Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS20100226749 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 12/716,515
Publication dateSep 9, 2010
Filing dateMar 3, 2010
Priority dateMar 4, 2009
Also published asCA2746723A1, CN101825096A, CN101825096B, EP2271841A1, EP2271841B1, WO2010100457A1
Publication number12716515, 716515, US 2010/0226749 A1, US 2010/226749 A1, US 20100226749 A1, US 20100226749A1, US 2010226749 A1, US 2010226749A1, US-A1-20100226749, US-A1-2010226749, US2010/0226749A1, US2010/226749A1, US20100226749 A1, US20100226749A1, US2010226749 A1, US2010226749A1
InventorsPeter David Gammack, James Dyson
Original AssigneeDyson Technology Limited
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Fan assembly
US 20100226749 A1
Abstract
A bladeless fan assembly includes a nozzle and a device for creating an air flow through the nozzle. The nozzle includes an interior passage, a mouth for receiving the air flow from the interior passage, and a surface located adjacent the mouth and over which the mouth is arranged to direct the air flow. The nozzle is mounted on a height adjustable pedestal.
Images(10)
Previous page
Next page
Claims(19)
1. A bladeless fan assembly comprising a nozzle and a device for creating an air flow through the nozzle, the nozzle comprising an interior passage, a mouth for receiving the air flow from the interior passage, and a surface located adjacent the mouth and over which the mouth is arranged to direct the air flow, wherein the nozzle is mounted on a height adjustable pedestal.
2. The fan assembly of claim 1, wherein the pedestal houses said device for creating an air flow.
3. The fan assembly of claim 2, wherein the pedestal comprises a duct for conveying the air flow to the nozzle.
4. The fan assembly of claim 3, wherein the pedestal comprises a base housing said device for creating an air flow, and wherein the duct extends between the base and the nozzle.
5. The fan assembly of claim 4, wherein said device for creating an air flow comprises an impeller, a motor for rotating the impeller, and a diffuser located downstream from the impeller.
6. The fan assembly of claim 5, comprising a plurality of vanes for guiding the air flow emitted from the diffuser into the duct.
7. The fan assembly of claim 5, comprising a plurality of vanes each for guiding a respective portion of the air flow emitted from the diffuser towards the duct.
8. The fan assembly of claim 7, comprising a plurality of radial vanes located at least partially within the duct, each of the radial vanes adjoining a respective one of the plurality of vanes.
9. The fan assembly of claim 1, wherein the interior passage is shaped to divide the received air flow into two air streams each flowing along a respective side of the opening.
10. The fan assembly of claim 1, wherein the interior passage is continuous.
11. The fan assembly of claim 1, wherein the interior passage is substantially annular.
12. The fan assembly of claim 1, wherein the mouth extends about the opening, and is preferably concentric with the interior passage.
13. The fan assembly of claim 1, wherein the nozzle comprises an inner casing section and an outer casing section which together define the interior passage and the mouth.
14. The fan assembly of claim 13, wherein the mouth comprises an outlet located between an external surface of the inner casing section of the nozzle and an internal surface of the outer casing section of the nozzle.
15. The fan assembly of claim 14, wherein the outlet is in the form of a slot extending at least partially about the opening.
16. The fan assembly of claim 14, wherein the outlet has a width in the range from 0.5 to 5 mm.
17. The fan assembly of claim 1, wherein the surface comprises a Coanda surface.
18. The fan assembly of claim 17, wherein the Coanda surface extends about the opening.
19. The fan assembly of claim 1, wherein the nozzle comprises a diffuser surface located downstream of the mouth.
Description
REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application claims the priority of United Kingdom Application No. 0903685.6, filed 4 Mar. 2009, the entire contents of which are incorporated herein by reference.

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates to a fan assembly. In a preferred embodiment, the present invention relates to a domestic fan, such as a pedestal fan, for creating an air current in a room, office or other domestic environment.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

A conventional domestic fan typically includes a set of blades or vanes mounted for rotation about an axis, and drive apparatus for rotating the set of blades to generate an air flow. The movement and circulation of the air flow creates a ‘wind chill’ or breeze and, as a result, the user experiences a cooling effect as heat is dissipated through convection and evaporation.

Such fans are available in a variety of sizes and shapes. For example, a ceiling fan can be at least 1 m in diameter, and is usually mounted in a suspended manner from the ceiling to provide a downward flow of air to cool a room. On the other hand, desk fans are often around 30 cm in diameter, and are usually free standing and portable. Floor-standing pedestal fans generally comprise a height adjustable pedestal supporting the drive apparatus and the set of blades for generating an air flow, usually in the range from 300 to 500 l/s.

A disadvantage of this type of arrangement is that the air flow produced by the rotating blades of the fan is generally not uniform. This is due to variations across the blade surface or across the outward facing surface of the fan. The extent of these variations can vary from product to product and even from one individual fan machine to another. These variations result in the generation of an uneven or ‘choppy’ air flow which can be felt as a series of pulses of air and which can be uncomfortable for a user.

In a domestic environment it is undesirable for parts of the appliance to project outwardly, or for a user to be able to touch any moving parts, such as the blades. Pedestal fans tend to have a cage surrounding the blades to prevent injury from contact with the rotating blades, but such caged parts can be difficult to clean. Furthermore, due to the mounting of the drive apparatus and the rotary blades on the top of the pedestal, the centre of gravity of a pedestal fan is usually located towards the top of the pedestal. This can render the pedestal fan prone to falling if accidentally knocked unless the pedestal is provided with a relatively wide or heavy base, which may be undesirable for a user.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present invention provides a bladeless fan assembly comprising a nozzle and means for creating an air flow through the nozzle, the nozzle comprising an interior passage, a mouth for receiving the air flow from the interior passage, and a surface located adjacent the mouth and over which the mouth is arranged to direct the air flow, wherein the nozzle is mounted on a height adjustable pedestal.

Through use of a bladeless fan assembly an air current can be generated without the use of a bladed fan. In comparison to a bladed fan assembly, the bladeless fan assembly leads to a reduction in both moving parts and complexity. Furthermore, without the use of a bladed fan to project the air current from the fan assembly, a relatively uniform air current can be generated and guided into a room or towards a user. The air current can travel efficiently out from the nozzle, losing little energy and velocity to turbulence.

The term ‘bladeless’ is used to describe a fan assembly in which air flow is emitted or projected forward from the fan assembly without the use of moving blades. Consequently, a bladeless fan assembly can be considered to have an output area, or emission zone, absent moving blades from which the air flow is directed towards a user or into a room. The output area of the bladeless fan assembly may be supplied with a primary air flow generated by one of a variety of different sources, such as pumps, generators, motors or other fluid transfer devices, and which may include a rotating device such as a motor rotor and/or a bladed impeller for generating the air flow. The generated primary air flow can pass from the room space or other environment outside the fan assembly through the telescopic duct to the nozzle, and then back out to the room space through the mouth of the nozzle.

Hence, the description of a fan assembly as bladeless is not intended to extend to the description of the power source and components such as motors that are required for secondary fan functions. Examples of secondary fan functions can include lighting, adjustment and oscillation of the fan assembly.

The shape of the nozzle of a fan assembly is not constrained by the requirement to include space for a bladed fan. Preferably, the nozzle surrounds the opening. The nozzle may be an annular nozzle which preferably has a height in the range from 200 to 600 mm, more preferably in the range from 250 to 500 mm.

Preferably, the mouth of the nozzle extends about the opening, and is preferably annular. The nozzle preferably comprises an inner casing section and an outer casing section which define the mouth of the nozzle. Each section is preferably formed from a respective annular member, but each section may be provided by a plurality of members connected together or otherwise assembled to form that section. The outer casing section is preferably shaped so as to partially overlap the inner casing section. This can enable an outlet of the mouth to be defined between overlapping portions of the external surface of the inner casing section and the internal surface of the outer casing section of the nozzle. The outlet is preferably in the form of a slot, preferably having a width in the range from 0.5 to 5 mm. The nozzle may comprise a plurality of spacers for urging apart the overlapping portions of the inner casing section and the outer casing section of the nozzle. This can assist in maintaining a substantially uniform outlet width about the opening. The spacers are preferably evenly spaced along the outlet.

The interior passage is preferably continuous, more preferably annular, and is preferably shaped to divide the air flow into two air streams which flow in opposite directions around the opening. The interior passage is preferably also defined by the inner casing section and the outer casing section of the nozzle.

The fan assembly preferably comprises means for oscillating the nozzle so that the air current is swept over an arc, preferably in the range from 60 to 120°. For example, a base of the pedestal may comprise means for oscillating an upper part of the base, to which the nozzle is connected, relative to a lower part of the base.

As mentioned above, the nozzle comprises a surface located adjacent the mouth and over which the mouth is arranged to direct the air flow emitted therefrom. This surface is preferably a Coanda surface, and the external surface of the inner casing section of the nozzle is preferably shaped to define the Coanda surface. The Coanda surface preferably extends about the opening. A Coanda surface is a type of surface over which fluid flow exiting an output orifice close to the surface exhibits the Coanda effect. The fluid tends to flow over the surface closely, almost ‘clinging to’ or ‘hugging’ the surface. The Coanda effect is already a proven, well documented method of entrainment in which a primary air flow is directed over a Coanda surface. A description of the features of a Coanda surface, and the effect of fluid flow over a Coanda surface, can be found in articles such as Reba, Scientific American, Volume 214, June 1966 pages 84 to 92. Through use of a Coanda surface, an increased amount of air from outside the fan assembly is drawn through the opening by the air emitted from the mouth.

In the present invention an air flow created by the fan assembly enters the nozzle. In the following description this air flow will be referred to as primary air flow. The primary air flow is emitted from the mouth of the nozzle and passes over the Coanda surface. The primary air flow entrains air surrounding the mouth of the nozzle, which acts as an air amplifier to supply both the primary air flow and the entrained air to the user. The entrained air will be referred to here as a secondary air flow. The secondary air flow is drawn from the room space, region or external environment surrounding the mouth of the nozzle and, by displacement, from other regions around the fan assembly, and passes predominantly through the opening defined by the nozzle. The primary air flow directed over the Coanda surface combined with the entrained secondary air flow equates to a total air flow emitted or projected forward from the opening defined by the nozzle. Preferably, the entrainment of air surrounding the mouth of the nozzle is such that the primary air flow is amplified by at least five times, more preferably by at least ten times, while a smooth overall output is maintained. The maximum air flow of the air current generated by the fan assembly is preferably in the range from 300 to 800 litres per second, more preferably in the range from 400 to 700 litres per second.

Preferably, the nozzle comprises a diffuser surface located downstream of the Coanda surface. The external surface of the inner casing section of the nozzle is preferably shaped to define the diffuser surface.

The nozzle is mounted on an adjustable pedestal. Preferably, the pedestal houses said means for creating an air flow so that the fan assembly has a compact appearance. The pedestal may comprise a duct for conveying the air flow to the nozzle. Thus, the pedestal may serve both to support the nozzle through which an air flow created by the fan assembly is emitted and to convey the created air flow to the nozzle. The means for creating an air flow through the nozzle may be located towards the bottom of the pedestal, thereby lowering the centre of gravity of the fan assembly in comparison to prior art pedestal fans where a bladed fan and drive apparatus for the bladed fan are connected to the top of the pedestal and rendering the fan assembly less prone to falling over if knocked. For example, in a preferred embodiment the pedestal comprises a base housing said means for creating an air flow, with the duct extending between the base and the nozzle. Alternatively, the means for creating an air flow may be located within the duct.

Preferably the means for creating an air flow through the nozzle comprises an impeller, a motor for rotating the impeller, and a diffuser located downstream from the impeller. The impeller is preferably a mixed flow impeller. The motor is preferably a DC brushless motor to avoid frictional losses and carbon debris from the brushes used in a traditional brushed motor. Reducing carbon debris and emissions is advantageous in a clean or pollutant sensitive environment such as a hospital or around those with allergies. While induction motors, which are generally used in pedestal fans, also have no brushes, a DC brushless motor can provide a much wider range of operating speeds than an induction motor.

The diffuser may comprise a plurality of spiral vanes, resulting in the emission of a spiraling air flow from the diffuser. As the air flow through the duct will generally be in an axial or longitudinal direction, the fan assembly preferably comprises means for guiding the air flow emitted from the diffuser into the duct. This can reduce conductance losses within the fan assembly. The air flow guiding means preferably comprises a plurality of vanes each for guiding a respective portion of the air flow emitted from the diffuser towards the duct. These vanes may be located on the internal surface of an air guiding member mounted over the diffuser, and are preferably substantially evenly spaced. The air flow guiding means may also comprise a plurality of radial vanes located at least partially within the duct, with each of the radial vanes adjoining a respective one of the plurality of vanes. These radial vanes may define a plurality of axial or longitudinal channels within the duct which each receive a respective portion of the air flow from channels defined by the plurality of vanes. These portions of the air flow preferably merge together within the duct.

The duct may comprise a base mounted on the base of the pedestal, and a plurality of tubular members connected to the base of the duct. The curved vanes may be located at least partially within the base of the duct. The axial vanes may be located at least partially within means for connecting one of the tubular members to the base of the duct. The connecting means may comprise an air pipe or other tubular member for receiving one of the tubular members.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

An embodiment of the present invention will now be described, by way of example only, with reference to the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a fan assembly, in which a telescopic duct of the fan assembly is in a fully extended configuration;

FIG. 2 is another perspective view of the fan assembly of FIG. 1, in which the telescopic duct of the fan assembly is in a retracted position;

FIG. 3 is a sectional view of the base of the pedestal of the fan assembly of FIG. 1;

FIG. 4 is an exploded view of the telescopic duct of the fan assembly of FIG. 1;

FIG. 5 is a side view of the duct of FIG. 4 in a fully extended configuration;

FIG. 6 is a sectional view of the duct taken along line A-A in FIG. 5;

FIG. 7 is a sectional view of the duct taken along line B-B in FIG. 5;

FIG. 8 is a perspective view of the duct of FIG. 4 in a fully extended configuration, with part of the lower tubular member cut away;

FIG. 9 is an enlarged view of part of FIG. 8, with various parts of the duct removed;

FIG. 10 is a side view of the duct of FIG. 4 in a retracted configuration;

FIG. 11 is a sectional view of the duct taken along line C-C in FIG. 10;

FIG. 12 is an exploded view of the nozzle of the fan assembly of FIG. 1;

FIG. 13 is a front view of the nozzle of FIG. 12;

FIG. 14 is a sectional view of the nozzle, taken along line P-P in FIG. 13; and

FIG. 15 is an enlarged view of area R indicated in FIG. 14.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

FIGS. 1 and 2 illustrate perspective views of an embodiment of a fan assembly 10. In this embodiment, the fan assembly 10 is a bladeless fan assembly, and is in the form of a domestic pedestal fan comprising a height adjustable pedestal 12 and a nozzle 14 mounted on the pedestal 12 for emitting air from the fan assembly 10. The pedestal 12 comprises a floor-standing base 16 and a height-adjustable stand in the form of a telescopic duct 18 extending upwardly from the base 16 for conveying a primary air flow from the base 16 to the nozzle 14.

The base 16 of the pedestal 12 comprises a substantially cylindrical motor casing portion 20 mounted on a substantially cylindrical lower casing portion 22. The motor casing portion 20 and the lower casing portion 22 preferably have substantially the same external diameter so that the external surface of the motor casing portion 20 is substantially flush with the external surface of the lower casing portion 22. The lower casing portion 22 is mounted optionally on a floor-standing, disc-shaped base plate 24, and comprises a plurality of user-operable buttons 26 and a user-operable dial 28 for controlling the operation of the fan assembly 10. The base 16 further comprises a plurality of air inlets 30, which in this embodiment are in the form of apertures formed in the motor casing portion 20 and through which a primary air flow is drawn into the base 16 from the external environment. In this embodiment the base 16 of the pedestal 12 has a height in the range from 200 to 300 mm, and the motor casing portion 20 has a diameter in the range from 100 to 200 mm. The base plate 24 preferably has a diameter in the range from 200 to 300 mm.

The telescopic duct 18 of the pedestal 12 is moveable between a fully extended configuration, as illustrated in FIG. 1, and a retracted configuration, as illustrated in FIG. 2. The duct 18 comprises a substantially cylindrical base 32 mounted on the base 12 of the fan assembly 10, an outer tubular member 34 which is connected to, and extends upwardly from, the base 32, and an inner tubular member 36 which is located partially within the outer tubular member 34. A connector 37 connects the nozzle 14 to the open upper end of the inner tubular member 36 of the duct 18. The inner tubular member 36 is slidable relative to, and within, the outer tubular member 34 between a fully extended position, as illustrated in FIG. 1, and a retracted position, as illustrated in FIG. 2. When the inner tubular member 36 is in the fully extended position, the fan assembly 10 preferably has a height in the range from 1200 to 1600 mm, whereas when the inner tubular member 36 is in the retracted position, the fan assembly 10 preferably has a height in the range from 900 to 1300 mm. To adjust the height of the fan assembly 10, the user may grasp an exposed portion of the inner tubular member 36 and slide the inner tubular member 36 in either an upward or a downward direction as desired so that nozzle 14 is at the desired vertical position. When the inner tubular member 36 is in its retracted position, the user may grasp the connector 37 to pull the inner tubular member 36 upwards.

The nozzle 14 has an annular shape, extending about a central axis X to define an opening 38. The nozzle 14 comprises a mouth 40 located towards the rear of the nozzle 14 for emitting the primary air flow from the fan assembly 10 and through the opening 38. The mouth 40 extends about the opening 38, and is preferably also annular. The inner periphery of the nozzle 14 comprises a Coanda surface 42 located adjacent the mouth 40 and over which the mouth 40 directs the air emitted from the fan assembly 10, a diffuser surface 44 located downstream of the Coanda surface 42 and a guide surface 46 located downstream of the diffuser surface 44. The diffuser surface 44 is arranged to taper away from the central axis X of the opening 38 in such a way so as to assist the flow of air emitted from the fan assembly 10. The angle subtended between the diffuser surface 44 and the central axis X of the opening 38 is in the range from 5 to 25°, and in this example is around 7°. The guide surface 46 is arranged at an angle to the diffuser surface 44 to further assist the efficient delivery of a cooling air flow from the fan assembly 10. The guide surface 46 is preferably arranged substantially parallel to the central axis X of the opening 38 to present a substantially flat and substantially smooth face to the air flow emitted from the mouth 40. A visually appealing tapered surface 48 is located downstream from the guide surface 46, terminating at a tip surface 50 lying substantially perpendicular to the central axis X of the opening 38. The angle subtended between the tapered surface 48 and the central axis X of the opening 38 is preferably around 45°. In this embodiment, the nozzle 14 has a height in the range from 400 to 600 mm.

FIG. 3 illustrates a sectional view through the base 16 of the pedestal 12. The lower casing portion 22 of the base 16 houses a controller, indicated generally at 52, for controlling the operation of the fan assembly 10 in response to depression of the user operable buttons 26 shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, and/or manipulation of the user operable dial 28. The lower casing portion 22 may optionally comprise a sensor 54 for receiving control signals from a remote control (not shown), and for conveying these control signals to the controller 52. These control signals are preferably infrared signals. The sensor 54 is located behind a window 55 through which the control signals enter the lower casing portion 22 of the base 16. A light emitting diode (not shown) may be provided for indicating whether the fan assembly 10 is in a stand-by mode. The lower casing portion 22 also houses a mechanism, indicated generally at 56, for oscillating the motor casing portion 20 of the base 16 relative to the lower casing portion 22 of the base 16. The oscillating mechanism 56 comprises a rotatable shaft 56 a which extends from the lower casing portion 22 into the motor casing portion 20. The shaft 56 a is supported within a sleeve 56 b connected to the lower casing portion 22 by bearings to allow the shaft 56 a to rotate relative to the sleeve 56 b. One end of the shaft 56 a is connected to the central portion of an annular connecting plate 56 c, whereas the outer portion of the connecting plate 56 c is connected to the base of the motor casing portion 20. This allows the motor casing portion 20 to be rotated relative to the lower casing portion 22. The oscillating mechanism 56 also comprises a motor (not shown) located within the lower casing portion 22 which operates a crank arm mechanism, indicated generally at 56 d, which oscillates the base of the motor casing portion 20 relative to an upper portion of the lower casing portion 22. Crack arm mechanisms for oscillating one part relative to another are generally well known, and so will not be described here. The range of each oscillation cycle of the motor casing portion 20 relative to the lower casing portion 22 is preferably between 60° and 120°, and in this embodiment is around 90°. In this embodiment, the oscillating mechanism 56 is arranged to perform around 3 to 5 oscillation cycles per minute. A mains power cable 58 extends through an aperture formed in the lower casing portion 22 for supplying electrical power to the fan assembly 10.

The motor casing portion 20 comprises a cylindrical grille 60 in which an array of apertures 62 is formed to provide the air inlets 30 of the base 16 of the pedestal 12. The motor casing portion 20 houses an impeller 64 for drawing the primary air flow through the apertures 62 and into the base 16. Preferably, the impeller 64 is in the form of a mixed flow impeller. The impeller 64 is connected to a rotary shaft 66 extending outwardly from a motor 68. In this embodiment, the motor 68 is a DC brushless motor having a speed which is variable by the controller 52 in response to user manipulation of the dial 28 and/or a signal received from the remote control. The maximum speed of the motor 68 is preferably in the range from 5,000 to 10,000 rpm. The motor 68 is housed within a motor bucket comprising an upper portion 70 connected to a lower portion 72. The upper portion 70 of the motor bucket comprises a diffuser 74 in the form of a stationary disc having spiral blades. The motor bucket is located within, and mounted on, a generally frusto-conical impeller housing 76 connected to the motor casing portion 20. The impeller 64 and the impeller housing 76 are shaped so that the impeller 64 is in close proximity to, but does not contact, the inner surface of the impeller housing 76. A substantially annular inlet member 78 is connected to the bottom of the impeller housing 76 for guiding the primary air flow into the impeller housing 76.

Preferably, the base 16 of the pedestal 12 further comprises silencing foam for reducing noise emissions from the base 16. In this embodiment, the motor casing portion 20 of the base 16 comprises a first annular foam member 80 located beneath the grille 60, and a second annular foam member 82 located between the impeller housing 76 and the inlet member 78.

The telescopic duct 18 of the pedestal 12 will now be described in more detail with reference to FIGS. 4 to 11. The base 32 of the duct 18 comprises a substantially cylindrical side wall 102 and an annular upper surface 104 which is substantially orthogonal to, and preferably integral with, the side wall 102. The side wall 102 preferably has substantially the same external diameter as the motor casing portion 20 of the base 16, and is shaped so that the external surface of the side wall 102 is substantially flush with the external surface of the motor casing portion 20 of the base 16 when the duct 18 is connected to the base 16. The base 32 further comprises a relatively short air pipe 106 extending upwardly from the upper surface 104 for conveying the primary air flow into the outer tubular member 34 of the duct 18. The air pipe 106 is preferably substantially co-axial with the side wall 102, and has an external diameter which is slightly smaller than the internal diameter of the outer tubular member 34 of the duct 18 to enable the air pipe 106 to be fully inserted into the outer tubular member 34 of the duct 18. A plurality of axially-extending ribs 108 may be located on the outer surface of the air pipe 106 for forming an interference fit with the outer tubular member 34 of the duct 18 and thereby secure the outer tubular member 34 to the base 32. An annular sealing member 110 is located over the upper end of the air pipe 106 to form an air-tight seal between the outer tubular member 34 and the air pipe 106.

The duct 18 comprises a domed air guiding member 114 for guiding the primary air flow emitted from the diffuser 74 into the air pipe 106. The air guiding member 114 has an open lower end 116 for receiving the primary air flow from the base 16, and an open upper end 118 for conveying the primary air flow into the air pipe 106. The air guiding member 114 is housed within the base 32 of the duct 18. The air guiding member 114 is connected to the base 32 by means of co-operating snap-fit connectors 120 located on the base 32 and the air guiding member 114. A second annular sealing member 121 is located about the open upper end 118 for forming an air-tight sealing between the base 32 and the air guiding member 114. As illustrated in FIG. 3, the air guiding member 114 is connected to the open upper end of the motor casing portion 20 of the base 16, for example by means of co-operating snap-fit connectors 123 or screw-threaded connectors located on the air guiding member 114 and the motor casing portion 20 of the base 16. Thus, the air guiding member 114 serves to connect the duct 18 to the base 16 of the pedestal 12.

A plurality of air guiding vanes 122 are located on the inner surface of the air guiding member 114 for guiding the spiraling air flow emitted from the diffuser 74 into the air pipe 106. In this example, the air guiding member 114 comprises seven air guiding vanes 122 which are evenly spaced about the inner surface of the air guiding member 114. The air guiding vanes 122 meet at the centre of the open upper end 118 of the air guiding member 114, and thus define a plurality of air channels 124 within the air guiding member 114 each for guiding a respective portion of the primary air flow into the air pipe 106. With particular reference to FIG. 4, seven radial air guiding vanes 126 are located within the air pipe 106. Each of these radial air guiding vanes 126 extends along substantially the entire length of the air pipe 126, and adjoins a respective one of the air guiding vanes 122 when the air guiding member 114 is connected to the base 32. The radial air guiding vanes 126 thus define a plurality of axially-extending air channels 128 within the air pipe 106 which each receive a respective portion of the primary air flow from a respective one of the air channels 124 within the air guiding member 114, and which convey that portion of the primary flow axially through the air pipe 106 and into the outer tubular member 34 of the duct 18. Thus, the base 32 and the air guiding member 114 of the duct 18 serve to convert the spiraling air flow emitted from the diffuser 74 into an axial air flow which passes through the outer tubular member 34 and the inner tubular member 36 to the nozzle 14. A third annular sealing member 129 may be provided for forming an air-tight seal between the air guiding member 114 and the base 32 of the duct 18.

A cylindrical upper sleeve 130 is connected, for example using an adhesive or through an interference fit, to the inner surface of the upper portion of the outer tubular member 34 so that the upper end 132 of the upper sleeve 130 is level with the upper end 134 of the outer tubular member 34. The upper sleeve 130 has an internal diameter which is slightly greater than the external diameter of the inner tubular member 36 to allow the inner tubular member 36 to pass through the upper sleeve 130. A third annular sealing member 136 is located on the upper sleeve 130 for forming an air-tight seal with the inner tubular member 36. The third annular sealing member 136 comprises an annular lip 138 which engages the upper end 132 of the outer tubular member 34 to form an air-tight seal between the upper sleeve 130 and the outer tubular member 34.

A cylindrical lower sleeve 140 is connected, for example using an adhesive or through an interference fit, to the outer surface of the lower portion of the inner tubular member 36 so that the lower end 142 of the inner tubular member 36 is located between the upper end 144 and the lower end 146 of the lower sleeve 140. The upper end 144 of the lower sleeve 140 has substantially the same external diameter as the lower end 148 of the upper sleeve 130. Thus, in the fully extended position of the inner tubular member 36 the upper end 144 of the lower sleeve 140 abuts the lower end 148 of the upper sleeve 130, thereby preventing the inner tubular member 36 from being withdrawn fully from the outer tubular member 34. In the retracted position of the inner tubular member 36, the lower end 146 of the lower sleeve 140 abuts the upper end of the air pipe 106.

A mainspring 150 is coiled around an axle 152 which is rotatably supported between inwardly extending arms 154 of the lower sleeve 140 of the duct 18, as illustrated in FIG. 7. With reference to FIG. 8, the mainspring 150 comprises a steel strip which has a free end 156 fixedly located between the external surface of the upper sleeve 130 and the internal surface of the outer tubular member 34. Consequently, the mainspring 150 is unwound from the axle 152 as the inner tubular member 36 is lowered from the fully extended position, as illustrated in FIGS. 5 and 6, to the retracted position, as illustrated in FIGS. 10 and 11. The elastic energy stored within the mainspring 150 acts as a counter-weight for maintaining a user-selected position of the inner tubular member 36 relative to the outer tubular member 34.

Additional resistance to the movement of the inner tubular member 36 relative to the outer tubular member 34 is provided by a spring-loaded, arcuate band 158, preferably formed from plastics material, located within an annular groove 160 extending circumferentially about the lower sleeve 140. With reference to FIGS. 7 and 9, the band 158 does not extend fully about the lower sleeve 140, and so comprises two opposing ends 161. Each end 161 of the band 158 comprises a radially inner portion 161 a which is received within an aperture 162 formed in the lower sleeve 140. A compression spring 164 is located between the radially inner portions 161 a of the ends 161 of the band 158 to urge the external surface of the band 158 against the internal surface of the outer tubular member 34, thereby increasing the frictional forces which resist movement of the inner tubular member 36 relative to the outer tubular member 34.

The band 158 further comprises a grooved portion 166, which in this embodiment is located opposite to the compression spring 164, which defines an axially extending groove 167 on the external surface of the band 158. The groove 167 of the band 158 is located over a raised rib 168 which extends axially along the length of its internal surface of the outer tubular member 34. The groove 167 has substantially the same angular width and radial depth as the raised rib 168 to inhibit relative rotation between the inner tubular member 36 and the outer tubular member 34.

The nozzle 14 of the fan assembly 10 will now be described with reference to FIGS. 12 to 15. The nozzle 14 comprises an annular outer casing section 200 connected to and extending about an annular inner casing section 202. Each of these sections may be formed from a plurality of connected parts, but in this embodiment each of the outer casing section 200 and the inner casing section 202 is formed from a respective, single moulded part. The inner casing section 202 defines the central opening 38 of the nozzle 14, and has an external peripheral surface 203 which is shaped to define the Coanda surface 42, diffuser surface 44, guide surface 46 and tapered surface 48.

The outer casing section 200 and the inner casing section 202 together define an annular interior passage 204 of the nozzle 14. Thus, the interior passage 204 extends about the opening 38. The interior passage 204 is bounded by the internal peripheral surface 206 of the outer casing section 200 and the internal peripheral surface 208 of the inner casing section 202. The base of the outer casing section 200 comprises an aperture 210.

The connector 37 which connects the nozzle 14 to the open upper end 170 of the inner tubular member 36 of the duct 18 comprises a tilting mechanism for tilting the nozzle 12 relative to the pedestal 14. The tilting mechanism comprises an upper member which is in the form of a plate 300 which is fixedly located within the aperture 210. Optionally, the plate 300 may be integral with the outer casing section 200. The plate 300 comprises a circular aperture 302 through which the primary air flow enters the interior passage 204 from the telescopic duct 18. The connector 37 further comprises a lower member in the form of an air pipe 304 which is at least partially inserted through the open upper end 170 of the inner tubular member 36. This air pipe 304 has substantially the same internal diameter as the circular aperture 302 formed in the upper plate 300 of the connector 37. If required, an annular sealing member may be provided for forming an air-tight seal between the inner surface of the inner tubular member 36 and the outer surface of the air pipe 304, and inhibits the withdrawal of the air pipe 304 from the inner tubular member 36. The plate 300 is pivotably connected to the air pipe 304 using a series of connectors indicated generally at 306 in FIG. 12 and which are covered by end caps 308. A flexible hose 310 extends between the air pipe 304 and the plate 300 for conveying air therebetween. The flexible hose 310 may be in the form of an annular bellows sealing element. A first annular sealing member 312 forms an air-tight seal between the hose 310 and the air pipe 304, and a second annular sealing member 314 forms an air-tight seal between the hose 310 and the plate 300. To tilt the nozzle 12 relative to the pedestal 14, the user simply pulls or pushes the nozzle 12 to cause the hose 310 to bend to allow the plate 300 to move relative to the air pipe 304.

The force required to move the nozzle 12 depends on the tightness of the connection between the plate 300 and the air pipe 304, and is preferably in the range from 2 to 4 N. The nozzle 12 is preferably moveable within a range of ±10° from an untilted position, in which the axis X is substantially horizontal, to a fully tilted position. As the nozzle 12 is tilted relative to the pedestal 14, the axis X is swept along a substantially vertical plane.

The mouth 40 of the nozzle 14 is located towards the rear of the nozzle 10. The mouth 40 is defined by overlapping, or facing, portions 212, 214 of the internal peripheral surface 206 of the outer casing section 200 and the external peripheral surface 203 of the inner casing section 202, respectively. In this example, the mouth 40 is substantially annular and, as illustrated in FIG. 15, has a substantially U-shaped cross-section when sectioned along a line passing diametrically through the nozzle 14. In this example, the overlapping portions 212, 214 of the internal peripheral surface 206 of the outer casing section 200 and the external peripheral surface 203 of the inner casing section 202 are shaped so that the mouth 40 tapers towards an outlet 216 arranged to direct the primary flow over the Coanda surface 42. The outlet 216 is in the form of an annular slot, preferably having a relatively constant width in the range from 0.5 to 5 mm. In this example the outlet 216 has a width in the range from 0.5 to 1.5 mm. Spacers may be spaced about the mouth 40 for urging apart the overlapping portions 212, 214 of the internal peripheral surface 206 of the outer casing section 200 and the external peripheral surface 203 of the inner casing section 202 to maintain the width of the outlet 216 at the desired level. These spacers may be integral with either the internal peripheral surface 206 of the outer casing section 200 or the external peripheral surface 203 of the inner casing section 202.

To operate the fan assembly 10, the user depresses an appropriate one of the buttons 26 on the base 16 of the pedestal 12, in response to which the controller 52 activates the motor 68 to rotate the impeller 64. The rotation of the impeller 64 causes a primary air flow to be drawn into the base 16 of the pedestal 12 through the apertures 62 of the grille 60. Depending on the speed of the motor 68, the primary air flow may be between 20 and 40 litres per second. The primary air flow passes sequentially through the impeller housing 76 and the diffuser 74. The spiral form of the blades of the diffuser 74 causes the primary air flow to be exhausted from the diffuser 74 in the form of spiraling air flow. The primary air flow enters the air guiding member 114, wherein the curved air guiding vanes 122 divide the primary air flow into a plurality of portions, and guide each portion of the primary air flow into a respective one of the axially-extending air channels 128 within the air pipe 106 of the base 32 of the telescopic duct 18. The portions of the primary air flow merge into an axial air flow as they are emitted from the air pipe 106. The primary air flow passes upwards through the outer tubular member 34 and the inner tubular member 36 of the duct 18, and through the connector 37 to enter the interior passage 86 of the nozzle 14.

Within the nozzle 14, the primary air flow is divided into two air streams which pass in opposite directions around the central opening 38 of the nozzle 14. As the air streams pass through the interior passage 204, air enters the mouth 40 of the nozzle 14. The air flow into the mouth 40 is preferably substantially even about the opening 38 of the nozzle 14. Within the mouth 40, the flow direction of the air stream is substantially reversed. The air stream is constricted by the tapering section of the mouth 40 and emitted through the outlet 216.

The primary air flow emitted from the mouth 40 is directed over the Coanda surface 42 of the nozzle 14, causing a secondary air flow to be generated by the entrainment of air from the external environment, specifically from the region around the outlet 216 of the mouth 40 and from around the rear of the nozzle 14. This secondary air flow passes through the central opening 38 of the nozzle 14, where it combines with the primary air flow to produce a total air flow, or air current, projected forward from the nozzle 14. Depending on the speed of the motor 68, the mass flow rate of the air current projected forward from the fan assembly 10 may be up to 400 litres per second, preferably up to 600 litres per second, and more preferably up to 800 litres per second, and the maximum speed of the air current may be in the range from 2.5 to 4.5 m/s.

The even distribution of the primary air flow along the mouth 40 of the nozzle 14 ensures that the air flow passes evenly over the diffuser surface 44. The diffuser surface 44 causes the mean speed of the air flow to be reduced by moving the air flow through a region of controlled expansion. The relatively shallow angle of the diffuser surface 44 to the central axis X of the opening 38 allows the expansion of the air flow to occur gradually. A harsh or rapid divergence would otherwise cause the air flow to become disrupted, generating vortices in the expansion region. Such vortices can lead to an increase in turbulence and associated noise in the air flow which can be undesirable, particularly in a domestic product such as a fan. The air flow projected forwards beyond the diffuser surface 44 can tend to continue to diverge. The presence of the guide surface 46 extending substantially parallel to the central axis X of the opening 38 further converges the air flow. As a result, the air flow can travel efficiently out from the nozzle 14, enabling the air flow can be experienced rapidly at a distance of several metres from the fan assembly 10.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2488467 *Sep 12, 1947Nov 15, 1949Lisio Salvatore DeMotor-driven fan
US3795367 *Apr 5, 1973Mar 5, 1974Src LabFluid device using coanda effect
US5110266 *Feb 26, 1990May 5, 1992Hitachi, Ltd.Electric blower having improved return passage for discharged air flow
US20090214341 *Apr 1, 2008Aug 27, 2009Trevor CraigRotatable axial fan
US20100226751 *Mar 3, 2010Sep 9, 2010Dyson Technology LimitedFan assembly
US20100226754 *Mar 3, 2010Sep 9, 2010Dyson Technology LimitedFan assembly
US20100226764 *Mar 3, 2010Sep 9, 2010Dyson Technology LimitedFan
GB2285504A * Title not available
JPS56167897A * Title not available
Non-Patent Citations
Reference
1 *JP 56168797 Translation
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7931449Sep 15, 2009Apr 26, 2011Dyson Technology LimitedFan
US7972111Mar 1, 2010Jul 5, 2011Dyson Technology LimitedFan assembly
US8052379Mar 3, 2010Nov 8, 2011Dyson Technology LimitedFan assembly
US8092166Nov 20, 2009Jan 10, 2012Dyson Technology LimitedFan
US8308445Sep 3, 2008Nov 13, 2012Dyson Technology LimitedFan
US8561935Nov 22, 2010Oct 22, 2013Karl F. Milde, Jr.STOL and/or VTOL aircraft
US8721286 *Mar 3, 2010May 13, 2014Dyson Technology LimitedFan assembly
US20100226751 *Mar 3, 2010Sep 9, 2010Dyson Technology LimitedFan assembly
Classifications
U.S. Classification415/90
International ClassificationF01D1/36
Cooperative ClassificationF04D29/601, F04F5/16, F24F13/32, F24F2221/28, F04D25/08, F04F5/46, F24F7/065
European ClassificationF24F7/06D, F04F5/16, F04F5/46, F04D25/08, F04D29/60C, F24F13/32
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Apr 21, 2010ASAssignment
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:GAMMACK, PETER DAVID;DYSON, JAMES;REEL/FRAME:024262/0844
Effective date: 20100413
Owner name: DYSON TECHNOLOGY LIMITED, UNITED KINGDOM