Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS20100114340 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 12/613,970
Publication dateMay 6, 2010
Filing dateNov 6, 2009
Priority dateJun 2, 2008
Also published asUS7925384, US20100185339
Publication number12613970, 613970, US 2010/0114340 A1, US 2010/114340 A1, US 20100114340 A1, US 20100114340A1, US 2010114340 A1, US 2010114340A1, US-A1-20100114340, US-A1-2010114340, US2010/0114340A1, US2010/114340A1, US20100114340 A1, US20100114340A1, US2010114340 A1, US2010114340A1
InventorsCharles Huizenga, Alex Do, Michael Corr, Dale Fong, Josh Mooney
Original AssigneeCharles Huizenga, Alex Do, Michael Corr, Dale Fong, Josh Mooney
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Automatic provisioning of wireless control systems
US 20100114340 A1
Abstract
Exemplary systems and methods for provisioning wireless control of facilities systems are provided. A message is broadcast to a network that includes one or more control devices, which may be associated with one or more control points (e.g., lights in lighting systems). The control device responds with information concerning the control device and/or any associated control points. A scene including at least one specification for operation the control point is assigned to the control device. A corresponding scene command may be generated and sent to the control device. Provisioning may further include generating a visual display of the various control devices and associated control points (e.g., lights) in the facilities system.
Images(4)
Previous page
Next page
Claims(18)
1. A method of provisioning a wireless control system, the method comprising:
broadcasting a message from a computing device to a wireless communications network comprising one or more control devices, each control device associated with one or more lights;
receiving a response at the computing device from a control device in the network, the response including information regarding the control device;
executing instructions stored in memory of the computing device, wherein execution of the instructions by a processor of the computing device:
assigns a scene to the control device based on at least the received response, the scene comprising a specification for operating the one or more lights associated with the control device, and
generates a scene command for the control device based on the assigned scene; and
transmitting the scene command from the computing device to the control device, wherein execution of the scene command by a processor of the control device configures the control device to direct operations of the one or more associated lights in accordance with the assigned scene.
2. The method of claim 1, wherein the wireless communication network is a multi-hop network and further comprising limiting the broadcast to control devices within a specified number of hops from the computing device.
3. The method of claim 1, further comprising identifying that the control device is associated with one or more relays, and wherein execution of the scene command by the control device includes independently controlling operation of each of the one or more relays.
4. The method of claim 3, wherein identifying that the control device is associated with the one or more relays is based on the received response, wherein the received response from the control device includes information concerning a number of relays associated with the control device and a measured or assigned electrical current consumption and voltage of the load controlled by each relay of the control device.
5. The method of claim 1, wherein the received response further includes location information and further comprising generating a visual display mapping the locations of the one or more control devices.
6. The method of claim 5, wherein assigning the scene to the control device is based on a spatial distribution of the scene and the location information received from the control device.
7. The method of claim 1, wherein the wireless communications network further comprises a sensor associated with one or more lights, the sensor receiving and responding to the broadcast message, and wherein the scene command is further based on the sensor response.
8. The method of claim 1, wherein the scene further includes specifications for operating a plurality of control devices, and wherein execution of the scene command by a processor of the control device configures the control device to operate in conjunction with at least another control device.
9. The method of claim 1, further comprising sending a plurality of scene commands to the control device, each of the plurality of scene commands corresponding to a different scene, wherein the control device determines a scene command to execute according to one or more rules.
10. The method of claim 9, wherein the one or more rules includes a condition associated with a scene command, wherein the control device is configured to detect satisfaction of the condition and execute the associated scene command in response to the detection.
11. The method of claim 9, wherein the one or more rules include an order of scene commands, wherein the control device executes the plurality of scene commands according to the order.
12. A system of provisioning a wireless control system, the system comprising:
a memory of a computing device, the memory configured to store one or more scenes, each scene comprising a specification for operating one or more lights associated with a control device;
a communications interface of the computing device, the communications interface configured to:
broadcast a message to a wireless communications network comprising one or more control devices, each control device associated with one or more lights, and
receive a response from a control device in the network, the response including information regarding the control device; and
a processor of the computing device, the processor configured to execute instructions stored in memory to
assign a scene from the one or more scenes stored in memory to the control device based on at least the received response, and
generate a scene command for the control device based on the assigned scene, wherein execution of the scene command by a processor of the control device configures the control device to direct operations of the one or more associated lights in accordance with the assigned scene.
13. The system of claim 12, wherein the processor is configured to further execute instructions for identifying that the control device is associated with one or more relays and wherein execution of the generated scene command by the control device includes independently controlling operation of each of the one or more relays.
14. The system of claim 14, wherein identifying that the control device is associated with one or more relays is based on the received response from the control device, wherein the received response includes information concerning a number of relays associated with the control device, a measured or assigned electrical current consumption and voltage of the load controlled by each relay of the control device.
15. The system of claim 14, wherein the processor is configured to further execute instructions for generating a visual display of the one or more control devices based on location information in the received response and further comprising a display interface for displaying the generated visual display, the visual display including a total number of unit loads associated with each relay for each control device, the determination of the total number of unit loads based on the information regarding the electrical current consumption of each relay.
16. The system of claim 12, further comprising a memory configured to store a plurality of scenes, each scene being associated with a spatial distribution, wherein the processor is configured to further execute instructions for assigning the scene to the control device based on a spatial distribution associated with the scene and location information received from the control device.
18. A computer-readable storage medium, having embodied thereon a program, the program being executable by a processor to perform a method for provisioning a wireless control system, the method comprising:
broadcasting a message to a wireless communications network comprising one or more control devices, each control device associated with one or more lights;
receiving a response from a control device in the network, the response including information regarding the control device;
assigning a scene to the control device based on at least the received response, the scene comprising a specification for operating the one or more lights associated with the control device;
generating a scene command based on the assigned scene; and
transmitting the scene command to the control device, wherein execution of the scene command by a processor of the control device configures the control device to direct operations of the one or more lights in accordance with the assigned scene.
19-27. (canceled)
Description
    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • [0001]
    The present application is a continuation-in-part of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 12/156,621 filed Jun. 2, 2008, which is entitled “Distributed Intelligence in Lighting Control,” the disclosure of which is incorporated herein by reference.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • [0002]
    1. Field of the Invention
  • [0003]
    The present invention relates to facilities management. More specifically, the present invention relates to provisioning wireless control systems for facilities management.
  • [0004]
    2. Description of Related Art
  • [0005]
    Various resources are provided to an area by facilities systems. Facilities systems may encompass lighting systems, HVAC systems, security systems, fire/safety systems, irrigation systems, agricultural wind systems, blind/louver systems, and the like. The area receiving the resources from facilities systems may include a building, a floor, a room, a group of buildings, etc. Depending on the area, the resources provided, and specific occupant requirements, such facilities systems may include multiple devices of various types. For example, a lighting system for a large building may include several types of lights in various configurations distributed throughout multiple rooms, on multiple floors, etc.
  • [0006]
    One possible way to manage a facilities system is to provide centralized control of all the devices in such a system. Centralization may allow an individual, such as a facilities manager, to control all the devices of the facilities system from one or a few control interfaces. For example, the facilities manager can turn on all of the lights and/or turn off all of the lights remotely and without having to physically flick each switch on and off in each room. Some disadvantages to a highly centralized control system may include implementation difficulties and inefficiencies. For example, it may be difficult and/or costly to retrofit a large area with a centralized control system.
  • [0007]
    Centralized control of a facilities system having multiple devices may also be complicated by various factors. For instance, some devices in the system may be subject to different demands than other devices in the system. Using the above example, the lighting system may need to provide more light in certain rooms that do not receive as much natural sunlight as other rooms. As such, high centralization may be inflexible to local conditions and unable to adapt to changing conditions. Further, high centralization may lead to waste. For example, using a highly centralized system to provide adequate resources to the rooms that require it may result in resources being sent to rooms that do not require the same amount of resources. Energy is wasted where resources are provided to areas that do not require such resources.
  • [0008]
    In contrast, a highly localized facilities control solution presents different disadvantages, such as in the ability to maintain and operate the facilities system. An example of a highly localized control solution is an individual light switch for a light or a group of lights in a particular location. Separate light switches may be distributed throughout a building, floor, etc., and each switch must be separately switched on for its associated device, or group of devices, to be activated. For some areas, this process may be extremely time-consuming. Additionally, separate switches may lead to energy waste when area occupants forget or neglect to switch off each individual switch.
  • [0009]
    A distributed wireless system may alleviate some of the problems of highly localized and highly centralized systems. One problem with implementing such a system, however, is that most buildings would need to be retrofitted for wireless control. Issues with retrofitting may include reluctance to change or lack of knowledge in implementing such a system. Further, rewiring and/or installing new systems may be costly and difficult to implement.
  • [0010]
    There is, therefore, a need in the art for improved provisioning for wireless control of facilities systems.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • [0011]
    Exemplary systems, methods, and apparatuses of the present invention provide for provisioning wireless control systems for facilities management. A message is broadcast from a computing device to a wireless communications network that includes one or more control devices. Such control devices may be associated with one or more control points (e.g., lights in lighting systems). In response to the broadcast message, the control device responds with information concerning the control device and/or any associated control points. The information is used to assign a scene to the control device. For example, with respect to a lighting system, such a scene includes at least one specification for operating the lights associated with the control device (e.g., operating at half power). A scene command is generated and sent to the control device.
  • [0012]
    Various embodiments of the present invention include methods for provisioning wireless control systems for facilities management. A method may include broadcasting a message to a wireless communications network comprising control devices, which may each be associated with one or more lights. Such methods may further include receiving a response from a control device, assigning a scene based on the response, generating a scene command, and transmitting the scene command to the control device. A scene is a set of one or more specifications concerning operation of the one or more lights associated with the control device. Execution of the scene command by the control device results in operation of the lights according to the specifications of the scene.
  • [0013]
    Various embodiments of the present invention include systems for provisioning wireless control systems for facilities management. An exemplary system may include a memory for storing one or more scenes, a communications interface for broadcasting a message to and receive a response from a wireless communications network including one or more control devices, each of which may be associated with one or more lights. Such systems may further include a processor for assigning a scene to a control device based on the response of the control device and generating a scene command based on the assigned scene. Upon receiving the scene command, the control device may execute the command, which results in operation of the one or more lights associated with the control device. Such operation will be in accordance with the specifications of the scene.
  • [0014]
    Some embodiments of the present invention include computer media and instructions for provisioning wireless control systems for facilities management. Embodiments may further include instructions for generating visual displays of the control devices and lights in the facilities system.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE FIGURES
  • [0015]
    FIG. 1 illustrates an exemplary implementation of a system for provisioning wireless control in a network environment.
  • [0016]
    FIG. 2 is a flowchart depicting an exemplary method for provisioning wireless control.
  • [0017]
    FIG. 3 is an exemplary screenshot of a display generated in provisioning wireless control.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • [0018]
    Embodiments of the present invention comprise systems and methods for provisioning wireless control systems for facilities management. A message is broadcast from a computing device to a wireless communications network that includes one or more control devices. Such control devices may be associated with one or more control points (e.g., lights in lighting systems). In response to the broadcast message, the control device responds with information concerning the control device and/or any associated control points. The information is used to assign a scene to the control device. For example, with respect to a lighting system, such a scene includes at least one specification for operating the lights associated with the control device (e.g., operating at half power). A scene command is generated and sent to the control device.
  • [0019]
    FIG. 1 illustrates an exemplary implementation of a system for provisioning wireless control in a wireless communications network 100. Communications network 100 may include computing device 120, one or more control devices 130A-130C, which may be associated with one or more lights, and sensor 130D. Control device 130A, for example, can control the operations of three lights associated with control device 130A, while control device 130B can control the operation of the one light associated with control device 130B. In some embodiments, network 100 may further include a sensor 130D.
  • [0020]
    The network 100 may be a local, proprietary network (e.g., intranet) and/or may be a part of a larger wide-area network. For example, the network 100 may be a local area network (LAN), which may also be communicatively coupled to a wide area network (WAN) such as the Internet. In some embodiments, the network 100 may be configured to transmit various electromagnetic waves, including, for example, radio signals. Examples of the network 110 may include IEEE 802.11 (Wi-Fi or Wireless LAN) networks, IEEE 802.16 (WiMAX) networks, IEEE 802.16c networks, and the like. Network 100 allows for communication between the various components of system 100. In some instances, network 100 is a multi-hop network.
  • [0021]
    Computing device 120 may comprise any combination of computer hardware and software configured to receive and transmit information over wireless communication network 100, thereby communicating with various control devices 130A-C or sensor 130D. Computing device 120 may be any type of desktop computer, laptop computer, handheld computer, server, etc. configured to communication over wireless communications network 100. If wireless communications network 100 is a multi-hop network, computing device 120 can broadcast a message to devices within a specified number of hops in the communications network 100.
  • [0022]
    Computing device 120 uses wireless communications network 100 to communicate with various devices, such as control devices 130A-C or sensor 130D. The control device (e.g., 130A) may be embedded in a fixture, housed within a ballast, in a separate device, etc. As illustrated in FIG. 1, a control device 130A may be associated with one or more light fixtures. Described in further detail in co-pending U.S. patent application Ser. No. 12/156,621 which has incorporated herein by reference, the control device 130A can controls the operation of the device or devices (i.e., lights) based on various types of signal information, including signal information sent over the network 100 from computing device 120. Computing device 120 may broadcast a message to devices in the network within a specified number of hops (e.g., two hops). Such a broadcast may be received by control devices 130A-C, but not by sensor 130D.
  • [0023]
    The control devices 130A-C may be associated with one or more fixtures of a facilities system. In the embodiment illustrated in FIG. 1, such fixtures are light fixtures 140. Also illustrated in FIG. 1 are the associations between the control device 130A with one light, between control device 130B with three lights, and control device 130C with one light.
  • [0024]
    FIG. 2 is a flowchart depicting an exemplary method for provisioning wireless control. In this method, a message is broadcast to the network 100 including one or more control devices, a response is received from a control device, a scene is assigned based on the response, a scene command for the scene is generated and transmitted to the control device. In some embodiments, a visual display is generated concerning the control device and any associated fixtures.
  • [0025]
    In step 210, a message is broadcast from computing device 120 to a communications network 100 including one or more control devices 130A-C. The message may include a request for information, including location information, number of fixtures or relays, power consumption, etc. In some embodiments, computing device 120 may limit the broadcast to a specified number of hops through wireless communications network 100.
  • [0026]
    In step 220, a response is received from a control device 130A. Such a response may include location information and the number of associated relays (e.g., three lights). In some cases, the response from control device 130A may include energy consumption, which may be used, for example, to determine that control device 130A is associated with three relays for the three lights. Information regarding current consumption (measured or assigned), voltage, etc., may be used, further, to determine the load of each relay. Identifying the number of relays and unit loads allows for individual control over each relay and load.
  • [0027]
    In step 230, a scene is assigned to the control device 130A. A scene is a set of one or more specifications concerning operation of the fixtures (e.g., light fixtures) associated with the control device 130A. The assignment is based in part on the information provided by control device 130A in step 220. For example, control device 130A provides a number of relays. The scene may specify that all the relays be operated at full power, half power, or low power. There may also be individual control over each relay, where one relay is operated at full power, and the others are operated at half power, etc. In some embodiments, a sensor 130D may have responded to the message broadcast in step 210. As such, the assignment of the scene to control device 130A may be further based on information provided by a sensor 130D. For example, if control device 130A and sensor 130D are the in the same location, a scene may be assigned to control device 130A in which the operation of the lights is dependent on conditions detected by sensor 130D. Such a scene may include increasing power to full capacity when sensor 130D detects low levels of natural or ambient light.
  • [0028]
    In step 240, a scene command is generated based on the assigned scene. There may be one or more commands associated with the scene based on the number of relays, the extent of individualized control over each relay, etc. In some embodiments, multiple scenes may be assigned to a control device 130A, in which case multiple scene commands associated with each scene are generated. In some embodiments, a scene command may include commands for cooperation between one or more control devices 130A. For example, a room may include lights under the control of two different control devices 130B and 130C. Controlling the lights in that room may include
  • [0029]
    In step 250, the scene command is transmitted to the control device 130A. The scene command is executable by the control device 130A to control operations of the lights associated with control device 130A in accordance with the specification(s) of the assigned scene. Where there are multiple scenes and multiple scene commands assigned to control device 130A, rules or conditions may also be provided to control device 130A for use in determining which scene command(s) to execute at certain time or under a certain set of circumstances.
  • [0030]
    In an optional step 260, a visual display may be generated based on the responses of the control devices 130A-C or sensor 130D that responded to the message broadcast in step 210. Such a display may reflect location information, such as a spatial distribution of the control devices and any associated lights. Such a display allows a user to view the control devices and associated fixtures. In some embodiments, the user may use the visual display to create and edit scenes, create rules for scenes, etc.
  • [0031]
    FIG. 3 is an exemplary screenshot of a display generated in provisioning wireless control. An exemplary display may include a plurality of control of devices, each of which may be associated with multiple relays, and each relay have be associated with a number of unit loads. Such a display may illustrate the spatial positioning of devices (and associated relays/loads) in a network and further, be superimposed on a two-dimensional or three-dimensional representation of the building(s), floor(s), room(s), etc. The display may further illustrate the locations of each device in a network. Location data may be provided as latitude, longitude, elevation, and/or x-y-z offsets from a known location.
  • [0032]
    A particular target device may determine its location in various ways, including use of independent location-aware devices, radio signal triangulation, calculations involving ultrasonic devices, an installation plan identifying devices in a floor plan, and/or location-aware barcode scanning upon installation. For example, an independent location-aware device (e.g., ultrasonic, GPS, A-GPS) can send a message containing the target device location from close proximity, optionally using a directional antenna to the target device.
  • [0033]
    Location may also be determined by using radio signal strength to triangulate the position of a particular device. The location may be triangulated relative to other devices and/or one or more independent commissioning devices. Independent commissioning devices may also be provided with known location constraints (e.g., from a floor plan or a grid layout) to aid in determination of a location of particular device. Such data may be processed by the commissioning device, and results may be sent via radio frequency network to the target device. Triangulation may also be used with an ultrasonic transmitter in conjunction with two or more receivers with known positions instead of or in addition to the radio signal strength.
  • [0034]
    Further, location may be determined through use of an installation plan identifying a target device and its location on a scaled floor plan. Such an installation plan can be used to calculate the location of the target device, and the data transmitted via the radio. Such an installation plan may have involved use of a location-aware scanning device. A location-aware scanning device can scan a bar code, for example, of a target device during installation and record the identity and location of the target device. This information can then be transmitted to the device via radio, either immediately or at a later time.
  • [0035]
    In addition to being used to generate displays, location information may further be used to automatically generate lighting scenes based on a particular distribution of light (e.g., turning off every other light fixture in a hallway). Location information may also be used to assign sensors, switches, etc., to controllers based on proximity and/or relationships to other building features (e.g., walls, floors). For example, all fixtures in a room could be automatically grouped together for control purposes.
  • [0036]
    Some of the above-described functions can be composed of instructions that are stored on storage media (e.g., computer-readable medium). The instructions may be retrieved and executed by the processor 230. Some examples of storage media are memory devices, tapes, disks, integrated circuits, and servers. The instructions are operational when executed by the processor 230 to direct the processor 230 to operate in accord with the invention. Those skilled in the art are familiar with instructions, processor(s), and storage media.
  • [0037]
    It is noteworthy that any hardware platform suitable for performing the processing described herein is suitable for use with the invention. The terms “computer-readable medium” and “computer-readable media” as used herein refer to any medium or media that participate in providing instructions to a CPU for execution. Such media can take many forms, including, but not limited to, non-volatile media, volatile media and transmission media. Non-volatile media include, for example, optical or magnetic disks, such as a fixed disk. Volatile media include dynamic memory, such as system RAM. Transmission media include coaxial cables, copper wire and fiber optics, among others, including the wires that comprise one embodiment of a bus. Transmission media can also take the form of acoustic or light waves, such as those generated during radio frequency (RF) and infrared (IR) data communications. Common forms of computer-readable media include, for example, a floppy disk, a flexible disk, a hard disk, magnetic tape, any other magnetic medium, a CD-ROM disk, digital video disk (DVD), any other optical medium, punch cards, paper tape, any other physical medium with patterns of marks or holes, a RAM, a PROM, an EPROM, an EEPROM, a FLASHEPROM, any other memory chip or cartridge, a carrier wave, or any other medium from which a computer can read.
  • [0038]
    Various forms of computer-readable media may be involved in carrying one or more sequences of one or more instructions to a CPU for execution. A bus carries the data to system RAM, from which a CPU retrieves and executes the instructions. The instructions received by system RAM can optionally be stored on a fixed disk either before or after execution by a CPU.
  • [0039]
    The above description is illustrative and not restrictive. Many variations of the invention will become apparent to those of skill in the art upon review of this disclosure. The scope of the invention should, therefore, be determined not with reference to the above description, but instead should be determined with reference to the appended claims along with their full scope of equivalents.
  • [0040]
    While the present invention has been described in connection with a series of preferred embodiment, these descriptions are not intended to limit the scope of the invention to the particular forms set forth herein. It will be further understood that the methods of the invention are not necessarily limited to the discrete steps or the order of the steps described. To the contrary, the present descriptions are intended to cover such alternatives, modifications, and equivalents as may be included within the spirit and scope of the invention as defined by the appended claims and otherwise appreciated by one of ordinary skill in the art.
Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4454509 *Jul 19, 1982Jun 12, 1984Regency Electronics, Inc.Apparatus for addressably controlling remote units
US5357170 *Feb 12, 1993Oct 18, 1994Lutron Electronics Co., Inc.Lighting control system with priority override
US5822012 *Aug 28, 1996Oct 13, 1998Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd.Home automation apparatus using a digital television receiver
US5927603 *Sep 30, 1997Jul 27, 1999J. R. Simplot CompanyClosed loop control system, sensing apparatus and fluid application system for a precision irrigation device
US5962989 *Sep 16, 1997Oct 5, 1999Negawatt Technologies Inc.Energy management control system
US6025783 *Apr 30, 1998Feb 15, 2000Trw Vehicle Safety Systems Inc.Wireless switch detection system
US6044062 *Dec 6, 1996Mar 28, 2000Communique, LlcWireless network system and method for providing same
US6175860 *Nov 26, 1997Jan 16, 2001International Business Machines CorporationMethod and apparatus for an automatic multi-rate wireless/wired computer network
US6249516 *Jan 27, 2000Jun 19, 2001Edwin B. BrownriggWireless network gateway and method for providing same
US6301674 *Dec 8, 1999Oct 9, 2001Kabushiki Kaisha ToshibaPower control method, power control system and computer program product for supplying power to a plurality of electric apparatuses connected to a power line
US6311105 *May 29, 1998Oct 30, 2001Powerweb, Inc.Multi-utility energy control system
US6388399 *Jan 26, 2001May 14, 2002Leviton Manufacturing Co., Inc.Network based electrical control system with distributed sensing and control
US6504266 *Jan 18, 2000Jan 7, 2003Sun Microsystems, Inc.Method and apparatus for powering up an electronic system after AC power has been removed
US6510369 *Aug 24, 1999Jan 21, 2003Plug Power Inc.Residential load shedding
US6535859 *Dec 3, 1999Mar 18, 2003Ultrawatt Energy System, IncSystem and method for monitoring lighting systems
US6548967 *Sep 19, 2000Apr 15, 2003Color Kinetics, Inc.Universal lighting network methods and systems
US6633823 *Jul 13, 2001Oct 14, 2003Nxegen, Inc.System and method for monitoring and controlling energy usage
US6640142 *Aug 2, 2000Oct 28, 2003International Business Machines CorporationSystem and method for controlling workspace environment
US6700334 *Jul 10, 2002Mar 2, 2004Hugewin Electronics Co., Ltd.RF wireless remote-control brightness-adjustable energy-saving lamp
US6891838 *Nov 1, 2000May 10, 2005Statsignal Ipc, LlcSystem and method for monitoring and controlling residential devices
US6914893 *Mar 19, 2001Jul 5, 2005Statsignal Ipc, LlcSystem and method for monitoring and controlling remote devices
US7039532 *Oct 10, 2003May 2, 2006Hunter Robert RMethod and apparatus for reading and controlling utility consumption
US7054271 *Mar 10, 2003May 30, 2006Ipco, LlcWireless network system and method for providing same
US7233080 *Sep 4, 2001Jun 19, 2007Valeo ElectroniqueMethod for processing detection signals for a motor vehicle
US7263073 *Aug 9, 2001Aug 28, 2007Statsignal Ipc, LlcSystems and methods for enabling a mobile user to notify an automated monitoring system of an emergency situation
US7274975 *Jun 6, 2005Sep 25, 2007Gridpoint, Inc.Optimized energy management system
US7333880 *Aug 19, 2005Feb 19, 2008Enernoc, Inc.Aggregation of distributed energy resources
US7339466 *Jan 11, 2006Mar 4, 2008Ge Security, Inc.Power line communication system with system member identification
US7346433 *Jun 24, 2005Mar 18, 2008Powerweb, Inc.Wireless internet power control system
US7349766 *Mar 8, 2006Mar 25, 2008Smartsynch, Inc.Systems and methods for remote power management using 802.11 wireless protocols
US7354175 *Feb 10, 2006Apr 8, 2008Steril-Aire, Inc.Environmentally resistant germicidal system
US7356308 *Jan 3, 2007Apr 8, 2008Sony CorporationRadio communication apparatus and radio communication method, radio communication system, recording medium, and computer program
US7417556 *Apr 24, 2001Aug 26, 2008Koninklijke Philips Electronics N.V.Wireless addressable lighting method and apparatus
US7491111 *Dec 13, 2005Feb 17, 2009Ghaly Nabil NInteractive play device and method
US7528503 *Jul 24, 2006May 5, 2009Cannon Technologies, Inc.Load shedding control for cycled or variable load appliances
US7561977 *Jun 13, 2003Jul 14, 2009Whirlpool CorporationTotal home energy management system
US7565227 *Aug 15, 2007Jul 21, 2009Constellation Energy Group, Inc.Multi-building control for demand response power usage control
US7571063 *Apr 28, 2007Aug 4, 2009Admmicro Properties LlcLighting performance power monitoring system and method with optional integrated light control
US7650425 *Aug 9, 2001Jan 19, 2010Sipco, LlcSystem and method for controlling communication between a host computer and communication devices associated with remote devices in an automated monitoring system
US7659674 *May 1, 2007Feb 9, 2010Philips Solid-State Lighting Solutions, Inc.Wireless lighting control methods and apparatus
US7677753 *Oct 18, 2007Mar 16, 2010Wills Michael HProgrammable remote control electrical light operating system
US7697927 *Jan 25, 2005Apr 13, 2010Embarq Holdings Company, LlcMulti-campus mobile management system for wirelessly controlling systems of a facility
US7706928 *Sep 6, 2006Apr 27, 2010Admmicro Properties, LlcEnergy management system with security system interface
US7719440 *Jul 20, 2005May 18, 2010Don DelpIntegrated building control and information system with wireless networking
US7755505 *Sep 6, 2006Jul 13, 2010Lutron Electronics Co., Inc.Procedure for addressing remotely-located radio frequency components of a control system
US7760068 *Oct 11, 2005Jul 20, 2010Panasonic Electric Works Co., Ltd.Operation switch wiring mechanism
US7783188 *May 29, 2008Aug 24, 2010Lab Partners Associates, Inc.System and method for maintaining hot shoe communications between a camera and a wireless device
US7880394 *Apr 17, 2008Feb 1, 2011Heathco LlcLighting system to facilitate remote modification of a light fixture modifiable operating parameter
US7889051 *Sep 3, 2004Feb 15, 2011The Watt Stopper IncLocation-based addressing lighting and environmental control system, device and method
US7902759 *Jun 26, 2009Mar 8, 2011Lutron Electronics Co., Inc.Method of programming a lighting preset from a radio-frequency remote control
US7925384 *Jan 20, 2010Apr 12, 2011Adura Technologies, Inc.Location-based provisioning of wireless control systems
US20010025349 *Jan 8, 2001Sep 27, 2001Sharood John N.Retrofit monitoring device
US20020043938 *Aug 7, 2001Apr 18, 2002Lys Ihor A.Automatic configuration systems and methods for lighting and other applications
US20030020595 *Jul 12, 2001Jan 30, 2003Philips Electronics North America Corp.System and method for configuration of wireless networks using position information
US20040002792 *Apr 30, 2003Jan 1, 2004Encelium Technologies Inc.Lighting energy management system and method
US20040100394 *Oct 24, 2003May 27, 2004Hitt Dale K.Distributed environmental control in a wireless sensor system
US20050043862 *Sep 17, 2004Feb 24, 2005Brickfield Peter J.Automatic energy management and energy consumption reduction, especially in commercial and multi-building systems
US20050090915 *Apr 22, 2004Apr 28, 2005Smart Systems Technologies, Inc.Programmable and expandable building automation and control system
US20060044152 *Sep 1, 2003Mar 2, 2006Ling WangMaster-slave oriented two-way rf wireless lighting control system
US20060142900 *Dec 27, 2004Jun 29, 2006Rothman Michael ASystem and method for enabling home power management
US20060215345 *Mar 14, 2006Sep 28, 2006The Regents Of The University Of CaliforniaWireless network control for building lighting system
US20070005195 *Jan 10, 2006Jan 4, 2007Nicholas PasqualeDistributed energy storage for reducing power demand
US20070085700 *Sep 11, 2006Apr 19, 2007Acuity Brands, Inc.Light management system having networked intelligent luminaire managers with enhanced diagnostics capabilities
US20070090960 *Mar 15, 2004Apr 26, 2007Mitsunori MikiLighting control system and control system
US20080071391 *Sep 6, 2006Mar 20, 2008Busby James BLighting systems and methods
US20080133065 *Oct 30, 2007Jun 5, 2008Cannon Technologies, Inc.Utility load control management communications protocol
US20080167756 *Jan 3, 2008Jul 10, 2008Gridpoint, Inc.Utility console for controlling energy resources
US20090018706 *Nov 26, 2006Jan 15, 2009Lupu WittnerFlexible electric load management system and method therefore
US20090026966 *Feb 26, 2007Jan 29, 2009Koninklijke Philips Electronics N VLighting system with lighting units using optical communication
US20090045941 *Aug 12, 2008Feb 19, 2009John CooperWireless, remote controlled, and synchronized lighting system
US20090055032 *Oct 28, 2008Feb 26, 2009Smartsynch, Inc.Systems and Methods For Remote Power Management Using 802.11 Wireless Protocols
US20090063257 *Aug 29, 2008Mar 5, 2009Powerit Solutions, LlcAutomated peak demand controller
US20090066473 *Mar 8, 2006Mar 12, 2009Koninklijke Philips Electronics, N.V.Commissioning wireless network devices according to an installation plan
US20090072945 *Dec 5, 2007Mar 19, 2009Meng-Shiuan PanAutomatic Lighting Control System And Method
US20090132070 *Dec 22, 2008May 21, 2009Whirlpool CorporationClient for an appliance network
US20090198384 *Feb 4, 2009Aug 6, 2009Ls Industrial Systems Co., Ltd.Electronic smart meter enabling demand response and method for demand response
US20090218951 *Mar 2, 2009Sep 3, 2009Mpj Lighting, LlcLighting and control systems and methods
US20090240381 *Mar 26, 2007Sep 24, 2009Rtp ControlsMethod and apparatus for controlling power consumption
US20100039240 *Feb 18, 2010Wayne-Dalton Corp.Method for Wiring Devices in a Structure Using a Wireless Network
US20100052939 *Mar 4, 2010Po-Hsiang LiangLighting System and Related Method Capable of Reducing Electricity Consumption
US20100066267 *Mar 18, 2010Meyer A CorydonRemotely controllable track lighting system
US20100134019 *Dec 2, 2008Jun 3, 2010Ma Lighting Technology GmbhMethod for operating a lighting system and lighting device for carrying out this method
US20100134051 *Mar 2, 2009Jun 3, 2010Adura Technologies, Inc.Systems and methods for remotely controlling an electrical load
US20100141153 *Nov 26, 2009Jun 10, 2010Recker Michael VWireless lighting devices and applications
US20100164386 *Dec 30, 2008Jul 1, 2010Tung-Hsin YouApplication infrastructure for constructing illumination equipments with networking capability
US20100179670 *Mar 1, 2010Jul 15, 2010Forbes Jr Joseph WMethod and apparatus for actively managing consumption of electric power supplied by one or more electric utilities
US20100185339 *Jan 20, 2010Jul 22, 2010Adura Technologies, Inc.Location-Based Provisioning of Wireless Control Systems
US20100191388 *Oct 14, 2009Jul 29, 2010Huizenga Charles AWireless Network Control for Building Facilities
US20100201203 *Aug 12, 2010Schatz David AWireless energy transfer with feedback control for lighting applications
US20100204847 *Feb 10, 2009Aug 12, 2010Leete Iii Lawrence FWireless infrastructure mesh network system using a lighting node
US20100207548 *Feb 17, 2009Aug 19, 2010Jeffrey IottLinking sequence for wireless lighting control
US20100237783 *Mar 19, 2009Sep 23, 2010Scott DupreWireless convenience lighting system and method of making same
US20110006877 *Jan 13, 2011Convergence Wireless, Inc.Method and apparatus for the zonal transmission of data using building lighting fixtures
US20110012541 *Jul 22, 2008Jan 20, 2011John Gerard FinchWireless switching applications
US20110043052 *Feb 24, 2011Charles HuizengaSystems and Methods for Remotely Controlling an Electrical Load
US20110101871 *Mar 9, 2009May 5, 2011Koninklijke Philips Electronics N.V.Configuration of a luminaire system
US20110109424 *Nov 5, 2010May 12, 2011Charles HuizengaWireless sensor
US20110112702 *Oct 26, 2010May 12, 2011Charles HuizengaSensor Interface for Wireless Control
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7884732Oct 14, 2009Feb 8, 2011The Regents Of The University Of CaliforniaWireless network control for building facilities
US7925384Jan 20, 2010Apr 12, 2011Adura Technologies, Inc.Location-based provisioning of wireless control systems
US8140279Sep 23, 2008Mar 20, 2012Budderfly Ventures, LlcComputer based energy management
US8275471Oct 26, 2010Sep 25, 2012Adura Technologies, Inc.Sensor interface for wireless control
US8364325Jun 2, 2008Jan 29, 2013Adura Technologies, Inc.Intelligence in distributed lighting control devices
US8396608Jun 30, 2010Mar 12, 2013Budderfly Ventures LlcComputer based energy management
US8565903Nov 17, 2011Oct 22, 2013Honeywell International Inc.Critical resource notification system and interface device
US8572230Jun 3, 2011Oct 29, 2013Honeywell International Inc.System for using attributes to deploy demand response resources
US8626354Jan 28, 2011Jan 7, 2014Honeywell International Inc.Approach for normalizing automated demand response events in energy management control systems
US8630744Jan 28, 2011Jan 14, 2014Honeywell International Inc.Management and monitoring of automated demand response in a multi-site enterprise
US8667132Jul 12, 2012Mar 4, 2014Honeywell International Inc.Arrangement for communication about and management of a resource using a mobile device
US8671167Jul 12, 2010Mar 11, 2014Honeywell International Inc.System for providing demand response services
US8671191Feb 2, 2012Mar 11, 2014Honeywell International Inc.Installation system for demand response resources
US8676953Oct 12, 2011Mar 18, 2014Honeywell International Inc.Use of aggregated groups for managing demand response resources
US8755915Aug 21, 2012Jun 17, 2014Abl Ip Holding LlcSensor interface for wireless control
US8782190Feb 2, 2011Jul 15, 2014Honeywell International, Inc.Demand response management system
US8798801Feb 10, 2012Aug 5, 2014Budderfly Ventures, LlcComputer based energy management
US8854208Nov 5, 2010Oct 7, 2014Abl Ip Holding LlcWireless sensor
US8893968Jun 7, 2011Nov 25, 2014Greenwave Systems Pte. Ltd.Network inclusion of a networked light bulb
US9002993Mar 28, 2011Apr 7, 2015Greenwave Systems Pte. Ltd.Dynamic configuration of a client-server relationship
US9124535Oct 17, 2013Sep 1, 2015Honeywell International Inc.System for using attributes to deploy demand response resources
US9137050Nov 18, 2011Sep 15, 2015Honeywell International Inc.Demand response system incorporating a graphical processing unit
US9137879 *Aug 1, 2012Sep 15, 2015Abl Ip Holding LlcNetworked system of intelligent lighting devices with sharing of processing resources of the devices with other entities
US9153001Jan 28, 2011Oct 6, 2015Honeywell International Inc.Approach for managing distribution of automated demand response events in a multi-site enterprise
US9183522Jul 9, 2014Nov 10, 2015Honeywell International Inc.Demand response management system
US9192019Dec 4, 2012Nov 17, 2015Abl Ip Holding LlcSystem for and method of commissioning lighting devices
US20090083167 *Sep 23, 2008Mar 26, 2009Budderfly Ventures, LlcComputer based energy management
US20090299527 *Dec 3, 2009Adura Technologies, Inc.Distributed intelligence in lighting control
US20100191388 *Oct 14, 2009Jul 29, 2010Huizenga Charles AWireless Network Control for Building Facilities
US20100286841 *Nov 11, 2010Budderfly Ventures, LlcComputer based energy management
US20110016200 *Jan 20, 2011Honeywell International Inc.System for providing demand response services
US20110043052 *Feb 24, 2011Charles HuizengaSystems and Methods for Remotely Controlling an Electrical Load
US20110112702 *Oct 26, 2010May 12, 2011Charles HuizengaSensor Interface for Wireless Control
US20110125542 *May 26, 2011Honeywell International Inc.Demand response management system
US20120165998 *Dec 22, 2011Jun 28, 2012Electronics And Telecommunications Research InstituteApparatus for verifying and managing consumption electric power data in a green home electric power management system and method thereof
US20140035482 *Aug 1, 2012Feb 6, 2014Jack C. Rains, Jr.Networked system of intelligent lighting devices with sharing of processing resources of the devices with other entities
EP2533615A2 *May 30, 2012Dec 12, 2012Greenwave Reality Pte LtdNetwork inclusion of a networked light bulb
EP2538378A1 *May 25, 2012Dec 26, 2012Honeywell International Inc.A system for using attributes to deploy demand response resources
WO2012168859A2 *Jun 5, 2012Dec 13, 2012Koninklijke Philips Electronics N.V.Automatically commissioning of devices of a networked control system
WO2014022091A1 *Jul 16, 2013Feb 6, 2014Abl Ip Holding LlcNetworked system of intelligent lighting devices with sharing of processing resources of the devices with other entities
WO2015185087A1 *Jun 2, 2014Dec 10, 2015Abb Technology LtdBuilding automation system and method therefor
Classifications
U.S. Classification700/90, 706/47
International ClassificationG06F17/00, G06N5/02
Cooperative ClassificationH05B37/0272
European ClassificationH05B37/02B6R
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Jan 15, 2010ASAssignment
Owner name: ADURA TECHNOLOGIES, INC.,CALIFORNIA
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:HUIZENGA, CHARLES;DO, ALEX;CORR, MICHAEL;AND OTHERS;REEL/FRAME:023799/0103
Effective date: 20100112
Feb 15, 2013ASAssignment
Owner name: ABL IP HOLDING LLC, GEORGIA
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:ADURA TECHNOLOGIES, INC.;REEL/FRAME:029818/0107
Effective date: 20121220