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Publication numberUS20100211889 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 12/769,787
Publication dateAug 19, 2010
Priority dateJul 1, 2003
Also published asUS7716593, US20050004990
Publication number12769787, 769787, US 2010/0211889 A1, US 2010/211889 A1, US 20100211889 A1, US 20100211889A1, US 2010211889 A1, US 2010211889A1, US-A1-20100211889, US-A1-2010211889, US2010/0211889A1, US2010/211889A1, US20100211889 A1, US20100211889A1, US2010211889 A1, US2010211889A1
InventorsJose H. Durazo, Jensen M. Harris, Jesse Clay Satterfield, Martijn E. van Tilburg, William R. Avery, Bruce D. Wiedemann
Original AssigneeMicrosoft Corporation
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Conversation Grouping of Electronic Mail Records
US 20100211889 A1
Abstract
Improved conversation grouping methods and systems are provided for electronic mail records. Electronic mail messages that are unread or flagged for follow-up are automatically displayed under an associated conversation grouping heading. If a conversation grouping contains only a single unread or flagged electronic mail message, the single electronic mail message is automatically displayed under the conversation grouping heading for review by a user. For a conversation grouping having no unread or flagged electronic mail messages, the latest electronic mail message in the grouping is automatically displayed under the conversation grouping heading.
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Claims(20)
1. A method for displaying electronic messages in a conversation grouping, the method comprising:
identifying a common conversation thread comprising a plurality of electronic messages;
grouping the plurality of electronic messages in the identified common conversation thread into a group heading;
displaying at least one unread message of the plurality of electronic messages under the group heading;
receiving an indication of group heading expansion; and
displaying, in response to the indication of group heading expansion, all of the plurality of electronic messages in an expanded display mode under the group heading.
2. The method of claim 1, further comprising displaying an icon adjacent to the group heading, the icon being configured to, upon selection, cause an expansion of the group heading.
3. The method of claim 2, wherein receiving the indication of group heading expansion comprises receiving a selection of the icon.
4. The method of claim 1, further comprising displaying at least one flagged message of the plurality of electronic messages under the group heading in addition to the displayed at least one unread message.
5. The method of claim 1, further comprising sorting, in the expanded display mode, the displayed plurality of electronic messages, wherein sorting the displayed plurality of electronic messages comprises sorting based on a time of one of the following: message receipt and message sending.
6. The method of claim 1, further comprising, when all of the plurality of electronic messages have been read and a display mode is not the expanded display mode, displaying a latest message of the common conversation thread.
7. The method of claim 1, wherein grouping the plurality of electronic messages in the identified common conversation thread into the group heading comprises grouping the plurality of electronic messages based on at least one of the following: received electronic messages, sent electronic messages, and stored electronic messages.
8. The method of claim 1, wherein identifying the common conversation thread comprises identifying a common subject of the plurality of electronic messages.
9. A computer-readable medium having a set of instructions which when executed perform a method for displaying electronic messages in a conversation grouping, the method executed by the set of instructions comprising:
identifying a common conversation thread comprising a plurality of electronic messages;
grouping the plurality of electronic messages in the identified common conversation thread into a group heading;
displaying at least one unread message of the plurality of electronic messages under the group heading;
receiving an indication of group heading expansion; and
displaying, in response to the indication of group heading expansion, all of the plurality of electronic messages in an expanded display mode under the group heading.
10. The computer-readable medium of claim 9, further comprising displaying an icon adjacent to the group heading, the icon being operative to, upon selection, cause an expansion of the group heading.
11. The computer-readable medium of claim 10, wherein receiving the indication of group heading expansion comprises receiving an indication of a selection of the icon.
12. The computer-readable medium of claim 9, further comprising displaying at least one flagged message of the plurality of electronic messages under the group heading in addition to the displayed at least one unread message.
13. The computer-readable medium of claim 9, further comprising sorting, in the expanded display mode, the displayed plurality of electronic messages, wherein sorting the displayed plurality of electronic messages comprises sorting based on one of the following: a time of message receipt and a time of message sending.
14. The computer-readable medium of claim 9, further comprising, when all of the plurality of electronic messages have been read and a display mode is not the expanded display mode, displaying a latest message of the common conversation thread.
15. The computer-readable medium of claim 9, wherein grouping the plurality of electronic messages in the identified common conversation thread into the group heading comprises grouping the plurality of electronic messages based on at least one of the following: received electronic messages, sent electronic messages, and stored electronic messages.
16. The computer-readable medium of claim 9, wherein identifying the common conversation thread comprises identifying a common subject of the plurality of electronic messages.
17. A system for displaying electronic messages in a conversation grouping, the system comprising:
a memory storage; and
a processing unit coupled to the memory storage, wherein the processing unit is operative to:
identify a common conversation thread comprising a plurality of electronic messages;
group the plurality of electronic messages in the identified common conversation thread into a group heading;
display at least one unread message of the plurality of electronic messages under the group heading;
display an expansion icon adjacent to the group heading;
receive a selection of the expansion icon; and
display, in response to the selection of the expansion icon, all of the plurality of electronic messages in an expanded display mode under the group heading.
18. The system of claim 17, wherein the processing unit is further operative to display at least one flagged message of the plurality of electronic messages under the group heading in addition to the displayed at least one unread message.
19. The system of claim 17, wherein the processing unit is further operative to sort, in the expanded display mode, the displayed plurality of electronic messages based on one of the following: a time of message receipt and a time of message sending.
20. The system of claim 17, wherein the processing unit is further operative to, when all of the plurality of electronic messages have been read and a display mode is not the expanded display mode, display a latest message of the common conversation thread.
Description
    RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • [0001]
    This application is a Continuation of co-pending U.S. application Ser. No. 10/851,442 entitled “Conversation Grouping of Electronic Mail Records” filed May 21, 2004, which claims benefit under 35 U.S.C. §119(e) of U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 60/484,437, entitled “Combined Outlook Bar and Folder List, Automatic Grouping, Adaptive Multi-Line View, Threaded View with Easier Access to All New Email, Search Folders” filed Jul. 1, 2003, which are incorporated herein by reference.
  • FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • [0002]
    The present invention generally relates to computer-generated user interfaces. More particularly, the present invention relates to grouping electronic mail records in a computer-generated user interface by electronic mail conversation strings or threads.
  • BACKGROUND
  • [0003]
    With the advent of the computer age, computer software users have grown accustomed to user-friendly software applications that help them write, calculate, organize, prepare presentations, send and receive electronic mail, make music, and the like. For example, modem electronic mail programs allow users to send and receive electronic mail to and from other users. Modem electronic mail programs also allow users to store sent or received mail in a variety of user-established storage folders.
  • [0004]
    According to prior electronic mail programs, a user interface may be provided for storing a list of received, sent or stored electronic mail messages or records. A typical electronic mail record includes information identifying a party from which an email message is received or to which an email message is sent. Additional information may identify the subject of the message and the time of message receipt or sending.
  • [0005]
    Prior systems allowed users to group email messages together in a user interface according to an electronic mail conversation. That is, all messages received by a user, sent by a user or stored by a user that are part of an electronic mail conversation between the user and other parties relating to a particular subject could be grouped together to allow the user to read, review, or otherwise dispose of messages included in a given electronic mail conversation. According to prior systems, when messages contained in a given conversation grouping were displayed, all messages included in the conversation grouping were displayed. All messages whether read or unread could be displayed or could be collapsed under a grouping heading. Unfortunately, when the user expanded the conversation grouping, or reviewed already displayed electronic mail messages under the conversation grouping heading, the user was required to review the list of all messages even though the user may only be interested in viewing unread messages. Additionally, if a conversation grouping contained only one email message, the user nonetheless had to select the conversation grouping heading for expansion to find that only a single email message item was included. Thus, the user had to perform unnecessary steps to read or otherwise dispose of single email messages placed in an electronic mail conversation grouping.
  • [0006]
    Accordingly, there is a need for an improved conversation grouping method and system for electronic mail records or messages. It is with respect to these and other considerations that the present invention has been made.
  • SUMMARY
  • [0007]
    Embodiments of the present invention solve the above and other problems by providing an improved conversation grouping method and system for electronic mail records and messages. Electronic mail messages belonging to a common conversation thread, as identified by a common subject, may be selectively grouped together and displayed in an electronic mail user interface. A conversation grouping may be created for received, sent, or stored electronic mail messages.
  • [0008]
    According to aspects of the invention, a conversation grouping heading is displayed in the electronic mail user interface for each conversation grouping. Under each heading, any electronic mail messages that have not been read or that have been read and have been flagged for follow-up are automatically displayed under the conversation grouping heading without requiring a user to expand the conversation grouping. If only a single message is in the conversation grouping, that single message is displayed under the heading so that the user is not required to expand the grouping to select the sole message contained therein. That is, the user may select the sole message contained under the heading by selecting the displayed electronic mail message record without the need for expanding the grouping in which the sole message is contained. If desired, the user may further expand a conversation grouping to show all messages contained in the grouping whether read, flagged, unflagged or unread. In an expanded display mode, messages may be sorted within the grouping according to time of receipt, time of sending, or a variety of other sorting properties.
  • [0009]
    According to other aspects of the invention, if all messages in a given conversation grouping have been read and have not been flagged for follow-up, then the latest message received or sent in the conversation grouping is automatically displayed under the grouping heading so that the user does not encounter a conversation grouping heading without encountering at least a single electronic mail message contained in the associated grouping. As described above, if desired, all messages in the grouping of read and not flagged messages may be displayed under the grouping heading by selectively expanding the grouping.
  • [0010]
    At any time more than one electronic mail message belonging to a particular conversation thread is displayed under a given conversation grouping heading (whether an initial automatic display or an expanded display), each successively displayed message in the thread may be indented relative to the preceding message in the same thread in order to distinguish one conversation thread from another conversation thread in the same conversation grouping. For example, a reply to a previous message is indented relative to the previous message. A reply to the reply is indented relative to the first reply. Upon the occurrence of a message in the conversation grouping of the same subject, but that is not a reply to a previous message, indentation is discontinued for that message to indicate a “break” in the back-and-forth sequence of conversation replies in the previous conversation thread. Preferably, a minimum number of characters is always displayed for a given mail message regardless of the number of indented mail messages contained in a given conversation grouping record.
  • [0011]
    According to another aspect of the invention, in order to display only unread or flagged messages under a given conversation grouping prior to any further expansion of the grouping, the electronic mail program responsible for displaying the electronic mail messages builds a cached mail thread hierarchy. A list of conversation mail threads is built where each mail thread points to individual data items that represent individual mail messages and that hold temporary data about individual mail messages such as whether individual mail messages are to be automatically displayed or not under a conversation grouping heading, as described above.
  • [0012]
    These and other features and advantages, which characterize the present invention, will be apparent from a reading of the following detailed description and a review of the associated drawings. It is to be understood that both the foregoing general description and the following detailed description are exemplary and explanatory only and are not restrictive of the invention as claimed.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0013]
    FIG. 1 illustrates an exemplary computing operating environment for embodiments of the present invention.
  • [0014]
    FIG. 2 illustrates a computer screen display showing an electronic mail program user interface according to embodiments of the present invention.
  • [0015]
    FIG. 3 illustrates a computer screen display showing an electronic mail inbox user interface showing electronic mail messages grouped together according to common conversations.
  • [0016]
    FIG. 4 is a simplified block diagram illustrating the relationship between a cached source table and a cached thread hierarchy for showing unread and/or flagged messages in a conversation grouping according to embodiments of the present invention.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • [0017]
    As briefly described above, embodiments of the present invention are directed to an improved conversation grouping method and system for electronic mail records. According to embodiments of the present invention, electronic mail messages that are unread or flagged for follow-up are automatically displayed under an associated conversation grouping heading. For any conversation grouping containing a single unread or flagged electronic mail message, the single electronic mail message is displayed under the conversation grouping heading for review by a user. For a given conversation grouping having no unread or flagged electronic mail messages, at least the latest electronic mail message in the grouping is automatically displayed under an associated conversation grouping heading.
  • [0018]
    In the following detailed description, references are made to the accompanying drawings that form a part hereof, and in which are shown by way of illustrations specific embodiments or examples. These embodiments may be combined, other embodiments may be utilized, and structural changes may be made without departing from the spirit or scope of the present invention. The following detailed description is therefore not to be taken in a limiting sense and the scope of the present invention is defined by the appended claims and their equivalents.
  • [0019]
    Referring now to the drawings, in which like numerals represent like elements through the several figures, aspects of the present invention and the exemplary operating environment will be described. FIG. 1 and the following discussion are intended to provide a brief, general description of a suitable computing environment in which the invention may be implemented. While the invention will be described in the general context of program modules that execute in conjunction with an application program that runs on an operating system on a personal computer, those skilled in the art will recognize that the invention may also be implemented in combination with other program modules.
  • [0020]
    Generally, program modules include routines, programs, components, data structures, and other types of structures that perform particular tasks or implement particular abstract data types. Moreover, those skilled in the art will appreciate that the invention may be practiced with other computer system configurations, including hand-held devices, multiprocessor systems, microprocessor-based or programmable consumer electronics, minicomputers, mainframe computers, and the like. The invention may also be practiced in distributed computing environments where tasks are performed by remote processing devices that are linked through a communications network. In a distributed computing environment, program modules may be located in both local and remote memory storage devices.
  • [0021]
    Turning now to FIG. 1, an illustrative computer architecture for a personal computer 2 for practicing the various embodiments of the invention will be described. The computer architecture shown in FIG. 1 illustrates a conventional personal computer, including a central processing unit 4 (“CPU”), a system memory 6, including a random access memory 8 (“RAM”) and a read-only memory (“ROM”) 10, and a system bus 12 that couples the memory to the CPU 4. A basic input/output system containing the basic routines that help to transfer information between elements within the computer, such as during startup, is stored in the ROM 10. The personal computer 2 further includes a mass storage device 14 for storing an operating system 16, application programs, such as the application program 105, and data.
  • [0022]
    The mass storage device 14 is connected to the CPU 4 through a mass storage controller (not shown) connected to the bus 12. The mass storage device 14 and its associated computer-readable media, provide non-volatile storage for the personal computer 2. Although the description of computer-readable media contained herein refers to a mass storage device, such as a hard disk or CD-ROM drive, it should be appreciated by those skilled in the art that computer-readable media can be any available media that can be accessed by the personal computer 2.
  • [0023]
    By way of example, and not limitation, computer-readable media may comprise computer storage media and communication media. Computer storage media includes volatile and non-volatile, removable and non-removable media implemented in any method or technology for storage of information such as computer-readable instructions, data structures, program modules or other data. Computer storage media includes, but is not limited to, RAM, ROM, EPROM, EEPROM, flash memory or other solid state memory technology, CD-ROM, DVD, or other optical storage, magnetic cassettes, magnetic tape, magnetic disk storage or other magnetic storage devices, or any other medium which can be used to store the desired information and which can be accessed by the computer.
  • [0024]
    According to various embodiments of the invention, the personal computer 2 may operate in a networked environment using logical connections to remote computers through a TCP/IP network 18, such as the Internet. The personal computer 2 may connect to the TCP/IP network 18 through a network interface unit 20 connected to the bus 12. It should be appreciated that the network interface unit 20 may also be utilized to connect to other types of networks and remote computer systems. The personal computer 2 may also include an input/output controller 22 for receiving and processing input from a number of devices, including a keyboard or mouse (not shown). Similarly, an input/output controller 22 may provide output to a display screen, a printer, or other type of output device.
  • [0025]
    As mentioned briefly above, a number of program modules and data files may be stored in the mass storage device 14 and RAM 8 of the personal computer 2, including an operating system 16 suitable for controlling the operation of a networked personal computer, such as the WINDOWS operating systems from Microsoft Corporation of Redmond, Wash. The mass storage device 14 and RAM 8 may also store one or more application programs. In particular, the mass storage device 14 and RAM 8 may store an application program 105 for providing a variety of functionalities to a user. For instance, the application program 105 may comprise many types of programs such as a word processing application program, a spreadsheet application, a desktop publishing, and the like. According to an embodiment of the present invention, the application program 105 comprises a multiple functionality software application for providing a user calendaring functionality, electronic mail functionality, contacts information functionality, electronic notes functionality, electronic journal functionality and the like. Some of the individual program modules comprising the multiple functionality program include a calendar module 125, an electronic mail program 130, a contacts module 135, a tasks module 140, a notes module 145 and a journal module (not shown). An example of such a multiple functionality program 105 is OUTLOOKŪ manufactured by Microsoft Corporation.
  • [0026]
    FIG. 2 illustrates a computer screen display showing an electronic mail program user interface according to embodiments of the present invention. The user interface is illustrative of an electronic mail program user interface for displaying electronic mail items received, sent or stored in a variety of storage folders. An example electronic mail program user interface, illustrated in FIG. 2, is provided by OUTLOOKŪ manufactured and marketed by Microsoft Corporation of Redmond, Wash.
  • [0027]
    The user interface illustrated in FIG. 2 includes a combined content selection and display pane 210 through which a user may select other types of functionality provided by a multiple functionality software application (described above) through which the user's electronic mail program may be provided. For example, through the combined contents selection and display pane 210, the user may select calendar functionality, contacts functionality, tasks functionality, notes functionality, and the like.
  • [0028]
    According to embodiments of the present invention, an inbox pane 220 is provided with which the user may view a listing of electronic mail messages that have been received by the user, that have been sent by the user, or which have been stored in one or more user-established storage folders. The inbox pane 220 is illustrative of an electronic mail program inbox with which the user may display and review a listing of electronic mail items received by the user. A number of electronic mail records such as the mail records 235 and 240 are listed in the inbox pane 220. A scroll button 233 is illustrated for allowing the user to scroll up or down through mail items listed in the inbox pane 220.
  • [0029]
    To the right of the inbox pane 220, a preview pane 270 is illustrated for displaying the contents of a selected mail item. As is appreciated by those skilled in the art, if the user has activated the preview pane functionality, the user may receive a preview of the contents of a selected mail message by focusing on the mail message in the inbox pane 220. For purposes of illustration only, the text and graphics displayed in the preview pane 270 are displayed in “Greeked” format where the actual substance of the text or graphics is not displayed in legible form.
  • [0030]
    According to embodiments of the present invention, an “Arranged by” field 225 is provided along an upper edge of the inbox pane 220. When the user selects a given arrangement type, the selected arrangement type is identified in the “Arranged by” field. For example, referring to FIG. 2, an arrangement type of “Conversation” has been selected by the user and is thus identified in the “Arranged by” field 225. Electronic mail messages may be grouped together according to a number of arrangement types, including “Date,” “Size,” “Subject,” presence or absence of properties such as attachments, and a variety of other arrangement types. For a detailed description of automatic grouping of electronic mail records according to a variety of arrangement types such as the “Conversation” type as illustrated in FIGS. 2 and 3, see U.S. Patent Application, “Automatic Grouping of Electronic Mail,” applicant reference number MS301751.01, attorney/agent reference number 60001.0255USU1, which is incorporated herein by reference as if full set out herein.
  • [0031]
    Adjacent to the “Arranged by” field 225 is a field 230 for identifying an overall sorting or ordering property applied to mail records displayed in the inbox pane 220. For example, if mail records displayed in the inbox pane 220 are displayed in a newest mail item on top orientation, the text in the field 230 may read “Newest on top.” Conversely, if mail items in the inbox pane 220 are displayed according to a newest mail item at the bottom where oldest mail items are pushed to the top of the listing, the text in the field 230 may read “Newest on bottom”, or “Oldest on top.” The order with which mail records are sorted may be selectively changed by the user by toggling the field 230 or the associated toggling switch located on the right side of the text contained in the field 230. As should be appreciated a number of ordering properties may be utilized including the age of the mail, size of mail, and presence of applied properties, for example, flags, attachments and the like.
  • [0032]
    Referring still to the inbox pane 220, illustrated in FIG. 2, a user may expand or contract the size of the inbox pane 220 by dragging one side of the inbox pane 220 inward or outward as desired. For example, if the user desires to narrow the size of the inbox pane 220, the user may drag the right side of the user interface inward in order to allow for more space in the preview pane 270 positioned adjacent to the inbox pane 220. As the inbox pane 220 is narrowed, icons and text fields of individual mail records may be rearranged to account for the change in size of the user interface. For a detailed description of rearranging the contents of an electronic mail record as the size of the user interface in which the record is displayed is changed, see United States Patent Application, “Adaptive Multi-Line View User Interface,” applicant reference number MS301754.01, attorney/agent reference number 60001.0257USU1, which is incorporated herein by reference as if fully set out herein.
  • [0033]
    According to embodiments of the present invention, as illustrated in FIG. 2, the inbox pane 220 contains electronic mail records received by the user automatically grouped according to a “Conversation” arrangement type. Electronic mail messages belonging to a common conversation thread, as identified by a common mail subject, may be selectively grouped together and displayed in a conversation grouping record such as the record 235, illustrated in FIG. 2. A conversation grouping may be created for received, sent or stored electronic mail messages. As illustrated in FIG. 2, after electronic mail messages are arranged or grouped according to a conversation grouping arrangement, electronic mail messages that have a common subject are grouped together in a single electronic mail record having a conversation grouping heading for identifying the subject matter of electronic mail messages contained in the grouping. For example, referring to FIG. 2, a first conversation grouping record 235 is illustrated in the inbox pane 220. A heading “review form” is displayed over electronic mail messages received by the user and having a common subject of “review form.”
  • [0034]
    As will be described in detail below, according to embodiments of the present invention, any electronic mail messages belonging to a given conversation grouping that are unread or that have been flagged for follow up by the user are automatically displayed under the conversation grouping heading as illustrated for the conversation grouping record 235. For example, the flag 250 illustrates a message that has been flagged by a user for follow up review. If a given conversation grouping contains only one unread or flagged electronic mail message, that single electronic mail message is nonetheless displayed under an associated conversation grouping heading as illustrated by the second electronic mail record illustrated in FIG. 2 bearing the heading “Grouping by flag status.” Advantageously, then, a user is not required to expand a given conversation grouping in order to select unread or flagged electronic mail messages, and the user is not required to expand a conversation grouping heading in order to select a single unread or read electronic mail message contained in the conversation grouping. Referring to the electronic mail record 240, if a given conversation grouping contains only electronic mail messages that have been read and that have not been flagged for follow up, the latest received or sent electronic mail message in the conversation grouping is displayed under the grouping heading to alert the user of the presence of electronic mail messages in the conversation grouping.
  • [0035]
    According to embodiments of the invention and referring back to the first conversation grouping record 235, illustrated in FIG. 2, if the user reads one of the unread messages displayed in the conversation grouping record 235, the read message will be marked as having been read by displaying the read message with a lighter display font. If the user dismisses the inbox pane 220 or otherwise begins a new session of electronic mail program and subsequently displays the inbox pane 220 with electronic mail messages arranged in conversation grouping arrangement, the read message from the conversation grouping record 235 will no longer be displayed to the user. That is, only the unread messages will be displayed under the conversation grouping heading. On the other hand, if the message read by the user is marked for follow up by the user, the message marked for follow up will be displayed under the conversation grouping heading.
  • [0036]
    FIG. 3 illustrates a computer screen display showing an electronic mail inbox user interface showing electronic mail messages grouped together according to common conversations. As shown in the example inbox pane 220, illustrated in FIG. 3, individual electronic mail groupings may be sorted relative to each other according to a variety of sorting properties. For example, each of the different conversation groupings are sorted relative to each other based on time and date of receipt of the latest electronic mail message contained in each of the different conversation groupings. For example, referring to FIG. 3, the first conversation grouping 305 illustrated at the top of the inbox pane 220 bears a date/time of 10:03 AM. The second conversation grouping 310 bears a latest message receipt time of 9:21 AM. The third conversation grouping record bears a receipt time of 9:14 AM, and so on. As should be understood, the different conversation groupings may be sorted by other properties, for example, presence or absence of attachments, file size of the largest mail message, alphabetical conversation grouping headings, and the like.
  • [0037]
    Referring to the second conversation grouping record 310, illustrated in FIG. 3, and the first conversation grouping record 235, illustrated in FIG. 2, when a given record contains unread messages or messages that have been flagged for follow up, those messages are automatically displayed under the conversation grouping heading without the need for further expansion of the conversation grouping by the user. However, as described above, where a conversation grouping contains only messages that have been read and have not been flagged for follow up, only the latest electronic mail message in the conversation grouping is displayed under the conversation grouping heading. If desired, the user may further expand the conversation grouping so that all electronic mail messages contained in the conversation grouping are displayed.
  • [0038]
    Referring to the conversation grouping 310, illustrated in FIG. 3, the user may select the button 315 for expanding the conversation grouping to display all electronic mail messages contained in the conversation grouping. Conversely, the user may collapse the record by selection of the button 315 to return the displayed conversation grouping record to the automatic display mode. For example, referring to the third conversation grouping, illustrated in FIG. 3, a single unread message from a mail sender “Marc Olson” is illustrated having an unexpanded chevron button disposed adjacent to the conversation grouping heading. Because a single unread message is displayed, the user may readily determine that only one unread message is included in the conversation grouping. However, because of the presence of the chevron button 315 located adjacent to the conversation grouping heading, the user understands that additional electronic mail messages are contained in the grouping that have been previously read and have not been flagged for follow up. By selection of the chevron button 315, the user may expand the conversation grouping to display the additional electronic mail messages contained in the grouping. On the other hand, the fourth conversation grouping record 330 also displays a single electronic mail message from a mail sender “Marc Olson,” but the absence of a chevron button 315 for this record alerts the user that no additional electronic mail messages, whether read or unread, are included in this conversation grouping.
  • [0039]
    Referring back to the first conversation grouping record 235, illustrated in FIG. 2, and the second conversation grouping 310, illustrated in FIG. 3, when more than one electronic mail message is included in a given conversation thread, whether displayed automatically, or whether displayed after expansion of the conversation grouping, each successive electronic mail message in the conversation thread is displayed in an indented orientation relative to a preceding electronic mail message in the same thread in order to distinguish one conversation thread from another conversation thread in the same conversation grouping. For example, a reply to a previous message is indented relative to the previous message. A reply to the reply is indented relative to the first reply. Upon the occurrence of a message in the conversation grouping of the same subject, but that is not a reply to a previous message, indentation is discontinued for that message to indicate a “break” in the back-and-forth sequence of conversation replies in the previous thread. According to an embodiment of the present invention, no indented displayed electronic mail message is displayed with less than a minimum number of characters (e.g., ten characters). Utilization of a minimum number of displayed characters insures that a user will always be able to view a portion of identification information associated with a given electronic mail message so that the user may determine the nature of the electronic mail message and whether the user desires to review or otherwise dispose of the displayed electronic mail message.
  • [0040]
    Referring to the fourth conversation grouping 330, illustrated in FIG. 3, a variety of icons may be displayed for providing additional information to a user. For example, the attachment icon 335 is displayed adjacent to the conversation grouping heading to alert the user that one or more electronic mail messages contained in the conversation grouping includes an attachment. An attachment icon is also displayed to the right of a single electronic mail message contained in the conversation grouping record 330 to alert the user that the electronic mail message includes an attached file or document. Other icons such as the header icon 340 may be displayed for providing other types of information to the user. For example, the header icon 340 may be used to indicate to the user that the entire electronic mail message file associated with the displayed electronic mail message has not been downloaded from an associated electronic mail server to the user's client-side computer. That is, the icon 340 alerts the user that only identification information such as the identity of the mail sender and the time and date of receipt of the electronic mail message are displayed to the user, and the associated electronic mail message text and/or an attached file or document has not been downloaded to the user's computer. As is well known to those skilled in the art, such functionality allows a user to avoid having excessively large electronic mail message text files or attached documents automatically downloaded to the user's client-side computer until the user selects the electronic mail message.
  • [0041]
    As described above, according to embodiments of the present invention, when a given conversation grouping contains email messages that have not been read or that have been read and that have been flagged for follow up, those messages are automatically displayed under an associated conversation grouping heading, such as the messages displayed in the first conversation grouping record 235, illustrated in FIG. 2. In order to display only unread or flagged email messages in a given conversation grouping, the electronic mail program 130 must track and account for those messages associated with a given conversation thread that have been read or that have been flagged for follow up. Referring to FIG. 4, according to an embodiment of the present invention, the email program 130 maintains a cached source table 410 and an associated folder contents table interface 415 for storing data associated with conversation threads (electronic mail messages of a common conversation or common subject). The folder contents table interface 415 is utilized by the electronic mail program 130 for interfacing electronic mail messages belonging to a given conversation thread that have been stored by the user in one or more storage folders. A thread collapse state 420 and an associated persisted hash table 425 are utilized by electronic mail program 130 for maintaining data associated with conversation groupings that are collapsed versus conversation groupings that are expanded.
  • [0042]
    According to embodiments of the present invention, the electronic mail program 130 builds a cached thread hierarchy 430 for electronic mail messages that have not been read or that have been flagged for follow up. A list of conversation mail threads, 435, 445 is built where each mail thread 435, 445 represents a given electronic mail conversation grouping. Each of the mail threads points to individual data items 440, 450 that represent individual mail messages associated with a given conversation mail thread. The data items 430, 450 hold temporary data about individual mail messages, such as whether a particular mail message is to be automatically displayed or not under a given conversation grouping heading. A row look-up index 460 and a hash table 470 are provided for maintaining the data associated with the location in memory of individual electronic mail messages.
  • [0043]
    Referring then to the first conversation grouping record 235, illustrated in FIG. 2, a mail thread 435 is established in the cached thread hierarchy for the conversation grouping record 235. Data items 440 representing each electronic mail message contained in the conversation grouping record 235 are pointed to by the thread 435. Each data item 440 is associated with a given electronic mail message contained in the conversation grouping and holds temporary data, about associated electronic mail messages. Consequently, for each of the unread messages contained in the conversation grouping record 235, a data item in the cached thread hierarchy will contain information pointed to by the mail thread 435 to notify the electronic mail program 130 that those electronic mail messages have not been read and that they should be automatically displayed in the conversation grouping record 235 under the appropriate conversation grouping heading when the user arranges the user's email messages by “Conversation.”
  • [0044]
    Having described exemplary operation and display of an improved electronic mail conversation grouping method and system with respect to FIGS. 2, 3 and 4 above, it is advantageous to describe operation of the conversation grouping method and system in terms of an example operation. Consider, for example that a user goes home for the evening, and while the user is home and is not receiving electronic mail, the user receives the following new electronic mail messages set out in Table 1. It should be appreciated that the electronic mail messages set out below are for purposes of example only and are not set out according to a particular format as may typically be displayed to the user. For each message set out below, the time of receipt, the identity of the sending party and the subject are provided.
  • [0000]
    TABLE 1
    5:48 PM, Jane Miller, trade show
    5:49 PM, John Smith, trade show
    6:21 PM, Ronald Ambrose, meeting directions
    9:15 PM, Jane Miller, trade show
    6:48 AM, Manuel Moreno, check this website out
    7:35 AM, Robert Jones, business cards
    7:49 AM, Facilities, new no parking zones
    7:52 AM, Jane Miller, trade show
  • [0045]
    If the user's electronic mail messages are simply sorted by date where unread messages are boldfaced and read messages are not boldfaced, the user's electronic mail messages may be presented or displayed as set out in Table 2 below.
  • [0000]
    TABLE 2
    7:52 AM, Jane Miller, trade show
    7:49 AM, Facilities, new no parking zones
    7:35 AM, Robert Jones, business cards
    6:48 AM, Manuel Moreno, check this website out
    9:15 PM, Jane Miller, trade show
    6:21 PM, Ronald Ambrose, meeting directions
    5:49 PM, John Smith, trade show
    5:48 PM, Jane Miller, trade show
    4:45 PM, Joe Brown, company dinner (already read)
    4:20 PM, Alfred Baker, office furniture (already read)
    3:25 PM, Alfred Baker, office furniture (already read)
  • [0046]
    If the user selects to have her electronic mail messages grouped according to a prior “Conversation” grouping system described in the background section above, the user likely will receive a list of grouping headings such as set out below in Table 3. Unfortunately, under the prior system, the user must expand each heading to view mail contained under each heading. And, if a given grouping, for example, “trade show,” contains the four new messages listed above plus five older messages already read by the user, the expanded view will contain all nine messages sorted by some sorting property, such as date. The user will have to parse the expanded list of messages to find those that have not been read. In addition, for any grouping containing only a single message (read or unread), for example, “company dinner,” the user will have to expand the grouping and then select the single message in order to review or otherwise dispose of the message.
  • [0000]
    TABLE 3
    +trade show
    +new no parking zones
    +business cards
    +check this website out
    +meeting directions
    +company dinner
    +office furniture
  • [0047]
    According to embodiments of the present invention, if the user selects to have the received electronic mail messages grouped according to a “Conversation” arrangement, conversation grouping headings and certain received messages may be displayed as set out in Table 4 below. As seen in Table 4, each of the unread messages
  • [0000]
    TABLE 4
    +trade show
    Jane Miller, 5:48 PM
    John Smith, 5:49 PM
    Jane Miller, 9:15 PM
    Jane Miller, 7:52 AM
    new no parking zones
    Facilities, 7:49 AM
    business cards
    Robert Jones, 7:35 AM
    check this website out
    Manuel Moreno, 6:48 AM
    meeting directions
    Ronald Ambrose, 6:21 PM
    company dinner
    Joe Brown, 4:45 PM
    +office furniture
    Alfred Baker, 4:20 PM

    grouped under the “trade show” heading are automatically displayed so that the user does not have to expand the grouping to see those messages. If the user does desire to see any messages in that grouping that have been read, the user may select the icon disposed adjacent to the heading to further expand the grouping to view all messages contained in the grouping. Single messages are contained in the “new no parking zones,” “business cards,” “check this website out,” and “meeting directions” conversation groupings, but those messages are automatically displayed under the corresponding headings so that the user may quickly select the messages without the need to first expand the grouping followed by selection of the desired message. Similarly, a single read message is contained in the “company dinner” grouping, but the single message is automatically displayed under the heading. In the case of the “office furniture” grouping, two read messages are included. According to embodiments of the present invention, the latest read message is automatically displayed under the heading, and an expansion icon is disposed adjacent to the heading to allow the user to further expand the grouping to view additional messages contained in the grouping.
  • [0048]
    As described herein, improved electronic mail message conversation grouping methods and systems are provided. It will be apparent to those skilled in the art that various modifications or variations may be made in the present invention without departing from the scope or spirit of the invention. Other embodiments of the present invention will be apparent to those skilled in the art from consideration of the specification and practice of the invention disclosed herein.
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Classifications
U.S. Classification715/752, 709/206, 709/207
International ClassificationG06F15/16, G06F3/14
Cooperative ClassificationG06Q10/107
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Jan 15, 2015ASAssignment
Owner name: MICROSOFT TECHNOLOGY LICENSING, LLC, WASHINGTON
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:MICROSOFT CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:034766/0001
Effective date: 20141014