Jan 28, 2014Covidien LpSurgical stapling apparatus including sensing mechanism
US8652120Jan 10, 2007Feb 18, 2014Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical instrument with wireless communication between control unit and sensor transponders
US8657174Feb 14, 2008Feb 25, 2014Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Motorized surgical cutting and fastening instrument having handle based power source
US8657178Jan 9, 2013Feb 25, 2014Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical stapling apparatus
US8668130May 24, 2012Mar 11, 2014Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical stapling systems and staple cartridges for deploying surgical staples with tissue compression features
US8672208Mar 5, 2010Mar 18, 2014Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical stapling instrument having a releasable buttress material
US8684253May 27, 2011Apr 1, 2014Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical instrument with wireless communication between a control unit of a robotic system and remote sensor
US8701959Jun 6, 2008Apr 22, 2014Covidien LpMechanically pivoting cartridge channel for surgical instrument
US8740036Dec 1, 2011Jun 3, 2014Covidien LpSurgical instrument with actuator spring arm
US8746529Dec 2, 2011Jun 10, 2014Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Accessing data stored in a memory of a surgical instrument
US8746530Sep 28, 2012Jun 10, 2014Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical instrument with wireless communication between control unit and remote sensor
US8747238Jun 28, 2012Jun 10, 2014Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Rotary drive shaft assemblies for surgical instruments with articulatable end effectors
US8752747Mar 20, 2012Jun 17, 2014Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical instrument having recording capabilities
US8752749May 27, 2011Jun 17, 2014Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Robotically-controlled disposable motor-driven loading unit
US8763875Mar 6, 2013Jul 1, 2014Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.End effector for use with a surgical fastening instrument
US8763876Jun 30, 2011Jul 1, 2014Covidien LpSurgical instrument and cartridge for use therewith
US8763879Mar 1, 2011Jul 1, 2014Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Accessing data stored in a memory of surgical instrument
US8783541Feb 9, 2012Jul 22, 2014Frederick E. Shelton, IVRobotically-controlled surgical end effector system
US8789740Jul 30, 2010Jul 29, 2014Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Linear cutting and stapling device with selectively disengageable cutting member
US8789741Sep 23, 2011Jul 29, 2014Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical instrument with trigger assembly for generating multiple actuation motions
US8794497Dec 18, 2012Aug 5, 2014Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical stapling head assembly with firing lockout for a surgical stapler
US8800838Feb 9, 2012Aug 12, 2014Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Robotically-controlled cable-based surgical end effectors
US8808325Nov 19, 2012Aug 19, 2014Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical stapling instrument with staples having crown features for increasing formed staple footprint
US8820603Mar 1, 2011Sep 2, 2014Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Accessing data stored in a memory of a surgical instrument
US8820605Feb 9, 2012Sep 2, 2014Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Robotically-controlled surgical instruments
US8840603Jun 3, 2010Sep 23, 2014Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical instrument with wireless communication between control unit and sensor transponders
US8844789Feb 9, 2012Sep 30, 2014Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Automated end effector component reloading system for use with a robotic system
US8864010Jan 20, 2012Oct 21, 2014Covidien LpCurved guide member for articulating instruments
US8893949Sep 23, 2011Nov 25, 2014Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical stapler with floating anvil
US8893950Oct 9, 2012Nov 25, 2014Covidien LpSurgical apparatus for applying tissue fasteners
US8899461Aug 12, 2011Dec 2, 2014Covidien LpTissue stop for surgical instrument
US8899465Mar 5, 2013Dec 2, 2014Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Staple cartridge comprising drivers for deploying a plurality of staples
US8911471Sep 14, 2012Dec 16, 2014Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Articulatable surgical device
US8925788Mar 3, 2014Jan 6, 2015Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.End effectors for surgical stapling instruments
US8931681May 13, 2014Jan 13, 2015Covidien LpSurgical instrument and cartridge for use therewith
US8931682May 27, 2011Jan 13, 2015Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Robotically-controlled shaft based rotary drive systems for surgical instruments
US8939343Dec 31, 2013Jan 27, 2015Covidien LpSurgical stapling apparatus including a drive beam
US8973804Mar 18, 2014Mar 10, 2015Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Cartridge assembly having a buttressing member
US8978954Apr 29, 2011Mar 17, 2015Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Staple cartridge comprising an adjustable distal portion
US8979827Mar 14, 2012Mar 17, 2015Covidien LpSurgical instrument with articulation mechanism
US8991677May 21, 2014Mar 31, 2015Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Detachable motor powered surgical instrument
US8992422May 27, 2011Mar 31, 2015Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Robotically-controlled endoscopic accessory channel
US8998058May 20, 2014Apr 7, 2015Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Detachable motor powered surgical instrument
US9005230Jan 18, 2013Apr 14, 2015Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Motorized surgical instrument
US9016539Oct 25, 2011Apr 28, 2015Covidien LpMulti-use loading unit
US9027817Dec 15, 2014May 12, 2015Covidien LpSurgical stapling apparatus including sensing mechanism
US9028494Jun 28, 2012May 12, 2015Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Interchangeable end effector coupling arrangement
US9028519Feb 7, 2011May 12, 2015Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Motorized surgical instrument
US9044230Feb 13, 2012Jun 2, 2015Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical cutting and fastening instrument with apparatus for determining cartridge and firing motion status
US9050083Sep 23, 2008Jun 9, 2015Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Motorized surgical instrument
US9050084Sep 23, 2011Jun 9, 2015Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Staple cartridge including collapsible deck arrangement
US9055941Sep 23, 2011Jun 16, 2015Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Staple cartridge including collapsible deck
US9060770May 27, 2011Jun 23, 2015Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Robotically-driven surgical instrument with E-beam driver
US9072515Jun 25, 2014Jul 7, 2015Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical stapling apparatus
US9072535May 27, 2011Jul 7, 2015Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical stapling instruments with rotatable staple deployment arrangements
US9072536Jun 28, 2012Jul 7, 2015Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Differential locking arrangements for rotary powered surgical instruments
US9078653Mar 26, 2012Jul 14, 2015Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical stapling device with lockout system for preventing actuation in the absence of an installed staple cartridge
US9084601Mar 15, 2013Jul 21, 2015Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Detachable motor powered surgical instrument
US9095339May 19, 2014Aug 4, 2015Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Detachable motor powered surgical instrument
US9101358Jun 15, 2012Aug 11, 2015Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Articulatable surgical instrument comprising a firing drive
US9101385Jun 28, 2012Aug 11, 2015Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Electrode connections for rotary driven surgical tools
US9113863Oct 16, 2012Aug 25, 2015Covidien LpSurgical fastening assembly
US9113874Jun 24, 2014Aug 25, 2015Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical instrument system
US9119657Jun 28, 2012Sep 1, 2015Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Rotary actuatable closure arrangement for surgical end effector
US9125662Jun 28, 2012Sep 8, 2015Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Multi-axis articulating and rotating surgical tools
US9138225Feb 26, 2013Sep 22, 2015Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical stapling instrument with an articulatable end effector
US9149274Feb 17, 2011Oct 6, 2015Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Articulating endoscopic accessory channel
US9155537Jul 11, 2012Oct 13, 2015Covidien LpSurgical fastener applying apparatus
US9179911May 23, 2014Nov 10, 2015Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.End effector for use with a surgical fastening instrument
US9179912May 27, 2011Nov 10, 2015Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Robotically-controlled motorized surgical cutting and fastening instrument
US9186143Jun 25, 2014Nov 17, 2015Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Robotically-controlled shaft based rotary drive systems for surgical instruments
US9198662Jun 26, 2012Dec 1, 2015Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Tissue thickness compensator having improved visibility
US9204878Aug 14, 2014Dec 8, 2015Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical stapling apparatus with interlockable firing system
US9204879Jun 28, 2012Dec 8, 2015Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Flexible drive member
US9204880Mar 28, 2012Dec 8, 2015Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Tissue thickness compensator comprising capsules defining a low pressure environment
US9211120Mar 28, 2012Dec 15, 2015Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Tissue thickness compensator comprising a plurality of medicaments
US9211121Jan 13, 2015Dec 15, 2015Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical stapling apparatus
US9216019Sep 23, 2011Dec 22, 2015Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical stapler with stationary staple drivers
US9220500Mar 28, 2012Dec 29, 2015Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Tissue thickness compensator comprising structure to produce a resilient load
US9220501Mar 28, 2012Dec 29, 2015Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Tissue thickness compensators
US9226751Jun 28, 2012Jan 5, 2016Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical instrument system including replaceable end effectors
US9232941Mar 28, 2012Jan 12, 2016Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Tissue thickness compensator comprising a reservoir
US9232944May 2, 2013Jan 12, 2016Covidien LpSurgical instrument and bushing
US9232945Jul 7, 2014Jan 12, 2016Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical stapling head assembly with firing lockout for a surgical stapler
US9237891May 27, 2011Jan 19, 2016Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Robotically-controlled surgical stapling devices that produce formed staples having different lengths
US9241714Mar 28, 2012Jan 26, 2016Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Tissue thickness compensator and method for making the same
US9271728May 16, 2012Mar 1, 2016Covidien LpSurgical fastener applying apparatus
US9271799Jun 25, 2014Mar 1, 2016Ethicon Endo-Surgery, LlcRobotic surgical system with removable motor housing
US9272406Feb 8, 2013Mar 1, 2016Ethicon Endo-Surgery, LlcFastener cartridge comprising a cutting member for releasing a tissue thickness compensator
US9277919Mar 28, 2012Mar 8, 2016Ethicon Endo-Surgery, LlcTissue thickness compensator comprising fibers to produce a resilient load
US9282962Feb 8, 2013Mar 15, 2016Ethicon Endo-Surgery, LlcAdhesive film laminate
US9282966Feb 7, 2014Mar 15, 2016Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical stapling instrument
US9282974Jun 28, 2012Mar 15, 2016Ethicon Endo-Surgery, LlcEmpty clip cartridge lockout
US9283054Aug 23, 2013Mar 15, 2016Ethicon Endo-Surgery, LlcInteractive displays
US9289206Dec 15, 2014Mar 22, 2016Ethicon Endo-Surgery, LlcLateral securement members for surgical staple cartridges
US9289209 *May 16, 2012Mar 22, 2016Covidien LpSurgical fastener applying apparatus
US9289210May 21, 2012Mar 22, 2016Ethicon Endo-Surgery, LlcSurgical stapler with apparatus for adjusting staple height
US9289211Jun 21, 2013Mar 22, 2016Covidien LpSurgical stapling apparatus
US9289212Sep 17, 2010Mar 22, 2016Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical instruments and batteries for surgical instruments
US9289256Jun 28, 2012Mar 22, 2016Ethicon Endo-Surgery, LlcSurgical end effectors having angled tissue-contacting surfaces
US9295465Nov 30, 2012Mar 29, 2016Covidien LpTissue stop for surgical instrument
US9301752Mar 28, 2012Apr 5, 2016Ethicon Endo-Surgery, LlcTissue thickness compensator comprising a plurality of capsules
US9301753Mar 28, 2012Apr 5, 2016Ethicon Endo-Surgery, LlcExpandable tissue thickness compensator
US9301759Feb 9, 2012Apr 5, 2016Ethicon Endo-Surgery, LlcRobotically-controlled surgical instrument with selectively articulatable end effector
US9307965Jun 25, 2012Apr 12, 2016Ethicon Endo-Surgery, LlcTissue stapler having a thickness compensator incorporating an anti-microbial agent
US9307986Mar 1, 2013Apr 12, 2016Ethicon Endo-Surgery, LlcSurgical instrument soft stop
US9307988Oct 28, 2013Apr 12, 2016Ethicon Endo-Surgery, LlcStaple cartridges for forming staples having differing formed staple heights
US9307989Jun 26, 2012Apr 12, 2016Ethicon Endo-Surgery, LlcTissue stapler having a thickness compensator incorportating a hydrophobic agent
US9314246Jun 25, 2012Apr 19, 2016Ethicon Endo-Surgery, LlcTissue stapler having a thickness compensator incorporating an anti-inflammatory agent
US9314247Jun 26, 2012Apr 19, 2016Ethicon Endo-Surgery, LlcTissue stapler having a thickness compensator incorporating a hydrophilic agent
US9320518Jun 25, 2012Apr 26, 2016Ethicon Endo-Surgery, LlcTissue stapler having a thickness compensator incorporating an oxygen generating agent
US9320520Aug 19, 2015Apr 26, 2016Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical instrument system
US9320521Oct 29, 2012Apr 26, 2016Ethicon Endo-Surgery, LlcSurgical instrument
US9320523Mar 28, 2012Apr 26, 2016Ethicon Endo-Surgery, LlcTissue thickness compensator comprising tissue ingrowth features
US9326767Mar 1, 2013May 3, 2016Ethicon Endo-Surgery, LlcJoystick switch assemblies for surgical instruments
US9326768Mar 12, 2013May 3, 2016Ethicon Endo-Surgery, LlcStaple cartridges for forming staples having differing formed staple heights
US9326769Mar 6, 2013May 3, 2016Ethicon Endo-Surgery, LlcSurgical instrument
US9326770Mar 6, 2013May 3, 2016Ethicon Endo-Surgery, LlcSurgical instrument
US9326771Mar 4, 2011May 3, 2016Ethicon Endo-Surgery, LlcStaple cartridge
US9332974Mar 28, 2012May 10, 2016Ethicon Endo-Surgery, LlcLayered tissue thickness compensator
US9332984Mar 27, 2013May 10, 2016Ethicon Endo-Surgery, LlcFastener cartridge assemblies
US9332987Mar 14, 2013May 10, 2016Ethicon Endo-Surgery, LlcControl arrangements for a drive member of a surgical instrument
US9345477Jun 25, 2012May 24, 2016Ethicon Endo-Surgery, LlcTissue stapler having a thickness compensator comprising incorporating a hemostatic agent
US9345480Jan 18, 2013May 24, 2016Covidien LpSurgical instrument and cartridge members for use therewith
US9345481Mar 13, 2013May 24, 2016Ethicon Endo-Surgery, LlcStaple cartridge tissue thickness sensor system
US9351726Mar 14, 2013May 31, 2016Ethicon Endo-Surgery, LlcArticulation control system for articulatable surgical instruments
US9351727Mar 14, 2013May 31, 2016Ethicon Endo-Surgery, LlcDrive train control arrangements for modular surgical instruments
US9351730Mar 28, 2012May 31, 2016Ethicon Endo-Surgery, LlcTissue thickness compensator comprising channels
US9358003Mar 1, 2013Jun 7, 2016Ethicon Endo-Surgery, LlcElectromechanical surgical device with signal relay arrangement
US9358005Jun 22, 2015Jun 7, 2016Ethicon Endo-Surgery, LlcEnd effector layer including holding features
US9364217Oct 16, 2012Jun 14, 2016Covidien LpIn-situ loaded stapler
US9364227Dec 12, 2014Jun 14, 2016Covidien LpSurgical instrument and cartridge for use therewith
US9364230Jun 28, 2012Jun 14, 2016Ethicon Endo-Surgery, LlcSurgical stapling instruments with rotary joint assemblies
US9364233Mar 28, 2012Jun 14, 2016Ethicon Endo-Surgery, LlcTissue thickness compensators for circular surgical staplers
US9370358Oct 19, 2012Jun 21, 2016Ethicon Endo-Surgery, LlcMotor-driven surgical cutting and fastening instrument with tactile position feedback
US9370359Mar 18, 2013Jun 21, 2016Covidien LpSurgical stapler having cartridge with adjustable cam mechanism
US9370364Mar 5, 2013Jun 21, 2016Ethicon Endo-Surgery, LlcPowered surgical cutting and stapling apparatus with manually retractable firing system
US9386983May 27, 2011Jul 12, 2016Ethicon Endo-Surgery, LlcRobotically-controlled motorized surgical instrument
US9386984Feb 8, 2013Jul 12, 2016Ethicon Endo-Surgery, LlcStaple cartridge comprising a releasable cover
US9386988Mar 28, 2012Jul 12, 2016Ethicon End-Surgery, LLCRetainer assembly including a tissue thickness compensator
US9393015May 10, 2013Jul 19, 2016Ethicon Endo-Surgery, LlcMotor driven surgical fastener device with cutting member reversing mechanism
US9398911Mar 1, 2013Jul 26, 2016Ethicon Endo-Surgery, LlcRotary powered surgical instruments with multiple degrees of freedom
US9402626Jul 18, 2012Aug 2, 2016Ethicon Endo-Surgery, LlcRotary actuatable surgical fastener and cutter
US9408604Feb 28, 2014Aug 9, 2016Ethicon Endo-Surgery, LlcSurgical instrument comprising a firing system including a compliant portion
US9408606Jun 28, 2012Aug 9, 2016Ethicon Endo-Surgery, LlcRobotically powered surgical device with manually-actuatable reversing system
US9414838Mar 28, 2012Aug 16, 2016Ethicon Endo-Surgery, LlcTissue thickness compensator comprised of a plurality of materials
US9433419Mar 28, 2012Sep 6, 2016Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Tissue thickness compensator comprising a plurality of layers
US9439649Dec 12, 2012Sep 13, 2016Ethicon Endo-Surgery, LlcSurgical instrument having force feedback capabilities
US20100237133 *May 14, 2010Sep 23, 2010Sachin ShahKnife/firing rod connection for surgical instrument
US20110226837 *Sep 22, 2011Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical stapling instrument
US20120312858 *Dec 13, 2012Mangesh PatankarSurgical fastener applying apparatus
CN102933159A *Mar 8, 2011Feb 13, 2013伊西康内外科公司Staple cartridge
CN103083051A *Oct 27, 2011May 8, 2013北京中法派尔特医疗设备有限公司Feeding mechanism of medical linear cutter stapler
CN103222885A *Apr 23, 2013Jul 31, 2013北京中法派尔特医疗设备有限公司Laparoscopic cutting stapler and safety device thereof
CN103381100A *Jul 16, 2013Nov 6, 2013施志文Electric linear type cutter stapler
CN103405254A *Apr 23, 2013Nov 27, 2013北京中法派尔特医疗设备有限公司Control method and control device for electric surgery suture nail installing instrument
EP2532311A3 *Jun 8, 2012May 20, 2015Covidien LPSurgical fastener applying apparatus
EP2532312A3 *Jun 8, 2012Oct 15, 2014Covidien LPSurgical fastener applying apparatus
WO2011115780A1 *Mar 8, 2011Sep 22, 2011Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Staple cartidge
WO2015065485A1 *Nov 4, 2013May 7, 2015Covidien LpSurgical fastener applying apparatus
Classifications
U.S. Classification227/175.2, 227/176.1, 227/180.1
International ClassificationA61B17/068
Cooperative ClassificationA61B2017/07285, A61B2017/0023, A61B2017/0725, A61B17/07207
European ClassificationA61B17/072B
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Aug 8, 2008ASAssignment
Owner name: ETHICON ENDO-SURGERY, INC., OHIO
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:NALAGATLA, ANIL K.;PATEL, SUDHIR B.;PRADHAN, DEBASISH;SIGNING DATES FROM 20080723 TO 20080805;REEL/FRAME:021361/0482
Mar 22, 2010ASAssignment
Owner name: ETHICON ENDO-SURGERY, INC.,OHIO
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:NALAGATLA, ANIL K.;PATEL, SUDHIR B.;PRADHAN, DEBASISH;AND OTHERS;SIGNING DATES FROM 20100302 TO 20100319;REEL/FRAME:024115/0038
Owner name: ETHICON ENDO-SURGERY, INC., OHIO
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:NALAGATLA, ANIL K.;PATEL, SUDHIR B.;PRADHAN, DEBASISH;AND OTHERS;SIGNING DATES FROM 20100302 TO 20100319;REEL/FRAME:024115/0038