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Publication numberUS20100004061 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 12/468,904
Publication dateJan 7, 2010
Filing dateMay 20, 2009
Priority dateMay 21, 2008
Also published asWO2009143208A2, WO2009143208A3
Publication number12468904, 468904, US 2010/0004061 A1, US 2010/004061 A1, US 20100004061 A1, US 20100004061A1, US 2010004061 A1, US 2010004061A1, US-A1-20100004061, US-A1-2010004061, US2010/0004061A1, US2010/004061A1, US20100004061 A1, US20100004061A1, US2010004061 A1, US2010004061A1
InventorsGreg Merril, Philip Feldman
Original AssigneeGreg Merril, Philip Feldman
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Exercise Gaming Device and Method of Interacting With Gaming or Other Scenarios Based on Physical Exercise
US 20100004061 A1
Abstract
The present invention embodiments promote performance of exercise by users during a computer simulation or game. An embodiment of the present invention includes an exercise device with a plurality of effector or gripping members in the form of handles to be manipulated by a user. A coil steel spring provides the resistance for the handles that may be compressed together or pulled apart for resistance-based exercise. The device further includes additional input devices to interact with a simulation or gaming scenario. The user applies forces to the handles to interact with the scenario, thereby requiring the user to perform exercises during the simulation or game play.
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Claims(32)
1. An apparatus to manipulate a computer-generated scenario comprising:
a plurality of effector members each engagable by a corresponding user body portion to receive forces applied thereto, wherein said effector members are coupled to each other and said applied force effects a measurable relative displacement between said effector members;
at least one displacement sensor to measure said relative displacement produced by said user body portion; and
a processor to process measurements from said at least one displacement sensor and facilitate interaction with said computer-generated scenario in accordance with said relative displacement.
2. The apparatus of claim 1, further including:
a resistive member coupled to said effector members to provide resistance to said effector members and resist said forces applied by said user body portion.
3. The apparatus of claim 2, wherein said resistive member includes a spring.
4. The apparatus of claim 1, further including:
a rotatable member coupled to one of said effector members to rotate in response to said forces applied to said one effector member;
wherein said at least one displacement sensor includes a rotation sensor to measure rotation of said rotatable member to provide a measurement of said relative displacement.
5. The apparatus of claim 4, wherein said rotation sensor includes an encoder.
6. The apparatus of claim 1, further including:
at least one orientation sensor to measure orientation of said apparatus, wherein said processor processes measurements from said orientation sensor and said at least one displacement sensor and facilitates control of said computer-generated scenario in accordance with said relative displacement and measured orientation.
7. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein said apparatus includes a housing, and one of said plurality of effector members is fixedly attached to said housing.
8. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein said processor includes:
a calibration module to measure forces applied to said effector members and set an amount of force required by said user to be applied to said effector members in order to interact with said computer-generated scenario.
9. The apparatus of claim 8, wherein said calibration module sets said required force to be a percentage of a user maximum strength determined from said measured displacement.
10. The apparatus of claim 8, wherein said calibration module monitors said measured displacement during interaction with said computer-generated scenario and dynamically adjusts said required force in accordance with said monitored displacement.
11. The apparatus of claim 1, further including a display to display information pertaining to exercise performed by said user.
12. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein said processor produces said computer-generated scenario, and wherein said processor processes measurements from said at least one displacement sensor and updates said computer-generated scenario in accordance with said measurements.
13. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein said computer-generated scenario includes one of a simulation and a gaming scenario, and said apparatus further includes at least one input device including at least one of a button, trigger and joystick to interact with said computer-generated scenario.
14. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein said effector members are configured to be engaged by at least one of a user hand and leg.
15. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein said computer-generated scenario is provided by a processing system, and said processor communicates with and transfers information to said processing system to control said computer-generated scenario of said processing system in accordance with said relative displacement.
16. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein said processor sets a resistance of said apparatus in accordance with a user specified resistance level.
17. A method of manipulating a computer-generated scenario via an exercise device comprising a plurality of effector members, at least one displacement sensor, and a processor, said method comprising:
(a) receiving forces applied to said plurality of effector members by a corresponding user body portion, wherein said effector members are coupled to each other and said applied force effects a measurable relative displacement between said effector members;
(b) measuring said relative displacement produced by said user body portion via said at least one displacement sensor; and
(c) processing measurements from said at least one displacement sensor, via said processor, and facilitating interaction with said computer-generated scenario in accordance with said relative displacement.
18. The method of claim 17, wherein step (a) further includes:
(a.1) providing resistance to said effector members via a resistive member coupled to said effector members to resist said forces applied by said user body portion.
19. The method of claim 17, wherein a rotatable member is coupled to one of said effector members to rotate in response to said forces applied to said one effector member and said at least one displacement sensor includes a rotation sensor, and step (b) further includes:
(b.1) measuring said rotation of said rotatable member, via said rotation sensor, to provide a measurement of said relative displacement.
20. The method of claim 17, wherein step (b) further includes:
(b.1) measuring an orientation of said exercise device via at least one orientation sensor; and
step (c) further includes:
(c.1) processing measurements from said orientation sensor and said at least one displacement sensor, via said processor, and facilitating control of said computer-generated scenario in accordance with said relative displacement and measured orientation.
21. The method of claim 17, wherein step (c) further includes:
(c.1) measuring said forces applied to said effector members and setting an amount of force required by said user to be applied to said effector members in order to interact with said computer-generated scenario.
22. The method of clam 21, wherein step (c) further includes:
(c.2) monitoring said measured displacement during interaction with said computer-generated scenario and dynamically adjusting said required force in accordance with said monitored displacement.
23. The method of claim 17 further including:
(d) displaying information pertaining to exercise performed by said user on a display.
24. The method of claim 17, wherein said processor produces said computer-generated scenario, and step (c) further includes:
(c.1) processing measurements from said at least one displacement sensor and updating said computer-generated scenario in accordance with said measurements via said processor.
25. The method of claim 17, wherein said computer-generated scenario includes one of a simulation and a gaming scenario, and wherein said exercise device further includes at least one input device including at least one of a button, trigger and joystick to interact with said computer-generated scenario.
26. The method of claim 17, wherein step (a) further includes:
(a.1) receiving said forces applied to said plurality of effector members by at least one of a user hand and leg.
27. The method of claim 17, wherein said computer-generated scenario is provided by a processing system, and step (c) further includes:
(c.1) transferring information from said processor to said processing system to control said computer-generated scenario of said processing system in accordance with said relative displacement.
28. The method of claim 17, wherein step (c) further includes:
(c.1) setting a resistance of said exercise device, via said processor, in accordance with a user specified resistance level.
29. A program product apparatus including a computer readable medium with computer program logic recorded thereon for manipulating a computer-generated scenario in response to manipulation of an exercise device including a plurality of effector members, at least one displacement sensor, and a processor, said program product apparatus comprising:
an environment module to generate and display a virtual environment for said computer-generated scenario that induces a user to apply force to said plurality of effector members by a corresponding user body portion, wherein said effector members are coupled to each other and said applied force effects a measurable relative displacement between said effector members, and wherein said virtual environment includes an object controllable by manipulation of said effector members; and
an update module to receive measurements of said relative displacement of said effector members from said exercise device and to control said object within said virtual environment in accordance with said received relative displacement measurements to update said virtual environment in accordance with manipulation of said effector members.
30. The apparatus of claim 29 further including:
a calibration module to generate and display a scenario responsive to manipulation of said effector members to calibrate said exercise device and set an amount of force required by said user to be applied to said effector members in order to interact with said virtual environment.
31. A method for manipulating a computer-generated scenario in response to manipulation of an exercise device including a plurality of effector members, at least one displacement sensor, and a processor, said method comprising:
(a) generating and displaying a virtual environment for said computer-generated scenario that induces a user to apply force to said plurality of effector members by a corresponding user body portion, wherein said effector members are coupled to each other and said applied force effects a measurable relative displacement between said effector members, and wherein said virtual environment includes an object controllable by manipulation of said effector members; and
(b) receiving measurements of said relative displacement of said effector members from said exercise device and controlling said object within said virtual environment in accordance with said received relative displacement measurements to update said virtual environment in accordance with manipulation of said effector members.
32. The method of claim 31, wherein step (a) further includes:
(a.1) generating and displaying a scenario responsive to manipulation of said effector members to calibrate said exercise device and set an amount of force required by said user to be applied to said effector members in order to interact with said virtual environment.
Description
CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application claims priority from U.S. Provisional Patent Application Ser. No. 61/054,837, entitled “Exercise Gaming Device and Method of Interacting With Gaming or Other Scenarios Based on Physical Exercise” and filed May 21, 2008, the disclosure of which is incorporated herein by reference in its entirety.

BACKGROUND

1. Technical Field

The present invention embodiments relate to interface devices for a gaming or simulation system to enable users to interact with video games or simulations and exercise during game play or simulation interaction.

2. Discussion of the Related Art

Currently, a wide variety of different types of exercise devices are commonly utilized to promote health and fitness, particularly for people having sedimentary lifestyles and/or work environments, and to provide rehabilitation for particular types of injuries.

Despite the availability of the exercise devices described above, people may not be performing a sufficient amount of exercise for good health. The lack of sufficient exercise may be attributed in part to the increasing popularity of video and computer games. The operation of video and computer games is generally performed by users in a sitting or reclining position (e.g., on a couch, chair, floor, etc.), typically for extended periods of time. Thus, the use of video games tends to decrease the available time for and amount of exercise performed by users. This decreased amount of exercise is typically detrimental to good health, and may contribute to a growing population of overweight people or even an epidemic of obesity.

SUMMARY

Accordingly, the present invention embodiments promote performance of exercise by users during a computer simulation or game. The present invention embodiments enable a user to perform exercises to interact with the simulation or game, thereby facilitating exercise and consumption of an increased quantity of calories during the interaction. An embodiment of the present invention includes a gaming device with a plurality of effector or gripping members in the form of handles to be manipulated by a user. A coil steel spring provides the resistance for the handles that may be compressed together or pulled apart for resistance-based exercise. The device further includes additional input devices to interact with a simulation or gaming scenario. The user applies forces to the handles to interact with the scenario, thereby requiring the user to perform exercises during the simulation or game play.

The above and still further features and advantages of the present invention will become apparent upon consideration of the following detailed description of example embodiments thereof, particularly when taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings wherein like reference numerals in the various figures are utilized to designate like components.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of an exercise gaming device coupled to a gaming or computer system according to an embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 2 is a side elevation view of the exercise gaming device of FIG. 1 illustrating components within a device housing interior.

FIG. 3 is a perspective view of the exercise gaming device of FIG. 1.

FIG. 4 is an exploded view in perspective of the exercise gaming device of FIG. 1.

FIG. 5 is a block diagram of an example control circuit for the exercise gaming device of FIG. 1.

FIG. 6 is an illustration of a user exercising legs with the exercise gaming device of FIG. 1.

FIG. 7 is an illustration of a user exercising arms with the exercise gaming device of FIG. 1.

FIG. 8 is a procedural flow chart illustrating the manner in which the gaming or computer system executes a virtual scenario and interacts with the exercise gaming device of FIG. 1.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF EXAMPLE EMBODIMENTS

An exercise gaming device according to an embodiment of the present invention is illustrated in FIGS. 1-2. Initially, an exercise gaming device 50 according to a present invention embodiment communicates with a gaming or computer system 170, preferably in a wireless fashion. The gaming system typically includes a processor or central processing unit (CPU) 180, a monitor or display device 190, and a storage drive and/or unit 175 to receive computer readable media (e.g., CD, DVD, etc.) containing software for various virtual simulation or gaming scenarios. Processing unit 180 is coupled to storage drive 175 and executes the software to provide the virtual scenarios on display device 190. The gaming system may be implemented by any conventional or other processing or gaming system (e.g., microprocessor system, personal computer, video gaming system, etc.). By way of example, gaming system 170 is a personal computer, where exercise gaming device 50 includes a joystick type controller with a wireless interface to the gaming system as described below.

The virtual scenarios provided by gaming system 170 generally include characters or objects that are controlled by a user via exercise gaming device 50. For example, the user may control movement and actions of a character or a vehicle (e.g., car, airplane, boat, etc.) to move through a virtual or computer-generated environment displayed on display device 190. Exercise gaming device 50 includes a plurality of input devices (e.g., triggers 64, 65, joystick 66, buttons 67, etc.) to enable a user to interact with the virtual scenario as described below. Gaming system 170 receives signals from exercise gaming device 50, and updates display device 190 to reflect the movements and/or actions of the character or object as indicated by user manipulation of the exercise gaming device.

Exercise gaming device 50 serves as a hand-held peripheral to gaming system 170, and enables a user to control a virtual gaming or simulation scenario while performing exercises. The exercise gaming device may further be held between user legs (or in other orientations) to be actuated by a variety of limbs, muscles or other body portions to control the virtual scenario.

Exercise gaming device 50 includes a housing 60 and effector members 72, 74. Housing 60 is generally cylindrical with effector members 72, 74 each extending from a respective housing lower side portion, and angularly displaced from each other by approximately one-hundred twenty degrees. The housing includes a device controller 150 with electronics (e.g., wireless transmitter, etc.) to couple exercise gaming device 50 to gaming system 170 as described below. Device controller 150 further enables exercise gaming device 50 to interact with monitoring or other sensors (e.g., heart rate monitor 148 (FIG. 5), etc.) as described below.

Effector members 72, 74 extend from housing 60 and each form a generally U-shaped configuration for engagement by a user. Effector member 72 further includes a slight taper or inward bend at a proximal portion thereof proximate housing 60. U-shaped effector members 72, 74 provide significant versatility for the user seeking to grip effector members 72, 74 in a convenient orientation for exercise or game play. Effector members 72, 74 include substantially cylindrical engagement members 73, 75 basically serving as a core or base, where engagement members 73, 75 are constructed of a substantially rigid material (e.g., metal, plastic, etc.). Engagement members 73, 75 include comfort members 55 (e.g., foam, rubber, or other padding) covering the respective engagement members to promote a comfortable holding of effector members 72, 74. Trigger type input devices 64, 65 are preferably disposed at the upper or distal ends of effector members 72, 74, and enable interaction with gaming system 170. Housing 60 includes a joystick or thumbstick type device 66, and one or more input buttons or other devices 67 disposed on the housing front surface to enable further interaction with gaming system 170. The housing front surface may further include one or more displays 614 as described below.

Exercise gaming device 50 may further include a sensing arrangement 185 of one or more sensors (e.g., accelerometer, infrared triangulation system, etc.) to measure the orientation (e.g., plural degree-of-freedom, etc.) of the exercise gaming device. The sensing arrangement measures the orientation along various axes (e.g., along X, Y and Z axes, twist, etc.) of exercise gaming device 50. The orientation measurements are provided to device controller 150, and may be utilized to provide directional controls for the virtual scenario (e.g., steering, etc.).

A user grips and applies force to effector members 72, 74 in order to direct the effector members toward (e.g., applying a pushing force) and away (e.g., applying a pulling force) from each other as described below. Exercise gaming device 50 includes a coiled spring 76 (FIG. 2) with ends that extend from housing 60 to form, or be coupled with, engagement members 73, 75 of effector members 72, 74. Spring 76 may be made from any strong flexible material (e.g., steel, plastics, etc.), where the spring coiled portion is placed between effector members 72, 74 and disposed within housing 60. Thus, when a user applies force to effector members 72, 74, spring 76 resists movement of effector members 72, 74 and exerts a force back to the user.

The amount of force applied to effector members 72, 74 causes the effector members to move, and the movement/displacement of these members is measured to control the virtual scenario displayed on display device 190 and provided by gaming system 170. This basically requires the user to perform exercise in order to interact with the virtual scenario. Further, exercise gaming device 50 may determine user exercise effort by measuring the force/energy exerted on effector members 72, 74 by the user based on the measured displacement of those members. Moreover, exercise gaming device 50 may receive information from an external user body monitor (e.g., heart rate monitor 148 (FIG. 5), etc.), and process the information as described below. It will be appreciated that numerous outputs may be determined by device controller 150 and displayed (e.g., graphs of heart rate versus energy, heart rate versus time, current and/or maximum heart rate, etc.).

The force applied by a user to effector members 72, 74 may be measured in various manners. The effect of a user exerting force on effector members 72, 74 results in a displacement of effector members 72, 74 relative to each other. This displacement is measured by an encoder 140, preferably a variable resistor or potentiometer with a rotatable actuator to vary resistance. However, encoders of various kinds (e.g., potentiometers with rotatable or linear actuators, optical encoders, etc.) may be utilized.

Referring to FIGS. 3 and 4, housing 60 includes a first portion 610 and a second portion 620 coupled together and defining a housing interior with a wheel member 630 disposed therein. First and second portions 610, 620 are each substantially cylindrical, and include open portions in facing relation to form the housing interior and closed portions respectively forming the front and rear surfaces of housing 60. First and second portions 610, 620 include edge portions 612, 622 in facing relation that are recessed to form a slot 625 in housing 60.

Wheel member 630 is substantially cylindrical, and includes dimensions slightly less than those of first and second portions 610, 620 to enable placement and rotation of the wheel member within housing 60. A portion of wheel member 630 is exposed through slot 625. Wheel member 630 includes a series of substantially rectangular spokes or bars 640. The spokes are arranged in a star type configuration with each spoke extending from a hub (or common central area) to the wheel member peripheral front edge (FIG. 4) facing first portion 610. An axle 650 is connected to wheel portion 630 at the hub of spokes 640. Axle 650 is suspended within housing 60 between wheel member 630 and second portion 620, and is further supported by encoder 140 disposed within second portion 620 and serving as an axle bearing. Encoder 140 is connected to a circuit board 665 (e.g., housing device controller 150) disposed on second portion 620 of housing 60. Encoder 140 may be located directly on circuit board 665, or may be wired to circuit board 665 from another location. In addition, one or more displays 614 may be disposed on the front surface of housing portion 610 along with joystick 66 and buttons 67. The displays may be of any conventional or other type (e.g., LCD, etc.), may be of any shape or size, and may be disposed at any suitable locations on housing 60 to display the virtual scenario and/or other desired information. One or more batteries 680 power the electronics of exercise gaming device 50 (e.g., device controller 150, circuit board 665, displays 614 on housing 60, etc.).

The proximal ends of effector members 72, 74 pass through openings in housing 60 for coupling with the coiled portion of spring 76. In particular, the proximal end of effector member 74 passes through opening 670 defined in second portion 620, and engages the spring coiled portion extending beyond wheel member 630. The proximal end of effector member 72 passes through slot 625 and an opening 627 defined in the wheel member portion that is exposed in slot 625. Thus, effector member 74 remains relatively fixed, while effector member 72 may be moved relative to effector member 74 as described below.

When a force is applied to effector members 72, 74, the effector members move relative to (e.g., toward or away from) each other. Since effector member 74 passes through opening 670 in second portion 620 of housing 60, effector member 74 does not rotate significantly relative to housing 60. On the other hand, effector member 72 passes through slot 625 and wheel member 630. Since wheel member 630 is rotatable within housing 60, effector member 72 causes wheel member 630 to rotate relative to housing 60, while traversing slot 625.

Rotation of wheel member 630 causes rotation of axle 650. Encoder 140 is coupled to axle 650, and calibrated to provide an indication of the angular position of axle 650 based on a varying resistance due to axle rotation. In other words, the resistance of encoder 140 changes with rotation of axle 650, thereby providing a measure of the axle (and wheel member) rotation and enabling determination of effector member displacement. Since user applied force generates a corresponding rotational angle of axle 650, a resistance is rotatably dialed for the applied force.

Encoder 140 is coupled to encoder circuitry on circuit board 665, and provides an electrical signal representing the resistance of the encoder. The encoder circuitry basically provides voltage and/or current to encoder 140 to measure the encoder resistance (e.g., the resulting electrical signal from the encoder in response to the voltage and/or current indicates the resistance). The resulting electrical signal from encoder 140 indicates a resistance that is related (e.g., linearly or nonlinearly) to the movement/displacement of effector member 72. For example, a compressive force by the user may be represented by a first signal from encoder 140 (e.g., indicating a high resistance), while a pulling force by the user may be represented by a second signal from encoder 140 (e.g., indicating a low resistance). The electrical signal from encoder 140 providing the resistance (and displacement of the effector members) may further enable determination of the applied force (since the force of spring 76 may be known).

Encoder 140 provides signals indicating displacement of effector member 72 (due to the measured rotation of axle 650). However, in order to determine the actual force/energy exerted by the user, the mechanical characteristics or profile of exercise gaming device 50 may be utilized. The profile is based on the geometry and material properties of exercise gaming device 50. Since encoder 140 provides a varying signal for applied force, the relevant profile may be a displacement versus actual force profile. For example, an elastic profile may be determined (e.g., by applying a range of known forces to the exercise gaming device and recording the corresponding displacement). A set of data points or a formula may be determined. Device controller 150 may be programmed with this profile to generate an actual force signal based on the encoder signal.

Utilization of multiple mechanical profiles determined in the manner described above may increase the accuracy of the calculation for the actual user effort. For example, a force applied to one area on effector members 72, 74 may result in a different displacement than that same force applied in a second different area on the effector members. Accordingly, different displacement versus force profiles may be created for the different areas on the effector members receiving applied force.

In order to implement the location specific profile system, exercise gaming device 50 may include a mode switch 147 (FIG. 5) receiving information pertaining to the location of force applied to effector members 72, 74. The mode switch may be implemented by any conventional or other input device (e.g., switch, button, slide, etc.), and may be disposed at any suitable location on the exercise gaming device (e.g., housing 60, effector members 72, 74, etc.). In other words, device controller 150 may include plural preprogrammed profiles (e.g., each associated with a specific area) for accurately calculating user effort. Accordingly, device controller 150 may include a displacement versus force profile for various locations on the effector members receiving applied force. The mode switch communicates with device controller 150 to allow a user to quickly select a general area of effector members 72, 74 for receiving applied force (e.g., where user hands are going to be placed). Device controller 150 retrieves the appropriate preprogrammed profile to determine the applied force.

A schematic block diagram of device controller 150 is illustrated in FIG. 5. Specifically, device controller 150 is disposed on circuit board 665, and includes a microprocessor 142, a Universal Serial Bus (USB) wireless Radio Frequency (RF) transmitter or transceiver (e.g., for two-way communications with the gaming system) 144, and a wireless heart rate signal receiver 146. The components of device controller 150 are powered by one or more batteries 680 received in a battery compartment in housing 60 (FIG. 3).

Wireless heart rate signal receiver 146 receives a wireless signal from external heart rate monitor 148 indicating the heart rate of the user. External heart rate monitor 148 may be implemented by any conventional or other heart rate monitor, and is worn by the user while exercising/playing with exercise gaming device 50. Microprocessor 142 may be implemented by any conventional or other microprocessor or processing device, and processes the signals from encoder 140 and a number of external inputs (e.g., heart rate monitor 148, triggers 64, 65, joystick 66, buttons 67, sensing arrangement 185, etc.). The microprocessor generates various output signals for wireless transmission to gaming system 170 via USB wireless RF transmitter 144.

Microprocessor 142 arranges the information for gaming system 170 in a format substantially similar to the format provided by a conventional game controller or other peripheral and compatible with the software executing on computer or gaming system 170 generating the virtual scenario. The format is preferably in the form of a packet or message, where specific locations within the packet are assigned to information or controls for the virtual scenario. The information for gaming system 170 is placed in the packet at the appropriate locations to provide the proper information to the gaming system to achieve desired actions in the virtual scenario. For example, when effector members 72, 74 provide throttle control, the displacement measurements are placed at the location in the packet assigned for throttle information. In this case, the displacement measurement is processed by the gaming system as a throttle control to control a velocity of an object in the virtual scenario. The microprocessor may process the displacement measurement to provide an appropriate control value to the gaming system. Alternatively, the microprocessor may provide the displacement measurement and enable the gaming system to determine the appropriate control value.

Microprocessor 142 may further determine various desired information based on the displacement measurements and/or other received information (e.g., instantaneous strength as a function of time, the degree of force applied to the effector members at any given time, the amount of work performed by the user during a particular session, resistance levels, time or elapsed time, force applied by the user, instantaneous force applied, total weight lifted, calories burned (e.g., based on the amount of work performed and user weight), resistance level setting, degree of effector member movement, heart rate, orientation, graphs of heart rate versus energy, heart rate versus time, current and/or maximum heart rate, and/or any other exercise or other related information). Exercise gaming device 50 may include mode switch 147 to receive information pertaining to the location of force applied to effector members 72, 74 as described above. This enables microprocessor 142 to utilize the appropriate preprogrammed profile associated with a specific area gripped by the user for accurately calculating user effort as described above.

Gaming system 170 includes or is coupled to a wireless receiver or transceiver (e.g., for two-way communications with the exercise gaming device) 145, preferably a USB wireless RF receiver or transceiver that can be inserted into a USB port of a personal computer or gaming system, to transmit and/or receive information from device controller 150. The gaming system updates the virtual scenario based on the received information. Further, the gaming system may display any desired information determined by microprocessor 142 and transferred to the gaming system. In addition, displays 614 may further display the virtual scenario and/or desired information.

Microprocessor 142 may include, or be coupled to, an audio/visual (A/V) module 157 that generates signals (e.g., video, audio, etc.) for transference from exercise gaming device 50 directly to a display device 195 (and/or displays 614). In this case, microprocessor 142 includes software to implement the virtual gaming or simulation scenario, and processes the received information (e.g., received from the encoder/potentiometer, heart rate monitor, triggers, joystick, buttons, sensing arrangement, etc.) to update the virtual scenario displayed on display device 195 (and/or displays 614). The A/V module may be implemented by any conventional or other processing system or circuitry (e.g., video processor, digital processor (DSP), etc.) providing audio and/or video signals. The signals may be provided to display device 195 wirelessly or via a cable (not shown) connected to and extending from housing 60 at any suitable location. The cable may be implemented by any conventional or other cable suitable to transfer video and/or audio signals. By way of example, a user may connect the exercise gaming device directly to a television set or other monitor through either an RF connector (e.g., via channels three or four), or through the monitor audio/visual ports (e.g., via RCA type connectors, etc.).

In addition, microprocessor 142 can perform a reset or reboot operation in response to actuation of a reset button 151. The reset button may be implemented by any conventional or other input device (e.g., button, switch, etc.), and may be disposed at any suitable location on the exercise gaming device (e.g., housing 60, effector members 72, 74, etc.).

Microprocessor 142 of exercise gaming device 50 may further include a calibration module 153 to measure forces applied to effector members 72, 74 and set an amount of force (or displacement) required by the user to be applied to the effector members in order to interact with the computer-generated scenario. The calibration module performs a dynamic calibration to adjust the device resistance to an appropriate level for each user. In particular, a virtual scenario may initially request the user (e.g., via gaming system 170) to apply force to effector members 72, 74 (e.g., to pop a displayed balloon, etc.). The calibration module measures the maximum force applied by the user (e.g., when a measured displacement remains constant over a certain time interval, etc.) based on the signals from encoder 140, and sets the exercise gaming device resistance to a certain level relative to the user maximum force or strength (e.g., the upper limit of force for interaction with the virtual scenario may be set to a certain percentage (e.g., seventy to ninety percent) of the user maximum strength). Further, the calibration module monitors the measured forces (or displacement) during interaction with the computer-generated scenario and dynamically adjusts the required force (or displacement) in accordance with the monitored values (e.g., as the user grows tired or fatigued). Alternatively, the required force (or displacement) may be adjusted based on conditions in the virtual scenario to enhance realism (e.g., heavier or lighter objects, traversing various environments, etc.). These conditions may be communicated from the gaming system to the exercise gaming device via the wireless link (e.g., transceivers 144 and 145).

Microprocessor 142 adjusts the information to control the virtual scenario in accordance with the calibration. In particular, the processor adjusts the control information (for the virtual scenario provided by the gaming system or the exercise gaming device) in order to facilitate a device resistance level in accordance with the dynamic calibration and/or the computer-generated scenario (e.g., the gaming or simulation may provide a virtual environment or conditions requiring additional or less force to perform an action). For example, since a greater displacement corresponds to a greater force, increasing the displacement measurement (e.g., by an offset value based on the desired device resistance level) enables a user to exert less force to achieve a particular displacement value, thereby effectively lowering the resistance of the peripheral for the user. Conversely, reducing the displacement measurement (e.g., by an offset value based on the desired device resistance level) requires a user to exert greater force to achieve the particular displacement, thereby increasing the resistance of the peripheral for the user. The amount of adjustment of the displacement measurement may be determined in any suitable manner (e.g., predetermined offsets, based on the calibration, force profiles, etc.).

In addition, microprocessor 142 may provide a desired resistance for the exercise gaming device in accordance with a user selected resistance level. In particular, the user specifies a desired device resistance level via triggers 64, 65, joystick 66, buttons 67 and/or other suitable input devices (e.g., arrow or other keys, slide, etc.). Microprocessor 142 determines an appropriate offset (or displacement measurement adjustment) and adjusts the displacement measurement by that offset to attain the desired device resistance corresponding to the user-specified resistance level. The adjustment of the displacement measurement effectively modifies the amount of force or displacement required by the user to attain a desired action in the virtual scenario as described above. The amount of adjustment of the displacement measurement may be determined in any suitable manner (e.g., predetermined offsets based on the specified resistance levels, force profiles, etc.).

The exercise gaming device may be utilized with any suitable body portions. For example, a user may utilize legs to apply the force to the effector members as illustrated in FIG. 6. Specifically, user 200 preferably achieves and maintains a seated position on a support 210 (e.g., chair, bench, etc.) or supporting surface (e.g., floor, etc.). Exercise gaming device 50 is placed between user legs at any suitable locations along the legs (e.g., between the ankle and upper thigh) to preferably enable the inner portions of the legs to engage effector members 72, 74, thereby requiring an inward pushing type force to displace the effector members (e.g., force the effector members toward each other). Alternatively, the exercise gaming device may be positioned with any desired portions of the user legs (e.g., between the ankle and upper thigh) placed between effector members 72, 74 to enable the user legs to engage effector members 72, 74, thereby requiring an outward pushing type force to displace the effector members (e.g., force the effector members away from each other). The user hands are utilized to actuate the input devices (e.g., triggers 64, 65, joystick 66, buttons 67, mode switch 147, etc.), while the user legs apply force to the effector members to control a virtual scenario.

The user may alternatively utilize hands to apply force to the effector members as illustrated in FIG. 7. Specifically, user 200 preferably achieves and maintains a seated position on support 210 (e.g., chair, bench, etc.) or supporting surface (e.g., floor, etc.), and grips effector members 72, 74 with the user hands at any desired locations on the effector members. The hands apply force to the effector members, and further manipulate the input devices (e.g., triggers 64, 65, joystick 66, buttons 67, mode switch 147, etc.) in order to control a virtual scenario. The user may utilize any body portions individually, or in any combinations, to apply the force to the effector members, and may operate the exercise gaming device in any desired position (e.g., standing, seated, squatting, etc.).

Operation of exercise gaming device 50 is described with reference to FIGS. 1-5. Initially, a virtual gaming or simulation scenario is selected and executed on gaming system 170, and the user engages exercise gaming device 50 with user legs (FIG. 6) and/or hands (FIG. 7) to interact with the virtual scenario. In the case of microprocessor 142 of gaming device 50 providing the virtual scenario, exercise gaming device 50 may utilize display device 195 and/or displays 614, and a virtual scenario is selected by the user (e.g., via triggers 64, 65, joystick 66, and/or buttons 67).

During an initial calibration, the user may be requested to apply force to (or displace) the effector members of exercise gaming device 50. Calibration module 153 in device controller 150 determines the maximum force applied (or displacement) and sets the device resistance (or amount of applied force or displacement needed) for the virtual scenario to an appropriate level for the user as described above. The device resistance level may further be controlled by the device controller during the virtual scenario as described above.

The user operates exercise gaming device 50 by applying pushing, pulling or other forces to displace effector members 72, 74. The user may apply one or more forces to effector members 72, 74 to effect corresponding movement, for example, of a character or an object in the displayed virtual scenario. The user may further manipulate triggers 64, 65, joystick 66, buttons 67 and any other input devices of exercise gaming device 50 for additional actions depending upon the particular virtual scenario. The force applied to effector member 72 enables wheel member 630 (and axle 650) to rotate within housing 60 as described above. Encoder 140 measures rotation of axle 650 and, hence, the displacement of effector member 72 relative to effector member 74.

The signals from encoder 140 and the various input and sensing devices (e.g., triggers 64, 65, joystick 66, buttons 67, heart rate monitor 148, sensing arrangement 185, etc.) are transmitted to microprocessor 142 for processing. The microprocessor determines the amount of displacement of effector member 72 based on the encoder signal, and may further determine (and/or display on an exercise gaming device or other display) any other desired information (e.g., instantaneous strength as a function of time, the degree of force applied to the effectors at any given time, the amount of work performed by the user during a particular session, resistance levels, time or elapsed time, force applied by the user, instantaneous force applied, total weight lifted, calories burned (e.g., based on the amount of work performed and user weight), resistance level setting, degree of effector movement, heart rate, orientation, graphs of heart rate versus energy, heart rate versus time, current and/or maximum heart rate, and/or any other exercise or other related information). For example, the microprocessor may determine the force based on stored profiles as described above.

Microprocessor 142 formats the information in an appropriate manner for transference to gaming system 170 as described above. For example, the microprocessor arranges the information in a format substantially similar to the format provided by a conventional game controller or other peripheral and compatible with the software executing on computer or gaming system 170 generating the virtual scenario. In other words, device controller 150 formats and forwards the information (including any orientation, input or sensing device (e.g., sensing arrangement 185, triggers 64, 65, joystick 66, buttons 67, etc.), and/or desired information) to gaming system 170. The gaming system processes the forwarded information to update and/or respond to an executing virtual scenario in accordance with the forwarded information.

In the case of microprocessor 142 including the virtual scenario, microprocessor 142 processes the received information (e.g., received from the encoder/potentiometer, heart rate monitor, triggers, joystick, buttons, sensing arrangement, etc.) to update the virtual scenario and provide the desired information on display device 195 and/or displays 614. Thus, the force applied by the user to exercise gaming device 50 results in a corresponding coordinate movement or action in the virtual scenario displayed on display devices 190, 195 and/or displays 614. In other words, user exercise serves to indicate desired user actions or movements to update movement or actions of characters or objects within the virtual scenario.

User manipulation of the effector members enables the user to interact with the virtual scenario (e.g., controls an object or some action in the virtual scenario). The greater the force applied to the exercise gaming device (or displacement of effector members 72, 74), the greater the effect within the virtual scenario. The virtual scenarios utilized with the exercise gaming device typically require the user to apply force to (or displace) the effector members (e.g., pull, compress, etc.) in a variety of different orientations to access different muscles and achieve goals in the virtual scenario. In addition, the exercise gaming device may include a dynamic calibration to control the amount of force (or displacement) required by a user in order to interact with the virtual scenario as described above.

Various virtual gaming or simulation scenarios may be employed by gaming system 170 for use with exercise gaming device 50. The virtual scenarios are preferably implemented in the form of one or more software modules or units for execution by the gaming system, and are typically stored on a computer readable or useable medium (e.g., CD, DVD, memory or memory device, magnetic and/or optical device, etc.). A manner in which a virtual scenario interacts with the exercise gaming device via the gaming system is illustrated in FIG. 8. Initially, a virtual gaming or simulation scenario is selected and loaded into the gaming system via storage drive 175 (FIG. 1). The virtual scenario may invoke calibration module 153 (FIG. 5) to initiate a calibration at step 310 and set the desired resistance level for the virtual scenario (and exercise gaming device) as described above.

The desired virtual environment is generated and displayed at step 312. The virtual scenario may further provide information pertaining to the displayed environment to the exercise gaming device to adjust the device resistance level in accordance with the environmental conditions (e.g., adjust device resistance for certain terrains, varying weights of objects, etc.). The virtual scenario directs or induces the user to manipulate the exercise gaming device effector members at step 314 in order for the user to control objects in the virtual environment (e.g., motion, direction, velocity, etc.). The user may be directed or induced to manipulate the exercise gaming device and/or effector members in certain directions or in certain manners to achieve desired actions in the virtual environment. For example, the virtual scenario may direct or induce the user to move the effector members toward or away from each other, twist the effector members or exercise gaming device, orient or tilt the exercise gaming device in a certain manner, and/or specify the body portions to apply force to the effector members. The objects are controlled within the virtual environment in accordance with the amount of force applied (or displacement of effector members 72, 74) or manipulation of the exercise gaming device, and other information (e.g., determined from sensing arrangement 185, triggers 64, 64, joystick 66, buttons, 67, etc.) provided by the exercise gaming device.

The exercise gaming device formats the measurements and signals from the various input and sensing devices (e.g., encoder 140, sensing arrangement 185, triggers 64, 65, joystick 66, buttons 67, etc.), and transfers this and other desired information to the gaming system. The virtual scenario receives and processes the information at step 316. The virtual scenario is configured to expect information for corresponding actions in the virtual environment to be placed in corresponding locations in the received formatted information from the exercise gaming device. The received information is processed by the virtual scenario in order to control the actions in the virtual environment corresponding to the locations in the formatted information. The displacement measurements of effectors 72, 74 may be processed by the exercise gaming device to provide appropriate control values for the corresponding actions in the virtual environment. Alternatively, the actual displacement measurements may be provided to and processed by the virtual scenario to determine appropriate controls for the corresponding actions.

The virtual scenario applies the received information to the corresponding actions in the virtual environment to update the environment at step 318 in accordance with manipulation of the exercise gaming device by the user. The virtual scenario may further display the various desired (exercise related) information determined by the exercise gaming device. Thus, the virtual scenario utilizes the displacement of effector members 72, 74 to control corresponding actions in the virtual environment.

It will be appreciated that the embodiments described above and illustrated in the drawings represent only a few of the many ways of implementing an exercise gaming device and method of interacting with gaming or other scenarios based on physical exercise.

Exercise gaming device 50 may include any quantity of any types of input devices disposed at any suitable locations (e.g., buttons, switches, slides, joysticks, etc.). The displays (e.g., display devices 190, 195, housing displays 614, etc.) may be of any quantity, shape or size, may be implemented by any conventional or other type of display (e.g., LCD, etc.), and may be disposed at any suitable locations. The housing may be configured in any fashion to accommodate effector members 72, 74 and/or the various mechanical arrangements described above.

The housing first and second portions may be of any quantity, shape or size and may be constructed of any suitable materials. These portions may be coupled together via any suitable fastening techniques (e.g., fasteners, adhesives, mated parts, posts, etc.) and encompass any exercise gaming device components. The first and second portions may be configured in any fashion to accommodate any components (e.g., trigger, joystick, effector members, displays, etc.).

Exercise gaming device 50 and corresponding components (e.g., housing, effector members, etc.) may be of any size or shape, may be arranged in any fashion and may be constructed of any suitable materials. Exercise gaming device 50 may be a hand-held unit or be mounted to any suitable support or surface. The housing of exercise gaming device 50 may be of any shape or size and may be constructed of any suitable materials. The housing may include any quantity of any types of input or other devices disposed at any suitable locations (e.g., buttons, switches, slides, joysticks, displays, etc.).

The effector members of exercise gaming device 50 may be constructed of any suitable materials, may have any suitable geometric configurations (e.g., rectangular, cylindrical, etc.) or size, and may be arranged in any suitable configuration (e.g., U-shape, etc.). The effector members may be oriented in any fashion relative to each other, and at any angular displacement relative to each other about the housing. The engagement members of exercise gaming device 50 may be constructed of any suitable materials, may have any suitable geometric configurations (e.g., rectangular, cylindrical, etc.) or size, and may be arranged in any suitable configuration (e.g., U-shape, etc.). The comfort members may be of any quantity, shape or size, and may be of any suitable material (e.g., rubber, foam, padded, fabric, etc.). The comfort members may include a treated portion to enhance gripping by a user (e.g., ridges or other embedded deformity, gripping material, etc.). The wheel member may be of quantity, shape or size, may be constructed of any suitable materials, and may include any quantity of spokes of any shape or size arranged in any fashion. The axle may be of any quantity, shape or size, may be constructed of any suitable materials, and may interface the encoder in any fashion. The axle may be connected to the wheel member and housing at any desired locations. The housing and wheel member may include any quantity of openings or slots of any shape or size and at any locations to accommodate the effector members.

The resistive member or spring may be implemented by any quantity of any suitable resistive devices (e.g., torsion or other spring, resilient structure or bar, etc.) providing any desired amount of force to resist user applied forces to the effector members, and may be disposed at any suitable locations or orientations. The spring may be constructed of any suitable materials (e.g., metal, etc.), may be arranged in any fashion (e.g., coiled, etc.), and may provide any suitable resistive forces. Any quantity of the effector members may be fixed or at least partially movable relative to the housing.

Any suitable number of any types of sensors (e.g., strain gauges, potentiometers, orientation sensors, optical or other encoders, etc.) may be employed by exercise gaming device 50 to facilitate the measurement of any one or more types of strain/displacement or other forces applied or energy exerted by the user (e.g., bending forces, twisting/torsion forces, compression forces and/or tension forces). The sensors may be constructed of any suitable materials, may be disposed at any locations and may be of any suitable type (e.g., strain gauge, potentiometer, optical or other encoder, etc.). Further, the sensors may include any electrical, mechanical or chemical properties that vary in a measurable manner in response to applied force or displacement. The sensors may include any desired arrangement and may be disposed at (or coupled to) any locations on any exercise gaming device components (e.g., comfort members, effector members, housing, spring, etc.).

Exercise gaming device 50 may be configured to accommodate any suitable quantity of force (or displacement) applied by a user. The sensing arrangement may be implemented by any quantity of any conventional or other sensors (e.g., accelerometer, infrared triangulation system, etc.) to measure the orientation (e.g., plural degree-of-freedom, etc.) of the exercise gaming device. The sensing arrangement may be disposed at any suitable locations on or within the exercise gaming device.

The microprocessor may be implemented by any quantity of any type of microprocessor, processing system or other circuitry, while the control circuit or device controller may be disposed at any suitable locations on or within the housing. The control circuit and/or microprocessor may be connected to the gaming system via any suitable peripheral, communications media or port (e.g., wirelessly, wired, etc.). The microprocessor may determine any desired exercise related information based on inputs from the user and/or various sensors (e.g., physical or exercise related information based on input from device sensors and health monitors (e.g., heart rate, temperature, weight, height, blood pressure, etc.), timers, encoder, input devices, etc.). The microprocessor may further arrange data (e.g., force, energy or other measurements by sensors, input device information, determined exercise and/or health information, etc.) into any suitable format that is recognizable by the gaming system. The information may include any desired information and be arranged in any desired format (e.g., or at any suitable locations within the format). The information from the microprocessor may be relayed to the gaming system via any suitable ports (e.g., peripheral ports, data ports, USB ports, etc.). Alternatively, the information may be directly communicated to the gaming system. The microprocessor may determine displacement and/or force in any suitable manner based on the encoder measurements (e.g., conventional relationships, profiles, etc.).

The microprocessor may include and execute any desired gaming or other applications. A/V modules may be implemented by any quantity of any conventional or other processing system or circuitry (e.g., video processor, digital signal processor (DSP), etc.) providing audio and/or video signals. Exercise gaming device 50 may be coupled directly to a display device via any conventional or other cable or connectors (e.g., RF, RCA type, etc.). The exercise gaming device may be configured to be selectively coupled to either a display device or a gaming processor (e.g., via a cable or game controller). In this case, the exercise device may include input devices to enable a user to indicate the manner of use.

Any suitable number of any types of conventional or other circuitry may be utilized to implement the control circuit or device controller. The control circuit may include any quantity of conventional or other components arranged in any fashion. The resistance change of the encoder may be determined in any manner via any suitable conventional or other circuitry. Alternatively, the control circuit may include any suitable circuitry to accommodate signals from varying sensors to determine the displacement. For example, the control circuit may include circuitry to accommodate pulse or other signals from an optical encoder measuring the displacement to enable the microprocessor to determine the displacement.

Any suitable number of any type of conventional or other displays may be connected to the microprocessor, where the microprocessor may provide any type of information relating to a particular session (e.g., results from exercises including force and work, calories burned, weight lifted, etc.). The RF transmitters and receivers (e.g., heart rate monitor, USB, etc.) may be implemented by any quantity of any conventional or other transmitters and receivers (or transceivers) and may communicate via any suitable energy form (e.g., optical, RF or electromagnetic, etc.). The transmitters, receivers and/or transceivers may utilize any suitable communications scheme or protocol. The transmitters, receivers and/or transceivers for communication between the exercise gaming device and gaming system may be configured for use with any suitable ports (e.g., USB, serial, parallel, peripheral, communication, etc.).

The exercise gaming device may utilize any quantity of any suitable power sources (e.g., batteries, wall outlet jack, etc.), and may include any quantity of any conventional or other power switches disposed at any suitable locations to enable or disable power to the exercise gaming device. The user may utilize any body portions (e.g., hands, legs, arms, etc.) individually or in any combinations to apply the force to the effector members.

The gaming system may be implemented by any quantity of any personal or other type of computer or processing system (e.g., IBM-compatible, Apple, Macintosh, laptop, palm pilot, microprocessor, gaming consoles such as the Xbox system from Microsoft Corporation, the PlayStation 2 system from Sony Corporation, the GameCube system or Wii system from Nintendo of America, Inc., etc.). The gaming system may be a dedicated processor or a general purpose computer system (e.g., personal computer, etc.) with any commercially available operating system (e.g., Windows, OS/2, Unix, Linux, etc.) and/or commercially available and/or custom software (e.g., communications software, application software, etc.) and any types of input devices (e.g., keyboard, mouse, microphone, etc.). The gaming system may execute software (e.g., virtual scenario, etc.) stored on a program product apparatus (e.g., hard disk, memory device, CD, DVD or other disks, etc.) including a computer useable or recordable medium or from a network or other connection (e.g., from the Internet or other network).

Any suitable number of any type of conventional or other displays may be connected to exercise gaming device 50 or gaming system 170 to provide any type of information relating to a particular computer session. A display may be located at any suitable location local or remote from the gaming system. The exercise gaming device may be utilized with any suitable sensors or monitors (e.g., heart rate, blood pressure, body temperature, etc.).

It is to be understood that the software of the exercise gaming device and gaming system (e.g., microprocessor, virtual scenario, etc.) may be implemented in any desired computer language, and could be developed by one of ordinary skill in the computer and/or programming arts based on the functional description contained herein and the flowchart illustrated in the drawings. Further, any references herein of software performing various functions generally refer to computer systems or processors performing those functions under software control. The processing of the exercise gaming device may be implemented by any hardware, software and/or processing circuitry, or may be implemented on the gaming system or exercise gaming device as software modules or units and/or hardware modules receiving the sensor and/or input device information or signals. The various functions of the processors (e.g., microprocessor, gaming system, etc.) may be distributed in any manner among any quantity (e.g., one or more) of hardware and/or software modules or units, processors, computer or processing systems or circuitry, where the processors, computer or processing systems or circuitry may be disposed locally or remotely of each other and communicate via any suitable communications medium (e.g., LAN, WAN, Intranet, Internet, hardwire, modem connection, wireless, etc.). The software and/or algorithms described above and illustrated in the drawings may be modified in any manner that accomplishes the functions described herein.

The terms “upward”, “downward”, “top”, “bottom”, “side”, “front”, “rear”, “upper”, “lower”, “vertical”, “horizontal”, “height”, “width”, “length”, “forward, “backward”, “left”, “right” and the like are used herein merely to describe points of reference and do not limit the present invention to any specific orientation or configuration.

Exercise gaming device 50 of the present invention embodiments is not limited to the gaming applications described above, but may be utilized with any processing system, software or application. The exercise gaming device may be utilized for interaction with any type of computer-generated scenario (e.g., providing only video for interaction, providing only audio for interaction, providing video and audio, etc.). The exercise gaming device (e.g., effector members, orientation, etc.) may be utilized for any desired actions within the simulation, gaming or other computer-generated scenarios (e.g., directional, speed or rate control, actuation of events, various motions or actions (e.g., throwing, rolling, swinging a sport or other item (e.g., bat, racquet, etc.), response to prompts, weapon actuation, etc.)). The virtual scenarios may alternatively be implemented in the form of one or more software modules or units for execution by the microprocessor of the exercise gaming device, and may perform the functions of the exercise gaming device and gaming system in substantially the same manner described above (e.g., FIG. 8) to update a displayed virtual environment. The virtual scenarios may be stored on a program product apparatus (e.g., CD, DVD, memory or memory device (e.g., ROM, RAM, etc.), magnetic and/or optical device, etc.) including a computer readable or useable medium accessible by the microprocessor.

From the foregoing description, it will be appreciated that the present invention embodiments make available a novel exercise gaming device and method of interacting with gaming or other scenarios based on physical exercise, wherein an exercise gaming device for a gaming or simulation system enables users to interact with video games or simulations and exercise during game play or simulation interaction.

Having described example embodiments of a new and improved exercise gaming device and method of interacting with gaming or other scenarios based on physical exercise, it is believed that other modifications, variations and changes will be suggested to those skilled in the art in view of the teachings set forth herein. It is therefore to be understood that all such variations, modifications and changes are believed to fall within the scope of the present invention as defined by the appended claims.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US20120258799 *Apr 5, 2012Oct 11, 2012Pierrick JouetDevice to control the movement of a virtual player and a virtual ball in a game application
US20120310971 *Jun 1, 2011Dec 6, 2012Tran Bao QFitness Device
Classifications
U.S. Classification463/36, 482/1
International ClassificationA63F9/24, A63B24/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63B2230/06, A63F2300/1018, A63B21/159, A63F13/06, A63F2300/1043, A63B24/0087, A63B2230/062, A63B2225/50, A63B21/023, A63B2024/0096, A63F2300/69
European ClassificationA63B21/15L, A63B21/02B, A63F13/06, A63B24/00R
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Sep 23, 2009ASAssignment
Owner name: IALABS-CA, LLC, MARYLAND
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:MERRIL, GREG;FELDMAN, PHILIP;REEL/FRAME:023270/0652;SIGNING DATES FROM 20090902 TO 20090908