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Publication numberUS20100212061 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 12/157,347
Publication dateAug 26, 2010
Filing dateJun 10, 2008
Priority dateJun 10, 2008
Publication number12157347, 157347, US 2010/0212061 A1, US 2010/212061 A1, US 20100212061 A1, US 20100212061A1, US 2010212061 A1, US 2010212061A1, US-A1-20100212061, US-A1-2010212061, US2010/0212061A1, US2010/212061A1, US20100212061 A1, US20100212061A1, US2010212061 A1, US2010212061A1
InventorsJanine C. Luciano
Original AssigneeThe Fairchild Corporation
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
All weather protective hooded garment
US 20100212061 A1
Abstract
A weather-resistant, protective garment particularly for wear by operators, occupants, and passengers of motor-sports vehicles, such as motorcycles, snowmobiles, and open aircraft, includes a water-proof garment shell provided with a pair of hoods. An inner one of the hoods is wearable under a helmet, and provides protection against water dripping into a neck opening of the garment. The inner hood also provides additional warmth during cold weather conditions. An outer one of the pair of hoods can be worm without a helmet, and the pair of hoods can be worn together in severe weather conditions as well.
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Claims(17)
1. A garment having a conformal, close-fitting hood for covering a wearer's head and neck beneath a crash helmet, said garment comprising:
a garment shell made of waterproof material, said garment shell defining a neck opening for passing a wearer's head and neck;
a hood disposed as said neck opening, wherein said hood includes a lower portion formed of waterproof material, and an upper portion formed of stretchy and conformal material fitting closely to a wearer's head, whereby said lower portion provides a wearer with protection against water dripping into said garment at the neck opening, and said upper portion is sufficiently conformal and close-fitting that a wearer may don a protective crash helmet over said hood.
2. The garment of claim 1 wherein said upper portion is formed of a tricot material.
3. The garment of claim 1 wherein said garment includes a collar structure circumscribing said neck opening, and said collar structure including a circumferential pocket receiving said hood in a stowed position.
4. The garment of claim 3 wherein said circumferential pocket includes a downwardly extending flap covering an opening of said circumferential pocket, whereby said circumferential pocket opens downwardly to exclude rain water.
5. A garment having a nested pair of hoods for protection of a wearer's head in a variety of weather conditions, said garment comprising:
a garment shell made of water resistant or waterproof material, said garment shell defining a neck opening and a pair of sleeves;
a collar structure at said neck opening, said collar structure including an inner hood in a stowed position disposed circumferentially about said collar structure, and in an unfurled position said inner hood covering the wearer's head; and
said collar structure also including an outer hood in a stowed position also disposed circumferentially about said collar structure, and in an unfurled position said outer hood covering said wearer's head, and also possibly covering said inner hood.
6. The garment of claim 5 wherein said collar structure defines a pair of circumferential pockets, with an upper one of said pair of circumferential pockets receiving said inner hood in its respective stowed position, and a lower one of said pair of circumferential pockets receiving said outer hood in its respective stowed position.
7. The garment of claim 5 wherein said inner hood includes a lower portion formed of waterproof or water resistant material, and an upper portion formed of stretchy and conformal material, whereby said lower portion of said inner hood provides a wearer with protection against water dripping into said garment at the neck opening, and said upper portion of said inner hood is sufficiently conformal and close-fitting that a wearer may don a protective helmet over said inner hood.
8. The garment of claim 7 wherein said upper portion is formed of a tricot material.
9. The garment of claim 5 wherein each one of said pair of circumferential pockets includes one of a pair of respective downwardly extending flaps each covering a respective opening of one of said pair of circumferential pockets, whereby said pair of circumferential pockets both open downwardly to exclude rain water.
10. An all-weather water-resistant garment having a nested pair of hoods to protect a wearer's head in a variety of weather conditions and in a variety of wear conditions, said garment comprising:
a water-proof shell having a front panel and a back panel cooperatively providing a neck opening, and a pair of sleeves one for each of the wearer's arms; said front panel, back panel, and sleeves being formed of a water-proof material; a generally vertically extending shell opening dividing said front panel into two parts and allowing a wearer ingress and egress from said garment;
said garment further having a hood structure including a pair of hoods for protection of a wearer's head in a variety of weather conditions, said hood structure including:
an inner hood in a stowed position disposed circumferentially about an upper extent of a collar of said garment, and in an unfurled position said inner hood covering the wearer's head; and
an outer hood in a stowed position disposed circumferentially about a lower extent of a collar of said garment, and in an unfurled position said outer hood covering said wearer's head, and also possibly covering said inner hood.
11. The garment of claim 10 wherein said collar of said garment includes a pair of circumferential pockets, with an upper one of said pair of circumferential pockets receiving said inner hood in its respective stowed position, and with a lower one of said pair of circumferential pockets receiving said outer hood in its respective stowed position.
12. The garment of claim 10 wherein said inner hood includes a lower portion formed of waterproof material, and an upper portion formed of material which is conformal to a wearer's head, so that said inner hood is sufficiently conformal and close-fitting that a wearer may don a protective helmet over said inner hood.
13. The garment of claim 10 wherein each one of said pair of circumferential pockets includes one of a pair of respective downwardly extending flaps each covering a respective opening of one of said pair of circumferential pockets, whereby said pair of circumferential pockets both open downwardly to exclude rain water.
14. A method of protecting at least the upper body, head, and neck of a person from rain both while the person is aboard a motorcycle and wearing a protective helmet, and while the person is off the motorcycle and no longer wearing the protective helmet but is still exposed to rain, said method comprising steps of:
providing a garment having a waterproof shell protecting the person's upper body from rain, and defining a head opening for the person's head and neck, and at said head opening providing a collar structure with a nested pair of hoods for protection of a wearer's head and neck;
providing for said collar structure to include an inner hood in a stowed position disposed circumferentially about said collar structure, and in an unfurled position said inner hood covering the wearer's head; and
said collar structure also including an outer hood in a stowed position also disposed circumferentially about said collar structure, and in an unfurled position said outer hood covering said wearer's head, and also possibly covering said inner hood.
15. The method of claim 14 wherein said collar structure is configured to define a pair of circumferential pockets, providing for an upper one of said pair of circumferential pockets to receive said inner hood in its respective stowed position, and providing for a lower one of said pair of circumferential pockets to receive said outer hood in its respective stowed position.
16. The method of claim 14 wherein said inner hood is configured to include a lower portion formed of waterproof material, and an upper portion formed of stretchy and conformal material, and the inner hood is utilized to provide a wearer with protection against water dripping into the garment at the neck opening, and the upper portion of the inner hood is structured to be sufficiently conformal and close-fitting that a wearer may don a protective helmet over the inner hood.
17. The method of claim 16 wherein each one of said pair of circumferential pockets is configured to include a respective downwardly extending flap covering a respective opening of one of said pair of circumferential pockets, and said pair of circumferential pockets are constructed to open downwardly to exclude rain water.
Description
BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of the Invention

The present invention relates to a protective garment, preferably configured as a jacket or coat, although the invention is not so limited. That is, the garment may be configured as a poncho or coverall, if desired. Most preferably, the garment is especially configured and structured for wear by participants in motor sports activities, who are thus exposed to the elements outdoors. Participants in motor sports also need physical protection for their person. Particularly, they need to wear a helmet while operating or riding on a sports motor vehicle, such as a motorcycle. The garment should also provide protection to the body of the participant in the event of a crash or fall. The present garment offers protection from the elements while the person wearing the garment is also wearing a helmet, and also while no helmet is being worn. Thus, the present inventive garment is particularly well suited for use by motorcycle riders, and other operators and passengers of motor sports vehicles.

During warm weather conditions, operators and passengers of sports motor vehicles desire an adequate ventilation air flow. But, during cold or wet weather conditions, operators and passengers of motor sports vehicles also need protection from the wet and cold. Such protection is needed both while the motor sports vehicle is in operation and moving, and also after the operator or passenger dismounts from the vehicle. In many respects, operators and passengers of motor sports vehicles are engaged in an outdoor activity, exposing them to the weather both while they are on the sport motor vehicle and also after they dismount from the vehicle. The present garment provides for all these differing wear conditions and needs. Additionally, in the event of a mishap, such as a spill from the sports motor vehicle, the garment also provides important physical protections against impact and abrasion.

2. Related Technology

Operators of motorcycles and other sports motor vehicles have for years sought to protect themselves from injury in the event of a mishap. Competition motorcycle riders have commonly worn full “leathers”, which are a full cover-all type of leather suit, many having doubled leather in areas of high abrasion, or with built in panels of protective body armor. For warm-weather wear, such “leathers” made in part from perforated leather panels have been available. These “leathers”, are generally not practical for wear by the street motorcycle rider. For example, these leather suits, whether made of un-perforated or perforated leather, provide virtually no protection against rain.

Nevertheless, street motorcycle riders have favored various leather jackets and coats because of the abrasion resistance provided by the leather in the event of a spill from the moving motorcycle. Many of these conventional leather motorcycle jackets traditionally do not have any form of body armor for the rider. Some leather jackets have no particular provision for ventilation to the rider in warm and hot weather. Particularly in hot weather leather can be uncomfortably warm to wear. However, even in hot weather some motorcycle riders endure the discomfort of a leather jacket, not because it is needed for protection from the elements, but because of concerns for personal safety and survival in the event of a spill from the motorcycle at any speed. On the other hand, in hot weather some cavalier motorcycle riders partially or fully open the front zipper or snaps of their jacket in order to allow the moving air stream to rush in. But, this greatly reduces the protection offered by a leather jacket. In hot weather, really foolish riders forgo the protection of a leather jacket and are seen riding in a T-shirt.

However, these hot weather expedients are very unsafe because a partially or fully open jacket billows or whips in the air stream, possibly compromising the rider's ability to control the vehicle, and certainly contributing to rider fatigue after a period. Fatigue reduces the rider's situational awareness and may be a contributing factor in many motorcycle accidents. Importantly, in the event of a spill, an open jacket or coat is more likely to slide up the wearer's torso, and provide little or no protection against abrasion. Of course, a T-shirt offers no protection at all.

Consequently, leather jackets and coats with provisions for ventilation while closed and still providing adequate protection to the wearer have been developed. Examples of leather coats and jackets which are conventional are seen in U.S. Pat. No. 4,608,715, issued Sep. 2, 1986 to Richard Miller and John Wyckoff; in U.S. Pat. No. 5,105,715, issued Apr. 21, 1992 to Paul Golde, and in U.S. Pat. No. 5,507,042, issued Apr. 16, 1996 to Michael van der Slessen. German patent publication No. DE 3818-566-A1 published Dec. 7, 1989, provides another example of this conventional approach to providing protection and ventilation to riders of motorcycles.

However, leather has a significant shortcoming in use for protection to motorcycle riders and other such sport vehicle operators and occupants. This shortcoming was alluded to above with respect to the leather suits generally worn by competition motorcycle riders. That is, leather is not of itself very good at protecting the wearer from the elements. In the event the wearer encounters a rain storm while riding a motorcycle or other motor sports vehicle, such as an open aircraft, for example, or encounters wet snow or water spray in the event of a snowmobile or boat operator or occupant, then the leather jacket or coat will quickly soak up enough water to become sodden and heavy, and will let water reach the wearer. Some very slight and generally temporary increase in the water resistance of leather garments can be achieved by treating them with a water repellant, such as ScotchGuard™, for example. However, this expedient is really not very long lasting and is not satisfactory. Consequently, motorcycle riders and other motor sports vehicle operators have had to carry a rain suit with them for use in foul-weather conditions.

A rain suit worn over a leather jacket does provide adequate foul-weather protection (i.e., it protects the rider against rain and vehicle water spray), and the rider still has the abrasion resistance provided by the leather jacket, but ventilation is completely cut off. Consequently, after the rain passes unless the rider stops to take off the rain suit, he finds himself in a virtual sauna of humidity trapped inside the rain suit with almost no ventilation. Further, if the wearer is traveling on a day with intermittent rain, the inconvenience of stopping to put on the rain suit when rain is encountered and stopping again to take it off again after the rain passes is very frustrating and time consuming.

Some sport vehicle rain suits made of Gortex™ and similar fabrics which are water-proof but breathable have been available for some time. Some of these suits are simply snowmobile suits put to this purpose. These snowmobile suits tend to have much more insulation than is desirable for many conditions of motorcycle riding. Other such fabric rain suits are made especially for motorcycle riders, and have less insulation. In general, all of these suits are worn over street clothes, and although some may have protective features such as body armor sections, none are known to provide ventilation for warm-weather wear.

Some garments have been developed which provide both rain protection and ventilation. U.S. Pat. No. 3,045,243 discloses a cold-weather garment intended for wear by military personnel. The garment disclosed does appear to provide protection against both rain and cold, and to allow ventilation when rain protection is not needed. However, this garment would not be suitable for wear by a motor sports vehicle occupant or operator. Such is the case because of the garment's bulk, lack of physical protection features for the wearer, and especially lack of protection against rain being driven through the ventilation openings by the moving air stream encountered by a sports vehicle operator or occupant.

U.S. Pat. No. 4,513,451, issued Apr. 30, 1985; and U.S. Pat. No. 4,722,099, issued Feb. 2, 1988, appear to relate to garments specifically intended for use by motorcycle riders and other sport vehicle operators and occupants. The '451 patent appears to disclose a ventilated suit. Ventilation is provided by opening panels of the suit. This suit appears to provide no protection against foul weather, and would require use of a rain suit also under such conditions. The '099 patent appears to disclose a suit made of real or synthetic leather, and having provisions for supplying a ventilation air flow through the suit which varies with speed. Again, this suit appears to provide no protection against foul weather, and also would require use of a rain suit under such conditions.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

In view of the deficiencies of the related technology, a primary object of this invention is to avoid one or more of these deficiencies.

More particularly, it is an object of this invention to provide a protective garment for wear by operators and occupants of sport vehicle, which will provide protection against water entering the garment at the neck opening during wet weather.

Another object is to provide such a garment which has provision for wearer's head and neck to be protected by a hood even when the wearer is also wearing a motorcycle helmet.

Still another object is to provide such a garment which has a duality of stowage areas located at a collar of the garment, with one stowage area receiving a hood constructed and configured to be worn under a motorcycle helmet, and with the other stowage area receiving a protective hood constructed to be worn without a motorcycle helmet.

Accordingly, the present invention according to one aspect provides a garment having an outer shell made of water-impermeable material, and having a nested pair of hoods for protection of a wearer's head in a variety of conditions. The garment comprises a garment shell made of water resistant or waterproof material, and the garment shell defines a neck opening and a pair of sleeves. A collar structure at said neck opening, said collar structure including an inner hood in a stowed position disposed circumferentially about said collar structure, and in an unfurled position said inner hood covering the wearer's head. The said collar structure also includes an outer hood in a stowed position also disposed circumferentially about said collar structure, and in an unfurled position said outer hood covering said wearer's head, and also possibly covering said inner hood.

A better understanding of the present invention will be obtained from reading the following description of a single preferred exemplary embodiment of the present invention when taken in conjunction with the appended drawing Figures, in which the same features (or features analogous in structure or function) are indicated with the same reference numeral throughout the several views. It will be understood that the appended drawing Figures and description here following relate only to one or more exemplary preferred embodiments of the invention, and as such, are not to be taken as implying a limitation on the invention. No such limitation on the invention is implied, and none is to be inferred.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING FIGURES

FIG. 1 provides a fragmentary perspective view of a motorcycle rider wearing a garment in the form of a coat or jacket embodying the present invention;

FIGS. 2 and 2 a respectively provide front and rear elevation views of the garment seen in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 provides an enlarged fragmentary view of the shoulder and collar portions of the garment seen in FIGS. 1-2 a, with the collar in a “dry weather” configuration;

FIG. 4 shows an enlarged fragmentary view similar to FIG. 3, but with an inner hood of the garment in an intermediate opening or unfurling position toward a “wet weather riding” configuration;

FIG. 5 illustrates the inner hood of the garment fully opened or unfurled to the “wet weather riding” configuration;

FIG. 6 shows an enlarged fragmentary view similar to FIG. 4, but with an outer hood of the garment in an intermediate opening or unfurling position toward a “wet weather” configuration; and

FIG. 7 illustrates the outer hood of the garment fully opened or unfurled to the “wet weather” configuration;

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF AN EXEMPLARY PREFERRED EMBODIMENT OF THE INVENTION

Viewing first FIGS. 1, 2, and 2 a in conjunction, a motorcycle rider 10 is seen riding a motorcycle 12. Because of the speed of movement of the motorcycle, the rider 10 is subjected to a moving air stream, indicated on FIG. 1 by arrow 14. The rider 10 is wearing a protective garment 16, which in this case takes the form of a coat or long jacket. It will be understood that the invention is not limited to its use by motorcycle riders, and that other operators, passengers, and occupants of motor sports vehicles may benefit from the use of this invention. Further, the invention is not limited to embodiment in a jacket or coat, and may find embodiment in a full cover-all type of riding suit, for example. In the case illustrated in FIG. 1, the rider 10 is also wearing protective gloves, boots, and a helmet (not individually referenced in FIG. 1). The rider 10 may be wearing a pair of heavy denim jeans, leather pants, or other protective pants.

Because the motorcycle 10 includes a protective fairing (not numbered in the drawing Figures), so long as the motorcycle is moving as some speed the air stream 14 will carry rain and traffic mist past the rider's lower body, so that water-proof pants (i.e., the pants of a rain suit, for example) may not be required for the rider's comfort. Alternatively, a rider of an un-faired motorcycle or one who is going to be riding for some time in foul weather conditions may choose to wear a pair of water or wind proof pants or the pants of a rain suit over ordinary jeans, for example.

As is seen in FIG. 1 however, the rider's upper body is substantially exposed to the air stream 14. Viewing FIG. 1, the posture of the rider's body is of importance. As the rider operates the motorcycle, the arms are generally extended in a forward and downward direction from the shoulders. Further, the rider's upper body or torso may be generally upright, or may be angulated forward from the waist. On the other hand, some riders of cruiser style motorcycles may have their upper body angulated somewhat rearwardly from the waist.

In order to obtain multi-faceted protection, the rider is wearing coat 16. This coat includes many features in combination providing several different kinds of unique protection for the rider 10. Viewing FIGS. 2 and 2 a in combination with FIG. 1, it is seen that this coat 16 generally includes an outer shell 18 formed substantially of water-proof fabric material. The shell 18 may be formed of a water-proof fabric material such as GORETEX™, for example. Another possible choice for the material from which the shell 18 may be formed is conventional waxed cotton canvas. Cordura™ nylon fabric and other nylon fabrics are also available with a waterproof membrane, and may be used to construct the shell 18. Such a waterproofing membrane may be polyurethane, for example. Other waterproof fabric and fabric-with-membrane materials are readily available in the market, and could be used to construct the shell 18. Conventional construction practices including providing a waterproof taping at seams of the jacket will apply also in making the shell 18. It will be understood that many alternative materials of construction for the jacket shell 18 are available and may be utilized, and that the invention is not limited to any particular material of construction for the jacket, or jacket shell 18. For example, a waterproof flexible plastic sheet material (rather than or in combination with a fabric) may be used to make all or a part of the shell 18.

The shell 18 includes a front panel 20 divided into left and right parts (20 l and 20 r) by a vertically extending opening 22 providing for the rider 10 to put the coat on and take it off. The coat 16 also includes a back panel 24 (seen in FIG. 2 a), a left sleeve 26 l, and a right sleeve 26 r. The back panel 24 may include a conventional ventilation opening, indicated with the numeral 24 a. The ventilation opening 24 a is provided with a zipper type of slide fastener (not seen in the drawing Figures) for controlling opening and closing of this ventilation opening, and is also provided with a conventional rain flap (seen in FIG. 2 a) overlying the zipper and its opening. The front panel 20 and back panel 24 each have respective lower hems 20 b and 24 b.

Although it is not seen in the drawing Figures, it will be understood that within the shell, the coat 16 may include an insulating liner, or liners. In the case of a coat provided with more than one such liner, the liners are conventionally of differing weights, and the lighter one of these may be permanently installed in the coat. A heavier inner liner for use in cold weather may be installed into and removable from the coat, usually by means of snaps or zipper attachments, according to the needs dictated by weather conditions.

The panels 20 and 24 and a collar structure 28 cooperatively form an opening 28 b for the riders neck. In order to provide physical protections to the rider 10, both against the possibilities of abrasion and impact in the event of a spill, and against traffic-thrown pebbles, rocks, other road debris, as well as against impacts with large insects, the coat 16 includes a rather tall band collar 28 (best seen in FIG. 3) secured to the panels 20 and 24, and closed at 28 a by a section of hook-and-loop material (i.e., VELCRO™, for example), or by a snap closure (not seen in the drawing Figures), and defining the neck opening 28 b.

When it is closed across the wearer's throat, the collar 28 provides protection against pebbles, rocks and insects impacting the rider's throat below the helmet. It is to be noted also that in order to provide resistance against the coat 16 sliding up the rider's arms or up the rider's torso during a slide following a spill from the moving motorcycle, for example, the sleeves 26 are provided with wrist bands 30 similarly secured with a hook-and-loop type material, or with snaps or other fasteners (not seen in the drawing Figures). The torso is provided with a waist band 32 which may be adjustable or elasticized (or both) helping to keep the coat 16 at the rider's waist. This waist band helps contribute to resistance of the coat 16 against billowing in the air stream 14.

Also, in order to provide protection against abrasion and impacts, the coat 16 is provided at the elbows, shoulders, and back with internal body armor panels, indicated generally on FIG. 1 with arrowed numerals 34. At the elbows and shoulders, external abrasion-resistant panels 36 of material such as high denier ballistic nylon fabric, KEVLAR™ fabric, KEVLAR™ impregnated plastic sheet material, or leather, for example, are attached to the shell 18. These panels 36 generally overlie the body armor panels 34, and provide in combination both a considerable impact protection, and provide resistance for the coat 10 from being abraded completely through to the skin of the rider in the event of a spill and slide or tumble from high speed.

As is seen in FIGS. 1 and 2, in dry, mild-weather conditions, the rider will likely wear the coat 16 with no provision being utilized for additional protection from the elements. In fact, in order to provide ventilation and improved comfort for the rider in warm-weather and hot-weather conditions, the coat 16 is provided with slit-like ventilation openings 38, 40 (best seen in FIG. 2) at the sleeves and torso, respectively. In FIGS. 1 and 2, all of the ventilation openings 38 and 40 are shown in their closed, fair-weather configurations. The differing configurations of these vent openings provides when they are opened for the wearer to receive cooling air flow on the arms and on the torso as well.

Returning to a consideration of FIGS. 1, 2, and 3 if the rider 10 is riding in foul-weather conditions, with rain or traffic mist being directed at the rider by air stream 14, then the rider will have the ventilation openings 38, 40 closed. However, the ride may find that in heavy rain or mist conditions, water will drip from the helmet into the neck opening 28 b. This dripping water can be very uncomfortable, especially if the rider is in rainy conditions for a considerable time. Accordingly, as is seen in FIGS. 4 and 5, the rider may unfurl a first or inner hood 42 from the collar 28 (indicated by the arrow on FIG. 4). Viewing FIGS. 3 and 4 in comparison to one another it is seen that in its stowed position the first or inner hood 42 is disposed at an upper circumferential portion 44 of the collar structure 28. The upper portion 44 of collar 28 includes a circumferentially extending and downwardly opening flap 46, covering an upper circumferential pocket indicated with the numeral 46 a. The flap 46 and inner hood 42 are held in their stowed position as seen in FIG. 3 by plural snaps, each indicated with the numeral 48.

Thus, by undoing these snaps 48, the wearer may open the flap 46 and withdraw the inner hood 42 downwardly from within pocket 46 a, and then may unfurl upwardly the upper part of the inner hood 42 (see especially FIG. 4) so that the inner hood 42 is opened to the position seen in FIG. 5. As will be noted on FIG. 5, the inner hood 42 includes a lower portion 42 a preferably formed of the same waterproof material as the shell 18 of the coat 16. Above the lower extent of the inner hood defined by the waterproof portion 42 a, the inner hood 42 includes a next circumferential portion 50 which is preferably formed of a water-resistant but air-permeable material. The portion 50 may be formed of Gortex™ for example. The portion 50 provides water resistance, but importantly is disposed circumferentially about at the elevation on the wearer's head corresponding with the location of the wearer's ears. Thus, the portion 50 because it is air-permeable is also-sound permeable, and provides to the wearer the same degree of hearing acuity the wearer would ordinarily have while wearing a protective motorcycle helmet. That is, the inner hood 42 does not interfere with the hearing, for example, of a motorcycle operator or passenger.

Next, above the portion 50, the inner hood 42 is configured to include a somewhat stretchy and conformal portion 52. This portion 52 may be formed, for example, of a tricot material, providing for the material of portion 52 to conform closely and comfortably to the wearer's head under a helmet. That is, the portion 52 of hood 42 is close-fitting to the wearer's head. The tricot material of the portion 52 is not waterproof, but is air-permeable and moisture-permeable. Accordingly, the portion 52 is “breathable” to allow perspiration to evaporate. Thus, it will be understood that the wearer may comfortably don a helmet over the inner hood as this hood is shown in FIG. 5. Although the portion 52 is breathable, the wearer still obtains a degree of warmth from the hood 42, and also obtains complete protection against water dripping from the helmet into the neck opening of the jacket 16.

Turning now to FIGS. 3, 6, and 7 in combination, it is seen that the jacket 16 also includes a second or outer hood 54, which is preferably made entirely of the same waterproof material as the shell 18 of the jacket 16. Viewing FIGS. 3 and 7 in comparison to one another it is seen that in its stowed position the second or outer hood 54 is disposed at a lower circumferential portion 56 of the collar structure 28. The lower portion 56 of collar 28 includes a second circumferentially extending and downwardly opening flap 58, covering a lower circumferential pocket indicated with the numeral 58 a. The flap 58 and outer hood 54 are held in their stowed position as seen in FIG. 3 by plural snaps, each indicated with the numeral 60. Accordingly, by undoing these snaps 60, the wearer may open the flap 56, and withdraw the outer hood 54 downwardly from within pocket 58 a, and then may unfurl upwardly the upper part of the outer hood 54 (see especially FIG. 6, and indicated by the arrow) so that the outer hood 54 is opened to the position seen in FIG. 7.

Because the outer hood 54 is made preferably of the same waterproof material as the shell 18 of the jacket 16, the rider will not wear a helmet over the hood 54. That is, the outer hood 54 is configured to be worn when complete weather protection is needed, but while the wearer is not operating a motorcycle or other sport motor vehicle. If desired, both the inner hood 42 and outer hood 54 may be worn together for best warmth and protection.

A distinct advantage of the present invention resides in its versatility. An operator, passenger, or occupant of a sport motor vehicle may wear the garment with comfort in virtually any weather conditions, and while also wearing a helmet. That is, the inner hood 42 provides increased weather protection while the wearer is a motorcycle rider, for example, and needs also to wear a helmet. On the other hand, once the rider dismounts from a motorcycle, in bad weather conditions, the outer hood 54 may be deployed in order to obtain great weather protection, all with use of features of the garment 16.

While the present invention has been depicted, described, and is defined by reference to a single particularly preferred embodiment of the invention, such reference does not imply a limitation on the invention, and no such limitation is to be inferred. The invention is capable of considerable modification, alteration, and equivalents in form and function, as will occur to those ordinarily skilled in the pertinent arts. The depicted and described preferred embodiment of the invention is exemplary only, and is not exhaustive of the scope of the invention. Consequently, the invention is intended to be limited only by the spirit and scope of the appended claims, giving full cognizance to equivalents in all respects.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7996920 *Apr 10, 2009Aug 16, 2011Lion Apparel, Inc.Protective garment with removable portions
US8156573 *Aug 10, 2010Apr 17, 2012Helmet House, Inc.Garment with deployable hood and method for using same
US8661563Sep 30, 2011Mar 4, 2014Massif Mountain Gear Company, LlcElbow pad and upper body garment with elbow reinforcement
US20110185482 *Feb 4, 2011Aug 4, 2011Godfrey Daniel HArticles of apparel with retractable protective elements
US20120028691 *Jul 29, 2010Feb 2, 2012Mr. Heath D. KoehlCase For A Portable Electronic Device
Classifications
U.S. Classification2/84, 2/87, 2/247, 2/98
International ClassificationA41D3/04, A41D1/00, A41D3/08, A41D27/20
Cooperative ClassificationA41D2200/20, A42B1/048, A41D27/28, A41D2600/102
European ClassificationA41D27/18, A41D13/00
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Jun 10, 2008ASAssignment
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:LUCIANO, JANINE C.;REEL/FRAME:021113/0358
Effective date: 20080605
Owner name: FAIRCHILD CORPORATION, THE, VIRGINIA