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Publication numberUS20100028481 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 12/562,416
Publication dateFeb 4, 2010
Filing dateSep 18, 2009
Priority dateOct 3, 2001
Also published asCA2358148A1, CA2462311A1, CA2462311C, CN1596182A, CN100349719C, CN101177033A, CN101177033B, DE60232261D1, EP1436132A1, EP1436132B1, EP2080604A1, EP2080604B1, US6921257, US6971869, US7108503, US7780434, US7891969, US20030086997, US20040265417, US20050106283, US20050214403, US20100310708, WO2003028974A1
Publication number12562416, 562416, US 2010/0028481 A1, US 2010/028481 A1, US 20100028481 A1, US 20100028481A1, US 2010028481 A1, US 2010028481A1, US-A1-20100028481, US-A1-2010028481, US2010/0028481A1, US2010/028481A1, US20100028481 A1, US20100028481A1, US2010028481 A1, US2010028481A1
InventorsGheorge (a.k.a.George Olaru) Olaru
Original AssigneeMold-Masters (2007) Limited
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Nozzle for an Injection Molding Apparatus
US 20100028481 A1
Abstract
A nozzle for an injection molding apparatus is provided. The injection molding apparatus has a mold component that defines a mold cavity and a gate into the mold cavity. The nozzle includes a nozzle body, a heater, a tip, a tip retainer, and a nozzle seal piece. The nozzle body defines a nozzle body melt passage therethrough that is adapted to receive melt from a melt source. The heater is thermally connected to the nozzle body for heating melt in the nozzle body. The tip defines a tip melt passage therethrough that is downstream from the nozzle body melt passage, and that is adapted to be upstream from the gate. The tip retainer is removably connected with respect to the nozzle body. The nozzle seal piece is connected with respect to the nozzle body. The material of nozzle seal piece has a thermal conductivity that is less than at least one of the thermal conductivity of the material of the tip and the thermal conductivity of the material of the tip retainer.
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Claims(25)
1. A nozzle for an injection molding apparatus, the injection molding apparatus having a mold component defining a mold gate and a mold cavity communicating with the mold gate, the nozzle comprising:
a nozzle body, the nozzle body defining a nozzle body melt passage therethrough, wherein the nozzle body melt passage is downstream from and in fluid communication with a melt source, and the nozzle body melt passage is upstream from and in fluid communication with the mold gate into the mold cavity;
a tip defining a tip melt passage therethrough, wherein the tip melt passage is downstream from and in fluid communication with the nozzle body melt passage, and the tip melt passage is adapted to be upstream from and in fluid communication with the mold gate;
a tip retainer that is connected to the nozzle body;
wherein the tip is made from a material which is more wear resistant then the tip retainer; and
a nozzle seal piece located between the mold component and the tip retainer, wherein the material of the nozzle seal piece has a thermal conductivity that is less than the thermal conductivity of the material of the tip retainer.
2. A nozzle as claimed in claim 1, wherein the tip is removably connected to the nozzle body.
3. A nozzle as claimed in claim 1, wherein the tip is made from tungsten carbide.
4. A nozzle as claimed in claim 2, wherein the tip retainer has a tip retainer threaded portion and the nozzle body has a nozzle body threaded portion that is adapted to mate with the tip retainer threaded portion.
5. A nozzle as claimed in claim 1, wherein the tip retainer is made from beryllium copper or beryllium free copper alloy.
6. A nozzle as claimed in claim 1, wherein the tip retainer is made from one of TZM (titanium/zirconium carbide), molybdenum or suitable molybdenum alloys, H13, mold steel, or AerMet 100™.
7. A nozzle as claimed in claim 1, wherein the nozzle seal piece is connected to the tip retainer.
8. A nozzle as claimed in claim 1, wherein the nozzle seal piece is adapted to align the nozzle with respect to the mold gate.
9. A nozzle as claimed in claim 1, wherein the nozzle seal piece is adapted to inhibit leakage of melt from a chamber that is formed between the tip and the mold gate.
10. A nozzle as claimed in claim 1, wherein the nozzle seal piece is made from steel, titanium or ceramic.
11. An injection molding apparatus comprising:
a manifold runner component;
a mold component, the mold component defining a mold cavity and a mold gate into the mold cavity; and
at least one nozzle, the nozzle comprising:
a nozzle body, the nozzle body defining a nozzle body melt passage therethrough, wherein the nozzle body melt passage is downstream from and in fluid communication with a melt source, and the nozzle body melt passage is upstream from and in fluid communication with the mold gate into the mold cavity;
a tip defining a tip melt passage therethrough, wherein the tip melt passage is downstream from and in fluid communication with the nozzle body melt passage, and the tip melt passage is adapted to be upstream from and in fluid communication with the mold gate;
a tip retainer that is connected to the nozzle body and removably retains the tip to the nozzle body;
wherein the tip is separable from the tip retainer and is made from a material which is more wear resistant then the tip retainer; and
a nozzle seal piece located between the mold component and the tip retainer, wherein the material of the nozzle seal piece has a thermal conductivity that is less than the thermal conductivity of the material of the tip retainer;
wherein the manifold runner component defines at least one runner, and the at least one runner is adapted to receive melt from a melt source.
12. An injection molding apparatus as claimed in claim 11, wherein the tip retainer has a tip retainer threaded portion and the nozzle body has a nozzle body threaded portion that is adapted to mate with the tip retainer threaded portion.
13. An injection molding apparatus as claimed in claim 12, wherein the nozzle seal piece forms a seal between the tip retainer and the mold component.
14. An injection molding apparatus as claimed in claim 12, wherein the nozzle seal piece forms a seal between the nozzle body and the mold component.
15. An injection molding apparatus as claimed in claim 12, wherein the nozzle seal piece forms a seal between the tip and the mold component.
16. An injection molding apparatus as claimed in claim 13, wherein the tip is made from tungsten carbide.
17. An injection molding apparatus as claimed in claim 16, wherein the tip retainer is made from beryllium copper or beryllium free copper alloy.
18. An injection molding apparatus as claimed in claim 13, wherein the tip retainer is made from beryllium copper or beryllium free copper alloy.
19. An injection molding apparatus as claimed in claim 13, wherein the nozzle seal piece is connected to the tip retainer.
20. An injection molding apparatus as claimed in claim 13, wherein the tip retainer is made from one of TZM (titanium/zirconium carbide), molybdenum or suitable molybdenum alloys, H13, mold steel, or AerMet 100™.
21. Components for a hot runner nozzle comprising in combination:
a nozzle tip having a melt channel; and
a tip retainer that is designed to removably retain the nozzle tip in the hot runner nozzle;
wherein the nozzle tip is separable from the tip retainer and is made from a material which is more wear resistant then the tip retainer, and the tip retainer has a threaded portion which retains the tip retainer and nozzle tip in the hot runner nozzle.
22. Components for a hot runner nozzle as claimed in claim 21, wherein the tip retainer has a tip retainer threaded portion and the nozzle body has a nozzle body threaded portion that is adapted to mate with the tip retainer threaded portion.
23. Components for a hot runner nozzle as claimed in claim 22, further comprising a nozzle seal piece coupled to an outside surface of the tip retainer, wherein the material of the nozzle seal piece has a thermal conductivity that is less than the thermal conductivity of the material of the tip retainer.
24. Components for a hot runner nozzle as claimed in claim 21, wherein the tip is made from tungsten carbide and the tip retainer is made from beryllium copper or beryllium free copper alloy.
25. Components for a hot runner nozzle as claimed in claim 21, wherein the tip retainer is made from one of TZM (titanium/zirconium carbide), molybdenum or suitable molybdenum alloys, H13, mold steel, or AerMet 100™.
Description
CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application is a continuation of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/925,211 filed Aug. 25, 2004, entitled “Injection Molding Nozzle,” which is a continuation of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/262,982, now U.S. Pat. No. 6,921,257, filed Oct. 3, 2002, entitled “Tip Assembly Having at Least Three Components for Hot Runner Nozzle,” which claims the benefit under 35 U.S.C.§119(e) to U.S. Provisional Application No. 60/356,170, filed Feb. 14, 2002, and U.S. Provisional Application No. 60/346,632, filed Jan. 10, 2002, and U.S. Provisional Application No. 60/330,540, filed Oct. 24, 2001, which are all incorporated by reference herein in their entireties.

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

This invention relates to an injection molding machine, and more particularly to a nozzle tip for a nozzle in an injection molding machine.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

It is known for a nozzle in hot runner injection molding machines to include a thermally conductive body and a thermally conductive tip. Furthermore, it is known for the nozzle to include a separate tip retainer that joins to the nozzle body and retains the tip in the nozzle body. The tip retainer is also typically used to seal between the nozzle and the mold cavity plate to which the nozzle transfers melt. Because the mold cavity plate is usually cooler than the tip, the tip retainer is typically made from a material that is less thermally conductive than the tip itself.

An example of such a nozzle construction is shown in U.S. Pat. No. 5,299,928 (Gellert). By making the tip retainer out of a less thermally conductive material than that of the tip itself, the efficiency of the nozzle to transfer heat from the heater to the melt is reduced, sometimes significantly.

Thus a need exists for new nozzle constructions that have high heat transfer efficiency.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

In a first aspect the invention is directed to a nozzle for an injection molding machine, comprising a nozzle body, a nozzle tip, a tip retainer, and a seal piece. The nozzle body has a body melt passage therethrough. The nozzle tip has a tip melt passage therethrough. The tip is connected to the body so that the tip melt passage is in communication with and downstream from the body melt passage. The tip is made from a thermally conductive and wear resistant material, such as for example Tungsten Carbide. The tip retainer is for retaining the tip on the body. The tip retainer is made from a thermally conductive material, such as for example Be—Cu (Beryllium-Copper), Beryllium-free Copper, TZM (Titanium/Zirconium carbide), Aluminum, Molybdenum or suitable Molybdenum alloys. The seal piece is located adjacent the downstream end of the tip retainer for sealing against melt flow between the tip retainer and a mold cavity plate. The seal piece is made from a relatively less thermally conductive material.

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

For a better understanding of the present invention and to show more clearly how it may be carried into effect, reference will now be made by way of example to the accompanying drawings, showing articles made according to a preferred embodiment of the present invention, in which;

FIG. 1 is a sectional view of a portion of a nozzle in accordance with a first embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a sectional view of a portion of a nozzle in accordance with a second embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 3 is a sectional view of a portion of a nozzle in accordance with a third embodiment of the present invention

FIG. 4 is a sectional view of a portion of a nozzle in accordance with a fourth embodiment of the present invention; and

FIG. 5 is a sectional view of a portion of a nozzle in accordance with a fifth embodiment of the present invention.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT

Reference is made to FIG. 1, which shows a nozzle 10, accordance with a first embodiment of the present invention. Nozzle 10 is for transferring melt from a manifold in a hot runner injection molding machine to a mold cavity 11 in a mold cavity plate 12. Mold cavity cooling channels 13 may optionally be included in mold cavity plate 12. Nozzle 10 has a body 14, a tip 16, a nozzle tip retainer 18 and a nozzle seal piece 19. The body 14 includes a heater 22. Body 14 may also include a thermocouple 26. The body 14 has a melt passage 28 that passes therethrough.

The tip 16 may be removable from the body 14, or alternatively may be fixed to body 14. The tip 16 has a melt passage 30 therethrough that communicates with the body melt passage 28. The melt passage 30 may exit from tip 16 into a chamber 32 that surrounds nozzle tip 16. The chamber 32 ends at a gate 34, which opens into the mold cavity 11.

Melt passes from a melt source, through one or more manifold runners, through the nozzle body melt passage 28, through the tip melt passage 30, through the chamber 32, through the gate 34 and finally into mold cavity 11.

The centre of the gate 34 defines an axis 36, which is generally parallel to the direction of flow of melt through gate 34, into the mold cavity 11.

The exit from the tip melt passage into the chamber 32 is shown at 38. Exit 38 may be positioned off-centre from axis 36, as shown, or alternatively exit 38 may be concentric with respect to axis 36.

Because the melt flows through tip 16, the tip may be used to heat the melt and is therefore preferably made from a thermally conductive material, so that heat from the heater 22 is transferred to the melt flowing through the melt passage 30. Also, however, because of the melt flow through tip 16, the tip 16 is exposed to a highly abrasive environment, and is therefore also preferably made from a wear resistant material. An example of such a material that meets both these criteria is Tungsten Carbide. The applicant's patent U.S. Pat. No. 5,658,604 (Gellert et al.) discloses the construction of a nozzle tip using Tungsten Carbide, and is hereby incorporated by reference.

Because the tip is preferably made from a material such as Tungsten Carbide, it can be relatively difficult to machine a thread on it for removably fastening it to the body 14.

The tip retainer 18 holds the tip 16 in place in the nozzle body 14. The tip retainer 18 may be less wear resistant than the tip 16 because the tip retainer 18 does not have an internal melt passage. Accordingly, the tip retainer 18 may be made from a material which is relatively easily machined with threads 40.

The tip retainer 18 may be separable from the tip 16 or may be integrally joined with the tip 16. The tip retainer 18 may, for example, include a threaded portion 40 for mating with a corresponding threaded portion on the nozzle body 14, as shown. Alternatively the tip retainer 18 may include an internal thread to mate with an external thread on the nozzle body 14. Tip retainer 18 may also include a gripping portion 42, which may be hexagonal for receiving a removal tool, for removing tip retainer 18 from nozzle body 14.

The tip retainer 18 may alternatively be brazed to the tip 16. This way, the tip 16 is more easily removable from the body 14 of the nozzle 10, because the tip 16 is assured of being removed from the body 14 when the tip retainer 18 is removed.

The tip retainer 18 is at least in part, positioned between the melt passage 30 and the heater 22 along a significant portion of the length of the melt passage 30. Thus the tip retainer 18 is preferably made from a thermally conductive material. However, as explained above, the tip retainer 18 is not necessarily made from a wear resistant material. The tip retainer 18 may be made from such materials as Be—Cu (Beryllium-Copper), Beryllium-free Copper, TZM (Titanium/Zirconium carbide), Aluminum, Molybdenum or suitable Molybdenum alloys, H13, mold steel or AerMet 100™.

A portion of the tip retainer 18 is exposed to the melt. As a result, tip retainer 18 has a sealing surface 44, which is the surface that receives the nozzle seal piece 19.

The nozzle seal piece 19 connects to the tip retainer 18 on the sealing surface 44. The nozzle seal piece 19 seals between the tip retainer 18 and the mold cavity plate 12, to inhibit melt leakage out from chamber 32, and may also serve to align the nozzle 10 in the bore 52 of the mold cavity plate 12. The nozzle seal piece 19 has an outer sealing surface 50 that provides a seal with the bore 52 of the mold cavity plate 12. This seal may be any suitable kind of seal, such as a mechanical seal. Outer surface 50 may optionally also serve as an alignment means for aligning nozzle 10 into the bore 52 of the mold cavity plate 12. The nozzle seal piece 19 is not positioned between the melt passage 30 and the heater 22, but is rather positioned between the melt passage and the mold cavity plate 12, which is typically cooler than the nozzle tip 16. Thus, the nozzle seal piece 19 is preferably made from a material that is comparatively less thermally conductive than the material of the nozzle tip 16, and that is generally equal to or less thermally conductive than the material of the tip retainer 18. For example, the nozzle seal piece 19 may be made from titanium, H13, stainless steel, mold steel or chrome steel. As another alternative, it may be made from ceramic. Other suitable materials for the seal piece 19 are disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 5,879,727 (Puri), which is hereby incorporated by reference. Puri discloses such materials for use as an insulative layer for a nozzle.

The seal piece 19 may be a separate piece that is mechanically joined to tip retainer 18 by a suitable joint, such as an interference fit, as shown. Alternatively, the seal piece 19 may be made by spraying a coating onto the tip retainer 18, and then machining the coating down as required, to a suitable dimension for mating and sealing appropriately with mold cavity plate 12. U.S. Pat. No. 5,569,475 (Adas et al.) discloses the method of spraying on an insulating layer onto a portion of a nozzle, and is hereby incorporated by reference.

Reference is made to FIG. 2, which shows a nozzle 100 in accordance with a second embodiment of the present invention that includes a tip 102. Tip 102 differs from tip 16 in that tip 102 has a melt passage 104 with an exit 106 that is concentric about the axis 36 of the gate 34.

Thus, a nozzle in accordance with the present invention may have a tip that inserts into the gate 34 and has an off-centre melt passage exit, or alternatively has a tip that has a concentric melt passage exit.

Reference is made to FIG. 3, which shows a nozzle 200 in accordance with a third embodiment of the present invention. Nozzle 200 is similar to nozzle 100, but includes a two-piece tip 202, instead of tip 102. Tip 202 includes an inner piece 204 and an outer piece 206. The inner piece 204 contains the melt passage 102 therethrough. Inner piece 204 may be made from a wear resistant material, and from a thermally conductive material. For example, inner piece 204 may be made from a material such as Tungsten Carbide. Outer piece 206 may be made from thermally conductive material, but is not required to be made from a material that is as wear resistant as the inner piece 206. For example, the outer piece 206 may be made from a material, such as Be—Cu (Beryllium-Copper), or Beryllium-free Copper or TZM (Titanium/Zirconium carbide). The nozzle 200 also includes body 14, retainer 18 and seal piece 19.

Reference is made to FIG. 4, which shows a nozzle 300 in accordance with a fourth embodiment of the present invention. Nozzle 300 is similar to nozzle 10, except that nozzle 300 is configured to receive a thermocouple 302, within the nozzle tip 304, to get a more accurate temperature for the melt flowing therethrough. Nozzle tip 302 includes an aperture 306 for receiving the sensing portion 308 of thermocouple 302. Aperture 306 may be, for example, a hole sized to snugly receive thermocouple 302, to facilitate heat conduction from the tip 302 to the sensing portion 308. Nozzle retainer 310 includes pass-through 312, which may be, for example, a slotted hole, to permit the passage of the thermocouple 302 into the aperture 306.

Nozzle 300 includes seal piece 19 which mounts to retainer 310 in the same way it mounts to retainer 18.

Reference is made to FIG. 5, which shows a nozzle 400 in accordance with a fifth embodiment of the present invention. Nozzle 400 is similar to nozzle 10, except that nozzle 400 includes a tip 402 that is wear resistant, particularly at the end 404. End 404 is subject to increased wear from the melt flow for several reasons. The available cross-sectional area through which the melt can flow (i.e., the gate area minus the area of end 404) is relatively small and as a result the melt flow velocity through the gate area is relatively high. The higher melt flow velocity increases the wear on the end 404. Furthermore, the end 404 has a relatively high surface-to-volume ratio, relative to other portions of the tip 402 that are exposed to the melt flow, and is therefore, particularly susceptible to wear from the melt flow.

Tip 402 includes an end 404 that is mode from a wear resistant and thermally conductive material, such as tungsten carbide. The rest of the tip 402 may be made from a less wear resistant material, thermally conductive, such as Be—Cu. By making the tip 402 with the compound construction described above, it is wear resistant in the place where it is needed most, and may be less wear resistant where it is needed less.

Retainer 18 and seal piece 19 cooperate with tip 402 in a manner similar to how they cooperate with tip 16.

While the above description constitutes the preferred embodiments, it will be appreciated that the present invention is susceptible to modification and change without departing from the fair meaning of the accompanying claims.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US8562335 *Jul 13, 2010Oct 22, 2013Airbus Operations S.A.S.Injection interface device
US20120171321 *Jul 13, 2010Jul 5, 2012AIRBUS OPERATIONS (inc as a Societe par Act Simpl)injection interface device
Classifications
U.S. Classification425/549, 425/564, 425/569
International ClassificationB29C45/27, B29C45/74, B29C45/20, B29C45/72, B29C47/12, B29C45/23
Cooperative ClassificationB29C45/278, B29C2045/2761
European ClassificationB29C45/27T
Legal Events
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Jan 23, 2014FPAYFee payment
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