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Publication numberUS20100069154 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 12/559,726
Publication dateMar 18, 2010
Filing dateSep 15, 2009
Priority dateSep 15, 2008
Publication number12559726, 559726, US 2010/0069154 A1, US 2010/069154 A1, US 20100069154 A1, US 20100069154A1, US 2010069154 A1, US 2010069154A1, US-A1-20100069154, US-A1-2010069154, US2010/0069154A1, US2010/069154A1, US20100069154 A1, US20100069154A1, US2010069154 A1, US2010069154A1
InventorsSeth A. Claussen
Original AssigneeClaussen Seth A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Retroactive Compatibility Interactive System and Method Thereof
US 20100069154 A1
Abstract
A controller in communicative connection with a receiver configured to receive data only as a function of at least one legacy input device, and method thereof are provided. The controller includes at least one non-legacy input device, and a retroactive compatibility device configured to translate data received as a function of the at least one non-legacy input device, such that the translated data is configured to be received by a receiver configured to receive data as a function of the at least one legacy input device.
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Claims(20)
1. A controller in communicative connection with a receiver configured to receive data only as a function of at least one legacy input device, said controller comprising:
at least one non-legacy input device; and
a retroactive compatibility device configured to translate data received as a function of said at least one non-legacy input device, such that said translated data is configured to be received by a receiver configured to receive data as a function of the at least one legacy input device.
2. The controller of claim 1, wherein said at least one non-legacy input device comprises a joystick and a trackball.
3. The controller of claim 2 further comprising a selection wheel configured to set a sensitivity of at least one of said joystick and said trackball.
4. The controller of claim 1 being a video game controller, wherein said receiver is a video game console.
5. The controller of claim 1, wherein said retroactive compatibility device is configured to translate data using one of a truncation filter, a division filter, and a pass-through.
6. The controller of claim 5, wherein said truncation filter is configured to emulate data within tolerances received from the at least one legacy input device.
7. The controller of claim 5, wherein said division filter is configured to emulate data received from the legacy input devices, wherein said emulated data exceeds tolerances received from the legacy input devices.
8. A video game system comprising a video game controller in communicative connection with a video game console configured to receive data only as a function of at least one legacy input device, said video game system comprising:
at least one input device; and
a retroactive compatibility device that translates data received as a function of said at least one input device, such that said translated data is configured to be received by the video game console that is configured to execute at least one software routine intended to function with data other than said data received as a function of said at least one input device.
9. The controller of claim 10, wherein said at least one input device is a joystick and a trackball.
10. The controller of claim 10, wherein said retroactive compatibility device is configured to translate data using one of a truncation filter, a division filter, and a pass-through.
11. The controller of claim 10, wherein said truncation filter is configured to emulate data within tolerances received from the legacy input device.
12. The controller of claim 10, wherein said division filter is configured to emulate data received from the legacy input devices, wherein said emulated data exceeds tolerances received from the legacy input devices.
13. A method of retroactive compatibility, such that a receiver receives data as a function of at least one non-legacy input device, wherein the receiver is configured to receive data only as a function of at least one legacy input device, said method comprising the steps of:
receiving data from the at least one non-legacy input device of a controller;
translating data received from the at least one non-legacy input device to be retroactively compatible; and
outputting said translated data from said controller to the receiver.
14. The method of claim 13 further comprising the step of selecting a filter method for translating said data received from the at least one non-legacy input device.
15. The method of claim 13, wherein said step of translating data further comprises:
emulating data within tolerances received from the at least one input device.
16. The method of claim 13, wherein said step of translating data further comprises:
emulating data received from the legacy input devices, wherein said emulated data exceeds tolerances received from the legacy input devices.
17. The method of claim 13, wherein said step of translating data further comprises:
passing-through said data received from the non-legacy input device.
18. The method of claim 13, wherein said controller is a video game controller, and the receiver is a video game console.
19. The method of claim 13, wherein the at least one non-legacy input device comprises a joystick and a trackball.
20. The method of claim 19 further comprising the step of selecting a sensitivity of at least one of said joystick and said trackball.
Description
CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION

This application claims priority under 35 U.S.C. §119(e) to U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 61/097,086, filed on Sep. 15, 2008, by Seth A. Claussen, the entire disclosure of which is hereby incorporated herein by reference.

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The present invention generally relates to a retroactive compatibility interactive system and method thereof, and more particularly, a video game system having a retroactive capability device and method thereof.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Generally, gaming and entertainment consoles provide platforms for delivering content, such as movies, television programming, or interactive games. Typically, gaming and entertainment consoles have an inability to significantly expand beyond an initial configuration after design and manufacture thereof. Thus, any technological advances in graphics, sound, or other processing hardware cannot be added to the gaming and entertainment console after the consoles are initially designed, manufactured, and sold. Once the console is made, the console is generally not subject to any significant changes or updates, and a user of such a console typically has to buy a new console in order to take advantage of new technologies.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

According to one aspect of the present invention, a controller in communicative connection with a receiver configured to receive data only as a function of at least one legacy input device includes at least one non-legacy input device. The controller further includes a retroactive compatibility device configured to translate data received as a function of the at least one non-legacy input device, such that the translated data is configured to be received by a receiver configured to receive data as a function of the at least one legacy input device.

According to another aspect of the present invention, a video game system includes a video game controller in communicative connection with a video game console configured to receive data only as a function of at least one legacy input device. The video game system includes at least one input device, and a retroactive compatibility device that translates data received as a function of the at least one input device, such that the translated data is configured to be received by the video game console that is configured to execute at least one software routine intended to function with data other than the data received as a function of the at least one input device.

According to yet another aspect of the present invention, a method of retroactive compatibility, such that a receiver receives data as a function of at least one non-legacy input device, wherein the receiver is configured to receive data only as a function of at least one legacy input device, includes the steps of receiving data from the at least one non-legacy input device of a controller, translating data received from the at least one non-legacy input device to be retroactively compatible, and outputting the translated data from the controller to the receiver.

These and other features, advantages and objects of the present invention will be further understood and appreciated by those skilled in the art by reference to the following specification, claims and appended drawings.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The present invention will now be described, by way of example, with reference to the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a top and back perspective view of a video game controller, in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a top plan view of a video game controller, in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 3 is a bottom plan view of a video game controller, in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 4 is a front plan view of a video game controller, in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 5 is a block diagram of a video game controller including a retroactive compatibility device, in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 6 is a flowchart illustrating data communication in a retroactive compatibility interactive system that includes a retroactive compatibility device, in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 7 is a flowchart illustrating data flow in a retroactive compatibility interactive system that includes having a retroactive compatibility device, in accordance with one another embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 8 is a flowchart illustrating data flow in a retroactive compatibility interactive system that includes a retroactive compatibility device, in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention; and

FIG. 9 is a flowchart illustrating data flow in a retroactive compatibility interactive system that includes having a retroactive compatibility device, in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

Before describing in detail embodiments that are in accordance with the present invention, it should be observed that the embodiments include combinations of method steps and apparatus components related to a retroactive compatibility interactive system and method thereof. Accordingly, the apparatus components and method steps have been represented, where appropriate, by conventional symbols in the drawings, showing only those specific details that are pertinent to understanding the embodiments of the present invention so as not to obscure the disclosure with details that will be readily apparent to those of ordinary skill in the art having the benefit of the description herein. Further, like reference characters in the description and drawings represent like elements.

In this document, relational terms, such as first and second, top and bottom, and the like, may be used to distinguish one entity or action from another entity or action, without necessarily requiring or implying any actual such relationship or order between such entities or actions. The terms “comprises,” “comprising,” or any other variation thereof, are intended to cover a non-exclusive inclusion, such that a process, method, article, or apparatus that comprises a list of elements does not include only those elements but may include other elements not expressly listed or inherent to such process, method, article, or apparatus. An element proceeded by “comprises . . . a” does not, without more constraints, preclude the existence of additional identical elements in the process, method, article, or apparatus that comprises the element.

In regards to FIGS. 1-5, a controller having at least one non-legacy input device in communicative connection with a receiver configured to receive data as a function of at least one legacy input device is generally shown at reference identifier 10. Typically, the controller 10 is a video game controller, as described herein; however, it should be appreciated by those skilled in the art that the controller 10 can be used in other suitable systems. According to one embodiment, the receiver is configured to receive data only as a function of at least one legacy input device.

The video game controller 10 can be configured to function with a receiver, such as, but not limited to, a video game console, generally indicated at 12. The video game controller 10 can include a plurality of input devices that have various affects with an image displayed on an image device or display 14 (e.g., a television screen, a computer screen, or the like) as a function of the video game console 12, the audio being emitted by an audio device 16 as a function of the video game console 12, or a combination thereof, according to one embodiment. Thus, the video game controller 10 and video game console 12 can be included in a retroactive compatibility interactive system, such as, but not limited to, a video game or entertainment system. The video game controller 10 can also include the plurality of input devices (e.g., first input device, second input device, . . . Nth input device), which can be used with any game being played in the video game console 12, such that the video game controller 10 includes a retroactive compatibility device, generally indicated at 18, that communicates as described in greater detail herein.

According to one embodiment the plurality of input devices (e.g., legacy input devices and non-legacy input devices) of the video game controller 10 can include a D-pad 20, a joystick 22, a trackball 24, an A-Button 26, a B-Button 28, a X-Button 30, a Y-Button 32, a selection wheel 34, a bumper 36, a trigger 38, the like, or combination thereof. For purposes of explanation and not limitation, the at least one non-legacy input device can include a joystick 22, a trackball 24, or a combination thereof. The video game controller 10 can also include one or more rotary wheels 40 that control a sensitivity of the joystick 22 and/or the trackball 24, one or more light emitting diodes and/or image display devices 42, which can indicate the status of operating conditions of the video game controller 10, one or more retroactive compatibility selection devices 44, a menu selection button 46, the like, or a combination thereof. Exemplary designs of the controller 10 are illustrated in U.S. Design patent application Ser. No. 29/323,654 entitled “VIDEO GAME CONTROLLER,” and U.S. Design patent application Ser. No. 29/342,439 entitled “VIDEO GAME CONTROLLER,” the entire disclosures of which are hereby incorporated herein by reference.

In regards to FIG. 5, the video game controller 10 can include the retroactive compatibility device 18 and the retroactive compatibility selection device 44. According to one embodiment, the retroactive compatibility device 18 is a device that is configured to allow the video game controller 10 to function with a game that is being played, via the video game console 12, wherein the game was not designed (e.g., executable software utilized to play the game) to function with one or more of the plurality of input devices contained in the video game controller 10. By way of explanation and not limitation, the video game controller 10 can include legacy input devices, such that these devices are recognized by the video game system 10, and the commands received therefrom can pass-through the retroactive compatibility device 18, whereas non-legacy input devices can be devices that are not recognized by the video game console 12 and be filtered by the retroactive compatibility device 18.

The retroactive compatibility device 18 can include a controller 48 and a memory device 50 that stores one or more executable software routines 52. Typically, the executable software routine 52 are executed by the controller 48 in order for the retroactive compatibility device 18 to function with the video game console 12, such that the software routines 52 of the retroactive compatibility device 18 are executed to analyze and/or convert the signal received from one or more of the plurality of input devices in order for the signal to be received and function with the executable software of the game being played via the video game console 12. According to an alternate embodiment, the retroactive compatibility device 18 and compatibility selection device 44 can be integrated with the video game console 12, an adapter in communication between the controller 10 and the video game console 12, or a combination thereof.

In regards to FIGS. 1-6, a method of collecting data is generally shown in FIG. 6 at reference identifier 100, according to one embodiment. Generally, the method 100 is a translation matrix for data, such that cursory devices (e.g., a mouse, the trackball 24, the joystick 22, other non-standard or non-legacy input devices, or a combination thereof) can be employed while utilizing current software that is not specifically designed for them. Typically, the method 100 can be implemented by the one or more executable software routines 52. The method 100 starts at step 102, wherein data is inputted from at least one of the plurality of input devices (e.g., an external source, such as a user), such as, but not limited to, the D-pad 20, the joystick 22, the trackball 24, the A-Button 26, the B-Button 28, the X-Button 30, the Y-Button 32, the selection wheel 34, the bumper 36, the trigger 38, the rotary wheel 40, the like, or combination thereof. The input data can include a form of travel data, such as, but not limited to, map-input coordinates or separate x and y variable data. According to one embodiment, travel data can be map-input data that may be conditioned with x and y standing alone rather than in an array variable coordinate system (e.g., a one-by-two {x,y} matrix).

At decision step 104, it is determined which translation method has been selected. According to one embodiment, at step 104, the travel data may be conditioned (e.g., convert binary to hexadecimal, a floating-point decimal to an integer, or the like, wherein an overall value does not change) for software routine purposes.

If it is determined at decision step 104 that a legacy functionality translation has been selected, then the method 100 proceeds to step 106, wherein the data inputted from the input device is morphed to mimic legacy devices or is nullified for retroactive compatibility. According to one embodiment, the legacy functionality translation step 106 is executed so that the data being received from the video game controller 10 by the video game console 12 from a standard controller (e.g., legacy device). By way of explanation and not limitation, for cursory devices (e.g., legacy device) this is an x:n translation, while additional input devices may be nullified entirely.

However, if it is determined at decision step 104 that a compatibility and overdrive method has been selected, the method 100 proceeds to step 108, wherein data that is a function of the movement or depression of the input devices is converted to be similar to data that is a function of a standard controller (e.g., legacy device), but operates measurably outside legacy standards. In such an embodiment, the data appears to the video game console 12 to be similar to that of a standard input, but may extend beyond the typical boundaries of standard input. For purposes of explanation and not limitation, for cursory devices, (e.g., legacy device) this translation method performs an x/n calculation and converts the data to a more meaningful state for video game consoles 12. For other input devices (e.g., a non-legacy input device) the input data can be reassigned a value from what standard control already allows, rather than being nullified entirely, according to one embodiment.

If it is determined at decision step 104 that a pass-through translation method has been selected, the method 100 proceeds to step 110, wherein data remains unmodified beyond any calculations performed in the data pull and preparation (e.g., signal processing). In such a step, the method sends the data received from a data pull and preparation directly to collection, so that the data is transmitted from the video game controller 10 to the video game console 12, according to one embodiment.

According to one embodiment, the method 100 can include step 112, wherein data is collected and stored for output until a time-to-live expires. Thus, data can be received from any of the chosen steps 106, 108, 110, and any modulation, encoding, or other calculations (e.g., truncation, preconfigured data reassignment, or the like), so that the data is then stored until it is time to send the data to an external source (i.e., video game console 12) or until the data's time-to-live expires. According to one embodiment, the time-to-live is a predetermined time period in which such data will be stored, at which time if the data has not been transmitted to an external device, such as, but not limited to, a video game console 12, the data will be deleted. The data can then be outputted from the video game controller 10 to an external device, such as, but not limited to, a video game console 12 at step 114.

According to an alternate embodiment, with reference to FIGS. 1-5 and 7, a method of collecting data is generally shown in FIG. 7 at reference identifier 200. The method 200 starts at step 202, wherein an outside source sends binary map-travel data from a device (e.g., data received as a function of movement of trackball 24). Typically, this data can be referred to as map-input. At step 204, a processor may send information through a digital logic filter, such that this information can include, but is not limited to, a timing modulation, map input sensitivity, map-input compatibility mode, add-on compatibility mode, button/input device configuration, the like, or a combination thereof. Such information can be transmitted from the video game controller 10, remitted by the video game controller 10, or a combination thereof. According to one embodiment, the controller 48 executes the one or more software routines 52 to perform steps 202 and 204, wherein the processor 48 is internal to the retroactive compatibility device 18. However, it should be appreciated that the controller 48 or other controller can be external to the retroactive compatibility device 18.

At step 206, operations of input may work on a cyclical basis, wherein the controller processor input (step 204) does not provide a timing modulation to determine when to record readings from the map-input (step 202). A resistor-capacitor circuit may be used to provide a base for timing modulation at step 208, according to one embodiment. In such an embodiment, at step 208, operations of input may work on a cyclical basis, wherein a timing mechanism tells an input processor when to record a reading from the x/y map device (step 202), if need-be. This modulation can also determine when to send an input signal to an interface of the video game console 12, and when to clear that signal (e.g., reset the input to an idle or zero state), should the input be stored in memory for retrieval by the interface of the video game console 12. Typically, the software program being run on the video game console 12 will query or open itself up to information being sent by the controller 48 for input at certain intervals, while a filter process can take queue from this query for timing purposes, such that data can be collected as fast as the intervals being queried. However, it should be appreciated by those skilled in the art that the method 200 can be implemented without a timing mechanism.

At step 210, input is received from a map device (step 202) and timing indicator (step 208), wherein this data is translated from raw data into data that the video game console 12 can use. Thus, it is determined whether to pass the data on directly from the map device (step 202), grab snapshot readings at intervals determined by timing modulation (step 208), or grab a series of readings based on either of the previous conditions and perform an average to pass along.

At step 212, external hardware, such as, but not limited to, the rotary wheel 40 allows the user to manually and instantaneously provide a sensitivity factor to the map input (e.g., joystick 22, trackball 24, the like, or a combination thereof). At step 216, a user can control a switch that tells the digital logical filter (e.g., the controller 48) which mode to use, and therefore, what calculations if any to perform on the map-input data. The method 200 then proceeds to step 218, wherein the digital logic (e.g., the video game console 12) receives the map input, and based upon the compatibility mode selected by the user (step 216) or the controller 48 (step 204), the information is sent through the proper data filter.

When a compatibility mode is selected at decision step 218, the method 200 can perform a sensitivity calculation at step 219. At step 219, the map-input information passed along from step 210 is factorized based upon the sensitive data received at step 204, step 212, or a combination thereof. According to one embodiment, manual input (e.g., using the rotary wheel 40) takes precedence over information sent from a master controller since the master controller sensitivity can always be used exclusively by setting the manual control to one hundred percent (100%) (x*1, wherein x is map-input data), and the manual input can be adjusted without setting the video game console 12 to an idle state (e.g., pausing the game). If x equals map data and F equals sensitivity factor, the manual factorization can include a range from ten percent (10%) (F=0.1) to one thousand percent (1,000%) (F=10), so that x*F will be passed onto other steps of the method 200, according to one embodiment.

If the full compatibility mode filter is selected, then the method 200 proceeds to step 217, wherein the filter takes the map-input and translates it to data that exactly duplicates that generated by a conditional analog stick, typically a +/− counter, according to one embodiment. In such a mode the map-input may rarely, if at all, differentiate from the map-data provided by an aforementioned analog stick, such that the filter allows previous games to function, but may not see the control benefits typically provided by traditionally map-input devices. According to one embodiment, this is a 1:1 translation, such that data from an analog stick communicates data that the program translates into an integer counter in the x-axis in a range from −10 to 10, while the map-input sends a zero-capture and motion data in the form of +356.24 dots from home. Typically, any value the map-input generates is translated to an integer that falls into the aforementioned range of the analog stick. For purposes of explanation and not limitation, any value from approximately 50 to 149.99 is translated to a +1 counter, while any value over approximately 950 becomes +10 (including 1001, 2,000, 10,000, etc.). Thus, the method 200 generally does not receive any value greater than what is traditionally sent by an analog stick, while the video game controller 10 can have universal compatibility with the video game console 12. In such an embodiment, any value exceeding a given range-matrix (positively or negatively) can be assigned a maximum positive or negative value allowable by a legacy device.

When a compatibly and overdrive filter is selected, at decision step 218, the method 200 proceeds to step 221, wherein the filter takes the map-input, and converts it to a data-type similar to what the traditional analog stick generates, for example, a +/31 counter is used by a traditional console game analog sticks. However, the filter can generate counters that allow for finer control and even exceed what is allowed by analog sticks, which typically results in a control response that more closely resembles typical mouse or trackball operation. According to one embodiment, this filter will be less compatible with the video game console 12 than the compatible mode as described in step 217, but more so than the compatibility mode described in step 220. Typically, step 221 is an A/B translation (e.g., 356.24/100=3.5624), such that the traditional analog stick sends a signal to the video game console 12 that is translated into an integer from 0-10, wherein the number must be a whole number, and due to the physical limitations of the analog stick, can never exceed 10. According to one embodiment, in this mode, the map-input data from the trackball 24 can be translated into data that looks nearly the same as that sent by the analog stick, can operate outside the typical boundaries, and can go beyond the physical limitations of the analog stick by generating counters that exceed ten, wherein this range would only be limited by the sensitivity and speed of motion of the trackball 24. It should be appreciated by those skilled in the art that the final number may be rounded for speed and process of efficiency, but the overall impact of this estimation will be negligible, such that the data can be rounded to an integer and generate a substantially identical data-type to the analog stick, but with a greater range.

If the method 200 proceeds to step 220, full control method has been selected, such that no further calculations are performed on the map-input data. Thus, the data is passed directly through, which can include signal processing for communicating the data, according to one embodiment. At step 222, the map-input data and any timing-modulation data from the filter, whether steps 217, 220, or 221 were implemented, is passed onto final collation. At decision step 224, the method 200 collates data from the various processes and communicates or sends the data onto the controller 48. The travel data or map-input data may be conditioned (e.g., convert binary to hexadecimal, a floating-point decimal to an integer, or the like, wherein an overall value does not change) for software routine purposes.

According to one embodiment, the method 200 can include step 226, wherein raw data that is created by additional buttons (e.g., the A-Button 226, the B-Button 28, the X-Button 30, the Y-Button 32, the selection wheel 34, the bumper 36, the trigger 38, the like, or combination thereof) can be received. Additionally, at step 228, the user can control a switch that tells the digital logic filter which mode to use for the additional buttons and input devices. At decision step 218, the digital logic (e.g., controller 48) receives the input from the additional buttons and devices, and based upon the compatibility mode selected by the user (step 228) or the controller 48 (step 204), the information is processed and/or filtered accordingly.

At step 232, a filtering process includes all of the data from the additional buttons and devices being nullified, so that the data is not passed on to the controller processor. This can result in all the additional buttons losing an effect, which allows for compatibility and traditional field of legacy games. At step 234, according to one embodiment, the filtering process allows for all the data from the additional buttons and devices to be reassigned to various legacy functions. Instead of delivering no response at all, this mode attempts to allow the additional buttons to mimic legacy button functionality. If step 236 is implemented, the filtering process allows all the data from the additional buttons and devices to be passed directly through to allow functionality as intended by the additional buttons. At step 238, the compatibility passed-through allows the data from the selected filter (steps 232, 234, 236) to pass onto final collation at step 224. At step 240 an output is emitted from the video game controller 10 to the video game console 12. It should be appreciated by those skilled in the art that the above circuitry and/or executable software routines can be at least partially included in the video game console 12 rather than the video game controller 10. It should further be appreciated by those skilled in the art that the video game controller 10 and video game console 12 can be other controller/console systems, wherein the inputs are entered on the controller to connect an audio and/or video output emitted by the console.

With respect to FIG. 8, a method of data flow in a digital logic and video game controller having a retroactive compatibility device is generally shown at reference identifier 850. The method 850 starts at step 852, wherein a filter method selection is received. Typically, a user of the video game controller 10 inputs the filter or compatibility method selection using one or more of the compatibility selection device 44. At step 854, travel data can be received/calculated. Such travel data is typically based upon inputs by a user using one or more input devices on the video game controller 10. Thus, data is received by a user activating one or more non-legacy output devices.

The method 850 then proceeds to step 856, wherein the selected filter method is performed on the travel data. Thus, the data received as a function of the non-legacy input device is translated to be retroactivity compatible. The data is then outputted at step 858. Typically, the method 850 returns to step 852 forming a continuous loop, but it should be appreciated by those skilled in the art that the method 850 can end after one or more cycles, such as, but not limited to, when the power to the video game controller 10 being turned off.

In regards to FIG. 9, a method for data flow in a digital logic in a video game controller 10 having a retroactive compatibility device 18 is generally shown at reference identifier 960. The method 960 starts at step 852, wherein a filter or compatibility method selection is received. The method 960 then proceeds to step 962, wherein coordinates of a cursory device are requested. Typically, the coordinates of the cursory device (e.g., the non-legacy input device) are displayed on a screen, which is not necessary, but can help visualize the process, and demonstrate the coordinates system that makes filtration desirable. At step 964, a variable use for filtration is declared. Typically, a sensitivity variable is initialized. The sensitivity variable initialization may be changed dynamically by a user. Other variables that may be declared are output variables that can be passed to the video game console 12. At step 966 variable(s) are initialized. Typically, the variables being initialized at step 966 are actual measurements of cursor moved over time. On the coordinate system, these variables are found subtracting the last known coordinate position for the current coordinate position, and the difference is then multiplied by a sensitivity setting when one is present. This calculation provides the “x” and “y” travel distances that may be used both in and of themselves by the video game controller 10, as set forth in later steps of the method 960.

The method 960 then proceeds to decision step 968. At decision step 968, it is determined which filter method is selected. If it is determined at decision step 968 that the truncation filter method is selected, then the method 960 proceeds to step 970, wherein the data passed to the application emulates data that the application would normally receive from non-cursory devices (e.g., legacy devices). Thus, if the travel data exceeds parameters of the video game console's 12 normal input, the filter can limit the output to within tolerances normally afforded by the video game console 12. According to one embodiment, the truncation filter is similar to the mode overdrive filter mode.

If it is determined at decision step 968 that the division filter method is selected, the method 960 proceeds to step 972, wherein the data is brought in line with the video game console's 12 normal input, such that data is emulated as-if received from a legacy input device, wherein the encoded data exceeds tolerances received from the legacy input devices. Thus, the division filter method may not exceed a single digit, whereas, a pass-through method data can reach two digits or three digits in length. This results in the data from the division filter method being more likely useable than the pass-through method but not as precise, while being more precise in the truncation method, but not as functional. Typically, the division filter can be similar to the full compatibility mode.

If it is determined at decision step 968 that the pass-through method is selected, then the method 960 proceeds to step 974. At step 974, the data received passes directly through to step 976. According to one embodiment, the pass-through method can be a default method if the user does not select another filter method. At step 976, data is outputted from the video game controller 10 to the video game console 12. At step 978, current coordinates can be passed to a global variable, wherein the global variable can be used in the next iteration. Thus, the current coordinates can become the “last known” coordinates the next time the filter is initiated, such that these are placed after the travel data has been calculated for a coordinate based cursory device. The method 960 can then proceed to step 980 where the thread is paused due to the speed of processing the above noted steps. However, it should be appreciated by those skilled in the art that the method 960 can be implemented without step 980.

Although the retroactive compatibility device 18 and compatibility selection device 44 is illustrated and described as being integrated with the controller 10, it should be appreciated by those skilled in the art that the retroactive compatibility device 18 and method 100, 200, 850, and 960 can be integrated and/or implemented by the controller 10, the video game console 12, an adapter in communicative connection between the controller 10 and the video game console 12, or a combination thereof. By way of explanation and not limitation, methods 850 and 960 may be implemented by the video game console 12.

According to one aspect, a video game system can include at least one input device and a retroactivity compatibility device that converts data received as a function of the at least one input device, such that the converted data is configured to be received by a video game console that is executing software routines not intended for functioning with respect to the data received as a function of the at least one input device.

According to one aspect, a method of retroactivity compatibility includes the steps of receiving data from an input device, and converting the received data to a format that can be utilized with software routines that are not intended for functioning with respect to the received data.

Advantageously, the video game controller 10 can include a combination of at least two of the trackball 24, the D-pad 20, and the joystick 22. Additionally, the video game controller 10 includes the retroactive compatibility device 18 that allows the user of the video game controller 10 to utilize at least one input device that the game being played on the video game console 12 was not intended to be used, such that the video game controller 10 is retroactively compatible. It should be appreciated by those skilled in the art that additional advantages, alone or in combination with the above advantages, may be present. It should further be appreciated by those skilled in the art that the above described components and method steps may be combined in alternative combinations.

Modifications of the invention will occur to those skilled in the art and to those who make or use the invention. Therefore, it is understood that the embodiments shown in the drawings and described above are merely for illustrative purposes and not intended to limit the scope of the invention, which is defined by the following claims as interpreted according to the principles of patent law, including the doctrine of equivalents.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US8133119 *Jan 30, 2009Mar 13, 2012Microsoft CorporationAdaptation for alternate gaming input devices
US8177643 *Dec 5, 2008May 15, 2012Microsoft CorporationOut-of-band voice communication with interactive voice response services during gameplay
US8795078 *Oct 24, 2010Aug 5, 2014Ailive Inc.Method and system providing compatibility between two different controllers
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Classifications
U.S. Classification463/37
International ClassificationA63F9/24
Cooperative ClassificationA63F2300/209, A63F2300/1043, A63F13/02
European ClassificationA63F13/02
Legal Events
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Dec 2, 2009ASAssignment
Owner name: S.A.C. CONSULTANCY,FLORIDA
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:CLAUSSEN, SETH A;US-ASSIGNMENT DATABASE UPDATED:20100318;REEL/FRAME:23590/457
Effective date: 20091130
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:CLAUSSEN, SETH A;REEL/FRAME:023590/0457