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Publication numberUS20100126055 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 12/276,223
Publication dateMay 27, 2010
Filing dateNov 21, 2008
Priority dateNov 21, 2008
Publication number12276223, 276223, US 2010/0126055 A1, US 2010/126055 A1, US 20100126055 A1, US 20100126055A1, US 2010126055 A1, US 2010126055A1, US-A1-20100126055, US-A1-2010126055, US2010/0126055A1, US2010/126055A1, US20100126055 A1, US20100126055A1, US2010126055 A1, US2010126055A1
InventorsRussell A. Potterfield
Original AssigneeBattenfeld Technologies, Inc.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Firearm support assemblies with stacking geometries and associated methods of use and manufacture
US 20100126055 A1
Abstract
Firearm support and rest assemblies having nested stacking geometries are disclosed herein. One embodiment of the disclosure, for example, is directed to a firearm rest assembly for supporting a firearm having a first section spaced apart from a second section. The firearm rest assembly includes a base having a lower surface spaced apart from an upper surface, and an intermediate surface positioned between and generally parallel to the lower and upper surfaces. The firearm rest assembly further includes first and second supports coupled to the base in a configuration selected from a stored arrangement and a support arrangement. The stored arrangement includes the first and second supports positioned between the lower surface and the intermediate surface, and the support arrangement includes the first support extending from the base beyond the upper surface to support the first section of the firearm, and the second support extending from the base beyond the upper surface to support the second section of the firearm.
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Claims(22)
1. A firearm rest assembly for supporting a firearm having a first section spaced apart from a second section, the firearm rest assembly comprising:
a base having a lower surface spaced apart from an upper surface, and an intermediate surface positioned between and generally parallel to the lower and upper surfaces;
first and second supports coupled with the base in a configuration selected from a stored arrangement and a support arrangement, wherein—
the stored arrangement includes the first and second supports positioned between the lower surface and the intermediate surface; and
the support arrangement includes the first support extending from the base beyond the upper surface to support the first section of the firearm, and the second support extending from the base beyond the upper surface to support the second section of the firearm.
2. The firearm rest assembly of claim 1 wherein the firearm rest assembly is a first firearm rest assembly, and wherein the base includes a storage cavity that is configured to at least partially receive a second firearm rest assembly in a nested configuration, wherein the second firearm rest assembly is generally similar to the first firearm rest assembly, and wherein the nested first and second firearm rest assemblies have a combined nested height that is less than the sum of the individual heights of the first and second firearm rest assemblies.
3. The firearm rest assembly of claim 2, further comprising a packaging material at least partially covering the base of the first firearm rest assembly, wherein the packaging material does not interfere with the nested configuration of the first firearm rest assembly and the second firearm rest assembly.
4. The firearm rest assembly of claim 1 wherein the base further comprises a support cavity configured to receive the first and second support members in the stored arrangement, and wherein the firearm rest assembly further includes a packaging material at least partially covering the base, wherein the packaging material generally conforms to the shape of the support cavity and at least partially retains the first and second supports in the support cavity in the support arrangement.
5. The firearm rest assembly of claim 4 wherein the packaging material includes a paper-based material having a series of bends conforming to the shape of the support cavity.
6. The firearm rest assembly of claim 4 wherein the packaging material includes vacuum-wrapped plastic generally conforming to the shape of the support cavity.
7. The firearm rest assembly of claim 1 wherein:
each of the first and second supports includes a tapered end portion; and
the base further includes a first opening configured to removably retain the tapered end portion of the first support in the support arrangement, and a second opening configured to removably retain the tapered end portion of the second support in the support arrangement.
8. The firearm rest assembly of claim 1 wherein in the stored arrangement the first and second supports are positioned generally parallel to the lower and intermediate surfaces, and in the support arrangement the first and second supports extend from the base in a direction generally perpendicular to the upper surface.
9. The firearm rest assembly of claim 1, further comprising a handle operably coupled to the base, wherein the handle is movable between a stored position between the lower surface and the intermediate surface and a carrying position extending from the base beyond the intermediate surface.
10. The firearm rest assembly of claim 1 wherein the intermediate surface is spaced apart from the lower surface by a distance approximately equal to a thickness of the first support member.
11. The firearm rest assembly of claim 1 wherein the base further comprises:
a support cavity configured to receive the first and second support members in the stored arrangement;
a first retaining member carried by a sidewall portion of the support cavity, wherein the first retaining member at least partially retains the first support in the stored arrangement; and
a second retaining member carried by the sidewall portion of the support cavity, wherein the second retaining member at least partially retains the second support in the stored arrangement.
12. The firearm rest assembly of claim 11 wherein each of the first and second supports includes a plurality of protrusions extending laterally from an edge portion of each support, and wherein the protrusions are generally aligned with the retaining members when the first and second supports are in the stored arrangement.
13. The firearm rest assembly of claim 1 wherein the first support is coupled to the base with a first hinge, and the second support is coupled to the base with a second hinge, and wherein the first and second supports pivot between the stored arrangement and the support arrangement.
14. The firearm rest assembly of claim 1 wherein in the support arrangement each support has an adjustable height extending from the base.
15. A stacked assembly of individual shooting rests, the stacked assembly comprising:
a first packaged shooting rest comprising:
a base having a storage cavity;
first and second supports coupled to the base in a configuration selected from a first arrangement and a second arrangement;
a handle coupled to the base in the configuration selected from the first and second arrangements;
packaging material covering at least a portion of the base, wherein the packaging material at least partially conforms to the shape of the storage cavity, wherein—
in the first arrangement the first support, the second support, and the handle are each positioned in the storage cavity; and
in the second arrangement the first support, the second support, and the handle extend from the base; and
a second packaged shooting rest generally similar to the first packaged shooting rest, wherein the second packaged shooting rest is at least partially received in the storage cavity of the first packaged shooting rest in a nested configuration, and wherein the combined height of the nested first and second packaged shooting rests is less than the sum of the heights of the individual first and second packaged shooting rests.
16. The stacked assembly of claim 1 wherein:
the base further includes a lower surface spaced apart from an upper surface, and an intermediate portion having an intermediate surface positioned between the lower and upper surfaces;
the storage cavity includes a support cavity separated from a handle cavity by the intermediate portion;
in the first arrangement the first and second supports are positioned in the support cavity between the first surface and the intermediate surface, and the handle is positioned in the handle cavity between the first surface and the intermediate surface; and
in the second arrangement the first and second supports extend from the base beyond the upper surface, and the handle extends from the intermediate portion beyond the intermediate surface.
17. The stacked assembly of claim 15 wherein each of the first and second packaged shooting rests includes means for retaining the corresponding first and second supports in the support cavity in the first arrangement.
18. The stacked assembly of claim 17 wherein the means for retaining the first and second supports in the support cavity include a plurality of retaining members in the support cavity that engage protrusions extending from each of the first and second supports.
19. A method of packaging shooting rest assemblies that are used for supporting a firearm having a first section spaced apart from a second section, the method comprising:
providing a first shooting rest assembly having a first base with a storage cavity, a first support configured to project from the first base to support the first section of the firearm, and a second support configured to project from the first base to support the second section of the firearm;
placing the first and second supports in the storage cavity of the first base;
providing a second shooting rest assembly that is generally similar to the first shooting rest assembly, wherein the second shooting rest assembly includes a second base; and
positioning at least a portion of the second base in the support cavity of the first base in a nested configuration.
20. The method of claim 19 wherein positioning at least a portion of the second base in the support cavity of the first base includes stacking the first and second firearm rest assemblies to have a combined height in the nested configuration that is less than the sum of the individual heights of the first and second firearm rest assemblies.
21. The method of claim 19, further comprising individually packaging the first firearm rest assembly with a packaging material when the first and second supports are in the storage cavity, wherein the packaging material generally conforms to the shape of the storage cavity of each of the first and second bases.
22. The method of claim 19 wherein placing the first and second supports in the storage cavity of the first base comprises engaging each of the first and second supports with retaining members carried by a sidewall portion of the first base, wherein the retaining members at least partially retain the first and second supports in the storage cavity.
Description
    TECHNICAL FIELD
  • [0001]
    The present disclosure is directed generally to firearm support assemblies and more specifically to firearm support assemblies that can be stacked in a nested configuration.
  • BACKGROUND
  • [0002]
    Shooters often use firearm rests or supports to steady a firearm during operation (e.g., target practice, accuracy testing, etc.). Holding a firearm without a stable support may not provide the required repeatability to determine the accuracy of the firearm. Many shooters accordingly use a firearm support in an attempt to reduce or eliminate human movement inherent to holding the firearm. For example, a shooter may position the front or forestock section of a firearm on a front firearm support, and the rear or buttstock section on a rear firearm support. Firearm supports can also conveniently hold a firearm, or portions of a firearm, for cleaning and maintenance. For example, placing the firearm in a firearm support can conveniently position the firearm and free the user's hands to clean or disassemble the firearm.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0003]
    In the drawings, identical reference numbers identify similar elements. The size and relative position of elements in the drawings are not necessarily drawn to scale. For example, the shapes of various elements and angles may not be drawn to scale, and some of these elements may be arbitrarily enlarged and positioned to improve drawing legibility.
  • [0004]
    FIG. 1 is a side isometric view of a firearm rest assembly configured in accordance with an embodiment of the disclosure.
  • [0005]
    FIG. 2 is a side plan view of a firearm support configured in accordance with an embodiment of the disclosure.
  • [0006]
    FIG. 3A is a side isometric view and FIG. 3B is a top plan view of the firearm rest assembly of FIG. 1.
  • [0007]
    FIG. 4 is a bottom isometric view of the firearm rest assembly of FIG. 1.
  • [0008]
    FIG. 5 is side view of a stacked assembly of firearm rest assemblies configured in accordance with another embodiment of the disclosure.
  • [0009]
    FIG. 6 is an isometric side view of a packaged firearm rest assembly configured in accordance with another embodiment of the disclosure.
  • [0010]
    FIG. 7 is an isometric side view of a firearm rest assembly configured in accordance with yet another embodiment of the disclosure.
  • [0011]
    FIG. 8 is a side cross-sectional view of a firearm rest assembly configured in accordance with a further embodiment of the disclosure.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • [0012]
    A. Overview
  • [0013]
    The following disclosure describes several embodiments of firearm rest assemblies and associated methods of use and manufacture. One embodiment of the disclosure, for example, is directed to a firearm rest assembly for supporting a firearm having a first section spaced apart from a second section. The firearm rest assembly includes a base having a lower surface spaced apart from an upper surface, and an intermediate surface positioned between and generally parallel to the lower and upper surfaces. The assembly also includes first and second supports coupled with the base in a configuration selected from a stored arrangement and a support arrangement. In the stored arrangement, the first and second supports are positioned between the lower surface and the intermediate surface, and in the support arrangement the first support extends from the base beyond the upper surface to support the first section of the firearm, and the second support extends from the base beyond the upper surface to support the second section of the firearm.
  • [0014]
    Another aspect of the disclosure is directed to a stacked assembly of individual shooting rests. The stacked assembly includes a first packaged shooting rest that receives a second packaged shooting rest in a nested configuration. The first packaged shooting rest includes a base having a storage cavity. The first packaged shooting rest also includes a first support, a second support, and a handle, each of which is coupled to the base in a configuration selected from a first arrangement and a second arrangement. The first packaged shooting rest also includes packaging material covering at least a portion of the base and at least partially conforming to the shape of the storage cavity. In the first arrangement the first support, the second support, and the handle are each positioned in the storage cavity, and in the second arrangement the first support, the second support, and the handle extend from the base. The second packaged shooting rest is generally similar to the first packaged shooting rest. When the second packaged shooting rest is at least partially received in the storage cavity of the first packaged shooting rest in a nested configuration, the combined height of the nested first and second packaged shooting rests is less than the sum of the heights of the individual first and second packages shooting rests.
  • [0015]
    A further aspect of the disclosure is directed to a method of packaging shooting rest assemblies that are used for supporting a firearm having a first section spaced apart from a second section. The method includes providing a first shooting rest assembly having a first base with a storage cavity, a first support configured to project from the first base to support the first section of the firearm, and a second support configured to project from the first base to support the second section of the firearm. The method also includes placing the first and second supports in the storage cavity of the first base. The method further includes providing a second shooting rest assembly that is generally similar to the first shooting rest assembly. The second shooting rest assembly includes a second base, and the method further includes positioning at least a portion of the second base in the support cavity of the first base in a nested configuration.
  • [0016]
    Specific details of several embodiments of the disclosure are set forth in the following description and in FIGS. 1-8 to provide a thorough understanding of these embodiments. A person skilled in the art will understand, however, that the disclosure may be practiced without several of these details or that additional details can be added to the disclosure. Several details describing well-known structures or processes often associated with firearms and firearm supporting devices have not been shown or described in detail to avoid unnecessarily obscuring the description of the embodiments of the disclosure. Where the context permits, singular or plural terms may also include the plural or singular terms, respectively. Moreover, unless the word “or” is expressly limited to mean only a single item exclusive from the other items in reference to a list of two or more items, the use of “or” in such a list is to be interpreted as including (a) any single item in the list, (b) all of the items in the list, or (c) any combination of the items in the list. Additionally, the term “comprising” is used throughout to mean including at least the recited feature(s) such that any greater number of the same feature or additional types of features are not precluded.
  • [0017]
    Reference throughout this specification to “one embodiment” or “an embodiment” means that a particular feature, structure, or characteristic described in connection with the embodiment may be included in at least one embodiment of the present invention. Thus, the appearances of the phrases “in one embodiment” or “in an embodiment” in various places throughout this specification are not necessarily all referring to the same embodiment. Furthermore, particular features, structures, or characteristics of the different embodiments may be combined in any suitable manner in one or more embodiments.
  • [0018]
    The headings provided herein are for convenience only and do not interpret the scope or meaning of the claimed invention.
  • [0019]
    B. Embodiments of Firearm Supports
  • [0020]
    FIG. 1 is a side isometric view of a firearm rest assembly 100 (“assembly 100”) configured in accordance with an embodiment of the disclosure. The assembly 100 is configured to support a firearm 102 (shown in broken lines). For example, the assembly 100 can be used to support the firearm 102 when shooting or cleaning the firearm 102. In the illustrated embodiment, the assembly 100 includes multiple supports 120 (identified individually as a first support 120 a and a second support 120 b) that are removably attached to a base 110. The supports 120 can be operably coupled to the base 110 in a configuration selected from a support arrangement and a stored arrangement. In the illustrated embodiment, for example, the base 110 removably receives the supports 120 in the support arrangement with the first support 120 a extending from the base 110 to support a buttstock section of the firearm 102, and the second support 120 b extending from the base 110 to support a forestock section of the firearm 102. As described in detail below, the base 110 also removably receives the supports 120 in a storage cavity 130 in the stored arrangement. According to one feature of the illustrated embodiment, when the storage cavity 130 removably retains the supports 120 in the stored arrangement, the entire assembly 100 can be stacked in a nested configuration with similar firearm rest assemblies to provide a reduced overall stacked height of multiple firearm rest assemblies.
  • [0021]
    FIG. 2 is a side plan view of one of the supports 120 illustrated in FIG. 1. In the illustrated embodiment, the support 120 includes an upper portion 222 extending from a lower portion 224. The upper portion 222 has a generally U-shaped configuration that is designed to receive a section of a firearm (FIG. 1). In other embodiments, the upper portion 222 can include other shapes suitable for supporting a firearm (e.g., a V-shape, ridged portions, planar portions, etc.). The illustrated upper portion 222 includes a pad member 221 attached to the support 120 to at least partially cushion or protect the firearm. For example, the pad member 221 can be made from a cushioned, pliable, or non-marring material (e.g., rubber, leather, etc.) that can provide a slip-resistant contact surface for the firearm. In other embodiments, however, the pad member 221 can be made from the same material as the support 120 and integrally formed with the support 120. In still further embodiments, the pad member 221 can be omitted from the support 120.
  • [0022]
    The lower portion 224 of the support 120 has a tapered width that is configured to allow the support 120 to be removably inserted into a corresponding opening in the base 110. More specifically, the support 120 has a first width W1, and the lower portion 224 of the support 120 has a second width W2 that is less than the first width W1. Accordingly, in the support arrangement (FIG. 1), the support 120 can be at least partially retained in the base 110 by inserting the lower portion 224 into an opening in the base 110 to frictionally engage the base 110. In other embodiments and as described below with reference to FIGS. 7 and 8, the supports 120 can attach to the base 110 in other configurations. For example, the lower portion 224 can have the same width as the support 120 and be inserted into a tapered opening in the base 110.
  • [0023]
    According to another feature of the illustrated embodiment, the support 120 includes multiple protrusions 226 (identified individually as a first through third protrusions 226 a-226 c) extending laterally from the support 120. The protrusions 226 act as retaining features to removably retain each support 120 in the base 110 when the support 120 is in the stored arrangement. For example, as explained in detail below with reference to FIG. 3A, the protrusions 226 engage corresponding retaining features (e.g., openings, tabs, etc.) in the base 110 when the support 120 is in the stored position. In certain embodiments, the support 120, as well as other components of the assembly 100 such as the base 110, can be molded (e.g., injection molded, thermoformed, etc.) from plastic materials to provide a lightweight configuration. In the illustrated embodiment, for example, the support 120 includes a plurality of ribs or stiffeners 225 to provide adequate reinforcement to the support 120 and allow the support 120 to be formed with a reduced thickness and weight. In other embodiments, however, the support 120 can be formed from other manufacturing methods or from other materials suitable for firearm rests.
  • [0024]
    In the embodiment illustrated in FIG. 2, the lower portion 224 of the support 120 also includes a retention opening 228. The retention opening 228 is configured to facilitate attachment of the support 120 to the base 110 in the stored arrangement. For example, a fastener (e.g., a cable tie, zip tie, string, wire, etc.) can pass through the retention opening 228 to attach the support 120 to the base 110 when the assembly 100 is packaged for retail sale or shipment.
  • [0025]
    FIG. 3A is a side isometric view and FIG. 3B is a top plan view of the assembly 100 of FIG. 1. Referring to FIGS. 3A and 3B together, the supports 120 are shown in the stored arrangement in the storage cavity 130 of the base 110. More specifically, the base 110 includes an intermediate portion 336 in the storage cavity 130. The intermediate portion 336 divides the storage cavity 130 into a support cavity 338 and a handle cavity 339. The intermediate portion 336 also has an intermediate surface 333 that is positioned between a lower surface 332 and an upper surface 334 of the base 110. In the stored arrangement, the base 110 retains the supports 120 in the support cavity 338 between the lower surface 332 and the intermediate surface 333. According to one feature of the illustrated embodiment, the distance from the lower surface 332 to the intermediate surface 333 is approximately equal to the thickness of the supports 120. In other embodiments, however, the distance from the lower surface 332 to the intermediate surface 333 can be greater than or less than the thickness of the supports 120.
  • [0026]
    The base 110 also includes retaining members 342 in a sidewall portion 340 (FIG. 3A) of the base 110. The retaining members 342 are configured to engage the corresponding third protrusions 226 c (FIG. 2) of each support 120 to retain the supports 120 in the stored arrangement in the support cavity 338. The intermediate portion 336 also includes retaining members 342 (FIG. 3B) to engage the corresponding first protrusions 226 a and second protrusions 226 b of each support 120. In certain embodiments, the retaining members 342 can be flexible tabs that are integrally formed with the base 110. To move the supports 120 from the stored arrangement to the support arrangement, a user can disengage each support 120 from the retaining members 342 and insert the lower portion 224 of each support 120 into a corresponding support opening 344 (identified individually as a first support opening 344 a and a second support opening 344 b) in the base 110. The support openings 344 frictionally engage the tapered width of the lower portion 224 of each support 120 to securely retain the supports 120 in the base 100. In other embodiments, however, the retaining members 342 can be attached or otherwise operably coupled to the base 110 to engage or retain the supports 120 in the stored arrangement. For example, the retaining members 342 can include bumps or other types of extensions that are attached or integrally formed with the base 110 to engage the corresponding protrusions 226 of the supports 120. In still further embodiments, the supports 120 can be formed without the protrusions 226, and retaining members 342 protruding from the base 110 can engage the supports 120 to retain the supports 120 in the stored arrangement.
  • [0027]
    The assembly 100 also includes a handle 312 that can be used to carry the entire assembly 100. The handle 312 is pivotally attached to the base 110 in a configuration selected from a stored position (FIG. 1) and a carrying position (FIGS. 3A and 3B). In the stored position, the handle storage cavity 339 receives the handle 312 between the lower surface 332 and the intermediate surface 333 of the base 110. In the carrying position, the handle 312 extends from the base 110 in a direction generally perpendicular to the intermediate surface 333 to allow a user to carry the assembly 100. In certain embodiments, the base 100 can include retaining features to retain the handle 312 in the stored or carrying positions. For example, the base 110 can include protrusions or tabs that engage the handle 312 in either of the stored or carrying positions.
  • [0028]
    According to another feature of the illustrated embodiment, the base 110 includes multiple storage features in addition to the support cavity 338 and the handle cavity 339. For example, the base 110 includes multiple recesses 346 in the upper surface 334 and intermediate surface 333 for holding various firearm paraphernalia (e.g., tools, accessories, cleaning supplies, etc.). In the illustrated embodiment, the recesses 346 include various shapes and sizes, such as relatively large recesses 346 having generally hemispherical shapes or frusto-conical shapes, or relatively small recesses 346. The recesses 346 enable a user to easily store and access various firearm accessories or cleaning supplies in the base 110. The base 110 also includes grooves 349 in the upper surface 334. The grooves 349 can be configured to hold, for example, a firearm cleaning rod or other firearm accessory. Another feature of the assembly 100 illustrated in FIGS. 3A and 3B is that the base 110 also includes generally contoured corners 347. For example, each corner 347 has a generally concave upper portion 348 that facilitates the stacking of multiple assemblies 100 as described below with reference to FIG. 5.
  • [0029]
    The illustrated embodiment also includes a display area 353 (FIG. 3A) on the base 110 that is configured to display information related to the assembly 100. In certain embodiments, the display area 353 can show graphical or textual information related to the assembly 100. For example, labels or stickers can be attached to the base 110 in the display area 353 to illustrated the use or advertise other features of the assembly 100. In other embodiments, information related to the assembly 100 can be applied directly (e.g., printed, molded, etc) on the display area 353. Moreover, one of ordinary skill in the art will appreciate that the display area 353 can be positioned at various locations on the base 110, or that that the assembly 100 can include multiple display areas 353.
  • [0030]
    FIG. 4 is an isometric bottom view of the firearm rest assembly 100 of FIG. 1 illustrating an underside 460 of the base 110. The underside 460 is shaped to allow the assembly 100 to be stacked in a nested configuration with similar firearm assemblies. For example, in certain embodiments the base 110 can be formed from a molded plastic material (e.g., with injection molding, blow molding, thermoforming, etc.). Accordingly, several of the features of the base 110 described above with reference to FIGS. 3A and 3B are visible in FIG. 4 extending into the underside 460 of the base 110. For example, the support cavity 338, the handle cavity 339, the second support opening 344 b, and the various recesses 346 are shown in FIG. 4 projecting into the underside 460. The retaining members 342 can also be seen from the underside 460 of the base 110. Moreover, each corner 347 of the base 110 includes one or more stiffeners 464 extending from a leg retention portion 462. The leg retention portion 462 can include an opening (e.g., a threaded hole) that receives a corresponding foot or leg (not shown). The stiffeners 464 provide support or rigidity to the corners 347. Each stiffener 464 is also configured to align with the concave upper portion 348 of each corner 347 when multiple assemblies 100 are in a stacked or nested configuration.
  • [0031]
    According to another feature of the illustrated embodiment, the base 110 includes retention holes 452 in the lower surface of the support cavity 338. The retention holes 452 can be used to secure the supports 120 in the base 110 when the assembly 100 is packaged or shipped. For example, when the supports 120 are in the stored arrangement, the retention holes 452 align with the retention openings 228 in each support 120. A fastener (e.g., a cable tie, zip tie, wire, string, etc.) can be inserted through the retention holes 452 in the base 110 and corresponding retention openings 228 in the supports 120 to securely retain the supports 120 to the base 110 during shipment or for retail sale. In other embodiments, however, the supports 120 can be retained in the stored arrangement with other methods suitable for keeping the supports 120 in the support cavity 338. For example, the supports 120 can be retained in the support cavity 338 for shipment or retail sale with an adhesive (e.g., tape, glue, non-drying silicon glue, etc.), molded protrusions, tabs, vacuum wrapping, etc.
  • [0032]
    FIG. 5 is side view of a stacked or nested assembly 502 including two firearm rest assemblies 500 (identified individually as a first firearm rest assembly 500 a and a second firearm rest assembly 500 b). Each firearm rest assembly 500 (“assembly 500”) is generally similar in structure and function to the assembly 100 described above with reference to FIGS. 1-4. For example, each assembly 500 carries supports or other components (not shown) in a stored arrangement to provide the stacked nested geometry of the assemblies 500. According to one aspect of the illustrated embodiment, the stacked assembly 502 has an overall nested height Hn that is appreciably less than the sum of individual heights Hi of each assembly 500. In certain embodiments, for example, the nested height Hn is approximately 1.3 times greater than the individual height Hi of each assembly 500. In other embodiments, however, the nested height Hn can be as great as approximately 1.8 times the individual height Hi of each assembly 500. In still further embodiments, the nested height Hn can be greater than 1.8 times, or less than 1.3 times, the individual height Hi of each assembly 500.
  • [0033]
    The reduced overall nested height Hn of the stacked assembly 502 provides several advantages for shipping and storing the assemblies 500. For example, the nested height Hn of the stacked assembly 502 can provide reduced shipping costs by allowing more units or assemblies 500 per volume when shipping. Retailers can also maximize shelf space due to the reduced nested height Hn of the assemblies 500. For example, and as explained in detail below with reference to FIG. 6, complete packaged assemblies 500, including all of the components associated with each assembly 500, can be stacked or nested together while still retaining the reduced overall nested height Hn of the stacked assembly 502.
  • [0034]
    FIG. 6 is an isometric view of a packaged firearm rest assembly 600 (“assembly 600”) configured in accordance with another embodiment of the disclosure. In the illustrated embodiment, the assembly 600 includes a base 610 that is generally similar in structure and function to the bases of the assemblies 100, 500 described above with reference to FIGS. 1-5. For example, the base 610 includes multiple cavities and recesses for storing supports 620 (identified individually as a first support 620 a and a second support 620 b), a handle 612, and other firearm paraphernalia. In the illustrated embodiment, however, the assembly 600 also includes packaging material 604 at least partially covering the base 610. The packaging material 604 can help to at least partially retain accessories, components, or hardware associated with the assembly. Moreover, the packaging material 604 is configured to allow the assembly 600 to be stacked or nested with other similar assemblies while still maintaining an overall reduced nested height.
  • [0035]
    In the illustrated embodiment, the packaging material 604 generally conforms to the shape and contour of the base 610 to thereby allow the assembly 600 to be stacked in the nested configuration with similar packaged assemblies. More specifically, the illustrated packaging material 604 includes a series of folds or bends that follow the shape of the cavities in the base 610. In certain embodiments, the packaging material 604 can be made from paper or a paper-based material (e.g., cardboard) that is folded to match the shape or contour of the base 610. In other embodiments, however, the packaging material 604 can be made from other materials, including, for example, plastic. In one embodiment, for example, the assembly 600 can include plastic packaging that is vacuum sealed to at least partially cover the base 610 and generally conform to the shape and contour of the base 610. In still further embodiments, the assembly 600 can include shrink wrap packaging that conforms to the shape of the base 610. In yet another embodiment, the assembly 600 can include a box generally surrounding the base 610 with cut-out portions corresponding to projections from the underside of a similar assembly to allow stacking of the assemblies in a nested configuration.
  • [0036]
    In certain embodiments, the packaging material 604 can also include textual or graphical information relating to the assembly 600. For example, the packaging material 604 can include instructions relating to the use of the assembly 600, features of the assembly 600, pictures of the assembly 600, etc. The packaging material 604 can also include brand identifying information such as a trademark or logo for the assembly 600. Moreover, in certain embodiments the packaging material 604 is configured to be positioned under the handle 612 to allow the handle 612 to pivot between the stored and carrying positions when the packaging material 604 is in place. In other embodiments, however, the packaging material 604 can at least partially cover the handle 612 to retain the handle 612 in the stored position.
  • [0037]
    According to another aspect of the embodiment illustrated in FIG. 6, the packaging material 604 also includes retention holes 606. A retention member 608 (e.g., a wire, twist tie, cable tie, zip tie, string, etc.) can pass through each retention hole 606 in the packaging material 604 and corresponding holes in the supports 620 and base 610. In this manner, the retention member 608 can secure the supports 620 to the base 610 and the packaging material 604, and still allow the assembly 600 to be stacked with a similar assembly in a nested configuration.
  • [0038]
    FIG. 7 is an isometric view of a firearm rest assembly 700 (“assembly 700”) configured in accordance with yet another embodiment of the disclosure. The assembly 700 includes several features that are generally similar in structure and function to the assemblies 100, 500, 600 described above with reference to FIGS. 1-6. For example, the assembly 700 includes a base 710 with supports 720 (identified individually as a first support 720 a shown in the stored arrangement and a second support 720 b shown in the support arrangement). Similar to the embodiments described above, the supports 720 can be positioned in the stored arrangement in a storage cavity 730. In the illustrated embodiment, however, the supports 720 are pivotally coupled to the base 710 to move from the stored arrangement to the support arrangement, and vice versa. More specifically, the assembly 700 includes hinges 721 (only one of which is visible in FIG. 7) that pivotally attach each support 720 to the base 710. The base 710 also includes storage retaining members 742 (identified individually as a first storage retaining member 742 a and a second storage retaining member 742 b) and support retaining members 744 (only one of which is visible in FIG. 7). The storage retaining members 742 and the support retaining members 744 can be generally similar to the retaining members 342 described above with reference to FIGS. 3A-4. In the illustrated embodiment, however, the storage retaining members 742 retain the supports 720 in the stored arrangement, and the support retaining members 744 retain the supports 720 in the support arrangement. In this manner, the supports 720 can be pivotally attached to the base 710 and securely retained in each of the stored and support arrangements. Moreover, when the supports 720 are in the stored arrangement, the assembly 700 can be stacked with similar assemblies in a nested configuration.
  • [0039]
    In certain embodiments, the supports 720 can be retained in the storage or support positions with features other than the storage retaining members 742 and the support retaining members 744. For example, in certain embodiments the hinges 721 can be spring-loaded hinges that can be used to position and retain the supports 720 in the desired configuration. In still further embodiments, other biasing features can be used to move or retain the supports 720 in the stored or support arrangements.
  • [0040]
    FIG. 8 is a side cross-sectional view of a firearm rest assembly 800 (“assembly 800”) configured in accordance with a further embodiment of the disclosure. In the illustrated embodiment, the assembly 800 includes a base 810 with a support opening 844 configured to receive an adjustable support 820. For purposes of illustration, the cross-sectional view shown of FIG. 8 is taken substantially along the line 8-8 of FIG. 3B, although the embodiment illustrated in FIG. 3B does not include an adjustable support 820. Referring to FIG. 8, in the illustrated embodiment the assembly 800 includes fasteners 874 (identified individually as a first fastener 874 a and a second fastener 874 b) that are rotatably retained in the base 810 in the support opening 844. The fasteners 874 receive corresponding threaded shafts 872 (identified individually as a first shaft 872 a and a second shaft 872 b) extending from the support 820. In certain embodiments, each fastener 874 can be a threaded nut having an exterior surface that facilitates rotation of the fastener 874 by a user. For example, the fasteners 874 can include a knurled exterior surface, a hexagonal surface, a wing nut configuration, etc. When a user rotates each fastener 874, the fasteners 874 move the corresponding shafts 872 up or down in the directions indicated by arrow 876. Accordingly, a user can adjust the height of the support 820 to move the section of the firearm positioned in the support 820. Moreover, similar to the embodiments described above, the support 820 can also be removably retained in the base 810 in a stored configuration to allow the assembly 800 to be stacked with similar assemblies in a nested configuration.
  • [0041]
    Although the embodiment illustrated in FIG. 8 includes two shafts 872 and corresponding fasteners 874, in other embodiments the assembly 800 can include a different number of adjustment mechanisms, including, for example, a single shaft 872 and corresponding fastener 874. In still further embodiments, the assembly 800 can include other adjustment mechanisms to adjust the height of the support 820 when the support 820 is in the support arrangement. Moreover, although only a single adjustable support 820 is shown in FIG. 8, one skilled in the art will appreciate that the assembly 800 can include at least a second adjustable support that is generally similar to the illustrated adjustable support 820.
  • [0042]
    From the foregoing, it will be appreciated that specific embodiments of the disclosure have been described herein for purposes of illustration, but that various modifications can be made without deviating from the spirit and scope of the disclosure. For example, the base of the assemblies described herein may have other configurations or include other suitable packaging assemblies (e.g., plastic clamshell packaging, shrink-wrapped packaging, etc.). Moreover, specific elements of any of the foregoing embodiments can be combined or substituted for elements in other embodiments. Furthermore, while advantages associated with certain embodiments of the disclosure have been described in the context of these embodiments, other embodiments may also exhibit such advantages, and not all embodiments need necessarily exhibit such advantages to fall within the scope of the invention. Accordingly, embodiments of the disclosure are not limited except as by the appended claims.
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Classifications
U.S. Classification42/94, 206/505
International ClassificationF41C27/00, B65D21/02
Cooperative ClassificationF41A23/18, F41A23/16
European ClassificationF41A23/16, F41A23/18
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Feb 13, 2009ASAssignment
Owner name: BATTENFELD TECHNOLOGIES, INC., MISSOURI
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:POTTERFIELD, RUSSELL A.;REEL/FRAME:022255/0543
Effective date: 20090202