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Publication numberUS20100147922 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 12/620,044
Publication dateJun 17, 2010
Filing dateNov 17, 2009
Priority dateDec 16, 2008
Also published asCA2686105A1, EP2198787A1, EP2446836A1, EP2559387A1, US8668129, US20100147921, US20110233259
Publication number12620044, 620044, US 2010/0147922 A1, US 2010/147922 A1, US 20100147922 A1, US 20100147922A1, US 2010147922 A1, US 2010147922A1, US-A1-20100147922, US-A1-2010147922, US2010/0147922A1, US2010/147922A1, US20100147922 A1, US20100147922A1, US2010147922 A1, US2010147922A1
InventorsLee Olson
Original AssigneeTyco Healthcare Group Lp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Surgical Apparatus Including Surgical Buttress
US 20100147922 A1
Abstract
A surgical buttress includes a body portion and a band disposed on each of the distal and proximal ends thereof. The surgical buttress is configured to attach to an end effector of a surgical stapling apparatus. The body portion, having perforations disposed thereon, overlies the working surface of one of the first or second jaws of the end effector. A resilient portion extends transversely beyond the side edges of the first or second jaws. Each band remains attached to the end effector following the firing thereof. The proximal band is removably attachable to a hook feature disposed on one of the first or second jaws of the end effector. The surgical buttress can be made from suitable degradable or non-degradable materials. One embodiment contemplates a detachable and disposable single use loading unit. A method of attaching the surgical buttress to a surgical apparatus is also envisioned.
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Claims(16)
1-20. (canceled)
21. A surgical stapling apparatus, comprising:
an end effector having a first jaw and a second jaw, the first jaw having a distal end and sides;
a plurality of fasteners disposed in fastener slots of the first jaw, and fastener forming pockets being provided on the second jaw; and
a surgical buttress having a body portion, a band connected to a distal end thereof, and resilient side skirt, the band being connected to the first jaw and encircling the distal end of the first jaw, the resilient side skirt engaging the sides of the first jaw;
the body portion of the surgical buttress being configured and dimensioned to substantially overlie at least some of the fastener slots of the first jaw.
22. A surgical stapling apparatus according to claim 21, wherein the resilient side skirt extends transversely beyond at least one side edge of the first jaw.
23. A surgical stapling apparatus according to claim 22, wherein the band comprises a resilient portion
24. A surgical stapling apparatus according to claim 22, wherein the band and resilient side skirt are configured and dimensioned to remain attached to the first jaw following the firing of the surgical stapling apparatus.
25. A surgical stapling apparatus according to claim 21, wherein at least the body portion of the at least one surgical buttress is made from degradable materials selected from the group comprising natural collagenous materials, cat gut, or synthetic resins including those derived from alkylene carbonates including trimethylene carbonate, tetramethylene carbonate; caprolactone, valerolactone, dioxanone, polyanhydrides, polyesters, polyacrylates, polymethylmethacrylates, polyurethanes, glycolic acid, lactic acid, glycolide, lactide, polyhydroxy butyrates, polyorthoester, polyhydroxy alkanoates, homopolymers thereof, and copolymers thereof.
26. A surgical stapling apparatus according to claim 21, wherein at least the body portion of the at least one surgical buttress is made from non-degradable materials selected from the group comprising polyolefins, including polyethylene, polydimethylsiloxane, polypropylene, copolymers of polyethylene and polypropylene, and blends of polyethylene and polypropylene; ultra high molecular weight polyethylene, polyamides; polyesters including polyethylene terephthalate; polytetrafluoroethylene; polyether-esters including polybutester; polytetramethylene ether glycol; 1,4-butanediol; polyurethanes; and combinations thereof; silk; cotton, linen, and carbon fibers.
27. A surgical stapling apparatus according to claim 21, further comprising a second band connected to a proximal end of the at least one surgical buttress for connection to a proximal end of the first jaw.
28. A surgical stapling apparatus according to claim 27, wherein the second band is configured and dimensioned to remain attached to the end effector following the firing of the surgical stapling apparatus.
29. A surgical stapling apparatus according to claim 27, further comprising a hook feature disposed on the proximal end of the first jaw of the end effector, wherein the second band is configured and dimensioned to engage the hook feature.
30. A surgical stapling apparatus according to claim 21, wherein the body portion of the at least one surgical buttress includes a plurality of perforations.
31. A surgical stapling apparatus according to claim 30, wherein the perforations are disposed along the perimeter of the body portion of the surgical buttress.
32. A surgical stapling apparatus according to claim 21, further comprising:
a surgical buttress connected to the second jaw and having a body portion, a band connected to a distal end thereof, and a resilient side skirt, the band being connected to the second jaw and encircling the distal end of the second jaw, the resilient side skirt engaging the sides of the second jaw,
the body portion of the surgical buttress being configured and dimensioned to substantially overlie at least some of the fastener forming pockets of the second jaw.
33. A surgical buttress for use with a surgical stapling apparatus, the surgical buttress comprising:
a body portion defining a length and a width, the body portion having sides, a distal end and a proximal end, wherein the body portion is configured and dimensioned to substantially overlie a portion of at least some of the fastener slots of a first jaw of an end effector of the surgical stapling apparatus or the fastener pockets of a second jaw of the end effector of the surgical stapling apparatus;
at least one band connected to the distal end of the body portion, wherein the at least one band encircles a portion of the end effector; and
a resilient side skirt engaging the sides of the first jaw or second jaw.
34. A surgical buttress according to claim 33, wherein the at least one band comprises a resilient portion of the buttress.
35. A surgical buttress according to claim 33, wherein at least the body portion is made from materials selected from the group comprising: natural collagenous materials, cat gut, or synthetic resins including those derived from alkylene carbonates including trimethylene carbonate, tetramethylene carbonate; caprolactone, valerolactone, dioxanone, polyanhydrides, polyesters, polyacrylates, polymethylmethacrylates, polyurethanes, glycolic acid, lactic acid, glycolide, lactide, polyhydroxy butyrates, polyorthoester, polyhydroxy alkanoates, homopolymers thereof, and copolymers thereof, polyolefins, including polyethylene, polydimethylsiloxane, polypropylene, copolymers of polyethylene and polypropylene, and blends of polyethylene and polypropylene; ultra high molecular weight polyethylene, polyamides; polyesters including polyethylene terephthalate; polytetrafluoroethylene; polyether-esters including polybutester; polytetramethylene ether glycol; 1,4-butanediol; polyurethanes; and combinations thereof; silk; cotton, linen, and carbon fibers.
Description
BACKGROUND

1. Technical Field

This application relates to a surgical apparatus, and more particularly, to a surgical buttress for use with a surgical stapling apparatus during operation of the stapling apparatus to apply a plurality of surgical fasteners to body tissue.

2. Background of Related Art

As medical and hospital costs continue to increase, surgeons are constantly striving to develop advanced surgical techniques. Advances in the surgical field are often related to the development of operative techniques which involve less invasive surgical procedures and reduce overall patient trauma. In this manner, the length of hospital stays can be significantly reduced, and, therefore, the hospital and medical costs can be reduced as well.

Although the present disclosure includes, but is not limited to use with endoscopic surgery, endoscopic surgery is one of the truly great advances in recent years to reduce the invasiveness of surgical procedures. Generally, endoscopic surgery involves incising through body walls for example, viewing and/or operating on the ovaries, uterus, gall bladder, bowels, kidneys, appendix, etc. There are many common endoscopic surgical procedures, including arthroscopy, laparoscopy (pelviscopy), gastroentroscopy and laryngobronchoscopy, just to name a few. Typically, trocars are utilized for creating the incisions through which the endoscopic surgery is performed. Trocar tubes or cannula devices are extended into and left in place in the abdominal wall to provide access for endoscopic surgical tools. A camera or endoscope is inserted through a relatively large diameter trocar tube which is generally located at the naval incision, and permits the visual inspection and magnification of the body cavity. The surgeon can then perform diagnostic and therapeutic procedures at the surgical site with the aid of specialized instrumentation, such as, forceps, cutters, applicators, and the like which are designed to fit through additional cannulas. Thus, instead of a large incision (typically 12 inches or larger) that cuts through major muscles, patients undergoing endoscopic surgery receive more cosmetically appealing incisions, between 5 and 10 millimeters in size. Recovery is, therefore, much quicker and patients require less anesthesia than traditional surgery. In addition, because the surgical field is greatly magnified, surgeons are better able to dissect blood vessels and control blood loss. Heat and water loss are greatly reduced as a result of the smaller incisions. In order to address the specific needs of endoscopic and/or laparoscopic surgical procedures, endoscopic surgical stapling devices have been developed and are disclosed in, for example, U.S. Pat. No. 5,040,715 (Green, et al.); U.S. Pat. No. 5,307,976 (Olson, et al.); U.S. Pat. No. 5,312,023 (Green, et al.); U.S. Pat. No. 5,318,221 (Green, et al.); U.S. Pat. No. 5,326,013 (Green, et al.); and U.S. Pat. No. 5,332,142 (Robinson, et al.).

In many surgical procedures, including those involved in open and endoscopic surgery, it is often necessary to staple tissue. It is especially challenging during endoscopic surgery because of the small openings through which the stapling of tissues must be accomplished. Instruments for this purpose can include two elongated members which are respectively used to capture or clamp tissue. Surgical devices wherein tissue is first grasped or clamped between opposing jaw structure and then joined by surgical fasteners are well known in the art. Typically, one of the members carries a fastener cartridge which houses a plurality of staples arranged in at least two lateral rows while the other member has an anvil that defines a surface for forming the staple legs as the staples are driven from the staple cartridge. The fasteners are typically in the form of surgical staples but two part polymeric fasteners can also be utilized. Generally, the stapling operation is effected by cam bars or wedges that travel longitudinally through the staple cartridge, with the cam bars acting upon staple pushers to sequentially eject the staples from the staple cartridge. A knife can travel between the staple rows to longitudinally cut and/or open the stapled tissue between the rows of staples. Such instruments are disclosed, for example, in U.S. Pat. No. 3,079,606 and U.S. Pat. No. 3,490,675.

A later stapler disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 3,499,591 applies a double row of staples on each side of the incision. This is accomplished by providing a disposable loading unit in which a cam member moves through an elongate guide path between two sets of staggered staple carrying grooves. Staple drive members are located within the grooves and are positioned in such a manner so as to be contacted by the longitudinally moving cam member to effect ejection of the staples from the staple cartridge of the disposable loading unit. U.S. Surgical, the assignee of the present application, has manufactured and marketed endoscopic stapling instruments for several years. Examples of such instruments include the Multifire ENDO GIA* 30 and Multifire ENDO GIA* 60 instruments. Other examples of such staplers are disclosed in U.S. Pat. Nos. 4,429,695 and 5,065,929.

In staplers of the general type described above, it is conventional to provide separate anvil slots at each staple forming location. This makes it necessary to maintain relatively stringent alignment between the staple holding assembly and the anvil to assure that the staples enter the anvil slots correctly for proper clinching. The importance of maintaining good alignment between the relatively movable staple holding assembly and anvil assembly may contribute to the complexity of the instrument and to the cost of manufacturing and maintaining it. It is important that every staple be formed properly since an incompletely or improperly formed staple may leave a gap in a wound closure. Currently, surgical buttress material is also used in combination with these instruments as reinforcement to staple lines to further promote proper staple formation while reducing twisting/malformation caused by misalignment or unusual tissue while minimizing reliance on strict manufacturing tolerances. These instruments have provided significant clinical benefits. Nonetheless, improvements are possible, for example, by reducing the complexity of manufacture and/or application.

SUMMARY

The present invention relates to a surgical buttress for use with a surgical stapling apparatus. The surgical stapling apparatus includes a housing, an end effector having first and second jaws and at least one surgical buttress. A plurality of fasteners are disposed in fastener slots of the first jaw, and fastener pockets are provided on the second jaw. The at least one surgical buttress has a body portion and at least one band connected to a distal end thereof for connection to the end effector. The at least one band encircles a portion of the end effector. The body portion of the at least one surgical buttress is configured and dimensioned to substantially overlie at least some of the fastener slots of the first jaw.

The at least one surgical buttress of the surgical stapling apparatus includes a resilient portion. The resilient portion extends transversely beyond at least one side edge of at least one of the first or second jaws of the end effector. The resilient portion of the surgical stapling apparatus is configured and dimensioned to remain attached to the end effector following the firing of the surgical stapling apparatus.

The surgical stapling apparatus further includes at least one second band connected to a proximal end of the at least one surgical buttress for connection to a proximal end of the end effector. The at least one second band of the surgical stapling apparatus is configured and dimensioned to remain attached to the end effector following the firing of the surgical stapling apparatus.

The surgical stapling apparatus further includes a hook feature disposed on the proximal end of at least one of the first or second jaws of the end effector. The at least one second band is configured and dimensioned to engage the hook feature.

At least the body portion of the at least one surgical buttress of the surgical stapling apparatus includes a plurality of perforations. The perforations are disposed along the perimeter of the body portion of the surgical buttress of the surgical stapling apparatus.

At least the body portion of the at least one surgical buttress of the surgical stapling apparatus can be made from degradable materials selected from the group comprising natural collagenous materials, cat gut, or synthetic resins including those derived from alkylene carbonates including trimethylene carbonate, tetramethylene carbonate; caprolactone, valerolactone, dioxanone, polyanhydrides, polyesters, polyacrylates, polymethylmethacrylates, polyurethanes, glycolic acid, lactic acid, glycolide, lactide, polyhydroxy butyrates, polyorthoester, polyhydroxy alkanoates, homopolymers thereof, and copolymers thereof.

At least the body portion of the at least one surgical buttress of the surgical stapling apparatus can be made from non-degradable materials selected from the group comprising polyolefins, including polyethylene, polydimethylsiloxane, polypropylene, copolymers of polyethylene and polypropylene, and blends of polyethylene and polypropylene; ultra high molecular weight polyethylene, polyamides; polyesters including polyethylene terephthalate; polytetrafluoroethylene; polyether-esters including polybutester; polytetramethylene ether glycol; 1,4-butanediol; polyurethanes; and combinations thereof; silk; cotton, linen, and carbon fibers.

In one aspect of the present disclosure, a surgical buttress for use with a surgical stapling apparatus including a body portion defining a length and a width is provided. The body portion has distal and proximal ends. The body portion is configured and dimensioned to substantially overlie a portion of at least one of the fastener slots of the first jaw of an end effector of the surgical stapling apparatus or the fastener pockets of the second jaw of the end effector of the surgical stapling apparatus. At least one band is connected to the distal end of the body portion. The at least one band is configured and dimensioned to encircle a portion of the end effector.

The surgical buttress further includes a resilient portion configured and dimensioned to extend transversely beyond at least one side edge of at least one of the first or second jaws of the end effector. The resilient portion of the surgical buttress is configured and dimensioned to remain attached to the end effector following the firing of the surgical stapling apparatus.

At least a portion of the body portion of the surgical buttress includes a plurality of perforations. At least a portion of the perforations of the surgical buttress are disposed along the perimeter of the body portion.

The at least one band of the surgical buttress is configured and dimensioned to remain attached to the end effector following the firing of the surgical stapling apparatus.

At least the body portion of the surgical buttress can be made from degradable materials selected from the group comprising natural collagenous materials, cat gut, or synthetic resins including those derived from alkylene carbonates including trimethylene carbonate, tetramethylene carbonate; caprolactone, valerolactone, dioxanone, polyanhydrides, polyesters, polyacrylates, polymethylmethacrylates, polyurethanes, glycolic acid, lactic acid, glycolide, lactide, polyhydroxy butyrates, polyorthoester, polyhydroxy alkanoates, homopolymers thereof, and copolymers thereof.

At least the body portion of the surgical buttress can be made from non-degradable materials selected from the group comprising polyolefins, including polyethylene, polydimethylsiloxane, polypropylene, copolymers of polyethylene and polypropylene, and blends of polyethylene and polypropylene; ultra high molecular weight polyethylene, polyamides; polyesters including polyethylene terephthalate; polytetrafluoroethylene; polyether-esters including polybutester; polytetramethylene ether glycol; 1,4-butanediol; polyurethanes; and combinations thereof; silk; cotton, linen, and carbon fibers.

According to a further aspect of the present disclosure, a surgical stapling apparatus having a housing, an end effector including first and second jaws, and at least one surgical buttress is provided. A plurality of fasteners are disposed in fastener slots of the first jaw. Fastener pockets are provided on the second jaw. The at least one surgical buttress has a body portion and at least one band connected to a distal end thereof for connection to the end effector. The at least one band encircles a portion of the end effector. The body portion of the at least one surgical buttress is configured and dimensioned to substantially overlie at least some of the fastener pockets of the second jaw.

According to yet another aspect of the present disclosure, a method of attaching a surgical buttress to a jaw of a surgical stapling apparatus is provided. The method includes the step of: providing a surgical buttress. The surgical buttress includes a body portion defining a length and a width; the body portion having distal and proximal ends, wherein the body portion is configured and dimensioned to substantially overlie a portion of at least one of the fastener slots of the first jaw of an end effector of the surgical stapling apparatus or the fastener pockets of the second jaw of the end effector of the surgical stapling apparatus; at least one band connected to the distal end of the body portion, wherein the at least one band is configured and dimensioned to remain attached to the end effector following the firing of the surgical stapling apparatus; and a resilient portion connected to the sides of the body portion. The method further includes the steps of affixing the at least one band to the distal end of at least one of the first or second jaws of the end effector; extending the resilient portion transversely beyond at least one side edge of at least one of the first or second jaws; and selectively affixing at least one second band to the proximal end of at least one of the first or second jaws of the end effector.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The above and other aspects, features, and advantages of the present disclosure will become more apparent in light of the following detailed description when taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of an endoscopic surgical stapler including a surgical buttress according to the present disclosure;

FIG. 2 is a perspective view illustrating an exemplary end effector during a fastener applying operation as fasteners are being sequentially fired;

FIG. 3 is a perspective view of the end effector illustrating a surgical buttress attached to the first and second jaws thereof in accordance with the present disclosure;

FIG. 4 is a bottom perspective view of the second jaw of FIG. 3;

FIG. 5A is a perspective view of the surgical buttress in accordance with the present disclosure;

FIG. 5B is side elevational view of the surgical buttress of FIG. 5A;

FIG. 5C is a front elevational view of the surgical buttress of FIGS. 5A and 5B; and

FIG. 6 is an exploded perspective view of one embodiment of a surgical stapling apparatus in accordance with the present disclosure including a single use loading unit having a surgical buttress with the single use loading unit separated from the distal end of the surgical stapling apparatus.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF EMBODIMENTS

Particular embodiments of the present disclosure will be described herein with reference to the accompanying drawings. As shown in the drawings and as described throughout the following description, and as is traditional when referring to relative positioning on an object, the term “proximal” refers to the end of the apparatus that is closer to the user and the term “distal” refers to the end of the apparatus that is further from the user. In the following description, well-known functions or constructions are not described in detail to avoid obscuring the present disclosure in unnecessary detail.

Referring now to the drawings, in which like reference numerals identify identical or substantially similar parts throughout the several views, FIG. 1 illustrates a surgical stapling apparatus 10. In accordance with the present disclosure, a surgical stapling apparatus 10 includes a housing 20 and an elongate member 30 extending from the housing 20. An end effector 40 is disposed on one end of the elongate member 30. The end effector 40 includes first and second jaws 50, 60. As seen in FIG. 2, a plurality of fasteners 70 are disposed in fastener slots 80 and formed in fastener pockets 90 (not shown). The fastener slots 80 are disposed on one of the first or second jaws 50, 60. The fastener pockets 90 are disposed on the other of the first or second jaws 50, 60.

As illustrated in FIGS. 3 and 4, a first surgical buttress 100 is shown disposed on or attached to the first jaw 50 and a second surgical buttress 200 is shown disposed on or attached to the second jaw 60. With reference to FIGS. 5A-5C, each surgical buttress 100, 200 includes a respective body portion 110, 210 having at least one distal band 120, 220 disposed at a distal end thereof for removably connecting the surgical buttress 100, 200 to a distal end of respective jaws 50, 60 of the end effector 40. Additionally, each surgical buttress 100, 200 has a proximal band 122, 222 disposed at the proximal end thereof for removably connecting the surgical buttress 100, 200 to a proximal end of respective jaws 50, 60 of the end effector 40. Each band 120, 220, 122, 222 is configured and dimensioned to encircle a portion of the end effector 40.

As used herein, the surgical buttress 100, 200 includes a pledget, gasket, buttress, or staple line reinforcement structure.

Each body portion 110, 210 defines a length and a width and is configured to substantially overlie at least a portion of the working surface of the respective first or a second jaws 50, 60 of the end effector 40 of the surgical stapling apparatus 10. Each surgical buttress 100, 200 may be configured and dimensioned to overlie at least a portion of the fastener slots 80 or the fastener pockets 90 of the respective first and second jaws 50, 60. As such, in use, the body portion 110, 210 of the surgical buttress 100, 200 provides fastener-line reinforcement for the plurality of fasteners 70 following the firing of the surgical stapling apparatus 10.

The distal bands 120, 220 are attached at the distal end of the body portions 110, 210 in such a manner so to remain attached to respective jaws 50, 60 of the end effector 40 following a firing of the stapling apparatus 10. For example, each distal band 120, 220 is configured and dimensioned to wrap around a distal end of a respective jaw 50, 60 of the end effector 40. Conversely, a proximal band 122, 222 is configured and dimensioned to wrap around a proximal end of respective jaws 50, 60. In one embodiment, as seen in FIG. 3, the proximal band 122 of the surgical buttress 100 may be configured to engage a hook feature 55 provided at the proximal end of the first jaw 50. Similarly, proximal band 222 of the surgical buttress 200 may be configured to engage the hook feature 55 provided at the proximal end of the first jaw 50.

As seen in FIG. 5C, each surgical buttress 100, 200 includes a plurality of perforations 114, 214 formed along the respective perimeter of the body portions 110, 210 thereof. In this manner, during use a central area of the body portions 110, 210 may be separated along the perforations 114, 214 following a securing thereof to tissue. It is further contemplated that perforations 114, 214 may be replaced with lines or slots of reduced thickness and may not necessarily penetrate completely through body portions 110, 120.

Referring again to FIGS. 3-4, 5A and 5C, each surgical buttress 100, 200 includes resilient side skirts 130, 230 extending transversely beyond at least one side edge of the respective body portions 110, 210 of each surgical buttress 100, 200. It is contemplated that side skirts 130, 230 may be affixed or adhered to the sides of respective jaws 50, 60.

It is envisioned that at least body portions 110, 120 of the surgical buttress 100, 200 can be made from degradable, absorbable and/or resorbable materials. Materials such as natural collagenous materials, cat gut, or synthetic resins including those derived from alkylene carbonates including trimethylene carbonate, tetramethylene carbonate; caprolactone, valerolactone, dioxanone, polyanhydrides, polyesters, polyacrylates, polymethylmethacrylates, polyurethanes, glycolic acid, lactic acid, glycolide, lactide, polyhydroxy butyrates, polyorthoester, polyhydroxy alkanoates, homopolymers thereof, and copolymers thereof can be used.

Furthermore, it is also contemplated that at least body portions 110, 120 of the surgical buttress 100, 200 can be made from non-degradable, non-absorbable and/or non-resorbable materials. Materials such as polyolefins, including polyethylene, polydimethylsiloxane, polypropylene, copolymers of polyethylene and polypropylene, and blends of polyethylene and polypropylene; ultra high molecular weight polyethylene, polyamides; polyesters including polyethylene terephthalate; polytetrafluoroethylene; polyether-esters including polybutester; polytetramethylene ether glycol; 1,4-butanediol; polyurethanes; and combinations thereof; silk; cotton, linen, and carbon fibers can be used.

Referring to FIG. 6, one embodiment of the present disclosure envisions a surgical stapling apparatus 10 that includes a single use loading unit 150, which in some manifestations, is disposable. Upon firing of the surgical stapling apparatus 10, each distal band 120, 220, each proximal band 122, 222, and each resilient side skirt 130, 230 are collectively detachable from respective body portions 110, 210 when the respective first or second jaw 50, 60 is removed from the surgical site after firing of the surgical stapling apparatus 10.

A method of attaching a surgical buttress 100, 200 to a jaw 50, 60 of a surgical stapling apparatus 10 is also contemplated. According to the present disclosure, the method includes the steps of providing a surgical buttress 100, 200 in accordance with the present disclosure; affixing at least one distal band 120, 220 to the distal end of a respective jaw 50, 60 of the end effector 40; extending at least a portion of the resilient side skirts 130, 230 of the surgical buttress 100, 200 transversely beyond at least one side edge of at least one of the first or second jaws 50, 60; and selectively affixing a proximal band 122, 222 to a proximal end of the respective first or second jaw 50, 60. It is contemplated that the resilient side skirts 130, 230 may be adhered to the first or second jaws 50, 60.

During operation of a surgical stapling apparatus 10, including at least one surgical buttress 100, 200, the first and second jaws 50, 60 are clamped against tissue of a patient, and the surgical stapling apparatus 10 is fired to deploy the fasteners 70 through the fastener slots 80. Upon firing, the fasteners 70 pass through the fastener slots 80, and the legs of the fasteners 70 penetrate through a first layer of tissue, through body portions 110, 210 of the surgical buttress 100, 200, through a second layer of tissue and are formed against the fastener pockets 90, thereby affixing the body portion 110, 210 of the surgical buttress 100, 200 to the tissue. Concomitantly therewith, a knife (not shown) translatably disposed within the end effector 40 cuts through the tissue clamped between the jaws 50, 60, through at least a portion of the body portion 110, 210 of the surgical buttress 100, 200. In certain embodiments, the knife can be configured and arranged to out through the proximal bands 122, 222, which are disposed distal of the knife prior to firing. The perforations 114, 214 disposed on the body portion 110, 210 enable a central area of the body portion 110, 210 of the surgical buttress 100, 200 to disengage or release from the end effector 40, while each distal band 120, 220, proximal band 122, 222, and the resilient side skirts 130, 230 remain attached. The central area of the body portion 110, 210 of the surgical buttresses 100, 200 remains attached to the tissue via the fasteners 70. The distal bands 120, 220 and the resilient side skirts 130, 230 remain affixed to the respective jaws 50, 60 of the end effector 40 as the end effector 40 is removed.

While using a single use loading unit 150, the user may remove the single use loading unit 150 or portions thereof from the surgical stapling apparatus 10 and subsequently dispose the single use loading unit 150 in its entirety or portions thereof. If further application is necessary, a user may replace the spent or fired single use loading unit 150 by mounting a new single use loading unit 150 onto the surgical stapling apparatus 10. The user may then repeat a fastening process.

In general, linear staplers, including open and endoscopic devices, can have two elongated members which are respectively used to capture or clamp tissue. Typically, one of the members carries a staple cartridge which houses a plurality of staples arranged in at least two lateral rows while the other member has an anvil that defines a surface for forming the staple legs as the staples are driven from the staple cartridge. Generally, the stapling operation is effected by cam bars that travel longitudinally through the staple cartridge, with the cam bars acting upon staple pushers to sequentially eject the staples from the staple cartridge. A knife can travel between the staple rows to longitudinally cut and/or open the stapled tissue between the rows of staples. Such an instrument is disclosed, for example, in U.S. Pat. No. 6,202,914, the entire content of which is incorporated herein by reference.

Some staplers apply a double row of staples on each side of the incision. This is accomplished by providing a disposable loading unit in which a cam member moves through an elongate guide path between two sets of staggered staple carrying grooves. Staple drive members are located within the grooves and are positioned in such a manner so as to be contacted by the longitudinally moving cam member to effect ejection of the staples from the staple cartridge of the disposable loading unit. An example of such a stapler is disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 5,065,929, the entire content of which is incorporated herein by reference.

Some of the instruments described above were designed for use in conventional surgical procedures wherein surgeons have direct manual access to the operative site. However, in endoscopic or laparoscopic procedures, surgery is performed through a small incision or through a narrow cannula inserted through small entrance wounds in the skin. In order to address the specific needs of endoscopic and/or laparoscopic surgical procedures, endoscopic surgical stapling devices have been developed and are disclosed in, for example, U.S. Pat. No. 5,865,361, the entire content of which is incorporated herein by reference.

It is further contemplated that the surgical buttress may be configured for use with a circular stapling apparatus, or a semi-circular stapling apparatus. The surgical buttress includes a resilient skirt at the circumferential periphery of the stapling apparatus which is resiliently pulled over the anvil and/or tubular body portion of the stapling apparatus. The surgical buttress is retained on the stapling apparatus through the resilience of the resilient skirt and/or friction. The surgical buttress can be released from the stapling apparatus utilizing perforations around the body portion of the surgical buttress and/or through the operation of the knife of the stapling apparatus.

Surgical stapling devices for applying an annular array of staples or fasteners to tissue are well known in the art. These devices typically include means for controlling the spacing between the fastener assembly and the anvil member at the distal end of the apparatus. The fastener assembly generally includes a circular array of fasteners such as staples, anastomosis rings, and the like, while the anvil member includes means for completing the circular anastomosis, typically an array of bucket members that clinch the staples after the staples are expelled from the fastener assembly, or may include a locking member for the anastomosis ring. The means for advancing or retracting the anvil in relation to the fastener assembly typically includes a wing-nut type mechanism at a proximal end of the instrument or a rotatable knob member, both of which engage a worm gear arrangement in the handle mechanism to slowly, and methodically advance the anvil member towards the fastener assembly.

Surgical stapling devices for applying an annular array of staples, as well as devices for completing a surgical anastomosis through the provision of anastomosis rings, are well known in gastric and esophageal surgery, for example in classic or modified gastric reconstruction typically formed in an end to end, end to side, or side to side manner. In use, the instrument is positioned within the lumen of an organ such as the stomach, esophagus, or intestine in order to perform the anastomosis. The tissue is positioned between the anvil and the fastener assembly and is typically tied off, for example, by a purse string suture. Thereafter, the anvil member is advanced towards the fastener assembly by rotation of the rotatable knob or wing nut assembly at the proximal end of the instrument to hold the tissue between the anvil member and the fastener assembly. As the staples or the fasteners are expelled from the fastener assembly, a circular knife typically follows the application of the staples to excise unwanted tissue at the anastomosis site. The instrument is then removed from the lumen of the organ.

Closing mechanisms associated with these types of stapling or fastening devices typically utilize a complex worm gear arrangement or screw bearing member to open and close the spacing between the anvil and the fastener assembly. These devices generally provide a rotatable knob or wing-like assembly remote from the fastener or staple pusher member, and the worm gear mechanism is provided to translate the rotational movement of the knob into longitudinal movement of the anvil member towards the staple pusher member. In order to effect this movement, the surgeon must grasp the device with one hand while rotating the knob or wing-like assembly with the other hand. Such instruments are disclosed, for example, in U.S. Pat. No. 5,915,616, the entire content of which is incorporated herein by reference.

In another example, it is contemplated that the surgical buttress is configured for use with surgical fastening devices for simultaneously applying an array of surgical fasteners, e.g., staples or other types of fasteners that are known in the art. Such devices are used for joining body tissue such as, for example, intestinal and gastric walls with spaced parallel rows of longitudinally aligned fasteners. These surgical fastening devices reduce the time of wound closure in a surgical procedure.

Typically, these devices include a fastener holder disposed on one side of the tissue to be joined, and an anvil assembly parallel to the fastener holder on the other side of the tissue to be fastened. The fastener holder is moved linearly towards the anvil assembly so that the tissue is clamped between them. The fasteners are driven from the fastener holder so that the ends of the fasteners pass through the tissue and form finished fasteners as they make contact with the anvil assembly, thereby producing an array of finished fasteners in the tissue. The fasteners can be one or two piece and made of metal, non-absorbable polymers, or bioabsorbable polymers such as polyglycolide, polylactide, and copolymers thereof.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,137,198 to Nobis et al. (“Nobis”) discloses a fastener applying device including a cartridge that is advanced towards an anvil assembly by an advancing mechanism. The advancing mechanism includes a first actuator member for advancing the cartridge towards the anvil assembly at an accelerated rate and a second actuator member spaced from the first actuator member for incrementally advancing the cartridge towards the anvil assembly.

Typically, these fastener applying devices include a pusher bar that is advanced over a predetermined stroke to interact with and eject the fasteners from the cartridge. At least one driver is positioned within the cartridge between the distal end of the pusher bar and the fasteners such that the pusher bar advances the drivers into engagement with the fasteners. The length of the drivers may be varied to facilitate ejection of different size fasteners from a fastener applying device having a fixed pusher bar stroke. Such instruments are disclosed, for example, in U.S. Pat. No. 5,964,394, the entire content of which is incorporated herein by reference.

While several embodiments of the disclosure have been shown in the drawings, it is not intended that the disclosure be limited thereto, as it is intended that the disclosure be as broad in scope as the art will allow and that the specification be read likewise. Therefore, the above description should not be construed as limiting, but merely as exemplifications of preferred embodiments. Thus the scope of the embodiments should be determined by the appended claims and their legal equivalents, rather than by the examples given.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification227/176.1
International ClassificationA61B17/072
Cooperative ClassificationA61B17/072, A61B17/115, A61B17/1155, A61B17/07292, A61B2017/00862, A61B2017/00473
European ClassificationA61B17/115, A61B17/115C, A61B17/072R, A61B17/072
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Nov 17, 2009ASAssignment
Owner name: TYCO HEALTHCARE GROUP LP,CONNECTICUT
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:OLSON, LEE;REEL/FRAME:023529/0464
Effective date: 20090107
Oct 2, 2012ASAssignment
Owner name: COVIDIEN LP, MASSACHUSETTS
Free format text: CHANGE OF NAME;ASSIGNOR:TYCO HEALTHCARE GROUP LP;REEL/FRAME:029065/0448
Effective date: 20120928