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Publication numberUS20100057085 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 12/203,330
Publication dateMar 4, 2010
Filing dateSep 3, 2008
Priority dateSep 3, 2008
Also published asEP2361048A2, US8409200, WO2010027895A2, WO2010027895A3
Publication number12203330, 203330, US 2010/0057085 A1, US 2010/057085 A1, US 20100057085 A1, US 20100057085A1, US 2010057085 A1, US 2010057085A1, US-A1-20100057085, US-A1-2010057085, US2010/0057085A1, US2010/057085A1, US20100057085 A1, US20100057085A1, US2010057085 A1, US2010057085A1
InventorsMatthew D. Holcomb, James T. Spivey, Omar J. Vakharia, Frederick Q. Johnson, Surag S. Mantri, Hoang V. Nguyen, Steven P. Woodard
Original AssigneeEthicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Surgical grasping device
US 20100057085 A1
Abstract
A surgical device comprising a clevis defining a longitudinal axis and a jaw comprising a first member and a second member. A slider is slidably engaged to the clevis, the slider comprising a pin. The pin is receiveably engaged in the first slot and the jaw is selectively moveable between a first position and a second position through longitudinal movement of the slider. In various embodiments, the first and second members are movable between an angular open position, a parallel open position, and a parallel closed position.
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Claims(35)
1. A surgical device comprising:
a clevis defining a longitudinal axis;
a jaw comprising a first member and a second member, the first member defining a first slot; and
a slider slidably engaged to the clevis, the slider comprising a pin, wherein the pin is receiveably engaged in the first slot and the jaw is selectively moveable between a first position and a second position through longitudinal movement of the slider, wherein the surgical device is dimensioned to be inserted through a working channel of an endoscope.
2. The surgical device of claim 1, wherein the second member defines a second slot, the pin receiveably engaged in the second slot.
3. The surgical device of claim 1, wherein the slider has a second pin.
4. The surgical device of claim 3, wherein the second member defines a second slot, the second pin receivably engaged in the second slot.
5. The surgical device of claim 1, wherein the jaw comprises a cutting element.
6. The surgical device of claim 2, wherein the first slot and the second slot are linear.
7. The surgical device of claim 2, wherein the first slot and second slot are non-linear.
8. The surgical device of claim 2, wherein a driveline is coupled to the slider.
9. The surgical device of claim 8, comprising:
a handle portion to receive a proximal end of the driveline;
a trigger operatively coupled to the driveline;
wherein the trigger is pivotally moveable in a first rotational direction to move the driveline in the first direction to open the jaw; and
wherein the trigger is pivotally moved in a second rotational direction to move the driveline in the second direction to close the jaw.
10. A surgical device comprising:
a clevis defining a longitudinal axis;
a jaw comprising a first member and a second member, the first member defining a first slot and the second member defining a second slot; and
a slider slidably engaged to the clevis, the slider comprising a pin, wherein the pin is receiveably engaged in the first slot and the second slot and wherein the jaw is selectively moveable between a first position and a second position through longitudinal movement of the slider, wherein the surgical device is dimensioned to be inserted through a working channel of an endoscope.
11. The surgical device of claim 10, comprising:
a driveline coupled to the slider;
a handle portion to receive a proximal end of the driveline;
a trigger operatively coupled to the driveline; and
wherein the trigger is pivotally moveable in a first rotational direction to move the driveline in the first direction to open the jaw; and is pivotally moved in a second rotational direction to move the driveline in the second direction to close the jaw.
12. The surgical device of claim 11, wherein the slider is moved in a direction toward the distal end of the surgical device to open the jaw and the slider is moved in a direction toward the proximal end of the surgical device to close the jaw.
13. The surgical device of claim 12, wherein the first slot is non-linear.
14. The surgical device of claim 13, wherein the second slot is non-linear.
15. A surgical device comprising:
a clevis defining a longitudinal axis;
a jaw comprising a first member and a second member, the first member defining a first slot;
a slider slidably engaged to the clevis, the slider comprising a pin;
a driveline coupled to the slider, wherein the pin is receiveably engaged in the first slot and the jaw is selectively moveable between a first position and a second position through longitudinal movement of the driveline;
a handle portion to receive a proximal end of the driveline;
a trigger operatively coupled to the driveline;
wherein the trigger is pivotally moveable in a first rotational direction to move the driveline in the first direction to open the jaw; and
wherein the trigger is pivotally moved in a second rotational direction to move the driveline in the second direction to close the jaw.
16. The surgical device of claim 15, wherein the second member defines a second slot, the pin receiveably engaged in the second slot.
17. The surgical device of claim 16, wherein first and second electrode portions are coupled to the first member and a second member, and wherein the first and second electrode portions are adapted to receive an electrical waveform.
18. The surgical device of claim 17, wherein an electrical waveform generator is coupled to the first and second electrode portions and the first and second electrode portions are adapted to receive an electrical waveform.
19. The surgical device of claim 18, wherein the first slot is non-linear.
20. The surgical device of claim 19, wherein the second slot is non-linear.
21. A surgical instrument, comprising:
a housing, the housing dimensioned to be inserted through a working channel of an endoscope; and
a jaw comprising a first member, a second member, and an electrode, the jaw pivotally connected to the housing, wherein the jaw is selectively movable between a first position, a second position, and a third position, wherein the first member and second member are substantially parallel in the first position and substantially parallel in the second position, and wherein the first member and second member are configured in an angular relation in the third position.
22. The surgical instrument of claim 21, wherein the housing further comprises a plurality of slots.
23. The surgical instrument of claim 22, wherein the first jaw comprises a first pivot pin and a second pivot pin and wherein the second jaw comprises a first pivot pin and second pivot pin.
24. The surgical instrument of claim 23, wherein the housing comprises a first slot, a second slot, a third slot, and a fourth slot.
25. The surgical instrument of claim 24, wherein a portion of the first slot is parallel to a portion of the second slot and wherein a portion of the third slot is parallel to a portion of the fourth slot.
26. The surgical instrument of claim 25, wherein the first pin is received by the first slot, the second pin is received by the second slot, the third pin is received by the third slot, and the fourth pin is received by the fourth slot.
27. The surgical instrument of claim 26, further comprising an actuator, wherein the first member and the second member are operably engaged with the actuator such that, when the actuator is moved relative to the housing, the first jaw member and the second jaw member are moved between the first, second, and third positions.
28. The surgical instrument of claim 27, wherein the jaw further comprises a second electrode.
29. The surgical instrument of claim 28, further comprising a switch, wherein the switch is selectively operable to place at least one of the first electrode and the electrode conductor in electrical communication with an electric current source.
30. The surgical instrument of claim 21, wherein the first position is a closed position, and wherein the third position is an open position.
31. The surgical instrument of claim 29, wherein the first slot has a curved portion and the third slot has a curved portion.
32. The surgical instrument of claim 31, wherein the first jaw and the second jaw are in the third position when the first pin is located in the curved portion of the first slot and the third pin is in the curved portion of the third slot.
33. A surgical instrument, comprising:
a hand piece;
a shaft;
a housing dimensioned to be inserted through a working channel of an endoscope; and
a grasping device, comprising:
a first jaw including a first electrode;
a second jaw including a second electrode, wherein the second jaw is selectively movable between an angular open position, a parallel open position, and a parallel closed position.
34. The surgical instrument of claim 33, further comprising an actuator, wherein the grasping device further comprises a pivot pin, wherein the first jaw member and the second jaw member are pivotably connected to the housing by the pivot pin, and wherein the first jaw member and the second jaw member are operably engaged with the actuator such that, when the actuator is moved relative to the shaft, the first jaw member and the second jaw member are pivoted between the angular open position, the parallel open position, and the parallel closed position;
35. The surgical instrument of claim 34, wherein the shaft is a flexible shaft.
Description
BACKGROUND

In laparoscopic surgical procedures, a small incision is made in the body and an elongate shaft of a surgical device is inserted through the incision to position a distal end of the shaft at a surgical site. In endoscopic procedures, the elongate shaft of a surgical device is inserted through a natural orifice, such as the mouth or anus, and is advanced along a pathway to position a distal end of the device at a surgical site. Endoscopic procedures typically require the use of a flexible shaft to accommodate the tortuous pathway of the body lumen, whereas rigid shafts can be used in laparoscopic procedures. These tools can be used to engage and/or treat tissue in a number of ways to achieve a diagnostic or therapeutic effect.

Often during laparoscopic and endoscopic procedures, a surgeon must grasp, ablate, manipulate, dissect, or clamp soft tissue. Such actions may be performed using a plier-like tool, such as a hemostat or forceps. In some circumstances, the working end of the tool includes a first electrode and a second electrode, where one of the electrodes is brought into close opposition to the other electrode, thereby allowing an electrical current to pass between the two conductive elements. When soft tissue is captured between the two electrodes, the flowing current can cauterize, vaporize, and/or otherwise treat the soft tissue. Previous bipolar forceps, referring to U.S. Pat. No. 5,944,718, the entire disclosure of which is hereby incorporated be reference herein, have included a first electrode which can be angularly pivoted relative to a stationary second electrode. These forceps have further included a first wire attached to the first electrode where the first wire is configured to supply current to the first electrode from an electrical source. In addition, these forceps have included a second wire which is attached to the second electrode where the second wire is configured to complete the electrical circuit and return the current back to the electrical source. In some circumstances the working end of the tool includes a cutting end with a first blade member and second blade member to allow for the cutting, severing, or dissection of soft tissue. In some circumstances the working end of the tool includes a plurality of teeth to assist in the gripping of tissue.

Generally, these laparoscopic and endoscopic devices require a linkage associated with the working end of the devices which allows for user-controlled operation. The linkage allows the user to move the jaws of the working end between an open position and a closed position. An open position is when the jaws are disposed in spaced relation to one another and a closed position is wherein the jaw members cooperate to grasp tissue therebetween. These linkages used to control the movement of the jaws can often be complex requiring a multitude of small components. Additionally, in some circumstances, such linkages may not provide the desired clamping force or opening force during surgical procedures.

Accordingly, there remains a need for improved methods and devices for controlling actuation of a working end of a surgical device.

FIGURES

The novel features of the various embodiments are set forth with particularity in the appended claims. The various embodiments, however, both as to organization and methods of operation may best be understood by reference to the following description, taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings as follows.

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of one embodiment of a surgical grasping device.

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of one embodiment of a system comprising the surgical grasping device shown in FIG. 1.

FIG. 2A illustrates an embodiment with a surgical grasping device protruding from the working channel of an endoscope.

FIG. 3 illustrates one embodiment of a bottom jaw of the surgical grasping device shown in FIG. 1.

FIG. 4 illustrates one embodiment of a top jaw of the surgical grasping device shown in FIG. 1.

FIG. 5 illustrates one embodiment of a slider of the surgical grasping device shown in FIG. 1.

FIG. 6 is a side view of one embodiment of the surgical grasping device shown in FIG. 1.

FIG. 6 a is a cross-sectional view of one embodiment of the surgical grasping device shown in FIG. 6 taken along the longitudinal axis.

FIG. 7 is a side view of one embodiment of the surgical grasping device shown in FIG. 1 during actuation.

FIG. 7 a is a cross-sectional view of one embodiment of the surgical grasping device shown in FIG. 7 taken along the longitudinal axis.

FIG. 8 is a side view of one embodiment of the surgical grasping device shown in FIG. 1 during actuation.

FIG. 8 a is a cross-sectional view of one embodiment of the surgical grasping device shown in FIG. 8 taken along the longitudinal axis.

FIG. 9 is a perspective view of one embodiment of a surgical grasping device.

FIG. 10 is a perspective view of one embodiment of a surgical grasping device.

FIG. 11 is a perspective view of a system comprising the surgical grasping device shown in FIG. 10.

FIG. 12 illustrates one embodiment of a bottom jaw of the surgical grasping device shown in FIG. 10.

FIG. 13 illustrates one embodiment of a top jaw of the surgical grasping device shown in FIG. 10.

FIG. 14 illustrates one embodiment of a slider of the surgical grasping device shown in FIG. 10.

FIG. 15 is a side view of one embodiment of the surgical grasping device shown in FIG. 10.

FIG. 15 a is a cross-sectional view of one embodiment of the surgical grasping device shown in FIG. 15 taken along the longitudinal axis.

FIG. 16 is a side view of one embodiment of the surgical grasping device shown in FIG. 9 during actuation.

FIG. 16 a is a cross-sectional view of one embodiment of the surgical grasping device shown in FIG. 16 taken along the longitudinal axis.

FIG. 17 is a side view of one embodiment of the surgical grasping device shown in FIG. 9 during actuation.

FIG. 17 a is a cross-sectional view of one embodiment of the surgical grasping device shown in FIG. 17 taken along the longitudinal axis.

FIG. 18 is a perspective view of one embodiment of a surgical grasping device.

FIG. 19 is a perspective view of one embodiment of a system comprising the surgical grasping device shown in FIG. 18.

FIG. 20 illustrates one embodiment of a bottom jaw of the surgical grasping device shown in FIG. 18.

FIG. 21 illustrates one embodiment of a top jaw of the surgical grasping device shown in FIG. 18.

FIG. 22 illustrates one embodiment of a slider of the surgical grasping device shown in FIG. 18.

FIG. 23 is a side view of one embodiment of the surgical grasping device shown in FIG. 18.

FIG. 23 a is a cross-sectional perspective view of one embodiment of the surgical grasping device shown in FIG. 23 taken along the longitudinal axis.

FIG. 24 is a side view of one embodiment of the surgical grasping device shown in FIG. 18 during actuation.

FIG. 24 a is a cross-sectional perspective view of one embodiment of the surgical grasping device shown in FIG. 24 taken along the longitudinal axis.

FIG. 25 is a side view of one embodiment of the surgical grasping device shown in FIG. 18 during actuation.

FIG. 25 a is a cross-sectional perspective view of one embodiment of the surgical grasping device shown in FIG. 25 taken along the longitudinal axis.

FIGS. 26 a-b are perspective views of one embodiment of a surgical grasping device.

FIGS. 27 a-b illustrate one embodiment of a bottom jaw of the surgical grasping device shown in FIGS. 26 a-b.

FIGS. 28 a-b illustrate one embodiment of a bottom jaw of the surgical grasping device shown in FIGS. 26 a-b.

FIGS. 29 a-b illustrate one embodiment of a slider of the surgical grasping device shown in FIGS. 26 a-b.

FIGS. 30 a-c illustrate one embodiment of a linkage of the surgical grasping device shown in FIGS. 26 a-b.

FIGS. 31 a-b illustrate one embodiment of a clevis of the surgical grasping device shown in FIGS. 26 a-b.

FIGS. 32 a-b illustrate one embodiment of a slot configuration on the clevis shown in FIGS. 31 a-b.

FIG. 33 is a side view of one embodiment of the surgical grasping device shown in FIGS. 26 a-b.

FIG. 33 a is a cross-sectional view of one embodiment of the surgical grasping device shown in FIG. 33 taken along the longitudinal axis.

FIG. 34 is a side view of one embodiment of the surgical grasping device shown in FIGS. 26 a-b.

FIG. 34 a is a cross-sectional view of one embodiment of the surgical grasping device shown in FIG. 34 taken along the longitudinal axis.

FIG. 35 is a side view of one embodiment of the surgical grasping device shown in FIGS. 26 a-b.

FIG. 35 a is a cross-sectional view of one embodiment of the surgical grasping device shown in FIG. 35 taken along the longitudinal axis.

FIG. 36 is a side view of one embodiment of the surgical grasping device shown in FIGS. 26 a-b.

FIG. 36 a is a cross-sectional view of one embodiment of the surgical grasping device shown in FIG. 36 taken along the longitudinal axis.

FIG. 37 is a side view of one embodiment of the surgical grasping device shown in FIGS. 26 a-b.

FIG. 37 a is a cross-sectional view of one embodiment of the surgical grasping device shown in FIG. 37 taken along the longitudinal axis.

FIG. 38 illustrates an isometric view of the surgical device shown in FIGS. 26 a-b ablating tissue.

FIG. 39 illustrates an isometric view of the surgical device shown in FIGS. 26 a-b ablating tissue.

FIG. 40 illustrates an isometric view of the surgical device shown in FIGS. 26 a-b ablating tissue.

DESCRIPTION

The various embodiments described herein are directed to actuating surgical devices, including cutting devices, grasping devices and electrical therapy ablation devices. The electrical therapy ablation devices comprise electrodes that can be positioned in or in proximity to a tissue treatment region (e.g., target site) within a patient endoscopically, transcutaneously (percutaneously), or laparoscopically and, in some embodiments, any combination thereof. In at least one form of the invention, a bipolar forceps can include two or more electrodes wherein the electrodes can be positioned against, or adjacent to, a vessel, such as a blood vessel, for example, and energy can be supplied to the electrodes. In various circumstances, the energy can be sufficient to at least substantially seal the vessel such that blood does not substantially flow therethrough. In at least one surgical technique, the bipolar forceps can be used to seal the vessel in two locations such that the vessel can be incised, or transected, at a location positioned intermediate the two seal locations. In at least one embodiment, the bipolar forceps can include a cutting element which can be configured to incise the vessel. In various embodiments, the cutting element can include a sharp edge which can be moved relative to the vessel. In at least one embodiment, the cutting element can be electrically connected to a source of energy wherein the energized cutting element can be configured to incise the tissue.

In at least one form of the invention, a bipolar forceps can include first and second electrodes positioned within first and second jaw members, respectively, wherein at least one of the jaw members can include a substantially tapered profile. In various surgical techniques, the jaw members can be positioned in a substantially closed position such that the distal end of the jaw members can be positioned intermediate a vessel, for example, and tissue at least partially surrounding the vessel. Thereafter, in at least one surgical technique, the jaw members can be opened in order to pull the vessel away from the soft tissue. In various techniques, the jaw members can be opened and closed repeatedly to enlarge a hole between the vessel and the tissue and/or otherwise separate the vessel from the tissue. In at least one embodiment, at least one of the jaw members can include ridges, teeth, and/or a textured outer surface configured to grip the soft tissue and/or vessel.

Once positioned, the electrical therapy electrodes are adapted to deliver energy, for example in the form of electrical current, to the treatment region. The electrical current may be generated by a control unit or generator located external to the patient. The electrical current may be characterized by a particular waveform in terms of frequency, amplitude, polarity, and pulse width. Depending on the diagnostic or therapeutic treatment rendered, the surgical device may comprise one electrode containing both a cathode and an anode or may contain a plurality of electrodes with at least one serving as a cathode and at least one serving as an anode. Depending on the diagnostic or therapeutic treatment rendered, the diseased tissue can be electrically ablated or destroyed. More particularly, the electrical therapy ablation devices may be employed to deliver sufficient energy to the diseased tissue to ablate or destroy tumors, masses, lesions, and other abnormal tissue growths. In at least one embodiment, the electrical therapy ablation devices and techniques described herein may be employed in the treatment of cancer by quickly creating necrosis and destroying live cancerous tissue in-vivo. Such devices and techniques are further described in a commonly-owned, co-pending U.S. patent application Ser. No. 11/897,676, entitled ELECTRICAL ABLATION SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS, Attorney Docket No. END6182USNP/070301, filed on Aug. 31, 2007, the entire disclosure of which is hereby incorporated by reference herein.

Electrical therapy ablation may employ electroporation or electropermeabilization techniques where an externally applied electric field (electric potential) significantly increases the electrical conductivity and permeability of a cell plasma membrane. Electroporation is the generation of a destabilizing electric potential across such biological membranes. In electroporation, pores are formed when the voltage across the cell plasma membrane exceeds its dielectric strength. Electroporation destabilizing electric potentials are generally in the range of several hundred volts across a distance of several millimeters. Below certain magnitude thresholds, the electric potentials may be applied across a biological membrane as a way of introducing some substance into a cell, such as loading it with a molecular probe, a drug that can change the function of the cell, a piece of coding DNA, or increasing the uptake of drugs in cells. If the strength of the applied electrical field and/or the duration of exposure to it are suitably chosen, the pores formed by the electrical pulse reseal after a short period of time, during which period extracellular compounds may enter into the cell. Below a certain field threshold, the process is reversible and the potential does not permanently damage the cell membrane. This process may be referred to as reversible electroporation (RE).

On the other hand, excessive exposure of live cells to large electric fields can cause apoptosis and/or necrosis—the processes that result in cell death. Excessive exposure of live cells to large excessive electrical fields or potentials across the cell membranes causes the cells to die and therefore may be referred to as irreversible electroporation (IRE).

Electroporation may be performed with devices called electroporators. These appliances create the electric current and send it through the cell. Electroporators may comprise two or more metallic (e.g., aluminum) electrically conductive electrodes connected to an energy source. The energy source generates an electric field having a suitable characteristic waveform output in terms of frequency, amplitude, polarity, and pulse width.

Endoscopy refers to looking inside the human body for medical reasons. Endoscopy may be performed using an instrument called an endoscope. Endoscopy is a minimally invasive diagnostic medical procedure used to evaluate the interior surfaces of an organ by inserting a small tube into the body, often, but not necessarily, through a natural body opening or through a relatively small incision. Through the endoscope, an operator may observe surface conditions of the organs, including abnormal or diseased tissue such as lesions and other surface conditions. The endoscope may have a rigid or a flexible tube and in addition to providing an image for visual inspection and photography, the endoscope may be adapted and configured for taking biopsies, retrieving foreign objects, and introducing medical instruments to a tissue treatment region referred to as the target site. Endoscopy is a vehicle for minimally invasive surgery.

Laparoscopic surgery is a minimally invasive surgical technique in which operations in the abdomen are performed through small incisions (usually 0.5-1.5 cm), keyholes, as compared to larger incisions needed in traditional surgical procedures. Laparoscopic surgery includes operations within the abdominal or pelvic cavities, whereas keyhole surgery performed on the thoracic or chest cavity is called thoracoscopic surgery. Laparoscopic and thoracoscopic surgery belong to the broader field of endoscopy.

A key element in laparoscopic surgery is the use of a laparoscope: a telescopic rod lens system that is usually connected to a video camera (single-chip or three-chip). Also attached is a fiber-optic cable system connected to a “cold” light source (halogen or xenon) to illuminate the operative field, inserted through a 5 mm or 10 mm cannula to view the operative field. The abdomen is usually insufflated with carbon dioxide gas to create a working and viewing space. The abdomen is essentially blown up like a balloon (insufflated), elevating the abdominal wall above the internal organs like a dome. Carbon dioxide gas is used because it is common to the human body and can be removed by the respiratory system if it is absorbed through tissue.

The embodiments of the actuating cutting, dissecting, and electrical therapy ablation devices and techniques described herein may be employed to treat diseased tissue, tissue masses, tissue tumors, and lesions (diseased tissue) at a tissue treatment region (target site) within the body. Minimally invasive therapeutic procedures to treat diseased tissue by introducing medical instruments to a tissue treatment region through a natural opening of the patient are known as Natural Orifice Translumenal Endoscopic Surgery (NOTES)™.

FIG. 1 illustrates one embodiment of a surgical device 10. Surgical device 10 may be employed to treat diseased tissue such as tumors and lesions inside a patient with electrical energy or otherwise dissect, cut, or manipulate tissue. Surgical device 10 may be used to treat the desired tissue treatment region in minimally invasive, open, or noninvasive surgical procedures. Minimally invasive surgical procedures include, for example, endoscopic, laparoscopic, thoracoscopic, or other surgical procedures that require small incisions or keyholes. Surgical device 10 also may be used in traditional open laparotomy procedures as well as external noninvasive procedures to treat diseased tissue outside the body. In one embodiment, surgical device 10 may be configured to be positioned within a natural opening of the patient such as the mouth, anus, vagina, or colon and subsequently advanced and positioned within internal body lumens such as the esophagus and/or uterus to reach the tissue treatment region or target site. Internal organs may be reached using trans-organ or trans-luminal surgical procedures. Surgical device 10 also may be configured to be positioned through a small incision or keyhole on the patient and can be passed through the incision to reach a tissue treatment region or target site through a trocar. The tissue treatment region may be located in various body lumens or organs such as the esophagus, stomach, colon, liver, breast, brain, lung, and other organs or locations within the body. Surgical device 10 can be configured to treat a number of lesions and ostepathologies comprising metastatic lesions, tumors, fractures, infected sites, inflamed sites, and the like. Once positioned in the tissue treatment region, surgical device 10 can be configured to treat and ablate the diseased tissue in that region. In one embodiment, surgical device 10 may be adapted to treat diseased tissue, such as cancers, of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, esophagus, or lung that may be accessed orally. In another embodiment, surgical device 10 may be adapted to treat diseased tissue, such as cancers, of the liver or other organs that may be accessible trans-anally through the colon and/or the abdomen via well-known procedures.

In one embodiment, surgical device 10 may be employed in conjunction with a flexible endoscope, such as the GIF-100 model available from Olympus Corporation. The flexible endoscope may be introduced into the patient trans-anally through the colon, orally through the esophagus, vaginally through the uterus, or the abdomen via an incision or keyhole and a trocar, for example. The endoscope assists the surgeon to guide and position the surgical device 10 near the tissue treatment region to treat diseased tissue in various body lumens and organs such as the esophagus, stomach, colon, liver, breast, brain, lung, and other internal tissue treatment regions.

FIG. 1 shows a perspective view of one embodiment of a surgical device 10. Surgical device 10 generally comprises a top jaw 18, a bottom jaw 20, a clevis 26 and a slider 24. In various embodiments, top jaw 18 may house a top electrode 22 and bottom jaw 20 may house a bottom electrode 28. A coupling 30 allows for the attachment of clevis 26 to a shaft 16. In various embodiments coupling 30 may be optionally configured to allow the surgical device 10 to rotate relative to and about a longitudinal axis “A”, thus allowing surgical device 10 to be positioned in multiple angular orientations. Some embodiments may have multiple couplings 30. Optionally, surgical device 10 may, for example, be attached to a laparoscopic and endoscopic instrument. Accordingly, in various embodiments, shaft 16 may be either flexible or rigid, or a combination thereof. A driveline 32 is located inside shaft 16. In various embodiments, driveline 32 passes through the center of coupling 30 and is attached to slider 24. Driveline 32 may be coupled to slider 24 using any suitable means, such as laser welding. Slider 24 functions to slide on longitudinal axis “A.”

As shown in FIG. 1, surgical device 10 is configured for electrical therapy ablation, but in other embodiments may be configured for cutting, dissecting, or grasping. For example, top jaw 18 and bottom jaw 20 may be configured with cutting blades, a plurality of teeth, or any other configuration providing the required functionality.

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of surgical device 10 and a handle assembly 14 coupled thereto. It is understood by those skilled in the art that surgical device 10 can be coupled to any control device, mechanical or electrical, which allows for actuation of top jaw 18 and bottom jaw 20. Handle assembly 14 comprises a base handle portion 86, a trigger 82, a rotation knob 84, and an opening 88 to receive the proximal end of driveline 32. Trigger 82 is operatively coupled to driveline 32. When trigger 82 is pivotally moved (e.g., squeezed) in a direction indicated by arrow 90, driveline 32 moves in a direction indicated by arrow 92, and top and bottom jaw members 18, 20 close in a direction indicated by arrow 94. When trigger 82 is pivotally moved (e.g., released) in a direction indicated by arrow 98, driveline 32 moves in a direction indicated by arrow 78, and top and bottom jaw members 18, 20 open in a direction indicated by arrow 96. The distal end of driveline 32 is received within rotation knob 84. When rotation knob 84 is rotated in a direction indicated by arrow 74, surgical device 10 also is rotated in a direction indicated by arrow 4. When rotation knob 84 is rotated in a direction indicated by arrow 76, surgical device 10 is also rotated in direction indicated by arrow 6. In various embodiments, an energy source, such as a waveform generator (not shown), may be connected to surgical device 10 in order to provide electrical energy to any electrodes incorporated into surgical device 10.

FIG. 2A illustrates one embodiment surgical device 10 with an endoscope 15. In the illustrated embodiment, surgical device 10 is introduced into a working channel 526 at the proximal end of the endoscope 15. As surgical device 10 is inserted through working channel 526, surgical device 10 protrudes from a distal end of endoscopic portion 524. As shown in FIG. 2A, endoscopic portion 524 may comprise a light source 532, a viewing port 534, and working channel 526. Viewing port 532 may transmit an image within its field of view to an optical device such as a charge coupled device (CCD) camera within the endoscope 15 so that an operator may view the image on a display monitor (not shown).

FIG. 3 shows a perspective view of bottom jaw 20 of one embodiment of surgical device 10. Jaw 20 may include a plurality of teeth 50. Jaw 20 also may define a cavity 52 to house bottom electrode 28. A rear fin 54 defines a hole 56 and a slot 58. Hole 56 is suitable to receive jaw pin 60 (FIG. 1). Slot 58 may extend through rear fin 54 to create an elongated opening or may only extend partially into rear fin 54 to create a groove or indention in rear fin 54. The shape of slot 58 may be of any desired curved, arcuate, or generally linear profile. In some embodiments, slot 58 may comprise any combination of curved, arcuate, or generally linear sections in order to achieve the desired functionality (i.e., open force, close force, clamp force).

FIG. 4 shows a perspective view of top jaw 18 of one embodiment of the surgical device 10. Top jaw 18 is constructed similarly to bottom jaw 20. Jaw 18 may include a plurality of teeth 50. Jaw 18 also may define a cavity 64 to house top electrode 22. A rear fin 66 defines a hole 68 and may have a slot 70. Hole 68 is suitable to receive jaw pin 60 (FIG. 1). Slot 70 may extend through rear fin 66 to create an elongated opening or may only extend partially into rear fin 66 to create a groove or indention in rear fin 66. The shape of slot 70 may be of any desired profile, such as curved, arcuate, or generally linear. When surgical device 10 is assembled, jaw pin 60 is inserted through holes 56, 68 to serve as a pivot point for top jaw 18 and bottom jaw 20.

As shown in FIG. 5, slider 24 may have top flanges 36 a, 36 b and bottom flanges 38 a, 38 b extending from either side of slider 24. Top flange 36 a and bottom flange 38 a on first side 40 define a first channel 41, and top flange 36 b and bottom flange 38 b define a second channel 42 on second side 44. First side 40 and second side 42 also may define a first hole 46 and second hole 48, respectively. First hole 46 and second hole 48 are suitable to receive a slider pin 47. In various embodiments, slider 24 is positioned in surgical device 10 such that clevis 26 is received by first channel 41 and second channel 42. As described in more detail below, slider 24 functions to slide on longitudinal axis “A”, as shown in FIG. 1, along clevis 26. Top flanges 36 a, 36 b and bottom flanges 38 a, 38 b keep slider 24 generally affixed to clevis 26 while allowing for axial movement. Since driveline 32 is coupled to slider 24, the actuation of trigger 82 also serves to move slider 24. Therefore, movement of trigger 82 is translated into longitudinal movement of slider 24 along clevis 26.

FIG. 6 is a side view of one embodiment of surgical device 10. When assembled, jaw pin 60 is inserted through hole 68 of top jaw 18 and hole 56 of bottom jaw 20. Jaw pin 60 serves as a pivot point during actuation of top jaw 18 and bottom jaw 20. Rear fins 54, 66 are positioned beside each other such that slider pin 47 may extend through first side 40 of slider 24, through slot 70 of top jaw 18, through slot 58 of bottom jaw 20, and through second side 44 of slider 24.

FIGS. 6, 6 a, 7, 7 a, 8, and 8 a demonstrate a progression of the actuation of one embodiment of surgical device 10. Referring first to FIGS. 6 and 6 a, a cross-sectional perspective view of one embodiment of surgical device 10 taken along longitudinal axis “A” of FIG. 6, surgical device 10 is shown in a “closed position.” In its closed position top jaw 18 and bottom jaw 20 are in close proximity to each other, allowing for the cutting, grasping, or ablating of tissue. In order to actuate, or open, top jaw 18 and bottom jaw 20, the user imparts movement to driveline 32. In various embodiments, trigger 82 may be used to impart such movement. Slider 24 is coupled to driveline 32; therefore, movement of driveline 32 in a first direction 72 moves slider 24 longitudinally in first direction 72, or toward the distal end of surgical device 10.

FIG. 7 shows the position of top jaw 18 and bottom jaw 20 after slider 24 has moved in first direction 72. By virtue of the movement of driveline 32, slider 24 has been moved longitudinally along clevis 26. FIG. 7 a is a cross-sectional perspective view of one embodiment of surgical device 10 taken along the longitudinal axis of FIG. 7. Movement of slider 24 in first direction 72 moves slider pin 47 in first direction 72. This movement of slider pin 47 causes slider pin 47 to travel within slot 58 of bottom jaw 20 and slot 70 of top jaw 18. Due to the profile of slots 58, 70, top jaw 18 and bottom jaw 20 pivot about jaw pin 60 and separate from each other.

FIG. 8 shows the position of top jaw 18 and bottom jaw 20 after slider 24 has moved further in first direction 72. Slider 24 has been further moved longitudinally along clevis 26. FIG. 8 a is a cross-sectional view of one embodiment of surgical device 10 taken along the longitudinal axis of FIG. 8. Due to the profile of slots 58, 70, top jaw 18 and bottom jaw 20 pivot about jaw pin 60 and separate further from each other. As shown, top jaw 18 and bottom jaw 20 are nearly at a completely opened position. Furthermore, pin 47 has traveled nearly the full length of slots 58, 70.

In various embodiments, other techniques may be utilized to move slider 34 longitudinally along clevis 26. For instance, rotational movement of driveline 32 may be utilized to translate slider 24 along 26. In one embodiment, the distal end of driveline 32 comprises a first threaded feature that engages a second threaded feature associated with slider 24. As the user rotates or twists driveline 32, the first threaded feature on the distal end of driveline 32 also rotates. As driveline 32 rotates, the threaded engagement of the first and second threaded features imparts longitudinal motion to the slider 24. In one embodiment, the user may lock, or selectively fix, top jaw 18 and bottom jaw 20 at any desired angle by impeding rotational movement of driveline 32.

FIG. 9 shows an embodiment of the present invention which may be used for electrical ablation therapy. First and second electrical conductors 302 a, 302 b are electrically coupled to the respective top and bottom electrodes 22, 28 formed in the respective top and bottom jaw members 18, 20. In one embodiment, driveline 32 may serve as an electrical conductor. In various embodiments, top and bottom electrodes 22, 28 may be formed having a substantially flat, paddle-like shape. First and second electrical conductors 302 a, 302 b may be received through lumens formed in shaft 16 and are coupled to top and bottom electrodes 22, 28 in any suitable manner. A switch may be coupled to electrical conductors 302 a, 302 b to enable an operator to activate and deactivate top and bottom electrodes 22, 28 after tissue at the desired target site is grasped between respective top and bottom jaw members 18, 20.

An energy source 301, such as an electrical waveform generator, is employed to energize top and bottom electrodes 22, 28 with an electrical energy level suitable to produce an arc between top electrode 22 and bottom electrode 28. The electric arc is suitable to ablate fibrous tissues such as adhesions growing between internal organs of a patient, for example. The input to energy source 301 is connected to a commercial power supply by way of a plug 304. The output of energy source 301 is coupled to surgical device 10 through first and second electrical conductors 302 a, 302 b.

In one embodiment, energy source 301 comprises a timing circuit to interrupt the output of energy source 301 and produce a cyclical pattern. The timing circuit may comprise suitable switching elements to produce a cyclical or pulsed output energy signal to drive top and bottom electrodes 22, 28 of surgical device 10. For example, energy source 301 may produce a series of n pulses suitable to generate the electric arc, when the pulsed energy is applied to top and bottom electrodes 22, 28.

In one embodiment, energy source 301 comprises an electrical waveform generator to produce an electrical waveform. The electrical waveform generator produces electric potentials at predetermined frequencies, amplitudes, polarities, and pulse widths.

In one embodiment, energy source 301 comprises a radio frequency (RF) generator to produce RF waveforms at predetermined frequencies, amplitudes, polarities, and pulse widths. The RF generator may be a conventional, bipolar/monopolar electrosurgical generator such as one of the many models commercially available, including Model Number ICC 350, available from Erbe, GmbH.

In one embodiment, energy source 301 may be a conventional, bipolar/monopolar pulsed DC generator such as one of the many models commercially available, including Model Number ECM 830, available from BTX Molecular Delivery Systems, Boston, Mass. In bipolar mode, top electrode 22 may be electrically coupled to one polarity and bottom electrode 28 may be electrically coupled to the opposite polarity.

In various embodiments, energy source 301 produces direct current (DC) electrical pulses delivered at frequencies in the range of 1-20 Hz, amplitudes in the range of ±100 to ≅1000 VDC, and pulse widths in the range of 0.01-100 ms. For example, an electrical waveform having an amplitude of +500 VDC and a pulse duration of 20 ms may be delivered at a pulse repetition rate or frequency of 10 HZ to ablate tissue. In one embodiment, the polarity of top and bottom electrodes 22, 28 may be electronically reversed. For example, the polarity of electrical pulses initially delivered at amplitudes in the range of +100 to +1000 VDC may be reversed to −100 to −1000 VDC.

FIG. 10 shows an embodiment of surgical device 110. In various embodiments, surgical device 110 may have a top jaw 118 and a bottom jaw 120 pivotally coupled to a clevis 126. Surgical device 110 may further comprise a slider 124 and a coupling 130. Coupling 130 allows for the attachment of clevis 126 to a shaft 116. In various embodiments coupling 130 may be optionally configured to allow the surgical device 110 to rotate relative to and about a longitudinal axis “B”, thus allowing surgical device 110 to be positioned in multiple angular orientations. Some embodiments may have multiple couplings 130. Optionally, surgical device 110 may, for example, be attached to a laparoscopic and endoscopic instrument. In various embodiments, shaft 116 may be rigid or flexible. A driveline 132 is located inside shaft 116. Driveline 132 passes through the center of coupling 130 and is attached to slider 124. Driveline 132 may be coupled to slider 124 using any suitable means, such as laser welding. Slider 124 functions to slide on longitudinal axis “B.”

As shown in FIG. 10 top jaw 118 and bottom jaw 120 comprise a plurality of teeth 150, but in various embodiments other jaw configurations may be used, such as scissors, or the jaw may be configured with an electrode, or plurality of electrodes, for ablation.

FIG. 11 is a perspective view of surgical device 110 and a handle assembly 114 coupled thereto. It is understood by those skilled in the art that surgical device 110 can be coupled to any control device, mechanical or electrical, which allows for actuation of top jaw 118 and bottom jaw 120. The handle assembly 114 comprises a base handle portion 186, a trigger 182, a rotation knob 184, and an opening 188 to receive the proximal end of driveline 132. Trigger 182 is operatively coupled to driveline 132. When trigger 182 is pivotally moved (e.g., squeezed) in a direction indicated by arrow 190, driveline 132 moves in a direction indicated by arrow 192, and top and bottom jaw members 118,120 close in a direction indicated by arrow 194. When trigger 182 is pivotally moved (e.g., released) in a direction indicated by arrow 198, driveline 132 moves in a direction indicated by arrow 178, and top and bottom jaws 118, 120 open in a direction indicated by arrow 196. The distal end of driveline 132 is received within rotation knob 184. When rotation knob 184 is rotated in a direction indicated by arrow 174, surgical device 110 is also rotated in a direction indicated by arrow 104. When rotation knob 184 is rotated in a direction indicated by arrow 176, surgical device 110 is also rotated in a direction indicated by arrow 106. In various embodiments, a waveform generator (not shown) may be connected to surgical device 110 in order to provide electrical energy to any electrodes incorporated into surgical device 110.

FIG. 12 shows a perspective view of one embodiment of a bottom jaw 120 of a surgical device 110. Bottom jaw 120 may include a plurality of teeth 150. A rear fin 154 defines a hole 156 and a slot 158. Hole 156 is suitable to receive jaw pin 160 (FIG. 9). Slot 158 may extend through rear fin 154 to create an elongated opening or may only extend partially into fin 154 to create a groove or indention in rear fin 154. The shape of slot 158 may be of any desired curved, arcuate, or generally linear profile. In some embodiments, slot 158 may comprise any combination of curved, arcuate, or generally linear sections in order to achieve the desired functionality.

FIG. 13 shows a perspective view of one embodiment of a top jaw 118. Top jaw 118 is constructed similarly to bottom jaw 120. Jaw 118 may include a plurality of teeth 150. A rear fin 166 defines a hole 168 and may have a slot 170. Hole 168 is suitable to receive jaw pin 160 (FIG. 10). Slot 170 may extend through rear fin 166 to create an elongated opening or may only extend partially into fin 166 to create a groove or indention in rear fin 166. The shape of slot 170 may be of any desired curved, arcuate, or generally linear profile. In some embodiments, slot 170 may comprise any combination of curved, arcuate, or generally linear sections in order to achieve the desired functionality. When surgical device 110 is assembled, jaw pin 160 is inserted through holes 156,168 to serve as a pivot point for top jaw 118 and bottom jaw 120.

As shown in FIG. 14, slider 124 may have top flanges 136 a, 136 b and bottom flanges 138 a, 138 b extending from either side of slider 124. Top flange 136 a and bottom flange 138 a on first side 140 define a first channel 141, and top flange 136 b and bottom flange 138 b define a second channel 142 on second side 144. First side 140 and second side 142 may also define a first hole 146 and second hole 148, respectively. First hole 146 and second hole 148 are suitable to receive a slider pin 147. In various embodiments, slider 124 is positioned in surgical device 110 such that clevis 126 is received by first channel 141 and second channel 142. As described in more detail below, slider 124 functions to slide on a longitudinal axis “B”, shown in FIG. 10, along clevis 126. Top flanges 136 a, 136 b and bottom flanges 138 a, 138 b keep slider 124 generally affixed to clevis 126. Since driveline 132 is coupled to slider 124, the actuation of trigger 182 also serves to move slider 124. Therefore, movement of trigger 182 is translated into longitudinal movement of slider 124 along clevis 126.

FIG. 15 is a side view of one embodiment of surgical device 110. When assembled, jaw pin 160 is inserted through hole 168 of top jaw 118 and hole 156 of bottom jaw 120. Jaw pin 160 serves as a pivot point during actuation of top jaw 118 and bottom jaw 120. Rear fin 154 and rear fin 166 are positioned beside each other such that slider pin 147 may extend through first side 140 of slider 124, through slot 170 of top jaw 118, through slot 158 of bottom jaw 120, and through second side 144 of slider 124.

FIGS. 15, 15 a, 16, 16 a, 17, and 17 a demonstrate a progression of the actuation of one embodiment of surgical device 110. Referring first to FIGS. 15 and 15 a, a cross-sectional view of one embodiment of surgical device 110 taken along the longitudinal axis of FIG. 15, surgical device 110 is shown in a “closed position.” In its closed position top jaw 118 and bottom jaw 120 are in close proximity to each other, allowing for the cutting, grasping, or ablating of tissue. In order to actuate, or open, top jaw 118 and bottom jaw 120, the user imparts movement to driveline 132. In various embodiments, trigger 182 may be used to impart such movement. Slider 124 is coupled to driveline 132; therefore, movement of driveline 132 in a first direction 172 moves slider 124 longitudinally in first direction 172, or toward the distal end of surgical device 110.

FIG. 16 shows the position of top jaw 118 and bottom jaw 120 after slider 124 has moved in first direction 172. By virtue of the movement of driveline 132, slider 124 has been moved longitudinally along clevis 126. FIG. 16 a is a cross-sectional perspective view of one embodiment of surgical device 110 taken along the longitudinal axis of FIG. 16. Movement of slider 124 in first direction 172 moves slider pin 147 in first direction 172. This movement of slider pin 147 causes slider pin 147 to travel within slot 158 of bottom jaw 120 and slot 170 of top jaw 118. Due to the profile of slots 158, 170, top jaw 118 and bottom jaw 120 pivot about jaw pin 160 and separate from each other. The profile of slot 170 and slot 148 allow for greater opening force during operation. Those skilled in the art will appreciate that different slot profiles will allow for different opening and closing force characteristics, or force profiles, for various embodiments.

FIG. 17 shows the position of top jaw 118 and bottom jaw 120 after slider 124 has moved further in first direction 172. Slider 124 has been moved longitudinally further along clevis 126. FIG. 17 a is a cross-sectional perspective view of one embodiment of surgical device 110 taken along the longitudinal axis of FIG. 17. Due to the profile of slots 158, 170, top jaw 118 and bottom jaw 120 pivot about jaw pin 160 and separate further from each other. As shown, top jaw 118 and bottom jaw 120 are nearly at a completely opened position. Furthermore, pin 147 has traveled nearly the full length of slots 158, 170.

FIG. 18 shows one embodiment of surgical device 210. In various embodiments, surgical device 210 may have a top jaw 218 and a bottom jaw 220 pivotally coupled to a clevis 226. Surgical device 210 may further comprise a slider 224 and a coupling 230. Coupling 230 allows for the attachment of clevis 226 to shaft 216. In various embodiments coupling 130 may be optionally configured to allow the surgical device 110 to rotate relative to and about a longitudinal axis “C”, thus allowing surgical device 110 to be positioned in multiple angular orientations. Some embodiments may have multiple couplings 130. Optionally, surgical device 210 may, for example, be attached to a laparoscopic and endoscopic instrument. In various embodiments, shaft 216 made be flexible or rigid, or a combination thereof. A driveline 232 is located inside shaft 216. In various embodiments, driveline 232 passes through the center of coupling 230 and is attached to slider 224. Driveline 232 may be coupled to slider 224 using any suitable means, such as laser welding. Slider 224 functions to slide on longitudinal axis “C.”

As the user squeezes trigger 282 (FIG. 19), driveline 232 is moved longitudinally inside shaft 216.

As shown in FIG. 18, top jaw 218 and bottom jaw 220 may comprise a plurality of teeth 250, but in various embodiments other jaw configurations may be used, such as scissors, or the jaw may be configured with an electrode, or plurality of electrodes, for ablation.

FIG. 19 is a perspective view of surgical device 210 and a handle assembly 214 coupled thereto. It is understood by those skilled in the art that surgical device 210 can be coupled to any control device, mechanical or electrical, which allows for actuation of top jaw 218 and bottom jaw 220. The handle assembly 214 comprises a base handle portion 286, a trigger 282, a rotation knob 284, and an opening 288 to receive the proximal end of driveline 232. Trigger 282 is operatively coupled to driveline 232. When trigger 282 is pivotally moved (e.g., squeezed) in a direction indicated by arrow 290, driveline 232 moves in a direction indicated by arrow 292, and top and bottom jaw members 218, 220 close in a direction indicated by arrow 294. When trigger 282 is pivotally moved (e.g., released) in a direction indicated by arrow 298, driveline 232 moves in a direction indicated by arrow 278, and top and bottom jaw members 218, 220 open in a direction indicated by arrow 296. The distal end of driveline 232 is received within rotation knob 284. When rotation knob 284 is rotated in a direction indicated by arrow 274, surgical device 210 also is rotated in a direction indicated by arrow 204. When rotation knob 284 is rotated in a direction indicated by arrow 276, surgical device 210 is also rotated in a direction indicated by arrow 206. In various embodiments, a waveform generator (similar to energy source 301 shown in FIG. 9) may be connected to surgical device 210 in order to provide electrical energy to any electrodes incorporated into surgical device 210.

FIG. 20 shows a perspective view of one embodiment of bottom jaw 220 of surgical device 210. Bottom jaw 220 may include a plurality of teeth 250. A rear fin 254 defines a hole 256, a first slot 258, and a second slot 259. Hole 256 is suitable to receive first jaw pin 260 (FIG. 17), and second slot 259 is suitable to receive second jaw pin 261 (FIG. 17). First slot 258 and second slot 259 may extend through rear fin 254 to create elongated openings or may only extend partially into fin 254 to create a groove or indention in rear fin 254. In various embodiments, one slot may extend through rear fin 254 while the other slot only extends partially through fin 254. First slot 258 and second slot 259 may be of any desired curved, arcuate, or generally linear profile. In some embodiments, slots 258, 259 may comprise any combination of curved, arcuate, or generally linear sections in order to achieve the desired functionality.

FIG. 21 shows a perspective view of top jaw 218 in accordance with various embodiments of the present invention. Top jaw 218 is constructed similarly to bottom jaw 220. Top jaw 218 may include a plurality of teeth 250. A rear fin 266 defines a hole 268 and may have a first slot 270 and a second slot 271. Hole 268 is suitable to receive second jaw pin 261 (FIG. 17), and second slot 271 is suitable to receive first jaw pin 260 (FIG. 17). First slot 270 and second slot 271 may extend through rear fin 266 to create elongated openings or may only extend partially into fin 266 to create a groove or indention in rear fin 266. In various embodiments, one slot may extend through rear fin 266, while the other slot only extends partially through rear fin 266. First slot 270 and second slot 271 may be of any desired curved, arcuate, or generally linear profile. In some embodiments, slots 270, 271 may comprise any combination of curved, arcuate, or generally linear sections in order to achieve the desired functionality.

As shown in FIG. 22 slider 224 may have top flanges 236 a, 236 b and bottom flanges 238 a, 238 b extending from either side of slider 224. Top flange 236 a and bottom flange 238 a on first side 240 define a first channel 241 and top flange 236 b and bottom flange 238 b define a second channel 242 on second side 244. A top post 280 and a bottom post 282 may extend perpendicularly from a front face 284 of slider 224. In various embodiments, a top pin 286 may extend perpendicularly from top post 280, and a bottom pin 288 may extend perpendicularly from bottom post 282. In various embodiments, slider 224 is positioned in surgical device 210 such that clevis 226 is received by first channel 241 and second channel 242. As described in more detail below, slider 224 functions to slide in a longitudinal axis “C” (shown FIG. 17) along clevis 226. Top flanges 236 a, 236 b and bottom flanges 238 a, 238 b keep slider 224 generally affixed to clevis 226. Since driveline 232 is coupled to slider 224, the actuation of trigger 282 also serves to move slider 224. Therefore, movement of trigger 282 is translated into longitudinal movement of slider 224 along clevis 226.

FIG. 23 is a side view of one embodiment of surgical device 210. When assembled, in various embodiments, second jaw pin 261 is inserted through hole 268 of top jaw 218 and second slot 259 of bottom jaw 220. First jaw pin 260 is inserted into hole 256 of bottom jaw 220 and second slot 271 of top jaw 218. Rear fin 254 and rear fin 266 are positioned beside each other such that top pin 286 may be received by first slot 258 of bottom jaw 220 and bottom pin 288 may be received by first slot 270 of top jaw 218.

FIGS. 23, 23 a, 24, 24 a, 25, and 25 a demonstrate a progression of the actuation of surgical device 210. Referring first to FIG. 23 and FIG. 23 a, a cross-sectional perspective view of one embodiment of surgical device 210 taken along the longitudinal axis of FIG. 23, surgical device 210 is shown in a “closed position.” In its closed position, top jaw 218 and bottom jaw 220 are in close proximity to each other, allowing for the cutting, grasping, or ablating of tissue. In order to actuate, or open, top jaw 218 and bottom jaw 220, the user imparts movement to driveline 232. In various embodiments, trigger 282 may be used to impart such movement. Since slider 224 is coupled to driveline 232, movement of driveline 232 in a first direction 272 moves slider 224 longitudinally in first direction 272, or toward the distal end of surgical device 210.

FIG. 24 shows the position of top jaw 218 and bottom jaw 220 after slider 224 has moved in first direction 272. By virtue of the movement of driveline 232, slider 224 has been moved longitudinally along clevis 226. FIG. 24 a is a cross-sectional view of one embodiment of surgical device 210 taken along the longitudinal axis of FIG. 24. Movement of slider 224 in first direction 272 moves top pin 286 and bottom pin 288 in first direction 272. This movement of top pin 286 and bottom pin 288 causes top pin 286 and bottom pin 288 to travel within first slot 258 and first slot 270, respectively. Additionally, second jaw pin 261 travels within second slot 259 and first jaw pin 260 travels within second slot 271 as top jaw 218 and bottom jaw 220 rotate with respect to each other. Due to the profile of first slots 258, 270, top jaw 218 and bottom jaw 220 pivot about jaw pins 260, 261 and pivotally separate from each other.

FIG. 25 shows the position of top jaw 218 and bottom jaw 220 after slider 224 has moved further in first direction 272. Slider 224 has been moved longitudinally further along clevis 226. FIG. 25 a is a cross-sectional view of one embodiment of surgical device 210 taken along the longitudinal axis of FIG. 25. Due to the profile of slots 258, 270, top jaw 218 and bottom jaw 220 pivot about jaw pins 260, 261 and separate further from each other. As shown, top jaw 218 and bottom jaw 220 are nearly at a completely opened position. Furthermore, top pin 286 has traveled nearly the full length of first slot 258, and bottom pin 288 has traveled nearly the full length of first slot 270. Similarly, second jaw pin 261 has traveled nearly the full length of second slot 259, and first jaw pin 260 has traveled nearly the full length of second slot 271.

FIG. 26 shows an embodiment of surgical device 310. In various embodiments, surgical device 310 may have a top jaw 318 and a bottom jaw 320 pivotally coupled to a clevis 326. As illustrated, top jaw 318 may house a top electrode 322 and bottom jaw 320 may house a bottom electrode 328. A coupling 330 may allow for the attachment of clevis 26 to a shaft 316. In various embodiments coupling 330 may be optionally configured to allow the surgical device 310 to rotate relative to and about a longitudinal axis “D”, thus allowing surgical device 310 to be positioned in multiple angular orientations. Some embodiments may have multiple couplings 330. Optionally, surgical device 310 may, for example, be attached to a laparoscopic and endoscopic instrument. Accordingly, in various embodiments, shaft 316 may be either flexible or rigid, or a combination thereof. A driveline 332 is located inside shaft 316. In various embodiments, driveline 332 passes through the center of coupling 330 and is attached to slider 324. Driveline 332 may be coupled to slider 324 using any suitable means, such as laser welding. Slider 324 functions to slide on longitudinal axis “D.”

As shown in FIGS. 26 a-b, surgical device 310 is configured for electrical therapy ablation, but in other embodiments may be configured for cutting, dissecting, or grasping. For example, top jaw 318 and bottom jaw 320 may be configured with cutting blades, a plurality of teeth, or any other configuration providing the required functionality. It is understood by those skilled in the art that surgical device 310 can be coupled to any control device, mechanical or electrical, which allows for actuation of top jaw 318 and bottom jaw 320, such as handle assembly 14 shown in FIG. 2.

FIG. 27 a shows a perspective view of bottom jaw 320 of one embodiment of surgical device 310. Jaw may include a plurality of teeth (not shown). Jaw 320 also may house bottom electrode 328 and a bottom insulator 329. A rear fin 354 may define a first hole 356 and a second hole 358. First hole 356 and second hole 358 are suitable to receive a first jaw pin 360 and second jaw pin 361 (FIG. 26 a). In various embodiments first jaw pin 360 may be unitary or integral with bottom jaw 320. Similarly, in various embodiments, embodiments second jaw pin 361 may be unitary or integral with bottom jaw 320. In the illustrated embodiment of bottom jaw 320 shown in FIG. 27 b, rear fin 354 comprises a recessed section 355. Recessed section 355 may include a pin 357 protruding from the recessed section. In various embodiments, pin 357 may be unitary with rear fin 354 or, in various embodiments, pin 357 may be a member inserted into a hole.

FIG. 28 a shows a perspective view of top jaw 318 of one embodiment of the surgical device 310. Top jaw 318 is constructed similarly to bottom jaw 320. Jaw 318 may include a plurality of teeth (not shown). Jaw 318 also may house top electrode 322 and a top insulator 323. A rear fin 366 may define a first hole 368 and a second hole 370. First hole 368 and second hole 370 are suitable to receive a first jaw pin 312 and a second jaw pin 314 (FIG. 26 b). In various embodiments the jaw pins may be unitary or integral with bottom jaw 320. As shown in FIG. 28 b, in various embodiments, top jaw 318 may comprise a pin 359 protruding from rear fin 366. In various embodiments, pin 359 may be unitary with rear fin 366 or, in various embodiments, pin 359 may be a member inserted into a hole.

As shown in FIGS. 29 a-b, slider 324 may have top flanges 336 a, 336 b and bottom flanges 338 a, 338 b extending from either side of slider 324. Top flange 336 a and bottom flange 338 a on first side 340 define a first channel 341, and top flange 336 b and bottom flange 338 b define a second channel 342 on second side 344. First side 340 and second side 342 also may define a first hole 346 and second hole 348, respectively. First hole 346 and second hole 348 are suitable to receive a slider pin 347 and a slider pin 348, respectively (FIGS. 30 a-b). In various embodiments, slider 324 may be positioned in surgical device 310 such that clevis 326 is received by first channel 341 and second channel 342. As described in more detail below, slider 324 functions to slide on longitudinal axis “D”, as shown in FIG. 26, along clevis 326. Top flanges 336 a, 336 b and bottom flanges 338 a, 338 b keep slider 324 generally affixed to clevis 326 while allowing for axial movement. Since driveline 332 is coupled to slider 324, the actuation of trigger 82 also serves to move slider 324. Therefore, movement of trigger 82 (FIG. 2) is translated into longitudinal movement of slider 324 along clevis 326.

FIGS. 30 a-c illustrate an embodiment of linkage 380. In various embodiments, linkage 380 may be comprised of a first link 382 and a second link 384. First link 382 may connect slider 324 to bottom jaw 320 and second link 384 may connect slider 324 to top jaw 318. In some embodiments, linkage 380 may comprise additional components. As shown in FIG. 30 c first link 382 may define a first hole 386 and a second hole 388. Similarly, second link 384 may define a first hole 390 and a second hole 392. Links 382 and 384 may be any suitable shape. Examples of suitable shapes may include oblong, rectangular, or rod-like. In various embodiments slider pin 347 may be received in second hole 388 and slider pin 348 may be received by second hole 392. Pin 357 may be received by first hold 386 and pin 359 may be received by first hole 390.

FIGS. 31 a-b illustrates a perspective view an embodiment of clevis 326 from two different angles. Clevis 326 has a distal end 400 and a proximal end 402. Proximal end 402 may be configured to couple to coupling 330. In various embodiments, distal end 400 might define a first hole 404 and a second hole 406. In various embodiments a pin (not shown) may be placed through first hole 404 and second 406 to reduce movement of first side 408 relative to second side 410 during operation of surgical device 310. Clevis 326 may have a first side 408 extending from proximal end 402 and a second side 410 extending from proximal end 402. In various embodiments, first side 408 and second side 410 may be substantially parallel. First side 408 may define a slot 412 and second side 410 may define a groove 414 for housing conductors.

Distal end of first side 408 may comprise a plurality of slots. In the illustrated embodiment, first side 408 comprises a first slot 416 and a second slot, comprised of first section 418 a and second section 418 b. An exemplary embodiment of first slot 416, first section 418 a, and second section 418 b are illustrated in FIGS. 32 a. The longitudinal axis “A1” of first section 418 a may be substantially parallel to longitudinal axis “A2” of first slot 416. Axis A1 and A2 may in positioned in an angular relationship to longitudinal axis “E”, the angular relationship identified by angle θ1. Second section 418 b diverges from first section 418 a at an angle θ2. In various embodiments, second section 418 b may be curved. In some embodiments, second section 418 b may have a curvature with a radius “r,” which converges on a point 420. First jaw pin 360 may be configured to engage and travel along the path defined by first section 418 a and second section 418 b. Second jaw pin 361 may be configured to engage and travel along the path defined by first slot 416.

Distal end of second side 410 may comprise a plurality of slots. In the illustrated embodiment, second side 410 comprises a first slot 422 and a second slot, comprised of first section 424 a and second section 424 b. An exemplary embodiment of first slot 422, first section 424 a, and second section 424 b are illustrated in FIGS. 32 b. The longitudinal axis “B1” of first section 424 a may be substantially parallel to longitudinal axis “B2” of first slot 422. Axis B1 and B2 may be positioned in an angular relationship to longitudinal axis “E”, the angular relationship identified by angle θ1. Second section 424 b diverges from first section 424 a at an angle θ2. In various embodiments, section 424 b may have a curvature with a radius “r,” which converges on a point 426. Second jaw pin 314 may be configured to engage and travel along the patent defined by first section 424 a and second section 424 b. First jaw pin 312 may be configured to engage and travel along the path defined by first slot 422.

FIGS. 33-35 demonstrate a progression of the actuation of surgical device 310. Referring first to FIG. 33, surgical device 310 is shown in a “closed position.” In its closed position, top jaw 318 and bottom jaw 320 are in close proximity to each other, allowing for the cutting, grasping, or ablating of tissue. In the illustrated embodiment, first jaw pin 360 and second jaw pin 361 are located near the proximal end of first section 418 a and first slot 416, respectively. In order to actuate, or open, top jaw 318 and bottom jaw 320, the user may impart movement to driveline 332. In various embodiments, trigger 82 may be used to impart such movement. Since slider 324 is coupled to driveline 332, movement of driveline 232 in a first direction 372 moves slider 324 longitudinally in first direction 372, or toward the distal end of surgical device 310. FIG. 33 a is a cross-sectional view of one embodiment of surgical device 310 taken along the longitudinal axis of FIG. 33.

FIG. 34 shows the position of top jaw 318 and bottom jaw 320 after slider 324 and linkage 380 have moved in first direction 372. By virtue of the movement of driveline 332, slider 324 has been moved longitudinally along clevis 326. Slider 324 may be coupled to first link 382 and a second link 384 which are coupled to top jaw 318 and bottom jaw 320, respectively. Thus, movement of slider 324 in first direction 372 moves first jaw pin 360 and second jaw pin 361 distally along the paths defined by first section 418 a and first slot 416, respectively. Movement of slider 324 in first direction 372 also moves first jaw pin 312 and second jaw pin 314 distally along the paths defined by first slot 422 and first section 424 a, respectively. Due to the profile of first section 418 a, first slot 416, first slot 422, and 424 a, top jaw 318 and bottom jaw 320 separate from each other in a direction indicated by arrows 429 while remaining substantially parallel. FIG. 34 a is a cross-sectional view of one embodiment of surgical device 310 taken along the longitudinal axis of FIG. 34.

FIG. 35 shows the position of top jaw 318 and bottom jaw 320 after slider 324 and linkage 380 have moved further in first direction 372. Slider 324 has been moved longitudinally further along clevis 326. Due to the profile of first section 418 a, first grove 416, first grove 422, and 424 a, top jaw 318 and bottom jaw 320 separate further from each other in a direction indicated by arrows 429 while remaining substantially parallel. Furthermore, second jaw pin 361 has traveled nearly the full length of the path defined by first grove 416, and first jaw pin 360 has traveled nearly the full length of the path defined by first section 418 a. Similarly, first jaw pin 312 has traveled nearly the full length of the path defined by first grove 422 and second jaw pin 314 has traveled nearly the full length of the path defined by first section 424 a. FIG. 35 a is a cross-sectional view of one embodiment of surgical device 310 taken along the longitudinal axis of FIG. 35.

FIG. 36 shows the position of top jaw 318 and bottom jaw 320 after slider 324 and linkage 380 have has moved further in first direction 372. Slider 324 has been moved longitudinally further along clevis 326. First jaw pin 360 is located in the path defined by second section 418 b. Second jaw pin 314 is located in the path defined by second section 424 b. As slider 324 is moved in first direction 372, first jaw pin 360 pivots about second jaw pin 361 and second jaw pin 314 pivots about first jaw pin 312. As first jaw pin 360 and second jaw pin 314 pivot, top jaw 318 and bottom jaw 320 angularly separate from each other the direction indicated by arrows 430. FIG. 36 a is a cross-sectional view of one embodiment of surgical device 310 taken along the longitudinal axis of FIG. 36.

FIG. 37 shows the position of top jaw 318 and bottom jaw 320 after slider 324 and linkage 380 have has moved further in first direction 372. Slider 324 has been moved longitudinally further along clevis 326. First jaw pin 360 is located near the distal end of the path defined by second section 418 b. Second jaw pin 314 is located near the distal end of the path defined by second section 424 b. First jaw pin 360 has pivoted further about second jaw pin 361 and second jaw pin 314 has pivoted further about first jaw pin 312. Top jaw 318 and bottom jaw 320 have angularly separated further from each other the direction indicated by 430 to achieve a fully opened position. FIG. 37 a is a cross-sectional view of one embodiment of surgical device 310 taken along the longitudinal axis of FIG. 37.

An exemplary procedure for use with surgical device 310 is illustrated in FIGS. 38-40. It will be appreciated by those skilled in the art that the methods described are also applicable to other embodiments or devices. After approaching an organ or tissue, such as artery 431, surgical device 310 is actuated to separate top jaw 318 and bottom jaw 320 so that the target, illustrated as artery 431, may be received between the jaw members (FIG. 38). Top jaw 318 and bottom jaw 320 are then “closed” to clamp artery 431 between top electrode 322 and bottom electrode 328. As top jaw 318 and bottom jaw 320 close in direction 432, they change from having an angular relationship (FIG. 38) to having a substantially parallel relationship (FIG. 39). Thus, top jaw 318 and bottom jaw 320 are able to engage artery 430 while in a substantially parallel position. As shown, the artery may be clamped by top jaw 318 and bottom jaw 320 to enable good contact with the ablation surfaces and an even distribution of electrical energy. Clamping also helps to remove blood from the tissue.

As appreciate by those skilled in the art, the pivoting configuration of top jaw 318 and bottom jaw 320 allows for a top electrode 322 and bottom electrode 328 to be in a parallel arrangement, even if the top jaw 318 and bottom jaw 320 are not in a fully “closed” position. Ablation energy is more effectively delivered to tissue if top electrode 322 and bottom electrode 328 are in a parallel arrangement. Thus, surgical device 310 can grip tissue and deliver energy to the tissue while the electrodes are in a parallel arrangement, even though the top jaw 318 and bottom jaw 320 are separated from each other. After energy has been delivered to the top electrode 322 and bottom electrode 328 by any suitable technique, top jaw 318 and bottom jaw 320 of surgical device 310 may be opened and removed from the ablation sight 434 of artery 431.

The devices disclosed herein can be designed to be disposed of after a single use, or they can be designed to be used multiple times. In either case, however, the device can be reconditioned for reuse after at least one use. Reconditioning can include any combination of the steps of disassembly of the device, followed by the cleaning or replacement of particular pieces, and subsequent reassembly. In particular, the device can be disassembled, and any number of the particular pieces or parts of the device can be selectively replaced or removed in any combination. Upon the cleaning and/or replacement of particular parts, the device can be reassembled for subsequent use either at a reconditioning facility or by a surgical team immediately prior to a surgical procedure. Those skilled in the art will appreciate that the reconditioning of a device can utilize a variety of techniques for disassembly, cleaning/replacement, and reassembly. The use of such techniques, and the resulting reconditioned device, are all within the scope of the present application.

Preferably, the various embodiments described herein will be processed before surgery. First, a new or used instrument is obtained and, if necessary, cleaned. The instrument can then be sterilized. In one sterilization technique, the instrument is placed in a closed and sealed container, such as a plastic or TYVEK® bag. The container and instrument are then placed in a field of radiation that can penetrate the container, such as gamma radiation, x-rays, or high-energy electrons. The radiation kills bacteria on the instrument and in the container. The sterilized instrument can then be stored in the sterile container. The sealed container keeps the instrument sterile until it is opened in the medical facility. It is preferred that the device is sterilized. This can be done by any number of ways known to those skilled in the art, including beta or gamma radiation, ethylene oxide, or steam.

Although the various embodiments have been described herein in connection with certain disclosed embodiments, many modifications and variations to those embodiments may be implemented. For example, different types of end effectors may be employed. Also, where materials are disclosed for certain components, other materials may be used. The foregoing description and following claims are intended to cover all such modifications and variations.

Any patent, publication, or other disclosure material, in whole or in part, that is said to be incorporated by reference herein is incorporated herein only to the extent that the incorporated material does not conflict with existing definitions, statements, or other disclosure material set forth in this disclosure. As such, and to the extent necessary, the disclosure as explicitly set forth herein supersedes any conflicting material incorporated herein by reference. Any material, or portion thereof, that is said to be incorporated by reference herein, but which conflicts with existing definitions, statements, or other disclosure material set forth herein will only be incorporated to the extent that no conflict arises between that incorporated material and the existing disclosure material.

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
WO2012083041A2 *Dec 15, 2011Jun 21, 2012Cook Medical Technologies LlcMedical devices with detachable pivotable jaws
Classifications
U.S. Classification606/51
International ClassificationA61B18/04
Cooperative ClassificationA61B2017/2944, A61B2017/2939, A61B2017/2934, A61B18/1445, A61B18/1492, A61B2017/2936
European ClassificationA61B18/14F2
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Nov 24, 2008ASAssignment
Owner name: ETHICON ENDO-SURGERY, INC.,OHIO
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:HOLCOMB, MATTHEW D.;SPIVEY, JAMES T.;VAKHARIA, OMAR J. AND OTHERS;SIGNED BETWEEN 20080918 AND 20081118;US-ASSIGNMENT DATABASE UPDATED:20100304;REEL/FRAME:21880/338
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:HOLCOMB, MATTHEW D.;SPIVEY, JAMES T.;VAKHARIA, OMAR J.;AND OTHERS;SIGNING DATES FROM 20080918 TO 20081118;REEL/FRAME:021880/0338
Owner name: ETHICON ENDO-SURGERY, INC., OHIO