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Publication numberUS2009617 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 30, 1935
Filing dateJun 11, 1930
Priority dateJun 11, 1930
Publication numberUS 2009617 A, US 2009617A, US-A-2009617, US2009617 A, US2009617A
InventorsNorman P Harshberger
Original AssigneeBakelite Building Prod Co Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Building material
US 2009617 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 30, 1935. N. P. HARSHBERGER 2,009,517

BUILDING MATERIAL 'Filed June 11,` 1930 EN.. ll'llll/llllllllllrllllllllllllIlIlIlllllllllI/Illllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll Patented July 3o, 1935 PATENT OFFICE BUILDING .MATERIAL T j Norman P. Harshberger, Scandale, N. Y., assignor to Bakelite Building Products Co. Inc., New

York, N. Y., a corporation of Delaware Application June 11, 1930, Serial No. 460,409

6 Claims.

surface thereof is formed in a. novel manner to` create shadow eifects in certain areas so as to 10 simulate designs or lines of demarcation.

A further object of this invention is to provide an improved method of producing shaded yeffects in which certain portions of the surface of the material are raised, said raised portions i15 creating shadow eiects.

A more specific object of this invention is to provide improved building material and method of producing shaded effects thereon in which asphalt is applied in spaced apart dot-like formawill produce shadows.

A further object of this invention is to provide improved -building material having certain portions of its area raised so as to space a superimposed unit therefrom when said units are laid on a roof to create air spaces for insulation purposes.

A further object of the invention is to provide improved building material which is simple and inexpensive to manufacture, attractive in appearance, and well adapted for the purpose described.

With the above and other objects in view, the

invention consists of the improved building material and method of Aproducing vshaded effects thereon, and all its parts and combinations as set 35 forth in the claims, and all equivalents thereof. In the accompanying drawing illustrating one complete embodiment of the preferred form of the invention, in which the same reference numerals designate the same partsin all of the views:

Fig. 1 is a plan view of a strip of the improved rooiing material; s

Fig. 2 is a sectional view taken on line 2-2 of Fig. 1;

,i Fig.- 3 is a plan view showing a pair of over- 45 lapping units as they appear when laid on a roof; and

Fig. 4 is a sectional view taken on line 4 4 of Fig. 3.

Referring to the drawing, the numeral 8 desig- 50 nates a strip df the usual composition building material which comprises a fabric base 9 such as felt, having a coating of asphalt II) applied thereto and having crushed mineral material II such as slate sprinkled over the asphalt and partially 55 embedded therein.

tion to create a plurality Vof raised portions which To create the novel design eiIect, additional asphalt is applied in dot-likeformation as at I2, said dots being spaced from one another and being arranged in desired lines as shown in Fig. l, or in certain areasl as shown in Fig. 3. Additional crushed mineral material I3 is applied over said- .raised portions I2.

The raised dotted areas .will naturally create shadows on the material and when a group of the umts laid on a roof is viewed from a distance.- 10 the eifect will be substantially the same as though the designs or lines of demarcation were formed by using mineral material of two diilerent shades.

In the present invention, mineral material of one shade only is used, and the effect is accentuated by the shadows produced by the raised portions.

T The groups of spots I2 may be formed so that the edges thereof will be suitable for associating with the edges of a strip to form desired ilgures. Also they may be formed by means of a cellulose material such as Duco, which readily dries, and hence will not stick to the other side of the strips as they are wound up into rolls. 0r these spots may be produced as raised figures by means y of a bituminous mineral only or in any other suitable manner.

If desired, the staggered raisedareas may be applied over the 'entire surface of the material, thereby producing a-two-tone effect throughout.

An advantageous feature of the invention is illustrated in Fig. 4 wherein it may be seen that when two units are placed in overlapping position on a roof, that an air space I4 is created therebetween which will serve as additional in.- sulation and which will prevent sweating between v the elements.

It is to be understood that the raised portions may be applied in any arrangement desired and they may be utilized on building material of shape. It is further to be understood that the 4o invention 1 contemplates in addition all other changes and modicationswhich may come withinthescopeoftheclaims. ,A f

What I claim is:

1. As an article of manufacture, iiexible roonng material comprising a Ycomposition base, aub stantially fiat and even bituminous adhesive layer on said base presenting an interspersed-mineral layer, and a plurality of individual `disconnected mineral surfaced bituminous overlays spaced in substantially close relation toeach other over said mineral layer and grouped to form distinc-` tive shingle effects and dividing said base into shingle configurations some composed of the mineral layer and others composed of said grouped overlays, the shadow effect cast by said overlays serving to aid in distinguishing said congurations from one another. ,Y

2. As an article of manufacture flexible roofing material comprising a composition base, a substantially flat bituminous adhesive layer on said base` presenting an interspersed-mineral layer and a plurality of individual disconnected mineral surfaced Aoverlays of additional material having closed peripheries in the plane of the base, spaced in substantially close relation to each other over said mineral layer and grouped to form broken lines dividing said base into similar shingle configurations comprising the mineral layer, the shadow effects cast by said overlays combining therewith in assembly to form effective lines of demarcation for said configurations.

3. A roof comprising a plurality of shingle elements of flexible roong material -each comprising a composition base having a substantially :dat and even mineral surface layer thereon and having a plurality of individual, disconnected substantially small overlays of other material spaced in substantially close relation to each other over said surface layer and grouped to form distinctive shingle eiects and dividing said base into shingle configurations some composed of the mineral layer and others composed of said grouped overlays, the shadows cast by said overlays serving to accentuate the distinction between shingle conilgurations and said elements being laid in overlappingposition with the overlays serving to register the configurations and to create connectixig pockets and spaces between the contacting overlapping portions to aid in the air circulation and insulation of the roof.

4. In a rooting assembly a plurality of overlapping shingle elements of flexible roong material each comprising a composition base having a substantially flat and even adhesive layer thereon presenting a mineral layer of interspersed-mineral particles and having a plurality of individual, disconnected, mineral surfaced bituminous overlaysI spaced in substantially close relation to each other over said mineral layer and grouped -to form distinctive shingle effects and dividing said base into shingle configurations some composed of the mineral layer and others composed of said grouped overlays, the shadows cast by said overlays serving to accentuate the distinction between shingle configurations and said elements being laid in overlapping courses with the overlays serving to register the congurations so as to produce vertical rows and horizontal courses of alternating shingle eifects and providing connecting cells and spaces between the contacting overlapping portions for air circulation and thermal insulation.

5. As an article of manufacture, roofing material comprising a composition base, having a substantially at water-proonng layer thereon gripping a granular surfacing, and a plurality of individual disconnected raised portions of additional material having closed peripheries in the plane of the base, spaced ln substantially close relation to each other over thesurface of said base and grouped to form broken lines dividing said base into shingle configurations, the shadow effects cast by said raised portions combining 'therewith in assembly to form effective lines in demarcation for said configurations. i

6. As an article vof manufacture, rooting material comprising a composition base, a substantially flat adhesive layer comprising bitumen on said base presenting an interspersed mineral layer, and a-plurallty of 'individual disconnected overlays of additional material including a granular wear resisting facing spaced.V insubstantially close relation to veach other over said mlneral layer, said overlays casting shadow eifects in assembly when laid in overlapping courses to accentuate the configurations formed and to create connecting pockets and spaces between overlapping portions to aid in the air circulation and insulation of the roof.

NORMAN P. HARSHBERGER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4817358 *Jul 18, 1983Apr 4, 1989Owens-Corning Fiberglas CorporationAsphalt shingle with foamed asphalt layer under tabs
US5232530 *Apr 6, 1992Aug 3, 1993Elk Corporation Of DallasMethod of making a thick shingle
US5305569 *Nov 18, 1992Apr 26, 1994Elk Corporation Of DallasRoofing shingle
US7117651 *Apr 3, 2003Oct 10, 2006Certainteed CorporationRainscreen clapboard siding
US7472523Aug 30, 2006Jan 6, 2009Certainteed CorporationRainscreen clapboard siding
WO2004090247A2 *Apr 1, 2004Oct 21, 2004Beck David HerbertRainscreen clapboard siding
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/553, 52/445, 52/554
International ClassificationE04D5/02
Cooperative ClassificationE04D5/02
European ClassificationE04D5/02