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Publication numberUS2009035 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 23, 1935
Filing dateAug 25, 1932
Priority dateAug 25, 1932
Publication numberUS 2009035 A, US 2009035A, US-A-2009035, US2009035 A, US2009035A
InventorsTowers Donigan D
Original AssigneeAnchor Duck Mills
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Laundry bag
US 2009035 A
Images(2)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

HEY 23, W35 D. D. TOWERS LAUNDRY BAG' Filed Aug. 25, 1952 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 l l v INVENTORy Doizyafz Towers,- MMA (D. Q

M/WHIATTORNEw D. D. TOWERS LAUNDRY' BAG Filed Aug. 25, 1932 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 l NVE N TO R ya/2.@ Th1/er BY M0006 (D DM/WATTORNEY,

Patented July 23, 1935 2,009,035 LAUNDRY BAG Donigan D. Towers, Rome, Ga., assigner to Anchor Duck Mills, Rome, Ga., a corporation of Georgia Application August 25,

10 Claims.

The present invention relates to bags or containers of the open mesh or net-woven type and has for one of its objects the pro-vision of an improved laundryl bag in which portions of the structure are arranged in such a novel manner as to secure greatly increased strength and long Wearing qualities, particularly at joints or connections, Without increasing the amount of material used.

The mesh or structure or bags of this type, in which, between repeated immersions and drying, articles or clothing are retained while being washed, is subject to very considerable stresses, torsional and otherwise. In order to meet these stresses various structural features, including fabrics having staggered or oblique weft or Warp member, or right angularly disposed cooperating members, with numerous reinforcements have heretofore been proposed.

I have found that such reinforcements may tend to obstruct free movement of the washing fluid through the fabric and that the members or threads of the mesh, when relatively inclined, may tend to close or become aligned in adjoining parallel relation, at least during the torsional stresses, and another of the objects of this invention, generally stated, is to overcome such dis-y advantages. Y

Connected with the foregoing, a feature of the present construction, in which the weft and Warp members are disposed right angularly, with relatively large openings, is a seam or elongatev joint for the cooperating opposed body panels or sections of the bag.

This elongate joint, as shall hereinafter appear in detail, cooperating as it does with-the weft threads or members of the fabric, which threads are straight and not bent or partly turned by the warp members, tends to form a cylindrical structure, which opposes the aforesaid torsional movement, thereby holding the openings of the mesh in wide condition for economical and efficient action of the washing fluid, to secure a further object of the invention.

The body panels, being continuous over the bottom of the bag, are of single piece structure. The seams, as already indicated, join these panels; and another feature of' the invention, eliminating structure which has heretofore held moisture unduly and caused extra weight, is a rounded or curvedportion which is disposed between and merges into said bottom and the ends of the elongate joints or seams.

The unitary panels are cut as a single piece from a web of material so that, when folded upon 1932, Serial No. 630,339

itself, its opposite ends form the mouth or open end of the bag, at which another' feature is disclosed. Y

This mouth, with a single run through the finishing machine, is formed with an endless overlapping or stitching in which the ends of Warp members, one or more or the Wefts, and the top ends of the seams or elongate joints are rolled and bound.

With the above indicated objects in View, and l0 others which will hereinafter appear, the essential features of the present improved construction are herein clearly described, and fully illustrated in the accompanying drawings, in which:

Fig. 1 is an elevational view of the complete 15 bag.

Fig. 2 is a plan view of woven material, as cut from a web, from which the bag is erected.

Fig. 3 is a horizontal section taken on the line 3--3 of Fig. l, looking in the direction of the ar- 20 rows.

Fig. 4 is a fragmentary detail of a curved lap seam, as taken from the bag in the cylindrical form.

Fig. 5 is an enlarged fragmentary view of the 25 network fabric bag, las taken from the latter in the erect or cylindrical form, and showing the overedged top end.

Fig. 6 is an enlarged fragmentary View in which details of the warp and ll interengage- 30 ment are shown; and

Fig. 7 is a somewhat diagrammatic yView showlng the manner of turning the blank of material into position to secure the sectionally curved seam of the cylindrical bag.

Similar characters of reference are applied to corresponding parts throughout the various views.

A blank of fabric cut from a web, as shown in Fig. 2, from which the bag is formed, consists in 40 the present instance of a pair of panels or sections 1, 8, between which is a fold line A at the bottom B. As shown more clearly in Figs'. 5 and 6 the meshes of this blank are relatively large and are formed by single straight cross weft 45 members 3 of duck yarn, with which are incorporated warp threads, generally designated 4. Thewefts 3 are continuous with eachother, or formed from a single member, there being bent portions or loops 3 at the opposite edges of 50 the web.

The threads 4 are arranged in groups of three, two of which l2, I3, in continuous intersecting semicircular form, provide loops and engage the wefts 3 on one side of the latter; and then the 55 third thread lli passes over the intersections of the rst two, and between and below the said wefts, to form an interlocked structure. This construction is uniform throughout the main portion of the panels, but at their lateral boundary edges the members of the warp groups 4 are woven closely together to form selvedges, as seen for instance in Fig. 5, at the line l5.

On lateral margin, of the panel 'I is formed with a selvedge S, opposite which on the panel 8 is a selvedge e'. The opposite margin of said panel 'l is formed with a selvedge 5, and opposite this latter selvedge and on the panel 8 is a cooperating selvedge 5.

'Io set up or erect the bag, with the opposite panels foldable on the line A, the selvedges 6' and 5 are turned inwardly (see Figs. '7 and 3), so that the inner faces of the selvedges t3 and 6', and also those of 5 and 5 engage as shown in Fig. 3. When the parts are turned as just stated, and the panel 'i is superposed upon the panel 8, the fold at i5 is superpcsed upon the outer edge of the selvedge 5', and the free edge of the selvedge 5 is superposed on the inner edge of the selvedge E as indicated by the broken line of Fig. 3, and as shown in Fig. 7. In like manner the outer edge of the selvedge becomes superposed upon the fold at l'l and the inner edge of the selvedge, as indicated by the broken line, becomes superposed upon the free edge of the selvedge 6', as indicated in Fig. 3.

Interposed portions of the strip or panels, between the respective selvedges, and at the line A, as clearly shown in Fig. 7, are in this manner partly twisted or spirally turned, so that angular corners are eliminated and a curved and symrnetrical junction, forming a strong corner lap, without bulk, is. effected, as seen in Fig. l. One longitudinal line of stitches for holding the selvedges together is sho-wn at 'l'. Any number' of these lines may be used, but about two are sufdcient.

As thus turned the selvedges are disposed on opposite front and rear faces of the bag and on different sides of the vertical central plane of the fold line A. When the articles to be washed are placed in the bag the latter takes a cylindrical form `and. the joined selvedges, which are then curved or about aligned with adjacent portions i', 8, Fig. 4, form extremely strong and plain lap seams. The stresses are then taken transversely and their forces act in the direction indicated by the arrows C, D.

It is thus practically impossible for the wefts to come into mutual contact, and the warp 4 and particularly the selvedges or lap seams contribute to bring about this result, in which the meshes of the panels, as already indicated, are

kheld open during the washing operation.

The cut edges 9 and il) of the network strip, which form the mouth or opening of the device are lashed or stitched with thread, as at l, to prevent unravel-ling. This stitching is effected by a single run through a machine, during which one or more of the wefts 3, the top ends of the lateral lap seams, and the ends of the warps 4, are slightly turned or rolled downwardly and outwardly to form a strong or heavy ring or band.

These top or edging stitches are mutually joined or interlocked on the inner face of the mouth l i, so that the aforesaid band is of unitary construction, or endless.

As the heretofore described constructionadmits of considerable modification without departing from the invention, the particular arrangements shown should be taken as illustrative, and not in a limited sense; therefore, the scope of the protection contemplated is to be taken solely from the appended claims, interpreted as broadly as is consistent with the prior art.

Having thus described my invention, what I claim is:

Y l. In a laundry bag comprising a body having opposed unitary network panels, said panels having a fold line therebetween, inwardly turned selvedges on opposed lateral sides of said panels, practically straight selvedges also on opposed lateral sides of said panels, said iirst selvedges engaging the second mentioned selvedges to form lap seams, and spiral portions continuous with said respective selvedges at said line to close the seams thereat.

2. In a laundry bag comprising a body having opposed unitary network panels, said panels having a fold line therebetween, an inwardly turned selvedge bounding one of said panels at one of the latter,v a practically straight selvedge bounding the opposite side of said panel, a practically straight selvedge bounding one side f the other panel and engaging said inwardly turned panel to form a lap seam, an inwardly turned selvedge bounding the opposite siderof the second mentioned panel and engaging the rst mentioned straight selvedge to form another lap and spiral selvedge portions disposedy between the respective straight and inwardly turned se vedges and joining the latter at said line for isealing said seams thereat.

3. A laundry bag comprising a network strip which is folded on its transverse central line to form a bottom, a panel, a coacting panel; said strip having lateral selvedges of c ose veave extending along both sides thereof, said rst panel having the selvedge on` one of its sides turned inwardly to engage the opposite selvedge on the second panel for forming a lapped seam, and said first panel having the selvedge on the other side thereof engaged against the selvedge on the opposite side of the second mentioned panel, the last mentioned selvedge being turned inwardly to form another lapped seam, the interposed portions of the selvedges between said seams being spirally turned to close the corners of the bag thereat.

4. A laundry bag comprising a network strip which is folded on its transverse central line to form a bottom, a panel, a coacting panel, said strip having lateral selvedges of close weave extending along both sides thereof, said irst panel having the selvedge on one of its sides turned inwardly to engage the opposite selvedge on the second panel whereby to form a lapped seam, and said first panel having the selvedge on the other side thereof engaged against the selvedge on the opposite side of the second mentioned panel, the last mentioned selvedge being turned inwardly to form another lapped seam, the interposed portions of the selvedges between'said seams being spirally turned to form rounded bottom corners on the bag.

5. A laundry bag comprising in combination a network strip which is folded on its transverse central line to form a bottom, a panel, a coacting panel; said strip having lateral selvedges of close weave extending along both sides thereof, said first panel having the selvedge on one of its sides turned inwardly to engage the opposite selvcdge on the second panel, and said rst panel having the selvedge on the other side thereof engaged against the selvedge on the opposite side of the second mentioned panel, the last mentioned selvedge being also turned inwardly, the interposed portions of the selvedges at said line being spirally turned, and stitches holding said respective engaged selvedges together and forming lapped seams.

6. A laundry bag comprising in combination a network strip which is folded on its transverse central line to form a bottom, a panel, a coacting panel; said strip having lateral selvedges of close weave extending along both sides thereof, said first panel having the selvedge on one of its sides turned inwardly to engage the opposite selvedge on the second panel, and said rst panel having the selvedge on the other side thereof engaged against the selvedge on the opposite side of the second mentioned panel, the last mentioned selvedge being also turned inwardly, the interposed portions of the selvedges at said line being spirally turned to close the corners of the bag thereat, said corners being rounded, and stitches holding said respective engaged selvedges together and forming lapped seams.

7. A bag comprising a strip of textile fabric which is folded on its transverse central line to provide opposed coacting panels; said strip having substantially straight marginal edges; one of said panels having the major portion of the outer face of one lateral margin thereof engaged against the major portion of the inner face of the corresponding margin of the opposite panel, there being a relatively small spirally disposed portion connecting the first portions said line; said rst panel having the major portion of the inner face of the other lateral margin thereof engaged against the major portion of the outer face of the corresponding margin of the second panel, there being also a relatively small spirally disposed portion of the second mentioned cooperating margins connecting the associated major portions at said line.

8. A bag comprising a strip of textile fabric which is folded on its transverse central line to provide opposed coacting panels, said strip having lateral selvedges; one of said panels having the major portion of the cuter face of one selvedge thereof engaged against the major portion of the inner face of the corresponding selvedge of the opposite panel, there being a relatively short spirally disposed portion connecting the first portions at one end of said line; said rst panel having the major portion of the inner face of the other selvedge thereof engaged against the major portion of the outer face of the corresponding selvedge of the second panel, there being also a relatively short spirally disposed portion of the second mentioned cooperating selvedges connecting the associated major portions at the opposite end of said line.

9. A bag comprising a strip of textile fabric which is folded on its transverse central line to provide opposed panels, said panels having their adjoining lateral margins disposed in overlapping relation to provide two-ply seams, the inner face of one of the respective margins being engaged against the outer face of the mating margin, there being relatively small spirally turned portions between the respective margins at the opposite ends of said line, and stitches holding the coacting margins in position.

10. The herein described bag comprising a strip of textile fabric having opposed marginal selvedges, said strip being folded upon its transverse central line to provide coacting panels, said panels having their adjoining selvedge portions disposed in overlapping relation practically throughont their length to provide two-ply seams, the inner face of one of said respective portions being engaged against the outer face of the mating portion, stitches holding said respective portions engaged, and there being relatively small spiralled portions between the respective first portion whereby to contract the corners of the bag at the opposite ends of said line.

DONIGAN D. TOWERS.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2602482 *Jun 2, 1949Jul 8, 1952Lyon Edna BWashing bag
US4388739 *Feb 17, 1981Jun 21, 1983Martinon Gerard RaymondWashing bag for curtains, drapes and the like
US5356024 *Jul 29, 1992Oct 18, 1994Allure Home Creation Co., Inc.Collapsible hamper for storage of laundry and other items
US5464113 *Apr 28, 1994Nov 7, 1995Allure Home Creation Co., Inc.Collapsible hamper for storage of laundry and other items
US5964533 *Sep 16, 1996Oct 12, 1999Lamont LimitedHamper apparatus and methods
US6089394 *Jul 22, 1996Jul 18, 2000Lamont LimitedCollapsible hamper for the storage of laundry and other items
US6494335Oct 27, 2000Dec 17, 2002Bajer Design & Marketing, Inc.Two frame collapsible structure and method of making and using same
US6948632Apr 15, 2003Sep 27, 2005Bajer Design & Marketing, Inc.Collapsible structure
US7845507Mar 5, 2008Dec 7, 2010Bajer Design & Marketing, Inc.Collapsible container having discontinuous frame members
US8127956Jun 23, 2009Mar 6, 2012Bajer Design & Marketing, Inc.Collapsible structure
USRE37924Aug 23, 2000Dec 10, 2002Bajer Design & Marketing, Inc.Collapsible container and method of making and using same
EP0034557A1 *Feb 17, 1981Aug 26, 1981Gérard Raymond MartinonBag for washing curtains, laces and the like
Classifications
U.S. Classification383/107, 383/102, 383/117
International ClassificationD06F95/00
Cooperative ClassificationD06F95/006
European ClassificationD06F95/00B2B