Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS20100092719 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 12/636,421
Publication dateApr 15, 2010
Filing dateDec 11, 2009
Priority dateJul 24, 2000
Also published asCN1264612C, CN1486223A, DE60136850D1, EP1351779A1, EP1351779A4, EP1351779B1, US7364782, US7632371, US20020009571, US20080113144, WO2002058854A1
Publication number12636421, 636421, US 2010/0092719 A1, US 2010/092719 A1, US 20100092719 A1, US 20100092719A1, US 2010092719 A1, US 2010092719A1, US-A1-20100092719, US-A1-2010092719, US2010/0092719A1, US2010/092719A1, US20100092719 A1, US20100092719A1, US2010092719 A1, US2010092719A1
InventorsLouis Brown Abrams
Original AssigneeHigh Voltage Graphics, Inc.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Flocked transfer and article of manufacture including the application of the transfer by thermoplastic polymer film
US 20100092719 A1
Abstract
A flocked transfer is produced by applying a release agent to a release sheet, and then applying the flocking to a release agent. Unlike the traditional method, a binder and thermoplastic hot melt film is applied to the back of the flock. The transfer, which is essentially release sheet, is then applied to a substrate, such as item of clothing, a rubber pad, etc., by positioning a sheet of thermoplastic hot melt film on the substrate; placing the transfer on the hot melt with the flock in contact with the hot melt film, and applying heat and pressure. The heat melts the thermoplastic hot melt film to bind the flock to the substrate and binds the flocking together. This method reduces the cost involved in producing flocked articles, especially for articles produced on a continuous basis.
Images(4)
Previous page
Next page
Claims(22)
1-23. (canceled)
24. An article, comprising:
(a) a flocked release sheet, comprising flock fibers, a release sheet, a release adhesive adhered to the release sheet, and a plurality of flock fibers, with the flock fibers being adhered to the release sheet by the release adhesive; and
(b) the plurality of flock fibers in contact with a pre-formed, solid, and self-supporting dual laminated film having first and second portions, with the flock fibers being substantially perpendicular to an adjacent surface of the pre-formed, solid, and self-supporting dual laminated film and the flock fibers being positioned between the release sheet and release adhesive one hand and the pre-formed, solid, and self-supporting dual laminated film on the other, wherein the flock fibers are positioned on the first portion.
25. The article of claim 24, wherein the first and second portions have differing chemical compositions.
26. The article of claim 25, wherein the first and second portions comprise thermoplastics.
27. The article of claim 24, wherein the first and second portions have differing properties.
28. The article of claim 27, wherein the first and second portions have differing melting points.
29. The article of claim 28, wherein the second portion is in contact with a substrate and wherein the first portion has a higher melting point than the second portion.
30. The article of claim 27, wherein the first and second portions have differing viscosities.
31. The article of claim 30, wherein the first portion is in contact with the flock fibers and wherein the second portion is in contact with a substrate and wherein the first portion has a higher viscosity than the second portion.
32. The article of claim 24, wherein the first portion comprises a polyurethane and wherein at least most of the flock is in direct contact with the first portion.
33. The article of claim 24, wherein the second portion is in contact with a substrate.
34. The article of claim 24, wherein there is no binder adhesive in contact with the pre-formed, solid, and self-supporting dual laminated adhesive film.
35. The article of claim 24, wherein at least most of the flock is in direct contact with the first portion.
36. The article of claim 24, wherein the second portion comprises a polyurethane and wherein the second portion is in contact with a substrate.
37. The article of claim 24, wherein the first and second portion comprise polyurethanes and wherein the first and second portions differ in one or both of melting points and viscosities.
38. The article of claim 37, wherein the first and second portions differ in one or both of properties and chemical composition.
39. An article of manufacture, comprising:
(a) a release sheet;
(b) a release adhesive deposited on the release sheet;
(c) flock fibers, a first surface of the fibers being adhered to the release adhesive; and
(d) a thermoplastic two-part adhesive layer adhered to a second surface of the fibers, a first part of the adhesive layer having at least one different property from a second part of the adhesive layer, wherein the first part of the adhesive layer is in contact with the second surface of the fibers.
40. The article of claim 39, wherein the different property is chemical composition.
41. The article of claim 39, wherein the first and second parts have differing melting points.
42. The article of claim 41, wherein the first part has a higher melting point than the second part.
43. The article of claim 39, wherein the first and second parts have differing viscosities.
44. The article of claim 43, wherein the first part has a higher viscosity than the second part.
Description
    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION
  • [0001]
    The present application is a continuation of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/455,575, filed Jun. 4, 2003, of the same title, which is a divisional patent application of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 09/735,721, filed Dec. 13, 2000 of the same title, which is a continuation-in-part patent application of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 09/621,830, filed Jul. 24, 2000 entitled “FLOCKED TRANSFER AND ARTICLE OF MANUFACTURE INCLUDING THE FLOCKED TRANSFER”, each of which is incorporated in its entirety by this reference.
  • STATEMENT REGARDING FEDERALLY SPONSORED RESEARCH DEVELOPMENT
  • [0002]
    N/A
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • [0003]
    This invention relates to flocked transfers, and, in particular to an improved method incorporating thermoplastic polymer film, in the making of the flocked transfer, which can reduce the cost and time required of producing transfers by a significant amount.
  • [0004]
    Heretofore, flocked transfers have generally been produced by applying a release agent to a release sheet. The flocking is applied to the release sheet in the desired pattern. A binder and a permanent hot melt adhesive are applied to the back of the flocking, and the transfer is allowed to dry. The binder is required to hold the flocking in the desired pattern. The hot melt adhesive, which is applied to the transfer as a powder, is used to adhere the transfer to a substrate, such as an article of clothing, a rubber pad, etc. The transfer is applied to the substrate by placing the transfer on the substrate with the dried hot melt adhesive in contact with the substrate. Heat, such as from an iron, is then applied to the release sheet. The heat melts the hot melt adhesive, to cause hot melt adhesive to flow into intimate contact with the substrate, forming a mechanical or physical adhesion with the substrate. The release agent then allows the release sheet to be removed from the transfer, leaving the flocking exposed on the substrate.
  • [0005]
    This traditional method has worked well for years. However, the method can be improved upon to reduce the cost of producing the transfer, and hence, the cost of the item containing the transfer.
  • [0006]
    In my co-pending application, I have described the usage of a thermoset film in lieu of the bond and powder for adhesion, which film, when subject to heat, adheres to the substrate, functions as an inherence for the flock. This current invention adds further enhancements to this process, by allowing the application and usage of a thermoplastic film, for adherence of the flock transfer.
  • BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • [0007]
    In accordance with the invention, generally stated, a flocked transfer of the present invention is produced by applying a release agent to a release sheet, and then applying the flocking to the release agent. Unlike the traditional method, a binder and adhesive are not applied to the ends of the flock, but rather, a thermoplastic polymer film is used in lieu thereof.
  • [0008]
    To form an article of manufacture with the flocked transfer, a hot melt film (in the form of a sheet are cut to shape) is positioned on the substrate to which the transfer is to be applied. The hot melt is preferably a blank or blank film, but can be any thermoplastic type of polymer film. The flock with the release adhesive and the release sheet (i.e., the transfer) is then placed on the sheet of hot melt film with the release sheet up, so that the flocking is in contact with the hot melt film. Heat is then applied to the transfer. The heat melts the hot melt film, and secures the flock to the substrate. Because the film is thermoplastic, even if it is subsequently subjected to heat, below a particular temperature, it will not remelt, nor become tacky, and hence, there is no risk of the fibers becoming matted down in any of this type of adhesive, which would otherwise ruin the plush pile effect. It is known that there is a enhanced adhesion with thermoplastic materials, because the thermoplastic materials will cross-attach, and thereby adhere the flock fibers to it, which may become chemically attached thereto. Through the usage of this invention, the finished flock surface is more plush, soft, because more of the fiber is exposed and extends upwardly out of the adhesive, than with the screen-printed latex, as currently used. Also, this affords better soil release during washing or cleaning because of less fiber/adhesive entanglement occurs with the flock, during application.
  • [0009]
    The use of a thermoplastic type of film for achieving adherence of a transfer to a surface, can be done either before or after the heat transferring operation, or where the heat transfer is produced. The thermoplastic film can be brought into the process at either stage, with respect to the manufacture of the transfer. It is most practical to combine the hot melt film before the heat transfer is fabricated, so it is combined in a convenient and portable manner, which operation was not possible with the previous type of application, for the thermoset film, because once the thermoset film was heated, it sets, and cannot be reheated.
  • [0010]
    In addition, it is possible to use a two-part thermoplastic type of film, such as commonly available in the industry, having different properties on each side in terms of, for example, melting point, and viscosity of structure. In this way, one can use a higher melting point holt melt film, of thermoplastic material, on the side that attaches to the flock fibers, so that the transfer is initially put together with higher heat in order to set the fibers in place, and then subsequently during application of the transfer to a textile, it may be done at a lower temperature to activate the hot melt on the substrate side while not hot enough to remelt the film holding the flock in place. Also, the hot melt holding the flock can be a very high viscosity, that is, it will not flow much when melted, in order to keep the fibers in place and not mat them together, while the film on the substrate side could be a lower viscosity type of film, that will readily flow so it will penetrate and establish a good mechanical adhesion of the transfer or grid to any substrate upon which the transfer is applied.
  • [0011]
    Thus, it is an object of this invention to provide for the development of a flock, that may be temporarily adhered onto a release film carrier, fabricated of a thermoplastic film. And, it is a further object that the hold melt film may be used as an intermediate layer, to attach the fibers to the substrate, when developing the transfer initially.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE SEVERAL VIEWS OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0012]
    FIG. 1 is a cross-sectional view of a prior art flock transfer;
  • [0013]
    FIG. 2 is a cross-sectional view of a flock transfer of the present invention;
  • [0014]
    FIG. 3 is an exploded view of the transfer, a hot melt sheet, and a substrate used to make an article of manufacture;
  • [0015]
    FIG. 4 is a cross-sectional view of an article of manufacture using the transfer of the present invention, showing a part of the transfer applied to part of the substrate and a part of the transfer and hot melt film spaced from the substrate; and
  • [0016]
    FIG. 5 is a schematic drawing of a process for continuously producing articles of manufacture, such as mouse pads, coasters, transfers for application to clothing, etc.
  • [0017]
    Corresponding reference numerals will used throughout the several views of the drawings.
  • DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT
  • [0018]
    The following detailed description illustrates the invention by way of example, and not by way of limitation. This description will enable one skilled in the art to make and use the invention, including what is presently believed is the best mode of carrying out the invention. A prior art flock transfer 101 is shown in FIG. 1. As is known, such transfers include a dimensionally stable release sheet 103, to which a conventional flock transfer release adhesive 105 is applied in a pattern which corresponds to the overall image to be flocked. The flock 107 is then electrostatically coated to the release sheet 105. A binder adhesive 109 is applied to the exposed ends of the flock to bind the flock together as a unit. Lastly, a hot melt adhesive 111 is applied. The transfer is then allowed to dry. The transfer is applied to a substrate, as is known, by positioning the transfer on a substrate, such as a shirt, coat, or other item of clothing, with the hot melt adhesive in contact with the substrate, and applying to the transfer. The heat activates the hot melt adhesive to adhere the transfer to the substrate. This process is described in my prior patent U.S. Pat. No. 4,810,549, as well as in my co-pending application, Ser. No. 09/548,839, filed Apr. 13, 2000, both of which are incorporated herein by reference.
  • [0019]
    In addition, I have described a similar transfer to that of this current invention, utilizing a thermosetting film, in my application having Ser. No. 09/621,830, filed on Jul. 24, 2000. The contents of that application are incorporated herein by reference.
  • [0020]
    A flocked transfer 1 of the present invention is shown in FIG. 2. The transfer 1 of the present invention includes a release sheet 3, to which a conventional release agent 5, such as a wax, or other binder, has been applied. The release agent is applied to the sheet in the shape of a pattern of the flocking. Flocking 7 is then applied to the release agent, and hence, to the release sheet, to form the transfer. The flocking 7 is applied, for example, in the manner as described in my previous patent and applications, which are incorporated herein by reference. Unlike the prior art processes, the transfer 1 is made without the use of a binder adhesive or hot melt adhesive. As is discussed below, a thermoplastic film is used to adhere the transfer to a substrate.
  • [0021]
    An article of manufacture, such as an item of clothing having a transfer 1 applied thereto, or a mouse pad, coaster, or any other numerous items having a flocked surface, can be manufactured in accordance with this invention and is easily produced using the transfer 1. Referring to FIGS. 2-5, the article of manufacture 11 is produced by positioning a hot melt sheet 13, between a substrate 15 and the flocked release sheet. The hot melt sheet is, for example, a sheet of thermoplastic polymer, comprising polyesters, and which is available from Bostik. The hot melt sheet can also be made from a thermoplastic polyurethane. Any other thermoplastic film should also work well. The substrate 15 can be item of clothing, a rubber pad (as for example, for producing a mouse pad or coaster), etc. The hot melt sheet can be precut to correspond to the shape of the transfer. The transfer 1 is then positioned on the hot melt sheet with the flock 7 against the hot melt sheet 13. Heat is applied to the transfer through the release sheet to activate the hot melt sheet. The hot melt sheet then acts to both bind the flock 7 together and to generally permanently adhere the flock 7 to the substrate 15. Preferably, to assemble the article, the flocked release sheet, the thermoplastic film, and the substrate are brought together and passed through a heat laminating press where the three parts are subject to a temperature of about 300° F. to 350° F. (generally in excess of 150° C.) and pressure (about 40-50 psi) for about 30 seconds. It has been found that a medium-to-firm pressure has been most advantageous in providing for assembly of this type of plush flocked transfer. The pressure and heat will cause the hot melt to adhere to the flock and the substrate. Additionally, the hot melt film will physically adhere or cure, to give a strong attachment of the flock to the substrate.
  • [0022]
    The basic premise of this application in utilizing a thermoplastic film which will semi-cure, after heat has been used to apply the transfer to a substrate, is that after heat application, if the temperature of the transfer does not rise to a particular heat level, it should not remelt again. In other words, the object is to use a hot melt film which has a melting point significantly high enough, so that when the transfer is applied through heat, it will adhere to the substrate, but that when the transfer and the substrate to which it is applied is not exposed to excessive heat, it will not remelt, even through the polymer film is thermoplastic, and for all practical purposes, in actual usage, the film will not remelt since it does not see those high temperatures again. In other words, if the melting point of the thermoplastic film is 350° F., and the top temperature that the flocked finished product will encounter, for example sunlight in a hot car, is only 250° F., then there is not a problem associated with the fact that the film is a thermoplastic and therefore can theoretically melt again, but only if it encounters those excessive temperatures.
  • [0023]
    Another attribute of the use of a thermoplastic film is that in the event one desires to remove the flocked transfer from, for example, an item of clothing, subjecting the transfer to those elevated temperatures, again, will allow the flock to be removed, if that is a need of the owner.
  • [0024]
    Articles, such as mouse pads or coasters, in which the entire top surface of the article is covered with the flocking can be produced on a continuous basis, as shown in
  • [0025]
    FIGS. 3 and 5. Rolls 21, 23 and 25, of the flocked release sheet 1, the thermoplastic hot melt film 13, and the substrate 15, are provided. The three parts are brought together at a lamination station 33. Rollers can be provided in front of the station 33 so that the three elements are adjacent each other as they enter the lamination station. In the lamination station, heat and pressure are applied to the three sheets (the flocked release sheet, the hot melt film, and the substrate) to melt the hot melt film. The melted hot melt film will then cure or cross-link, as noted above, to adhere the flock to the substrate. A web 35 exits the laminating station. The web 35 is then allowed to cool. The web 35 is ultimately directed to a cutting station where it is cut into individual articles. Once the web 35 is cooled, it can be directed immediately to a cutting station (after the sheet 35 cools), or it can be wound up on an uptake roller to be cut into individual articles at a later time, or at a different location. At the cutting station, the release sheet is removed from the flock and gathered on a take-up roll or is otherwise disposed of. After the release sheet has been removed from the flock, the substrate with flock adhered thereto is cut to form the articles 11. It is also likely that one could remove the release liner either before or after the die cutting procedure. As shown in FIG. 3, a fringe material 50 can be applied to peripheral edges of the flocked release sheet 1 or substrate 15 during this manufacturing process.
  • [0026]
    Preferably the release sheet is flocked and supplied in roll form as shown in FIG. 5. However, the flocking of the release sheet could be made part of the process.
  • [0027]
    To produce flocked articles, such as shirts, jackets, sports bags, etc., which cannot be easily flocked on a continuous basis, the hot melt sheet can be applied to the transfer 1 prior to applying the transfer to the substrate. To do this, the thermoplastic hot melt film is placed in contact with the flock of the transfer, and the transfer and release sheet are heated to a temperature at which the thermoplastic hot melt film becomes tacky, but below the temperature at which the thermoplastic hot melt film begins to cure or physically adhere. This will adhere the thermoplastic hot melt film to the transfer 1 to form a transfer which can later be applied to an article by positioning the transfer with the hot melt film in position on the article (i.e., a piece of clothing) and applying heat and pressure to the transfer, for example, with an iron, sufficient to melt the hot melt film, to cause the hot melt film to somewhat cure or physically adhere, to adhere the flock, and secure to the clothing.
  • [0028]
    The method eliminates two steps from the prior art method: (1). Application of the binder adhesive, and (2) application, cleaning, sintering, and drying of the hot melt adhesive. In a continuous process, the present method also eliminates a station for applying the binder of hot melt adhesives as well as a station for drying the completed transfer. Because the station is not needed to apply (i.e., print) the binder and hot melt adhesives are applied to the flocking as part of the transfer, the machinery required to produce the article 11 is much less expensive (both in actual cost and in maintenance cost). Additionally, because the binder adhesive and hot melt adhesive is not used, the cost of the article of manufacture is reasonably reduced.
  • [0029]
    It is conceivable in the performance of the manufacture of the transfer of this invention, that the thermoplastic film may be a dual laminated type of film. For example, the upper surface may include a polyester type of film, that may have a melting point at a higher temperature. The lower film, laminated thereto, may be a polyethylene type of film, designed to have a lower temperature melting point. Hence, when the flock is applied to the upper surface of the laminated film, it will embed slightly into that film when heated, and the flock is electrostatically or otherwise applied, and while the bottom surface of the laminated film may likewise soften, once the transfer is cooled, all the films will become structurally sound, once again, in a film structure. Then, when a lower heat is applied to the transfer, for application of the transfer to a textile, rubber, or other surface, as when the transfer is being applied, the bottom polyethylene or EVA film will slightly soften, or melt, to function as an adhesive, for application of the entire transfer to its supporting substrate or surface. This is an example as to how the thermoplastic film(s) of this invention can be used not only for constructing of the transfer, but to function in a dual manner to allow for the application of the transfer to a shirt, bag, or other material, during its final application.
  • [0030]
    Another one of the advantages of utilization of thermoplastics, in the fabrication of flocked transfers, is that the binder adhesives previously used in the flocking process, typically contain an acrylic, or other materials, which may be flammable. Thermoplastics avoid that predicament. Furthermore, the thermoplastic type binder exhibits wash fastness, and will hold the flock in place even during severe washing conditions. Furthermore, thermoplastic films exhibit better elasticity, than can be obtained from the thermoset or other binder hot melt systems now in use. In addition, the use of the film provides a thinner profile for the finished product, providing a less bulky type of flock transfer, both visually and structural wise, when applied to a garment or other textiles. For example, flock transfers made in accordance with this invention can even be used upon sheer garment textiles. The usage of the thermoplastic film of this invention, avoids the necessity for application of binders, as previously used, and which contain formaldehyde or other undesired chemicals, as used in previous adhesives to achieve cross linking for flocking purposes in the prior art. There are other miscellaneous film properties that are enhanced through the usage of thermoplastic films, versus the usage of the binder-hot melt powder combination, because there are films that have performance characteristics that cannot be obtained nor are they available for the binder-powder systems. For example, adhesions to leather, or other tough-to-stick-to-surfaces, that exhibit greater tensile strength, such as stretching that will not split, can be better accommodated through the usage of thermoplastic film.
  • [0031]
    Variations or modifications to the subject matter of this invention may occur to those skilled in the art upon reviewing the invention as described herein. Such variations, if within the scope of this invention, are intended to be encompassed within the claims to issue upon the invention of this application. The description of the preferred embodiment, as shown in the drawings, is set forth for illustrative purposes only.
Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1580717 *Apr 14, 1925Apr 13, 1926Sayles Finishing Plants IncOrnamented fabric and method of ornamenting it
US1905989 *Jan 18, 1933Apr 25, 1933Charles SafirGarment monogram
US1992676 *Jun 15, 1933Feb 26, 1935Mantle Lamp CompanyLight-transmitting body
US2230654 *Jul 1, 1939Feb 4, 1941Kinetic Chemicals IncTetrafluoroethylene polymers
US2275617 *Jul 20, 1939Mar 10, 1942Gen Aniline & Film CorpPhotographic strip film and stripfilm paper
US2278227 *Oct 9, 1940Mar 31, 1942ThackerayMulticolor flock printing machine
US2636837 *Apr 9, 1949Apr 28, 1953Summers Edward ClaytonProcess of producing flocked designs
US2981588 *Nov 10, 1959Apr 25, 1961Allied Textile Printers IncColored flocked fabrics
US3314845 *Jul 23, 1964Apr 18, 1967Du PontMethod of flocking and subsequently developing latently crimpable fibers and article produced thereby
US3377232 *Sep 8, 1964Apr 9, 1968British Nylon Spinners LtdNonwoven fabrics and the method of manufacture thereof
US3432446 *Mar 31, 1965Mar 11, 1969Carter S Ink CoPorous applicator prepared by bonding thermoplastic fibrous flock particles at point of contact with the aid of a plasticizer
US3496054 *Jan 13, 1967Feb 17, 1970Kem Wove Ind IncFlocked nonwoven textile material having a relief pattern therein
US3565742 *Jul 17, 1967Feb 23, 1971Monsanto CoFlocked golf green
US3639149 *Oct 28, 1970Feb 1, 1972American Cyanamid CoComposite laminate of water-extended unsaturated polyester
US3644267 *Jan 28, 1970Feb 22, 1972Eastman Kodak CoLow-viscosity high-strength thermoplastic adhesive
US3657060 *Aug 25, 1970Apr 18, 1972Penn Novelty Co TheEmbroidered emblem with thermoplastic adhesive
US3793050 *Aug 12, 1971Feb 19, 1974E MumpowerMethod of applying flocking to a base
US3803453 *Jun 19, 1973Apr 9, 1974Du PontSynthetic filament having antistatic properties
US3936554 *Apr 19, 1974Feb 3, 1976M. Lowenstein & Sons, Inc.Three dimensional decorative material and process for producing same
US3953566 *Jul 3, 1973Apr 27, 1976W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc.Process for producing porous products
US4018956 *Oct 3, 1975Apr 19, 1977Microfibres, Inc.Method of making a differentially shrunk flocked fabric, and flocked fabric product
US4138945 *May 16, 1977Feb 13, 1979Thomas RejtoSimultaneous heat transfer printing and embossing method
US4142929 *Jan 30, 1978Mar 6, 1979Kazuo OtomineProcess for manufacturing transfer sheets
US4263373 *May 24, 1977Apr 21, 1981Westinghouse Electric Corp.Method of making an ultra thin glue adherable decorative laminate
US4314813 *Sep 29, 1980Feb 9, 1982Yasuzi MasakiFlock transfer sheet and flock transfer printing process
US4314955 *Aug 21, 1980Feb 9, 1982Bayer AktiengesellschaftMethod of filling cavities, in particular, mold cavities, with a reactive flowable mixture
US4318946 *Oct 31, 1979Mar 9, 1982Dallas PavoneDecorative simulated stained glass light transmissive mosaic panels
US4319942 *Jun 6, 1979Mar 16, 1982The Standard Products CompanyRadiation curing of flocked composite structures
US4369157 *Apr 11, 1977Jan 18, 1983Dri-Print Foils, Inc.Method of automatically decorating articles as they are in-mold formed automatically
US4370374 *Sep 2, 1980Jan 25, 1983Plate Bonn Gesellschaft Mit Beschrankter HaftungMultilayer plastic film, process for its production and its use
US4430372 *Jun 11, 1982Feb 7, 1984Firma Carl FreudenbergNon-woven fabric with improved hot-press properties and method for manufacturing same
US4438533 *May 27, 1981Mar 27, 1984Kufner Textilwerke KgInterlining for garments and method for the manufacture thereof
US4510274 *Jan 12, 1983Apr 9, 1985Denki Kagaku Kogyo Kabushiki KaishaVinyl acetate-ethylene copolymer emulsion and aqueous emulsion adhesive composition containing the emulsion
US4574018 *Dec 30, 1983Mar 4, 1986Toray Industries, Inc.Pile fabric production process
US4582658 *Jul 23, 1984Apr 15, 1986Bayer AktiengesellschaftProcess for the production of a cellular composite plastic part
US4650533 *Nov 23, 1984Mar 17, 1987Transfer Print Foils, Inc.Preparation of hot transfer product for continuous in-mold decoration
US4652478 *Jan 29, 1986Mar 24, 1987Franz Joseph RathFlock transfer sheet patch
US4797320 *Jan 4, 1988Jan 10, 1989Bayer AktiengesellschaftComposite plastic moldings and a process for their production
US4810321 *May 26, 1987Mar 7, 1989Bayer AkteingesellschaftProcess for the preparation of a metal-plastic laminate
US4810549 *Aug 24, 1987Mar 7, 1989High Voltage Graphics, Inc.Plush textured multicolored flock transfer
US4812247 *Aug 11, 1986Mar 14, 1989Bayer AktiengesellschaftPlastics moulding containing reinforced fillings
US4895748 *Apr 3, 1989Jan 23, 1990Squires William JFlocked foam fabric with flattened fibers which are color printed
US4985296 *Mar 16, 1989Jan 15, 1991W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc.Polytetrafluoroethylene film
US5008130 *Jun 22, 1989Apr 16, 1991Uniroyal Textilcord, S.A.Method of producing a patterned flocked web of material
US5009943 *Oct 21, 1988Apr 23, 1991Stahls' Inc.Pre-sewn letter and method
US5009950 *Mar 14, 1989Apr 23, 1991Bayer AktiengesellschaftComposite structures
US5108530 *Dec 1, 1989Apr 28, 1992Bayer AktiengesellschaftMethod of producing a deep-drawn formed plastic piece
US5198277 *Oct 7, 1991Mar 30, 1993Interface, Inc.Pattern-tufted, fusion-bonded carpet and carpet tile and method of preparation
US5298031 *Nov 4, 1992Mar 29, 1994Malden Mills Industries Inc.Method for treating velvet-like fabric which is simultaneously embossed and decorated
US5306567 *Mar 22, 1993Apr 26, 1994Eastman Kodak CompanyThermosetting coating compositions
US5385694 *Mar 30, 1994Jan 31, 1995W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc.Microemulsion polymerization systems and coated materials made therefrom
US5403884 *Jan 13, 1993Apr 4, 1995National Starch And Chemical Investment Holding CorporationProcess for flocking EDPM substrates
US5480506 *Jun 3, 1994Jan 2, 1996Mahn, Sr.; John E.Ornamental transfer specially adapted for adherence to nylon
US5489359 *Jun 20, 1994Feb 6, 1996Brother Kogyo Kabushiki KaishaPrinting method for thermally transferring image section of print sheet to image receiving member and print sheet making device
US5597633 *Feb 10, 1995Jan 28, 1997Pelikan GmbhTransfer adhesive tape
US5597637 *Sep 6, 1994Jan 28, 1997High Voltage Graphics, Inc.Elastomeric backing for flock transfer
US5599416 *May 12, 1995Feb 4, 1997Kuwahara; EijiThermally transferable type emblem made of thermoplastic synthetic resin and method of manufacturing the same
US5622587 *Dec 19, 1991Apr 22, 1997Barthelman; Kenneth L.Method for producing a three-dimensional laminated decal composite
US5858156 *Feb 17, 1998Jan 12, 1999High Voltage Graphics, Inc.Diminishing bleed plush transfer
US5863633 *Aug 5, 1996Jan 26, 1999Squires; William J.Flocked fabric with water resistant film
US6010764 *Mar 28, 1998Jan 4, 2000High Voltage Graphics, Inc.Transfer fabricated from non-compatible components
US6170881 *Feb 3, 1997Jan 9, 2001Serigraph, Inc.Pseudo three-dimensional image display and method of manufacturing including reflective monochrome or holographic roll leafing
US6171678 *Jul 14, 1998Jan 9, 2001Bayer Antwerp N.V.Polyurethane carpet backings with improved tuft bind
US6178680 *Jun 30, 1998Jan 30, 2001Printmark Industries, Inc.Applique for apparel and method for making the applique
US6202549 *Jun 23, 1993Mar 20, 2001Leonhard Kurz Gmbh & Co.Process and apparatus for transferring prints from a support on to a substrate
US6350504 *Jun 3, 1998Feb 26, 2002Microfibres, Inc.Printed flocked pile fabric and method for making same
US6361855 *Oct 28, 1999Mar 26, 2002Specialty Adhesive Film Co.Method of forming heat activated transfer for improved adhesion and reduced bleedthrough
US6376041 *Feb 13, 1998Apr 23, 2002Microfibres, Inc.Embossed fabric
US6555648 *Sep 10, 2001Apr 29, 2003Cyril HindsTetrafluoroethylene products with enhanced crystallinity and processes for producing the same
US6676796 *Feb 26, 2001Jan 13, 2004Honeywell International Inc.Transferrable compliant fibrous thermal interface
US7191720 *Feb 3, 2003Mar 20, 2007Hbi Branded Apparel Enterprises, LlcMethod of manufacture for stitchless garment
US7338697 *Mar 21, 2003Mar 4, 2008High Voltage Graphics, Inc.Co-molded direct flock and flock transfer and methods of making same
US7344769 *Jul 24, 2000Mar 18, 2008High Voltage Graphics, Inc.Flocked transfer and article of manufacture including the flocked transfer
US7351368 *Jul 3, 2003Apr 1, 2008High Voltage Graphics, Inc.Flocked articles and methods of making same
US8110059 *Sep 29, 2005Feb 7, 2012Nobuo KurodaThree-dimensional decoration piece made of synthetic resin and method of manufacturing the same
US20040010093 *May 9, 2003Jan 15, 2004Rainer WefringhausUV-resistant flocking adhesive for polymeric substrates
US20040033334 *Jun 10, 2003Feb 19, 2004Playtex Products, Inc.Electrostatic flocking and articles made therefrom
US20040050482 *Jul 3, 2003Mar 18, 2004Abrams Louis BrownFlocked articles and methods of making same
US20050001419 *Dec 19, 2003Jan 6, 2005Levy Kenneth L.Color laser engraving and digital watermarking
US20050070419 *Sep 29, 2004Mar 31, 2005Haasl Andrew L.Assembly for and method of adjusting the phasing of folding rolls to create a fold in sheets of material
US20050070434 *Sep 23, 2004Mar 31, 2005Fresco Plastics LlcMethod and apparatus for continuously forming dye sublimation images in solid substrates
US20050081985 *Oct 7, 2004Apr 21, 2005Abrams Louis B.Processes for precutting laminated flocked articles
US20060026778 *Aug 4, 2005Feb 9, 2006Societe D'enduction Et DeProcess for continuous production of a flocked and dyed cloth backing
US20060029767 *Aug 4, 2005Feb 9, 2006Societe D'enduction Et De FlockageProcess for continuous production of a flocked and dyed cloth backing
US20070003761 *May 18, 2004Jan 4, 2007Toray Industries, Inc.Fibers excellent in magnetic field responsiveness and conductivity and product consisting of it
US20070022548 *Aug 1, 2006Feb 1, 2007High Voltage Graphics, Inc.Process for heat setting polyester fibers for sublimation printing
US20070026189 *Jul 27, 2006Feb 1, 2007High Voltage Graphics, Inc.Flocked articles having noncompatible insert and porous film
US20080003399 *Aug 21, 2007Jan 3, 2008High Voltage Graphics, Inc.Wet-on-wet method for forming flocked adhesive article
US20080006968 *Aug 21, 2007Jan 10, 2008High Voltage Graphics, Inc.Heat moldable flock transfer with heat resistant, reusable release sheet and methods of making same
US20080050548 *Sep 7, 2007Feb 28, 2008High Voltage Graphics, Inc.Decorative article with control shrinkage carrier
US20080095973 *Oct 17, 2007Apr 24, 2008High Voltage Graphics, Inc.Laser textured flocked substrate
US20090075075 *Feb 14, 2008Mar 19, 2009High Voltage Graphics, Inc.Sublimation dye printed textile
US20120015156 *Jun 20, 2011Jan 19, 2012Louis Brown AbramsHeat applied appliqué or transfer with enhanced elastomeric functionality
US20120028003 *Jun 20, 2011Feb 2, 2012Louis Brown AbramsDimensional, patterned heat applied applique or transfer made from knit textile
USD108581 *Nov 19, 1936Feb 22, 1938 Design for a rug
USD125860 *Dec 30, 1940Mar 11, 1941 Haas rug or similar article
USD162533 *May 29, 1950Mar 20, 1951 Morris b. goldfaeb
USD366654 *Jul 26, 1994Jan 30, 1996Westinghouse Electric CorporationMousepad
USD391572 *Aug 27, 1996Mar 3, 1998Oneworld Enterprises LimitedRadio with earphones
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US8168262Jun 14, 2010May 1, 2012High Voltage Graphics, Inc.Flocked elastomeric articles
US9012005Feb 16, 2010Apr 21, 2015High Voltage Graphics, Inc.Flocked stretchable design or transfer including thermoplastic film and method for making the same
US9175436Mar 11, 2011Nov 3, 2015High Voltage Graphics, Inc.Flocked articles having a resistance to splitting and methods for making the same
US9180728Jun 20, 2011Nov 10, 2015High Voltage Graphics, Inc.Dimensional, patterned heat applied applique or transfer made from knit textile
US9180729Jun 20, 2011Nov 10, 2015High Voltage Graphics, Inc.Heat applied appliqué or transfer with enhanced elastomeric functionality
US9193214Oct 14, 2013Nov 24, 2015High Voltage Graphics, Inc.Flexible heat sealable decorative articles and method for making the same
US20100233410 *May 26, 2010Sep 16, 2010High Voltage Graphics, Inc.Wet-on-wet method for forming flocked adhesive article
US20100276060 *Jun 14, 2010Nov 4, 2010High Voltage Graphics, Inc.Flocked elastomeric articles
US20110052859 *Sep 2, 2010Mar 3, 2011High Voltage Graphics, Inc.Processes for precutting laminated flocked articles
USRE45802Sep 21, 2012Nov 17, 2015High Voltage Graphics, Inc.Flocked articles having noncompatible insert and porous film
Classifications
U.S. Classification428/86
International ClassificationD06Q1/14, D04H11/00, B32B33/00, B29L9/00, B29L7/00, B32B7/06, B29C65/40, B32B37/04, B44C1/17, B05D1/14
Cooperative ClassificationY10T428/23914, Y10T428/23943, Y10T428/23993, Y10T428/23929, Y10T156/1052, Y10S428/914, B44C1/1725, B44C1/1712, B32B2037/1223, B44C1/1716, B32B37/025, B32B37/04, D04H11/00, D06Q1/14, B44C1/172
European ClassificationD06Q1/14, B32B37/02B, B44C1/17F6, B44C1/17F2, B44C1/17F, D04H11/00, B44C1/17F4, B32B37/04