Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS20100016797 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 12/486,164
Publication dateJan 21, 2010
Filing dateJun 17, 2009
Priority dateJul 17, 2008
Also published asCA2670853A1, EP2145594A2, EP2145594A3, US7914491, US8403892, US20110021876
Publication number12486164, 486164, US 2010/0016797 A1, US 2010/016797 A1, US 20100016797 A1, US 20100016797A1, US 2010016797 A1, US 2010016797A1, US-A1-20100016797, US-A1-2010016797, US2010/0016797A1, US2010/016797A1, US20100016797 A1, US20100016797A1, US2010016797 A1, US2010016797A1
InventorsBrian Rockrohr
Original AssigneeTyco Healthcare Group Lp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Constricting mechanism for use with a surgical access assembly
US 20100016797 A1
Abstract
The present disclosure relates to a surgical access member for establishing percutaneous access to a surgical worksite within tissue. The surgical access member includes a constricting mechanism that is adapted to removably receive a surgical instrument and resiliently transition between an open state and a constricted state. In the open state, insertion of the surgical instrument through the constricting mechanism is substantially uninhibited. In the constricted state, the constricting mechanism substantially limits transverse movement of the surgical instrument, and may facilitate the creation of a substantially fluid-tight seal therewith.
Images(14)
Previous page
Next page
Claims(18)
1. A surgical access device adapted for removable positioning within a percutaneous tissue tract, comprising:
a housing;
a constricting mechanism positioned within the housing and including a proximal member in mechanical cooperation with a distal member to permit relative rotation therebetween such that the constricting mechanism is repositionable between a first state, in which the constricting mechanism is adapted to permit insertion of a surgical instrument, and a second state, in which the constricting mechanism is adapted to engage the surgical instrument to limit transverse movement thereof; and
an access sleeve extending distally from the housing.
2. The surgical access device of claim 1, wherein the constricting mechanism further includes a plurality of rods positioned between the proximal and distal members.
3. The surgical access device of claim 2, wherein the proximal member includes a first plurality of pins extending outwardly therefrom and the distal member includes a second plurality of pins extending outwardly therefrom, the first plurality of pins and the second plurality of pins being configured and dimensioned for engagement with the plurality of rods.
4. The surgical access device of claim 3, wherein the first plurality of pins and the second plurality of pins each correspond in number to the number of rods.
5. The surgical access device of claim 3, wherein each rod includes a bore formed at a first end and a slot formed at a second end.
6. The surgical access device of claim 5, wherein the first plurality of pins and the second plurality of pins each include a stem portion terminating in a head, the head defining a transverse dimension greater than a transverse dimension defined by the stem portion.
7. The surgical access device of claim 6, wherein each bore and each slot defines a substantially identical transverse dimension greater than the transverse dimension defined by the stem portion of each pin but less than the transverse dimension defined by the head of each pin such that the pins are securely engageable with the rods.
8. The surgical access device of claim 7, wherein the plurality of first pins are positioned within the bores of each of the plurality of rods and the plurality of second pins are positioned within the slots of each the plurality of rods such that relative rotation between the proximal and distal members causes the rods to pivot about the plurality of first pins as the plurality of second pins traverse the slots.
9. The surgical access device of claim 8, wherein the plurality of rods are interlaced to define an opening therebetween that extends through the constricting mechanism, the opening defining a first transverse dimension when the constricting mechanism is in the first state and a second, smaller transverse dimension when the constricting mechanism is in the second state.
10. The surgical access device of claim 1, wherein at least one of the first and second members includes a tactile member configured for manual engagement to facilitate relative rotation between the proximal and distal members.
11. The surgical access device of claim 2, wherein each rod includes a scalloped portion configured and dimensioned to engage an outer surface of the surgical instrument.
12. The surgical access device of claim 1, wherein the constricting mechanism further including a biasing member in mechanical cooperation with at least one of the proximal and distal members to normally bias the constricting mechanism into the second state.
13. The surgical access device of claim 1, wherein the constricting mechanism further includes a sleeve connected to the proximal and distal members, the sleeve defining a passageway therethrough configured and dimensioned to receive the surgical instrument.
14. The surgical access device of claim 13, wherein the sleeve is forced into engagement with an outer surface of the surgical instrument as the constricting mechanism is repositioned from the first state into the second state such that a substantially fluid-tight seal is formed between the constricting mechanism and the surgical instrument.
15. The surgical access device of claim 14, wherein the sleeve is formed of a resilient material such that the passageway enlarges as the constricting mechanism is repositioned from the second state into the first state to facilitate removal of the surgical instrument.
16. The surgical access device of claim 1, wherein the constricting mechanism further includes at least one seal member associated with at least one of the proximal member and the distal member, the seal member being adapted to form a substantially fluid tight seal with the surgical instrument upon insertion.
17. A method of establishing percutaneous access to a surgical worksite, comprising the steps of:
providing a surgical access assembly that includes:
a housing;
a constricting mechanism positioned within the housing and including a proximal member in mechanical cooperation with a distal member to permit relative rotation therebetween; and
an access sleeve extending distally from the housing.
positioning the surgical access device within tissue;
inserting the surgical instrument into the surgical access device; and
effectuating relative rotation between the proximal and distal members of the constricting mechanism such that the constricting mechanism engages the surgical instrument to limit transverse movement thereof.
18. A method of manufacturing a constricting mechanism for use with a surgical access device to limit transverse movement of a surgical instrument inserted therethrough, comprising the steps of:
providing a proximal member including a first plurality of pins extending outwardly therefrom;
providing a distal member including a second plurality of pins extending outwardly therefrom;
providing a plurality of rods including structure adapted to receive one of the first plurality of pins and one of the second plurality of pins; and
positioning the rods between the proximal and distal members such that the rods receive one of the first plurality of pins and one of the second plurality of pins to permit relative rotation between the proximal and distal members such that the constricting mechanism is repositionable between a first state, in which the constricting mechanism is adapted to permit insertion of the surgical instrument, and a second state, in which the constricting mechanism is adapted to engage the surgical instrument to limit transverse movement thereof.
Description
CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION

The present application claims the benefit of and priority to U.S. Provisional Application Ser. No. 61/081,483 filed on Jul. 17, 2008, the entire contents of which are incorporated herein by reference.

BACKGROUND

1. Technical Field

The present disclosure relates generally to apparatus and methods for providing percutaneous access to an internal worksite during a surgical procedure. More particularly, the present disclosure relates to a constricting mechanism for use with a surgical access system such, as a trocar or cannula assembly, that is adapted to removably receive a surgical instrument.

2. Background of the Related Art

Minimally invasive surgical procedures are generally performed through small openings in a patient's tissue, as compared to the larger incisions typically required in traditional procedures, in an effort to reduce both patient trauma and recovery time. Access tubes, such as trocars or cannulae, are inserted into the openings in the tissue, and the surgical procedure is carried out by one or more surgical instruments inserted through the lumen which they provide. Generally, such procedures are referred to as “endoscopic”, unless performed on the patient's abdomen, in which case the procedure is referred to as “laparoscopic”.

In laparoscopic procedures, the patient's abdominal region is typically insufflated, i.e., filled with carbon dioxide, nitrogen gas, or the like, to raise the abdominal wall and provide sufficient working space at the surgical worksite. Accordingly, preventing the escape of the insufflation gases is desirable in order to preserve the insufflated surgical worksite. To this end, surgical access systems generally incorporate a seal adapted to maintain the insufflation pressure.

During the course of a minimally invasive surgical procedure, it is often necessary for a clinician to use different surgical instruments which may vary in size, e.g., diameters. Additionally, a clinician will frequently manipulate the surgical instruments transversely, or side-to-side, in an effort to access different regions of the surgical worksite. This transverse movement may cause the seal to deform, thereby allowing the escape of insufflation gas around the instrument.

While many varieties of seals are known in the art, there exists a continuing need for a mechanism capable of addressing these concerns.

SUMMARY

In one aspect of the present disclosure, a surgical access device is disclosed that is adapted for removable positioning within a percutaneous tissue tract. The surgical access device includes a housing, a constricting mechanism positioned within the housing, and an access sleeve that extends distally from the housing.

The constricting mechanism includes a proximal member in mechanical cooperation with a distal member to permit relative rotation therebetween such that the constricting mechanism is repositionable between a first state and a second state. In the first state, the constricting mechanism is adapted to permit insertion of a surgical instrument, and in the second state, the constricting mechanism is adapted to engage the surgical instrument to limit transverse movement thereof.

The proximal member includes a first plurality of pins extending outwardly therefrom and the distal member includes a second plurality of pins extending outwardly therefrom. Each of the first and second pluralities of pins are configured and dimensioned for engagement with a plurality of rods positioned between the proximal and distal members. The first plurality of pins and the second plurality of pins each correspond in number to the number of rods. Each rod includes a bore formed at a first end and a slot formed at a second end, and each of the first and second pluralities of pins includes a stem portion terminating in a head. The head of each pin defines a transverse dimension that is greater than a transverse dimension defined by the stem portion, and each bore and slot defines a substantially identical transverse dimension that is greater than the transverse dimension defined by the stem portion of each pin, but less than the transverse dimension defined by the head of each pin, such that the pins are securely engagable with the rods.

In one embodiment of the constricting mechanism, the plurality of first pins are positioned within the bores of each of the plurality of rods and the plurality of second pins are positioned within the slots of each the plurality of rods such that relative rotation between the proximal and distal members causes the rods to pivot about the plurality of first pins as the plurality of second pins traverse the slots.

The rods may be arranged in an interlaced configuration to define an opening therebetween that extends through the constricting mechanism. When the constricting mechanism is in the first state, the opening defines a first transverse dimension, and when the constricting mechanism is in the second state, the opening defines a second, smaller transverse dimension.

In another embodiment of the constricting mechanism, at least one of the first and second members includes a tactile member that is configured for manual engagement to facilitate relative rotation between the proximal and distal members.

In yet another embodiment of the constricting mechanism, each rod includes a scalloped portion that is configured and dimensioned to engage an outer surface of the surgical instrument.

In still another embodiment, the constricting mechanism further includes a biasing member that is in mechanical cooperation with at least one of the proximal and distal members to normally bias the constricting mechanism into the second state.

Additionally, or alternatively, the constricting mechanism may include a sleeve connected to the proximal and distal members and defining a passageway therethrough that is configured and dimensioned to receive the surgical instrument. The sleeve is forced into engagement with an outer surface of the surgical instrument as the constricting mechanism is repositioned from the first state into the second state such that a substantially fluid-tight seal is formed between the constricting mechanism and the surgical instrument. The sleeve may be formed of a resilient material such that the passageway enlarges as the constricting mechanism is repositioned from the second state into the first state to facilitate removal of the surgical instrument.

In another embodiment, the constricting mechanism may further include at least one seal member associated with at least one of the proximal and distal members and adapted to form a substantially fluid tight seal with the surgical instrument upon insertion.

In an alternate aspect of the present disclosure, a method of establishing percutaneous access to a surgical worksite is disclosed. The method includes the provision of a surgical access assembly having a housing, a constricting mechanism positioned within the housing and including a proximal member in mechanical cooperation with a distal member to permit relative rotation therebetween, and an access sleeve extending distally from the housing. The method further includes the steps of positioning the surgical access device within tissue, inserting the surgical instrument into the surgical access device, and effectuating relative rotation between the proximal and distal members of the constricting mechanism such that the constricting mechanism engages the surgical instrument to limit transverse movement thereof.

In another aspect of the present disclosure, a method of manufacturing a constricting mechanism for use with a surgical access device to limit transverse movement of a surgical instrument inserted therethrough. The method includes the steps of providing a proximal member including a first plurality of pins extending outwardly therefrom, providing a distal member including a second plurality of pins extending outwardly therefrom, providing a plurality of rods including structure adapted to receive one of the first plurality of pins and one of the second plurality of pins, and positioning the rods between the proximal and distal members such that the rods receive one of the first plurality of pins and one of the second plurality of pins to permit relative rotation between the proximal and distal members. Relative rotation between the proximal and distal members repositions the constricting mechanism between a first state, in which the constricting mechanism is adapted to permit insertion of the surgical instrument, and a second state, in which the constricting mechanism is adapted to engage the surgical instrument to limit transverse movement thereof.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

Various embodiments of the present disclosure are described herein below with references to the drawings, wherein:

FIG. 1 is a side, schematic view of a surgical access assembly including one embodiment of a constricting mechanism in accordance with the principles of the present disclosure;

FIG. 2 is a top, plan view of the constricting mechanism seen in FIG. 1 with parts separated;

FIG. 3 is a side, plan view of the constricting mechanism seen in FIG. 1 with parts separated;

FIG. 4 is an enlarged view of the section indicated in FIG. 3;

FIG. 5 is a top, schematic view of the constricting mechanism seen in FIG. 1 shown in an open state prior to the insertion of a surgical instrument;

FIG. 6 is a top, schematic view of the constricting mechanism seen in FIG. 1 shown in a constricted state with a surgical instrument inserted therethrough;

FIG. 7 is a top, schematic view of another embodiment of the constricting mechanism seen in FIG. 1;

FIG. 8 is a top, schematic view of yet another embodiment of the constricting mechanism seen in FIG. 1 including a biasing member and shown in a constricted state;

FIG. 9 is a top, schematic view of the constricting mechanism seen in FIG. 8 shown in an open state;

FIG. 10 is a side, schematic view of still another embodiment of the constricting mechanism seen in FIG. 1 including a tubular sleeve and shown in an open state with a surgical instrument inserted therethrough;

FIG. 11 is a top, schematic view of the constricting mechanism seen in FIG. 10 shown a constricted state;

FIG. 12 is a side, schematic view of one embodiment of the constricting mechanism seen in FIG. 10 including a biasing member and shown a constricted state subsequent to the insertion of a surgical instrument through the tubular sleeve;

FIG. 13 is a side, schematic view of another embodiment of the constricting mechanism seen in FIG. 1 including a seal member;

FIG. 14 is a top view of the constricting mechanism seen in FIG. 13 illustrating the seal member prior to the insertion of a surgical instrument;

FIG. 15 is a top, schematic view of the constricting mechanism seen in FIG. 14 shown in a constricted state and illustrating the seal member with a surgical instrument inserted therethrough; and

FIG. 16 is a side, schematic view of one embodiment of the constricting mechanism seen in FIG. 13 including a biasing member.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

In the drawings and in the description which follows, in which like references numbers identify similar or identical elements, the term “proximal” will refer to the end of an instrument or component that is closest to the clinician during use, while the term “distal” will refer to the end that is furthest from the clinician. Additionally, use of the term “surgical instrument” throughout the present disclosure should be understood to include any surgical instrument that may be employed during the course of a minimally invasive surgical procedure, including but not limited to an obturator, a surgical fastening apparatus, a viewing scope, or the like. Finally, the term “transverse” should be understood as referring to any axis, or movement along any axis, that intersects the longitudinal axis of an instrument or component.

FIG. 1 illustrates a surgical access assembly 1000 having a housing 1002 at a proximal end 1004 thereof and an access sleeve 1006 which extends distally therefrom along a longitudinal axis “A”. The housing 1002 is configured and dimensioned to accommodate a constricting mechanism 100, which will be described in detail below, and may be any structure suitable for this intended purpose. Further information regarding the housing 1002 may be obtained through reference to commonly owned U.S. Pat. No. 7,169,130 to Exline et al., the entire contents of which are incorporated by reference.

The access sleeve 1006 is configured and dimensioned for positioning with a tissue tract 10 formed in a patient's tissue “T”, which can be either pre-existing or created by the clinician through the use of a scalpel, for example. The access sleeve 1006 defines a lumen 1008 and an open distal end 1010 to permit the passage of one or more surgical instruments “I” therethrough to facilitate percutaneous access to a surgical worksite “W” removed from the patient's tissue “T” with the surgical instrument “I”.

Referring now to FIGS. 2-6 as well, one embodiment of the constricting mechanism 100 will be discussed. The constricting mechanism 100 includes a proximal member 102 A and a distal member 102 B in mechanical cooperation such that the respective proximal and distal members 102 A, 102 B are adapted for relative rotation. The proximal and distal members 102 A, 102 B define respective apertures 104 A, 104 B that are configured and dimensioned to accommodate passage of the surgical instrument “I” therethrough. While the respective proximal and distal members 102 A, 102 B are illustrated as substantially annular structures, any suitable configuration may be employed, including polygonal configurations such as triangular, square, or hexagonal. The respective proximal and distal members 102 A, 102 B may be formed of any suitable biocompatible material, including but not being limited to polymeric materials.

To facilitate relative rotation between the proximal and distal members 102 A, 102 B, the proximal and distal members 102 A, 102 B include a plurality of pins 106 A, 106 B, respectively, that are engagable with a plurality of rods 108. The plurality of pins 106 A, 106 B correspond in number to the number of rods 104, and accordingly, in the embodiment seen in FIGS. 1-6, the proximal member 102 A includes three pins 106 A and the distal member 102 B includes three pins 106 B corresponding to a first rod 104 A, a second rod 104 B, and a third rod 104 C. In alternate embodiments, however, the constricting mechanism 100 may include fewer or greater numbers of pins 106 A, 106 B and rods 108.

The pins 106 A depend downwardly from the proximal member 102 A, i.e., towards the distal member 102 B, whereas the pins 106 B depend upwardly from the distal member 102 B, i.e., towards the proximal member 102 A Each of the pins 1-6 A, 106 B includes a stem portion 110 that terminates in a head 112. The stem portion 110 defines a transverse dimension “DS” and the head 112 defines a transverse dimension “DH”. As best seen in FIG. 4, the transverse dimension “DH” defined by the head 112 is greater than the transverse “DS” defined by the stem portion 110.

Each of the plurality of rods 108 A, 108 B, 108 C includes a bore and a slot formed at opposite ends thereof that are configured and dimensioned to receive the pins 106 A, 106 B included on the proximal and distal members 102 A, 102 B, respectively. Specifically, the first rod 108 A includes a bore 114 A at a first end 116 A1 and a slot 118 A at a second end 116 A2, the second rod 108 B includes a bore 114 B at a first end 116 B1 and a slot 118 B at a second end 116 B2, and the third rod 108 C includes a bore 114 C at a first end 116 C1 and a slot 118 C at a second end 116 C2. The bores 114 A, 114 B, 114 C and the slots 118 A, 118 B, 118 C each define a transverse dimension “D” that is greater than the transverse dimension “DS” defined by the stem portion 110 of the pins 106 A, 106 B, but less than the transverse dimension “DH” defined by the head 112, such that the pins 106 A, 106 B can be inserted through the bores 114 A, 114 B, 114 C and the slots 118 A, 118 B, 118 C, respectively, and thereby securely engage the rods 108 A, 108 B, 108 C. In the particular embodiment of the constricting mechanism 100 seen in FIGS. 1-6, the bores 114 A, 114 B, 114 C receive the pins 106 A included on the proximal member 102 A while the slots 118 A, 118 B, 118 C receive the pins 106 B included on the distal member 102 B. In an alternate embodiment, however, the bores 114 A, 114 B, 114 C may receive the pins 106 B included on the distal member 102 B while the slots 118 A, 118 B, 118 C receive the pins 106 A included on the proximal member 102 A.

The slots 118 A, 118 B, 118 C extend along the rods 108 A, 108 B, 108 C to define a length “LS” that is dimensioned to accommodate relative movement between the rods 108 A, 108 B, 108 C and the pins 106 A, 106 B which they receive during manipulation of the constricting mechanism 100, as described in further detail below. Upon assembly of the constricting mechanism 100, the rods 108 A, 108 B, 108 C are interlaced such that an opening 120 is defined therebetween. As seen in FIGS. 5-6, the rods 108 A, 108 B, 108 C are arranged such that the first end 116 A1 of the rod 108 A is positioned on top of the second end 116 B2 of the of the rod 108 B, the second end 116 A2 of the rod 108 A is positioned beneath the first end 116 C, of the rod 108 C, and the first end 116 B1 of the rod 108 B is positioned on top of the second end 116 C2 of the rod 108 C. However, other arrangements of the rods 108 A, 108 B, 108 C in alternate embodiments of the constricting mechanism 100 are also within the scope of the present disclosure.

Referring still to FIGS. 1-6, operation of the constricting mechanism 100 will be described in conjunction with the surgical access system 1000. Initially, i.e., prior to insertion of the surgical instrument “I”, the constricting mechanism 100 is in an open state (FIG. 5) in which the opening 120 I defined between the rods 108 A, 108 B, 108 C is dimensioned to allow the surgical instrument “I” to pass therethrough substantially uninhibited. After insertion of the surgical instrument “I”, the clinician effectuates relative rotation between the proximal and distal members 102 A, 102 B, for example, by rotating the proximal member 102 A relative to the distal member 102 B in the direction of arrow 1. To facilitate rotation of the proximal member 102 A, in one embodiment, the proximal member 102 A includes a tactile member 122 that extends through the housing 1002 of the surgical access system 1000 (FIG. 1) for manual engagement by the clinician.

Relative rotation between the respective proximal and distal members 102 A, 102 B causes the rods 108 A, 108 B, 108 C to pivot about the pins 106 A extending through their respective bores 114 A, 114 B, 114 C. As the rods 108 A, 108 B, 108 C pivot, the pins 106 B outwardly traverse the slots 118 A, 118 B, 118 C through which they extend in the direction indicated by arrow “X. The clinician continues to rotate the proximal member 102 A until the constricting mechanism is transitioned into a constricted state (FIG. 6) in which the rods 108 A, 108 B, 108 C define a narrowed opening 120 C and engage an outer surface 12 of the surgical instrument “I”. The engagement of the rods 108 A, 108 B, 108 C with the surgical instrument “I” substantially limits any transverse movement of the surgical instrument “I” within the constricting mechanism 100, and thus, within the surgical access system 1000 (FIG. 1).

As seen in FIG. 7, in one embodiment, the constricting mechanism 200 may include rods 208 A, 208 B, 208 C having scalloped portions 224 A, 224 B, 224 C, respectively, to increase the surface area of each rod 208 A, 208 B, 208 C that is in contact with the surgical instrument “I” in the constricted state.

Referring again to FIGS. 1-6, to remove the surgical instrument “I” from the constricting mechanism 100, the clinician returns the constricting mechanism 100 to the open state (FIG. 5) by rotating the proximal member 102 A in the direction of arrow 2. As the constricting mechanism 100 transitions from the constricted state to the open state, the rods 108 A, 108 B, 108 C again pivot about the pins 106 A, and the pins 106 B inwardly traverse the slots 118 A, 118 B, 118 C in the direction indicated by arrow “Y”. The clinician continues to rotate the proximal member 102 A until the surgical instrument “I” can be withdrawn from the constricting mechanism 100. Alternatively, however, if the configuration and dimensions of the surgical instrument “I” allow, the clinician can simply withdraw the surgical instrument “I” in the proximal direction while the constricting mechanism 100 is in the constricted state.

Referring now to FIGS. 8-9, in an alternate embodiment, the constricting mechanism 300 may include a biasing member 326, such as a torsion spring or the like, in mechanical cooperation with the respective proximal and distal members 302 A, 302 B. The biasing member 326 applies a biasing force “FB” to the respective proximal and distal members 302 A, 302 B which acts to normally bias the constricting mechanism 300 towards the constricted state (FIG. 8). In this embodiment, as the clinician rotates the proximal member 302 A in the direction of arrow 1, the biasing force “FB” is overcome, and the constricting mechanism 300 transitions from the constricted state to the open state (FIG. 9).

To effectuate such rotation, the clinician can either manually displace the tactile member 322 in the direction of arrow 1, as discussed above with respect to the embodiment seen in FIGS. 1-6, or alternatively, if the configuration and dimensions of the surgical instrument “I” allow, the clinician can simply force the surgical instrument “I” through the opening 320 C defined by the constricting mechanism 300 in the constricted state. As the surgical instrument “I” is forced distally through the opening 320 C, the surgical instrument “I” applies a transverse force “FT” to the rods 308 A, 308 B, 308 C that is directed radially outward. The transverse force “FT” causes the rods 308 A, 308 B, 308 C to pivot about the pins 306 A extending through their respective bores 314 A, 314 B, 314 C. As the rods 308 A, 308 B, 308 C pivot, the pins 306 B inwardly traverse the slots 318 A, 318 B, 318 C in the direction of arrows “Y”, thereby effectuating relative rotation between the respective proximal and distal members 302 A, 302 B and enlarging the opening 320 C.

When the clinician seeks to remove the surgical instrument “I”, the clinician can either return the constricting mechanism 300 to the open state (FIG. 9) by displacing the tactile member 322 in the direction of arrow 1 and effectuating relative rotation between the respective proximal and distal members 302 A, 302 B, or alternatively, the clinician can simply withdraw the surgical instrument “I” from the constricting mechanism 300 in the proximal direction, if the configuration and dimensions of the surgical instrument “I” allow.

In an alternate embodiment, the constricting mechanism may further include a motor and worm gear assembly in mechanical cooperation with the constricting mechanism to regulate the reciprocal transitioning between the open and constricted states thereof. Employing a motor and worn gear assembly may allow the constricting mechanism to check the transverse force applied to the rods by the surgical instrument upon insertion such that the rods will not be spread apart.

Referring now to FIGS. 10-11, an alternate embodiment of the constricting mechanism, referred to generally by reference number 400, will be discussed. The constricting mechanism 400 is substantially similar to the constricting mechanism 100 that was discussed above with respect to FIGS. 1-6, and accordingly, will only be discussed with respect to its differences therefrom.

The constricting mechanism 400 includes a tubular sleeve 428 positioned within the opening 420 defined between the rods 408 A, 408 B, 408 C. The tubular sleeve 428 is connected to the respective proximal and distal members 402 A, 402 B in any suitable manner, including but not limited to integral formation therewith or the use of an adhesive. The tubular sleeve 428 defines a passageway 430 therethrough that is configured and dimensioned to receive the surgical instrument “I”. In the embodiment seen in FIGS. 10-11, the tubular sleeve 428 defines an inwardly tapered configuration to facilitate insertion of the surgical instrument “I” through the passageway 430. The tubular sleeve 428 may be formed of any biocompatible material that is at least semi-resilient in nature, and in one embodiment, may be adapted to close the passageway 430 in the absence of the surgical instrument “I”.

Following insertion of the surgical instrument “I”, the constricting mechanism 400 is transitioned from the open state seen in FIG. 10 to the constricted state seen in FIG. 11. During this transition, the rods 408 A, 408 B, 408 C deform the tubular sleeve 428 inwardly in the direction of arrows “Y”. As the tubular sleeve 428 deforms, the tubular sleeve 428 engages the outer surface 12 of the surgical instrument “I” to form a substantially fluid-tight seal therewith. Accordingly, when in the constricted state, the constricting member 400 serves not only to restrict transverse movement of the surgical instrument “I” inserted therethrough, as described above with respect to the embodiment of FIGS. 1-6, but also to substantially prevent the escape of insufflation gas.

As the constricting mechanism 400 is returned to the open state, the resilient nature of the material comprising the tubular sleeve 428 allows the passageway 430 to re-open, thereby facilitating the removal of the surgical instrument “I” and the insertion of a subsequent instrument, if necessary.

FIG. 12 illustrates an alternate embodiment of the constricting mechanism, referred to generally by the reference umber 500. The constricting mechanism 500 is substantially similar to the constricting mechanism 400 discussed with respect to FIGS. 10-11, but for the incorporation of a biasing member 526, such as a torsion spring or the like. The biasing member 526 is in mechanical cooperation with the respective proximal and distal members 502 A, 502 B. As discussed above with respect to the embodiment of the constricting mechanism 300 seen in FIGS. 8-9, the biasing member 526 acts to normally bias the constricting mechanism 500 towards the constricted state thereof in which the tubular sleeve 528 engages the outer surface 12 of the surgical instrument “I” to form a substantially fluid-tight seal therewith.

With reference now to FIGS. 13-15, another embodiment of the constricting mechanism, referred to generally by reference number 600, will be discussed. The constricting mechanism 600 is substantially similar to the constricting mechanism 100 discussed above with respect to FIGS. 1-6, and accordingly, will only be discussed with respect to its differences therefrom.

The constricting mechanisms 600 includes a seal member 632 defining an aperture 634 therethrough that is adapted to close in the absence of a surgical instrument “I” to substantially prevent the escaped of insufflation gas through the constricting mechanism 600. The seal member 632 may include any structure suitable for this intended purpose, including but not limited to a tricuspid valve 636, as best seen in FIG. 14, or a slit-valve. In the embodiment seen in FIGS. 13-15, the constricting mechanism 600 includes a single seal member 632 that is associated with the proximal member 602 A. However, the seal member 632 may alternatively be associated with the distal member 602 B. Additionally, the present disclosure contemplates an embodiment of the constricting mechanism 600 which includes multiple seal members 632 i.e., first and second seal members, that are respectively associated with the proximal and distal members 602 A, 602 B.

Upon insertion of the surgical instrument “I” into the constricting mechanism 600, the aperture 634 defined by the seal member 632 is enlarged and substantially conforms to the outer surface 12 of the surgical instrument “I” such that a substantially fluid-tight seal is formed therewith. Accordingly, the constricting member 600 seen in FIGS. 13-15 may be employed to not only restrict transverse movement of the surgical instrument “I” upon insertion, as described above with respect to the embodiment seen in FIGS. 1-6, but also to substantially prevent the escape of insufflation gas.

FIG. 16 illustrates an alternate embodiment of the constricting mechanism, referred to generally by reference number 700. The constricting mechanism 700 is substantially similar to the constricting mechanism 600 discussed with respect to FIGS. 13-15, but for the incorporation of a biasing member 726, such as a torsion spring or the like. The biasing member 726 is in mechanical cooperation with the respective proximal and distal members 702 A, 702 B As discussed above with respect to the embodiment seen in FIGS. 8-9, the biasing member 726 acts to normally bias the constricting mechanism 700 towards the constricted state thereof to facilitate the secure engagement of a surgical instrument (not shown) to substantially limit transverse movement thereof.

Although the illustrative embodiments of the present disclosure have been described herein with reference to the accompanying drawings, the above description, disclosure, and figures should not be construed as limiting, but merely as exemplifications of particular embodiments. It is to be understood, therefore, that the disclosure is not limited to the precise embodiments described above. For example, each embodiment of the constricting mechanism discussed herein above has been described as including a proximal member that is rotated relative to a distal member to transition the constricting mechanism between open and constricted states. It should be appreciated, however, that the constricting mechanism may alternatively be caused to transition between the open and constricted states by rotating the distal member relative to the proximal member. Various other changes and modifications may also be implemented by one skilled in the art without departing from the scope or spirit of the present disclosure

Classifications
U.S. Classification604/164.01, 29/428
International ClassificationB23P11/00, A61B17/34
Cooperative ClassificationA61B17/3462, A61B2017/347, A61B17/3421, A61B17/3498
European ClassificationA61B17/34H, A61B17/34V
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Oct 2, 2012ASAssignment
Effective date: 20120928
Owner name: COVIDIEN LP, MASSACHUSETTS
Free format text: CHANGE OF NAME;ASSIGNOR:TYCO HEALTHCARE GROUP LP;REEL/FRAME:029065/0448
Jun 17, 2009ASAssignment
Owner name: TYCO HEALTHCARE GROUP LP,CONNECTICUT
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:ROCKROHR, BRIAN;US-ASSIGNMENT DATABASE UPDATED:20100413;REEL/FRAME:22837/574
Effective date: 20090524
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:ROCKROHR, BRIAN;REEL/FRAME:022837/0574
Owner name: TYCO HEALTHCARE GROUP LP, CONNECTICUT