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Publication numberUS2009216 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 23, 1935
Filing dateAug 28, 1933
Priority dateAug 28, 1933
Publication numberUS 2009216 A, US 2009216A, US-A-2009216, US2009216 A, US2009216A
InventorsAnibal Benjamin H
Original AssigneeAnibal Benjamin H
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Closure for bottles or the like
US 2009216 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 23, 1935. a. H. ANEBAL 2,009,216

CLOSURE FOR BOTTLES OR THE LIKE Filed Aug. 28, 1935 NIS 50 r 4 '5 k5 M f /IT s;

INVENTOR.

Bar /4277i) Hyz'kad.

ATTORNEYS.

Patented July 23,1935

.UUVNITED STATES OFFICE The invention relates generally to locksand it has particular relation to a, lock for bottle caps orv the like.

310116 object-of the invention is to provide an improved bottle cap which maybe so locked on a bottle that unauthorized persons normally will notbe ableto remove the cap and hence the contentsof the bottle without breaking the latter.

Another object of theinvention is to provide a bottle cap of this character which includes a simple form of combination lock. that may be readily. manipulated either to lock the cap on the bottle or to permit its removal by one possess- .ing the combination.

Another. object of the invention is to provide a bottle cap of locking character which may be manufactured in avery'eflicient and economical manner: so as :to provide a cap not prohibitive in use because ofits cost. I

. For'a better understanding of the invention means of asplit locking ring-32 which is partially disposed in the groove 2-0 in the inner shell, and

reference .may be had to the drawing illustrating oneiorm thereof, wherein:

Figure .1 is a fragmentary and elevational view of a bottle illustrating a cap constructed according to oneform ofthe invention, with the cap shown in verticalcross section. Fig. 2 is a fragmentary view as seen from the right sideof Fig. l, withparts of the. cap in cross section so as to illustrate certain details more clearly." I

Fig; 3' is a cross-sectional view taken substan tially along the line 3-3 of Fig. 1. I

Referring to Fig. 1, an ordinary bottle is indicated at l1] and is provided "with a neck H having conventional threads P2. .The bottlecap illustrated comprises an inner shell l3 having grooves M in its inner peripheral surface for receiving the threads l2 on the bottle neck, and amend wall for closing the opening in the bottle. Normal- 1y, a-layer l B of sealing material may be disposed between the end Wall l5 and the end of the bottle neck, if a more perfect seal is desired. The outer periphery of the shell I3 is slightly tapered, as

" indicated at ll, and at the upper and lower ends of the taper, shoulder portions l8 andl g may beprovided for a purpose which will later be set forth. The tapered portion of the shell also is provided with an annular groove 26 and the purpose of this groove will also be set forth hereinafter... At its upper side, the end wall 15 of the shell isprovided with a pair of radially spaced and circumferentially,extending ribs 22 and 2.3 v v I outer shell above the end wall l-5, includes a transversely extending pin 41 having a conical 55 and, asbes-t shown by Figs. .2 and 3, these ribs are not completely :annular but are separated at one point to provide a substantial space 2-4. At either side of this space, the ribs are bridged by walls 25 and 26 respectively. A single and wide rib mi-ghtbe usedin place of two ribs, but by using two ribs, the cost of the cap may be reduced. 5

The cap also includes an outer shell 28 telescopically 1'i-tting..-over the inner shell I3, which is providedwith inner shoulder portions 29 and 30 adjacent the shoulder-s l8 and IS on the inner shell, and an inner tapered portion 3| adjacent to the tapered portion IT on the inner shell. These parts ofthe shells are substantially complementary so as to properly position the outer shell on the inner shell and provide a more closely united and s-tronger assembly. is desirable partic-ularly in properly guiding the outer shell in any rotary movement thereof on and relative to the inner shell and in 1z roviding a more rigid assembly when the shells are locked together for simultaneous rotary movement.

Theshells are retained in assembled relation by .ina, groove 33 in the -outer shell. This ring is of such construction that it naturally tends to con- 25 tract into the groove 29 but the groove 33 is of such dimensions that the ring may expand thereinto sufii'ci-ently to permit inserting the inner shell into the outer :shell. The side wall of the outer shell extends substantially above the end wall 15 of the inner shell when the parts are in assembled relation, and is provided with diametrically disposed openings 34 and 35 Upwardly of theseopen-ings, the outer shell has an end wall 36 which closes it similarly to the closing 5 of the inner shell by the end wall l-5. Thus within the upwardly projecting portion of the side wall on the outer shell and between the end walls I51and 36, a substantialspace is provided which is adapted to receive a locking device to'be here- 40 'inafter, describe-d.

As shown best by Figs. 2 and 3, the upperpart .of the'upper shell has spaced projections 49, M

and 32 at each side of the diametrical line of openings 34; and 35, which define transverse spaces 43 and 44 extending substantial-lyto the rim of, the shell. The projections 48 are bridged b an upper portion 5 integral with the shell,

shown by Fig. 1, but between the pairs of projections 4i and 42, a space 46 is provided as 50 shown by Fig. 2 which is-open substantially to the upper and base portion '36 of the shell. 7

.A locking device providedin the space in the head 48 at one end and it will be noted that this head has circumferentially spaced and scribed indicia. A sleeve 49 having similar indicia is rotatably mounted on the right end of the pin 4'! and substantially abuts the head 48, and this sleeve at its left end terminates in a cam 50 which, as best shown by Fig. 2, has radially and oppositely projecting portions 5| and 52. A second sleeve 53 has a press fit on the left end of the pin for rotation therewith and foradditionally locking the sleeve to the pin, a portion of the sleeve as indicated at 54 may be pressed into a groove in the pin. Manifestly, other suitable means may be used for locking the. Sleeve 53 to the pin so that they will rotate together. The sleeve 53 is provided with acam 55 which may be identical to the cam 50 and on adjacent sides of the cams, the sleeves are provided with short and substantially abutting portions. It follows that the cams are disposed in spaced relation and that they can not move axially relative to the pin. The cams are so'shaped that when in proper vertical positions as shown by Figs. 1 and 2, and with the space 24dir'ectly below the space between projections 42, the cams-and pin may be moved transversely so as to dispose thecam 50 between the pair of projections 42 and between the end walls 25 and 26 on the inner shell. When the cam 50 is so positioned, it looks the shells so that upon turning the outer shell, the inner shell turns therewith. With the cams and pin in positions as shown in Fig. l, the outer shell may turn relative to the inner shell and by turning the pin 47 and/or loose sleeve 53, one or both cams may be so positioned that thepin and cam assembly cannot be moved to the right because one cam would engage one of the ribs 4! and 42 as the case may be. The wall 45 of course will prevent any undesirable movement'of the P assembly in the opposite direction.

It will be appreciated that it is necessary for both cams to be positioned vertically as shown and that the pin 41 and sleeve 49- be separately turned to'properly position the cams to permit transverse movement of the assembly to'lock the shells. It will also be appreciated that the arrangement is ofsuch character that normally no one would be able to see from the-outside how the camswere positioned and it would be necessary to have predetermined knowledge as to how the pin and sleeve 53 should be turned. By numbering the indicia on the sleeve 49 and on the head 48 and providing a suitable marker-on the outer shell 28 adjacent thereto as shown by Fig. 3,-and with a predetermined knowledge as to where the indicia on the sleeve 49 and head 48 should be with respect to the marker on the shell, one may readily position the cams 50 and 55 to enable their transverse movement into locking positions. In actual practice, it will probably be easier to turn sleeve 49 until the combination indicia thereof is aligned with the marker on the shell, and then turn pin 4'! until the combination indicia thereof is aligned with that on the sleeve and hence with the marker on the shell.

In manufacturing the sleeve 49, the indicia thereon may be formed by pushing the outer end of the sleeve into a tubular die member having circumferentially spaced and axially directed teeth for forming or scribing lines thereon and it is apparent that in the manufacture of numerous sleeves, without making observations as to the position of the sleeve with respect tothe tubular die, the indicia may be positioned automatically with respect to the cam in a varying number of ways so that in effect each sleeve manufactured would have its lines scribed differently, and this automatically would provide a different combination lock on each cap manufactured. Furthermore, in fastening the pin 41 to the sleeve 53, by not directing any attention to their relative turned positions, the combination may be varied automatically so as to avoid duplicates.

The construction described may be manufactured from metal or other suitable material and the parts, with possibly the exception of the pin 48,' may be manufactured by a die casting process.

After manufacturing the parts, the sleeves 49 and 53'may be disposed in the positions shown before assembling them with the pin, by tilting each sleeve and inserting it through the adjacent opening in the side wall. of the outer shell 28, andthen the pin 41 may be pushed through the sleeve 49 and then through the sleeve 53. As stated previously, the sleeve 53 will have a press fit on the pin so as to cause its rotation therewith and after the parts are assembled, metal in the end of the sleeve may be pressed into the groove in the pin. Then prior to assembly of the inner and outer shells, the cams maybe turned until they are properly positioned for movement between the projections 4| and 42, and then the position of the indiciaon the outer end of sleeve 49 and on the head 48 of the pin may be noted with respect to the marker on the outer shell. After noting such positions of the indicia with respect to the marker on the outer shell 28, the inner shell l3 may be moved into the outer shell and this causes expansion of the locking ring 32 into the groove 33, until grooves 20 and 33 become aligned, whereupon the locking ring contracts into groove 20 to hold the shells in assembled relation. As the parts are now assembled they are locked positively against separation and it is impossible for anyone to learn of the combination except by a tedious hit-and-miss process which would-be practically impossible in viewof the enormous number of combinations that would be possible. When the parts are so assembled, and with the cams 5D and 55 aligned with the spaces 43 and 44, the cams may turn and the ribs 22 and 23 are so designed that they will not interfere with this rotary movement.

.This automatically locks the pin against transverse movement and hence causes the outer shell to become rotary with respect to the inner shell. When the cams are positioned for locking the shells, they may be moved to the right so as to lock the shells together and then the cap may be mounted on the bottle. It of course will be necessary to move the cam 50 between the end walls 25 and 26 of the inner shell and, in order to properlyposition the inner and outer shells to facilitate this movement, markers at the bottom "edges'of the shells may be provided so as to inacter is verydesirable and, in view of the fact "that it may be retailed at a small cost, it may be used in various capacities where a' cap of this character would meet a public demand.

Although only one form of the invention has been described and illustrated in detail, it will be apparent. to those skilled in the art that various modifications may be made without departing from the scope of the appended claims.

I claim:

1. A look for bottle caps or the like comprising an inner shell adapted to be applied to a bottle or the like by turning it, an outer shell covering the inner shell, means retaining the shells assembled but permitting relative rotary movement thereof, and releasable means for locking the shells against such relative rotary movement and comprising a slidable pin extending transversely through a portion of the outer shell and having its end accessible for manual manipulation.

2. A look for bottle caps or the like comprising an inner cup shape shell adapted to be applied to a bottle or the like by turning it, an outer cupshape shell so covering the inner shell as to provide a space between the base portions of the shells, means retaining'the shells assembled but permitting relative rotary movement thereof, separately and relatively rotatable elements in the space, means for locking the shells together when the elements are in predetermined positions, and means accessible to the exterior of the outer shell'for separately turning the elements.

3. A look for bottle caps or the like comprising an inner cup shape shell adapted to be applied to a bottle or the like by turning it, an outer 'cup shape shell so covering the inner shell as to provide a space between the base portions of the shells, means retaining the shells assembled but permitting relative rotary movement thereof, separately movable and relatively rotatable-elements in the space, means jointly on both shells for receiving one of the elements to lock the'shells together, and means for preventing movement of the last element into such joint receiving means except when both elements are in predetermined turned positions.

4. A lock for bottle caps or the like comprising an inner cup shape shell adapted to .be applied to a bottle or the like by turning it, an outer cup shape shell so covering the inner shell as to provide a space between the base portions of the shells, means retaining the shells assembled but permitting relative rotary movement thereof, a rotary pin extendingthrough the outer shell and such space and being movable in the direction of its length, a pair of cams on the pin and disposed in said space, means locking one cam to the pin for rotary movement therewith, the other cam being free to rotate on the pin, means extending to the exterior of the outer shell for turning the latter cam, means jointly on the shells for receiving one cam when the pin is moved longitudinally, so as to lock the shells together, and means for preventing longitudinal movement of the pin to move the last mentioned cam into locking position, except when the cams are in predeter-t mined, turned positions.

5. A combination lock for bottle caps comprising relatively movable members one of which has a lock receiving space, a rotary pin extending through and to the exterior of the space in one of the members, a pair of cams on the pin and disposed within such space, means securing one of the cams on the pin for rotary movement therewith, the other cam being rotatable relative to the pin, means operatively connected to the last mentioned cam and extending to the exterior of the space for turning said cam on the pin, and

means jointly on the members for receiving one of the cams to lock the members together, when the cams are relatively turned to predetermined positions. a

6. A combination lock for bottle caps comprising relatively movable members one of which has a lock receiving space, a rotary and transversely movable pin extending through said space and to the exterior of the member, a pair of non-circular verse position.

7. A lock for bottle caps or the like comprising an inner shell adapted to be applied to a bottle or the like by turning it, an outer shell covering the inner shell, means retaining the shells assembled but permitting relative rotary movement thereof, and releasable means for locking the shells against such relative rotary movement, said last mentioned means comprising a rotatable pin extending transversely through a portion of the outer shell and which is slidable transversely thereof and rotatable about its own linear axis.

8. A combination lock for bottle caps or the like comprising an inner cup-shaped shell adapted to be releasably secured to a bottle or the like by turning the shell, an outer cup-shaped shell socovering the inner shell as to provide a space between the base portion of the shell, means retaining the shells assembled but permitting relative turning movement thereof, a rotatable and transversely slidable pin extending through the sidewalls of the outer shell and through such space, a sleeve rotatably mounted on one end of the pin and extending to the exterior of the outer shell so that it may be manually turned from the outside of said shell, acam in such space and rigidly connected to the inner end of the sleeve, a second cam adjacent the first cam and rigidly connected to the pin, means holding the cams against axial movement on the pin so as to move 1 therewith when the pin is moved transversely through the outer shell, means on the outer shell allowing rotary movement of the pin, sleeve and cams but normally preventing transverse shifting thereof except when the latter cams are in predetermined turned positions, means on the shells for receiving one of the cams when the pin is shifted transversely so as to lock the shellsagainst relative turning movement, and means on the outer end of the pin and sleeve for indicating the turned positions thereof required to' so position the cams that the sleeve and pin may be shifted transversely.

BENJAMIN H. ANIBAL.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2990075 *May 27, 1955Jun 27, 1961Rhodes Gilbert LSafety cap for containers
US4690292 *Jun 20, 1986Sep 1, 1987Product Investment IncorporatedSafety closure
US8662330Oct 5, 2009Mar 4, 2014Cap-N-Lock, LlcLockable cap for medical prescription bottle
WO2011028845A1 *Sep 1, 2010Mar 10, 2011Cap-N-Lock, LlcLockable cap for a bottle
Classifications
U.S. Classification215/206, 215/220
International ClassificationB65D55/14, B65D55/02
Cooperative ClassificationB65D55/14
European ClassificationB65D55/14