Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS20100227680 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 12/280,012
PCT numberPCT/US2007/004366
Publication dateSep 9, 2010
Filing dateFeb 20, 2007
Priority dateFeb 20, 2006
Also published asWO2007098156A2, WO2007098156A3
Publication number12280012, 280012, PCT/2007/4366, PCT/US/2007/004366, PCT/US/2007/04366, PCT/US/7/004366, PCT/US/7/04366, PCT/US2007/004366, PCT/US2007/04366, PCT/US2007004366, PCT/US200704366, PCT/US7/004366, PCT/US7/04366, PCT/US7004366, PCT/US704366, US 2010/0227680 A1, US 2010/227680 A1, US 20100227680 A1, US 20100227680A1, US 2010227680 A1, US 2010227680A1, US-A1-20100227680, US-A1-2010227680, US2010/0227680A1, US2010/227680A1, US20100227680 A1, US20100227680A1, US2010227680 A1, US2010227680A1
InventorsSamuel Leopold, Jim Motyl
Original AssigneeWms Gaming Inc.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Wagering game machine wireless key
US 20100227680 A1
Abstract
Apparatus, systems, and methods may operate to receive authorization information from a wireless key at a wagering game machine, the machine including a wagering game unit operable to receive a wager in association with a wagering game. Further activities may include granting access to a gaming machine control system included in the wagering game machine in response to receiving the authorization information.
Images(8)
Previous page
Next page
Claims(26)
1. An apparatus, comprising:
a key to authorize access to a gaming machine control system included in a wagering game machine having a wagering game unit operable to receive a wager in association with a wagering game; and
a wireless mechanism included in the key configured to transmit to and receive from the wagering game machine at least information associated with operation of the wagering gaming machine.
2.-3. (canceled)
4. The apparatus of claim 1, further comprising:
an encryption engine included in the key.
5. The apparatus of claim 1, further comprising:
an authorization actuator included in the key to initiate transmission of the authorization information.
6. The apparatus of claim 1, further comprising:
an activity function actuator included in the key to initiate functions of the wagering game machine after access to the wagering game machine is granted.
7.-11. (canceled)
12. A method comprising:
receiving authorization information from a wireless key at a wagering game machine including a wagering game unit operable to receive a wager in association with a wagering game;
granting access to a gaming machine control system included in the wagering game machine in response to receiving the authorization information based upon an automatic comparison between the authorization information and existing authorized user data; and
transmitting at least information associated with operation of the wagering game machine to the wireless key.
13. The method of claim 12, further including:
recording identification information associated with the wireless key.
14. The method of claim 13, wherein the identification information includes at least one of wireless key identification information and attendant identification information.
15. (canceled)
16. The method of claim 12, further including:
locating the wireless key within a selected distance of the wagering game machine to initiate a process of accessing the gaming machine control system.
17. The method of claim 12, further including:
activating at least one of an authorization actuator included in the wireless key and an initiation mechanism included in the wagering game machine to initiate a process of accessing the gaming machine control system.
18. The method of claim 12, further including:
activating an activity function actuator included in the wireless key to reset the wagering game machine.
19. The method of claim 12, further including:
recording attendant activity associated with the wagering game machine in a memory included in the wireless key.
20.-22. (canceled)
23. The method of claim 12, further including:
navigating a configuration menu using an activity function actuator included in the wireless key.
24. (canceled)
25. A machine-readable medium having instructions stored therein for directing a machine to perform operations comprising:
receiving authorization information from a wireless key at a wagering game machine including a wagering game unit operable to receive a wager in association with a wagering game;
granting access to a gaming machine control system included in the wagering game machine in response to receiving the authorization information based upon an automatic comparison between the authorization information and existing authorized user data; and
transmitting at least information associated with operation of the wagering game machine to the wireless key.
26. The machine-readable medium of claim 25, wherein the operations further comprise:
polling to detect presence of the wireless key.
27. The machine-readable medium of claim 25, wherein the operations further comprise:
verifying winnings associated with the wagering game in response to receiving an activation indication associated with an activity function actuator included in the wireless key.
28. A wagering game machine system, comprising:
a gaming machine control system including a wagering game unit operable to receive a wager in association with a wagering game;
a receiver to receive wireless information from a wireless key, the information including authorization information to authorize access to the gaming machine control system; and
a transmitter to transmit at least information associated with operation of a wagering game machine comprising the wagering game unit.
29. The wagering game machine system of claim 28, including:
a network interface to couple to the gaming machine control system.
30. The wagering game machine system of claim 28, including:
an authentication unit to authenticate the authorization information.
31. The wagering game machine system of claim 28, including:
a display to display graphics associated with the access to the gaming machine control system.
32. The wagering game machine system of claim 28, including:
a server to couple to the wagering game machine control system via a network and forward the authorization information that has been received to a wagering game server.
33. The wagering game machine system of claim 28, including:
a key to authorize access to the gaming machine control system, the key including a wireless mechanism to send the authorization information to the receiver.
Description
    RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • [0001]
    This patent application claims the priority benefit of U.S. Provisional Patent Application Ser. No. 60/743,323 filed Feb. 20, 2006 and entitled “WAGERING GAME MACHINE WIRELESS KEY”, and of U.S. Provisional Patent Application Ser. No. 60/845,338 filed Sep. 18, 2006 and entitled “WAGERING GAME MACHINE WIRELESS KEY”, which applications are incorporated herein by reference.
  • FIELD
  • [0002]
    Embodiments of the inventive subject matter relate generally to wagering game machines, including access and configuration mechanisms associated with wagering game machines.
  • COPYRIGHT
  • [0003]
    A portion of the disclosure of this patent document contains material which is subject to copyright protection. The copyright owner has no objection to the facsimile reproduction by anyone of the patent disclosure, as it appears in the Patent and Trademark Office patent files or records, but otherwise reserves all copyright rights whatsoever. Copyright 2006, 2007, WMS Gaming, Inc.
  • BACKGROUND
  • [0004]
    Wagering game makers strive to improve the user experience associated with the games they provide. One way of increasing the entertainment value associated with wagering game operations includes offering excellent customer service to the user. For example, if play has stopped because the game needs a tilt condition cleared, the person playing the game appreciates prompt attention by an attendant.
  • [0005]
    Typically a mechanical key, carried by the attendant, is used to provide access to various features of the wagering game machine, such as reset operations and clearing tilts. Because a single attendant may carry a large number of keys, accessing a particular game may require some time before the proper key is located. The use of mechanical keys also can affect the physical placement of the machines, due to the location of access doors and key cylinders. Finally, such keys may sometimes be readily duplicated, lost, and/or stolen, which can present additional customer service and security issues. Thus, there is a need for improved apparatus, systems, and methods providing access to wagering game machines.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0006]
    FIG. 1 is a block diagram illustrating apparatus and systems according to various embodiments of the invention.
  • [0007]
    FIG. 2 is a block diagram illustrating a wagering game machine network according to various embodiments of the invention.
  • [0008]
    FIGS. 3A-3B comprise a flow diagram illustrating several methods according to various embodiments of the invention.
  • [0009]
    FIG. 4 is a perspective view of a wagering game machine according to various embodiments of the invention.
  • [0010]
    FIG. 5 comprises a flow diagram illustrating several methods according to various embodiments of the invention.
  • [0011]
    FIG. 6 comprises a flow diagram illustrating several methods according to various embodiments of the invention.
  • [0012]
    FIG. 7 is a block diagram illustrating an apparatus according to various embodiments of the invention.
  • [0013]
    FIG. 8 is a block diagram illustrating apparatus and systems according to various embodiments of the invention.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION Example Operating Environment
  • [0014]
    FIG. 1 is a block diagram illustrating apparatus 190 and systems 160 according to various embodiments of the invention. As shown in FIG. 1, a wagering game machine 102 may include a central processing unit (CPU) 126 coupled to a main memory 128, which may include a wagering game unit 132 and an authentication unit 136. In many embodiments, the wagering game unit 132 can receive wagers and conduct wagering games, such as video poker, video black jack, video slots, video lottery, etc. In some embodiments, the wagering game machine 102 may comprise a mobile wagering game machine 104.
  • [0015]
    The CPU 126 may be coupled to an input/output (I/O) bus 122, which facilitates communication between the wagering game machine's components. For example, the I/O bus 122 may be connected to a payout mechanism 108, a primary display 110, a secondary display 112, other displays (not shown), a value input device 114, a player input device 116, an information reader 118, a wager input unit 120, and a storage unit 130. In some embodiments, the wager input unit 120 can electronically receive wagering value (e.g., monetary value) from a player's casino account or other suitable “cashless gaming” value source.
  • [0016]
    The I/O bus 122 may also be connected to an external system interface 124, such as a network interface, which can in turn be connected to external systems 106 (e.g., wagering game networks). In some embodiments, the I/O bus 122 and/or the external system interface 124 may be connected to a transmitter 140 and/or receiver 142, that are in turn connected to an antenna 144.
  • [0017]
    In some embodiments, the wagering game machine 102 includes additional peripheral devices and/or more than one of each component shown in FIG. 1. For example, in one embodiment, the wagering game machine 102 may include multiple external system interfaces 124 and multiple CPUs 126. In some embodiments, any of the components can be integrated or subdivided. Additionally, in some embodiments, the components of the wagering game machine 102 can be interconnected according to any suitable interconnection architecture (e.g., directly connected, bus (as shown), network, hypercube, etc.).
  • [0018]
    In some embodiments, a key 100 to authorize access to a gaming machine control system 138 included in the wagering game machine 102 may be used by an attendant to gain access to a multitude of features and elements of the wagering game machine 102. The key 100 typically communicates with the wagering game machine 102 using a wireless connection 134. In some embodiments the key 100 communicates with the wagering game machine 102 via radio frequencies (RF) or infrared frequencies. The key 100 may also communicate with a wagering game server 252 (FIG. 2) directly or indirectly via the LAN 258.
  • [0019]
    Embodiments of the key 100 may include a variety of elements, such as a display 162, including a touch screen display, a processor 164, one or more memories 166 (e.g., volatile and/or non-volatile memories), indicators 168 (e.g., lights, light-emitting diodes, fiber optics), actuators 170 (e.g., manual push-buttons, electronic capacitive switches, resistive switches), biometric sampler 169, and keypads/keyboards 172. In some embodiments, the function of physical indicators 168 may be supplemented, or supplanted, by virtual indicators 174 shown on the display 162. If the display 162 comprises a touch screen display, the function of the actuators 170 may also be supplemented or supplanted by locations 176 on the display 162 that are responsive to touch. Most embodiments include a transmitter 178 and/or receiver 180, coupled to an antenna 182, so as to communicate authorization information 184 via the wireless connection 134 to one or more wagering game machines 102.
  • [0020]
    Thus, many embodiments may be realized. For example, an apparatus 190 may comprise a key 100 to authorize access to a gaming machine control system 138 included in a wagering game machine 102 having a wagering game machine 102 operable to receive a wager in association with a wagering game. The key 100 may further include a wireless mechanism 186, such as a wireless transmitter 178 and/or wireless receiver 180, to send authorization information 184 to the wagering game machine 102. The wireless mechanism 186 may comprise many elements, such as a passive radio-frequency identification device (RFID), an active RFID device, and/or a transceiver, among others.
  • [0021]
    The wireless receiver 180 might be used to receive information from the wagering game machine 102, such as an initiation or polling communication that elicits the provision of authorization information 184 by the key 100. The wireless receiver 180 might also be used to receive an acknowledgement indication that some particular signal (e.g., the authorization information) was received by the wagering game machine 102.
  • [0022]
    In some embodiments, the memory 166 may comprise a volatile memory, or a non-volatile memory, or both. The memory 166 may be one-time programmable, or re-programmable. The memory 166 may be used to store identification information unique to the key 100, and/or the attendant entrusted with the use of the key 100. The memory 166 may be used to record a variety of activities in which the attendant may engage, as explained in detail below.
  • [0023]
    In some embodiments, the key 100 may include an encryption engine 188. The encryption engine 188, perhaps comprising a separate processor, may be used to encrypt authorization information 184 that is later decrypted and verified by the wagering game machine 102, perhaps as part of the functions executed by the authentication unit 136. In an embodiment any communication 134 between the key 100 and a wagering game machine 102 may be encrypted using one or more known wireless encryption protocols or techniques.
  • [0024]
    The actuators 170 included in the key may include any of several types. For example, the actuators 170 may include an authorization actuator to initiate transmission of the authorization information 184. As noted above, the actuators 170 may take any of several forms, including one or more buttons on a key fob. In an embodiment, the key 100 may require a user to provide biometric data via the biometric sampler 169 or touch screen 162 or provide other unique user indicia via the touch screen 162. The biometric data may be a representation of a user's fingerprint, retinal scan or other user unique biometric information.
  • [0025]
    The memory 166 may include sampled biometric data or unique data for each authorized key user. When a user attempts key 100 activation, the user may be required to provide biometric data via the biometric sampler 169 or unique user indicia via another input. The key 100 may compare the sampled biometric data or unique user indicia to the authorized data in memory 166 and determine whether to grant functionality to the user. The key 100 may limit user functionality based on the user's biometric data, unique user indicia or other input including a key fob.
  • [0026]
    In an embodiment the key 100 may transmit a user's biometric data, unique user indicia, or other input to the wagering game machine 102, wagering game server 252, or other casino 256. The wagering game machine 102, wagering game server 252, or other casino 256 may compare the sampled biometric data, unique user indicia, or other input to the authorized user data in a database 478, 494 (FIG. 7) and determine whether the user is authorized to use the key 100. The wagering game machine 102, wagering game server 252, or other casino 256 may transmit an authorization message that may grant or deny a user access to the wagering game machine 102 via the key 100. The authorization message may also include a user access level where a key 100 or wagering game machine 102 may use the access level to limit or set the functions or controls a user may be able to perform on the wagering game machine 102.
  • [0027]
    In an embodiment the database 478, 494 or storage unit 130 may include a captured or authorization list for keys 100. The wagering game machine 102, wagering game server 252, or other casino 256 may determine whether the key 100 is on the list and restrict wagering game machine 102 accordingly. For example, keys 100 on a captured list may be denied authorization to wagering game machines 102. In addition, the wagering game machine 102, wagering game server 252, or other casino 256 may compile and store user specific or key specific task lists in a database 478, 494, storage unit 130. The wagering game machine 102, wagering game server 252, or other casino 256 may forward a task list to a key 100 along with an authorization message where a user may be able to view the list via the key's 100 display 162.
  • [0028]
    Further, the wagering game machine 102, wagering game server 252, or other casino 256 may inform machine, server, or casino attendants via a user perceptible format the identity of a key 100 or user attempting access to a waging game machine 102. The wagering game machine 102 may forward authorization requests including a unique key 100 identifier and user identifier to a wagering game server 252 or other casino 256. The wagering game server 252 or other casino 256 may inform associated attendants of authorization attempts including user indicia and key indicia. In an embodiment a wagering game server 252 or other casino 256 may audibly via a local speaker or telephony including POTS, cellular, or other RF system inform associated attendants of authorization attempts.
  • [0029]
    Another form of actuator 170 may include an activity function actuator. For example, after access to the wagering game machine 102 has been granted, perhaps as a function of the authentication unit 136, an activity function actuator might be operated (e.g., depressed) to reset the machine 102, or to initiate some other activity that has been pre-programmed, such as opening a diagnostic menu on the primary display 110. Some embodiments of the key 100 may include actuators representing arrow up and arrow down buttons to navigate a displayed menu, either on the primary display 110, or on the key display 162.
  • [0030]
    As noted above, the indicators 168 may also take several forms. For example, the key 100 may include an indicator 168 that comprises an activity function indicator. Examples include a small LED that lights to indicate when the key 100 is in the process of communicating over the wireless connection 134, and/or that a battery included in the key 100 is functional. Of course, separate virtual indicators 174 may also be used to indicate similar or identical information, as well as other information, including whether the authorization information 184 has been accepted by the machine 102, and whether or not access to the gaming machine control system 138 has been granted.
  • [0031]
    Other embodiments may be realized. For example, a wagering game machine 102, 104 may comprise a gaming machine control system 138 including a wagering game unit 132 operable to receive a wager in association with a wagering game, and a receiver 142 to receive wireless authorization information 184 to authorize access to the gaming machine control system 138. Some embodiments may include an external system interface 124, such as a network interface, to couple to the gaming machine control system 138. As noted previously, the wagering game machine 102 may also include an authentication unit 136 to authenticate the authorization information, as well as a display (e.g., displays 110, 112) to display graphics associated with accessing the gaming machine control system. For example, the display 110 may display a request for entry of an access code, user biometric data or other unique user indicia, as part of authenticating the authorization information, or in addition to it.
  • [0032]
    The response may be entered using one of the actuators 170, the touch screen 162, and/or the keypad/keyboard 172. In an embodiment the wagering game machine 102 may include a biometric sampler 121. After authentication via a key 100, a user may be required to provide biometric data to a gaming machine 102 via the biometric sampler 121 prior to accessing the machine 102. In an embodiment, the primary or secondary display 110, 112 may be a touch screen and coupled with the biometric sampler 121.
  • [0033]
    In some embodiments, any of the components of the wagering game machine 102 (e.g., the authentication unit 136) can include hardware, firmware, and/or software for performing the operations described herein. Furthermore, any of the components can include machine-readable media including instructions 140 for causing a machine to perform the operations described herein. Machine-readable media includes any mechanism that provides (i.e., stores and/or transmits) information in a form readable by a machine (e.g., a wagering game machine, computer, etc.). For example, tangible machine-readable media includes read only memory (ROM), random access memory (RAM), magnetic disk storage media, optical storage media, flash memory, the main memory 128, and the storage unit 130, etc. Machine-readable media also includes any media suitable for transmitting software over a network.
  • [0034]
    FIG. 8 is a block diagram illustrating a system 520 according to various embodiments of the invention. In the system 520 a passive or active RF identification (RFID) device 530 may function as a key 100 and may be employed to enable wireless access of a wagering game machine 102. In the system 520 the wagering game machine 102 may communicate, via a wireless air interface 546, with one or more RFID devices 530. In an embodiment the wagering game machine 102, via the interface 546 may provide power, query, data, and timing information to an RFID device 530. A RFID device 530, responsive to power, query, data, and timing information may provide response data including a Key ID 548 that uniquely identifies the RFID device 530. The wagering game machine 102 may determine whether the RFID device 530 is an authorized key based on its Key ID 548. The wagering game machine 102 may also forward the Key ID 548 to a wagering game server 252 or casino 256.
  • [0035]
    In an embodiment a RFID device 530 may scavenge power from a received radio-frequency signal and may backscatter response data (including its Key ID 548) to the wagering game machine 102 by modulating the impedance of the antenna 542. During a RFID device to wagering game machine 102 transmission, the wagering game machine 102 may transmit a Continuous-Wave (CW) radio signal. The RFID device 530 may backscatter-modulate the CW signal with bits representing its Key ID 548, creating a radio-frequency (RF) information waveform that is transmitted back to the wagering game machine 102.
  • [0036]
    In an embodiment the RFID device 530 includes a RFID circuit or chip 540 coupled to an antenna or antennae to facilitate the reception and transmission of radio-frequency signals via the air interface 546. The RFID circuit 540 and the antenna 542 may be located on a base material or substrate (e.g., a plastic or paper material) to constitute the RFID device 530. In an embodiment the RFID device 530 530 may include a number of subcomponents, which may be implemented on one or more integrated circuits that form part of the RFID device 530. As shown in FIG. 8 the RFID device 530 may include an RF front end 536, a CPU 534, a memory 532, and a power source 538 where the components are coupled together via a bus 544.
  • [0037]
    The front end 536 may include components to facilitate the processing of radio-frequency signals received via the coupled antenna 542 and also to facilitate the transmission of a radio-frequency signal (e.g., a modulated backscatter signal) via the coupled antenna 542. The CPU 534 may control the operation and states of the RFID device 530. The memory 532 may store, inter alia, a Key identifier 548, a product identifier, configuration values applicable to configuration of the RFID device 530 and possibly one or more algorithms. In an embodiment, the RFID device 530 may be a passive device that scavenges power from radio-signals received via the air interface 546. Alternatively, the RFID device 530 may be an active device and include a power source 538 to power the RFID device 530. While FIG. 1 describes example embodiments of a wagering game machine, FIG. 2 shows how a plurality of wagering game machines can be connected in a wagering game network. Thus, FIG. 2 is a block diagram illustrating a wagering game machine network according to various embodiments of the invention. As shown in FIG. 2, the wagering game network 206 may include a plurality of casinos 256 connected to a communications network 260.
  • [0038]
    Each of the plurality of casinos 256 may include a local area network 258, which in turn may include wagering game machines 202 and mobile wagering game machines 204 connected to a wagering game server 252. The wagering game machines 202, mobile wagering game machines 204, and wagering game server 252 can include hardware and machine-readable media including instructions for carrying out the various methods described herein. In one embodiment, the wagering game server 252 can perform such methods in concert with serving wagering games over the local area network 258. Any one or more of the wagering game machines 202 and mobile wagering game machines 204 may be similar to or identical to the wagering game machine 102 shown in FIG. 1.
  • [0039]
    The wagering game machines 102, 104, 202, 204 described herein can take any suitable form, such as floor standing models, handheld mobile units, bartop models, workstation-type console models, etc. In one embodiment, the wagering game network 206 can include other network devices, such as accounting servers, wide area progressive servers, and/or other devices suitable for use in connection with embodiments of the invention. The components of each casino 256 can communicate over wired 208 and/or wireless connections 234 including cellular and satellite based communication. Furthermore, they can employ any suitable connection technology, such as Bluetooth, 802.11, Ethernet, public switched telephone networks, SONET, etc.
  • [0040]
    Thus, further embodiments may be realized. For example, referring now to FIGS. 1 and 2, it can be seen that a wagering game system 160, 206 may comprise a wagering game machine 102, 104, 202, 204 coupled to a receiver (e.g., receiver 142) and a gaming machine control system (e.g., control system 138). The system 160, 206 may also comprise one or more wagering game units (e.g., wagering game unit 132) operable to receive a wager in association with a wagering game, as well as one or more keys 100, 200 to authorize access to the gaming machine control system in the various wagering game machines 102, 104, 202, 204. In some embodiments, the keys 100, 200 may include a wireless mechanism 186 to send authorization information 184 to the receiver 142 in the wagering game machine 102. Thus, the key 200 may be similar to or identical to the key 100, and communicate with the various wagering game machines 102, 104, 202, and 204 using a wireless connection 134, 234.
  • [0041]
    In some embodiments, the system 160, 206 may include one or more servers 252 to couple to the gaming machine control systems in the wagering game machines 102, 104, 202, 204 via one or more networks 258, 260. As noted previously, each of the wagering game machines 102, 104, 202, 204 may include an authentication unit 136 coupled to the wagering game unit (e.g. a wagering game unit 132 in the machines 102, 104, 202, 204) to authenticate the authorization information 184 transmitted by the key 100, 200. In some embodiments, the wagering game unit system 206 may include one or more displays 110, 112, 210 to display graphics associated with access to the gaming machine control systems 138 in the machines 102, 104, 202, 204.
  • [0042]
    The embodiments described herein may provide a variety of advantages. For example, casino attendants that make use of the keys 100, 200 do not have to physically place a key into a machine to access various features, saving time and effort. At the same time, since the keys 100, 200 may be used so as to never leave the person of the attendant, there is less chance of their being lost or stolen. The keys 100, 200 can be programmed, perhaps depending on the status and responsibility of the attendant that uses them, and the access options selected. Each key 100, 200 can also identify the attendant that uses it, since programming with a unique number that corresponds to the attendant is possible. Thus, attendants endowed with keys 100, 200 may be able to react more quickly to customers, and access the corresponding machines, without having to fumble for keys, while the number of lost and stolen keys may be reduced.
  • [0043]
    Many activities of the attendant may be regulated via the use of keys 100, 200. For example, upon granting access to the control system 138, the attendant may be permitted to clear control system memory, such as the main memory 128, or storage unit 130 memory. Paytables may be changed, games may be changed, firmware may be verified, software may be verified, and media may be downloaded from an external source, including from the key 100, 200 itself. Other permitted activities may include, but are not limited to: obtaining game play history, clearing tilts, resetting the wagering game machine, unlocking game features, obtaining information regarding money movement in and out of the wagering game machine, verifying winnings, etc. As noted, user or attendant activities may be limited as a function of user biometric data, user unique indicia or other user input.
  • [0044]
    As mentioned previously, the memory 166 in the key 100, 200 may be used to store a variety of information such as the actions performed by the attendant, the date such were performed, the number of times they were performed, the money removed or added, the games changed or selected, game play history, when winnings were verified, clock-in times, clock-out times, key reprogramming times, etc. Such information might also be transferred to the server 252, if desired. The server 252 may transmit tasks to a key 100, 200 where received tasks may be stored in the memory 166 for display to a user. The server 252 may transmit tasks based on a wireless key's location relative to one or more wagering game machines 102, 104 or the user associated with the key 100, 200.
  • [0045]
    An apparatus 460 is shown in FIG. 7 that may be used in various embodiments as a server 252. The apparatus 460 may include a central processing unit (CPU) 462, a random access memory (RAM) 464, a read only memory (ROM”) 466, a display 468, a user input device 472, a transceiver application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) 474, a microphone 478, a speaker 482, a storage device 486, and an antenna 484. The CPU 462 may include an access module 492.
  • [0046]
    In an embodiment, the access or authentication module 492 may receive access or authentication requests or notifications from a key 100 or wagering game machine 102. The access module 492 may generate authentication grant or denial messages for the wagering game machine 102 or key 100 in response to authentication requests or notifications. The access module 492 may, via the display 468, speaker 482, or ASIC 474, provide authentication notification to one or more server attendants where the notification may include identification of wireless key 100, 200 being used to seek access or the user requesting access to a wagering game machine 102.
  • [0047]
    The RAM 464 may include an access database 478 where the access database 478 may be used to store received access requests or notifications, captured or authorized wireless key databases, wireless key or user task databases, user unique data, access codes, or user biometric data. The access module 492 may retrieve user data from the access database 478 in response to access requests or notifications to determine whether an authorized or active user or attendant is seeking access to one or more wagering game machines 102. The access module 492 may also determine whether the wireless key 100, 200 associated with the authentication or access request has been captured (stolen) or is authorized to enable wagering game access. The access module 492 may also generate task lists for a specific wireless key 100, 200 or user. The apparatus 460 may transmit the task list or access messages to a wireless key 100, 200.
  • [0048]
    The ROM 466 is coupled to the CPU 462 and may store program instructions executed by the CPU 462 and access module 492. The RAM 464 is coupled to the CPU 462 and may store temporary program data, overhead information, and access database 478. The user input device 472 may comprise an input device such as a keypad, touch pad screen, track ball or other similar input device that allows the user or server attendant to navigate through menus in order to operate the apparatus 460. The display 468 may be an output device such as a CRT, LCD or other similar screen display that enables the user or server attendant to read, view, or hear access notifications.
  • [0049]
    The microphone 488 and speaker 482 may be incorporated into the device 460. The microphone 488 and speaker 482 may also be separated from the apparatus 460. Received data may be transmitted to the CPU 462 via a serial bus 476 where the data may include access requests or notifications, access grants or denials, security notifications, or protocol information. The transceiver ASIC 474 may include an instruction set necessary to communicate data signals over the LAN 258, a wireless network, or cellular network. The ASIC 474 may be coupled to the antenna 484 to communicate signals within a wireless network. The storage device 486 may comprise any convenient form of data storage The storage device 486 may include an access database 494 where the access database 494 may be used to store received access requests or notifications, captured or authorized wireless key databases, wireless key or user task databases, user unique data, access codes, or user biometric data.
  • [0050]
    Any of the components previously described can be implemented in a number of ways, including simulation via software. Thus, the keys 100, 200; wagering game machine 102; mobile wagering game machine 104; payout mechanism 108; displays 110, 112, 210; value input device 114; player input device 116; information reader 118; wager input unit 120; 110 bus 122; external system interface 124; CPU 126; main memory 128; storage unit 130; wagering game unit 132; wireless connections 134, 234; authentication unit 136; gaming machine control system 138; transmitters 140, 178; receivers 142, 180; antennas 144, 182; wagering game systems 160, 260; display 162; processor 164; memory 166; indicators 168; actuators 170; keypads/keyboards 172; virtual indicators 174; locations 176; authorization information 184; wireless mechanism 186; encryption engine 188; apparatus 190; mobile wagering game machines 204; wagering game network 206; wired connections 208; wagering game server 252; casinos 256; local area network 258; communications network 260, apparatus 460, CPU 462, RAM 464, ROM 466, transceiver ASIC 474, access module 492, user input 472, display 468, microphone 488, speaker 482, storage device 486, and antenna 484 may all be characterized as “modules” herein.
  • [0051]
    These modules may include hardware circuitry, single or multi-processor circuits, memory circuits, software program modules and objects, firmware, and combinations thereof, as desired by the architect of the systems 160, 260 and apparatus 190, and as appropriate for particular implementations of various embodiments. In some embodiments, the modules may be included in a system operation simulation package such as a software electrical signal simulation package, a power usage and distribution simulation package, a network security simulation package, a power/heat dissipation simulation package, a signal transmission-reception simulation package, or any combination of software and hardware used to simulate the operation of various potential embodiments. Such simulations may be used to characterize or test the embodiments, for example.
  • [0052]
    It should also be understood that the apparatus and systems of various embodiments can be used in applications other than wagering game machines. Thus, various embodiments of the invention are not to be so limited. The illustrations of apparatus 190 and systems 160, 260 are intended to provide a general understanding of the structure of various embodiments, and they are not intended to serve as a complete description of all the elements and features of apparatus and systems that might make use of the structures described herein.
  • [0053]
    Applications that may include the novel apparatus and systems of various embodiments include electronic circuitry used in high-speed computers, communication and signal processing circuitry, modems, single or multi-processor modules, single or multiple embedded processors, and application-specific modules, including multilayer, multi-chip modules. Such apparatus and systems may further be included as sub-components within a variety of electronic systems, such as data bridges, switches, and hubs; televisions and cellular telephones; personal computers and workstations; medical devices; radios and video players; and vehicles, among others.
  • Example Operations
  • [0054]
    FIGS. 3A-3B comprise a flow diagram illustrating several methods 311 according to various embodiments of the invention. For example, in some embodiments, a method 311 may begin at block 321 with polling (perhaps by one or more wagering game machines) to detect the presence of a wireless key. The method 311 may also begin (or continue) at block 325 with locating the wireless key within a selected distance of the wagering game machine to initiate the process of accessing a gaming machine control system. For example, in some embodiments, the selected distance may be less than one meter, in others, less than 10 cm, and in still others, less than 1 cm.
  • [0055]
    The method 311 may continue at block 329 with activating one or more of an authorization actuator included in the wireless key, and an initiation mechanism included in the wagering game machine (e.g., the player input device 116, such as a push-button, wheel, or joystick) to initiate a process of accessing the gaming machine control system. In some embodiments, the correct activation sequence may involve activating one or more authorization activators included in the key 100 including data biometric sampler 169 substantially simultaneously with locating the key close to the wagering game machine, and/or with activating the initiation mechanism. In some embodiments, these activities may be used to initiate the access process if they are accomplished within a selected time period, i.e., one activity occurs some selected time after another occurs.
  • [0056]
    The method 311 may include transmitting the authorization information (using the wireless key) at block 331. In some embodiments, the method 311 may include also transmitting identification information associated with the wagering game machine at block 331. The identification information may be unique, perhaps comprising attendant unique data and wireless key 100 device data including a media access control (MAC) address. The address might be entered using a keypad or keyboard on the key, or at the wagering game machine, via a player input device. The display on the key might even be used to display information about multiple game machines in the area, and the intended machine could be selected using the key, such that individual game machines may be controlled over longer distances. Progressive gaming involves a gaming device, or wagering game machine, that has an increasing jackpot based on a function of credits that are bet. Included are games that award progressive jackpots or a pool based on criteria other than obtaining winning symbols on the machine.
  • [0057]
    Progressive gaming may include stand-alone progressive game machines, which comprise a single progressive game that is not a part of a link; multiple game machines, or “linked progressives” that offer common progressive jackpots linked to a progressive controller within a single gaming venue; and multi-site progressive gaming machines that are interconnected across more than one gaming venue. A multi-site progressive gaming machine can offer common progressive jackpots (e.g., a system jackpot) at all participating locations. Some wagering game machines described herein can be identified in a manner similar to or identical to the manner in which networks and servers identify individual machines for linked and multi-site progressives.
  • [0058]
    The method 311 may continue with receiving the authorization information from the wireless key at the wagering game machine at block 333. Receiving the authorization information may include receiving identification information associated with the wireless key, such as wireless key identification information and attendant identification information.
  • [0059]
    In some embodiments, the method 311 may also include requesting entry of a code by the wagering game machine at block 337. If the code entered is evaluated as being incorrect at block 341, the method 311 may continue at block 321. If the code entered is evaluated as being correct at block 341, then the method 311 may continue at block 345 with authenticating the authorization information at block 345.
  • [0060]
    The method 311 may include granting access to the gaming machine control system included in the wagering game machine in response to receiving the authorization information at block 349. As noted above, the process of accessing the wagering game machine can be initiated by the key alone, or by the wagering game unit (e.g., using polling), or a combination of both (e.g., operating actuators on the key and a player input device on the wagering game machine within a selected period of time. The process of accessing a wagering game machine may include entering biometric data via the wireless key 100, wager machine 102, or both). The identification information associated with the wireless key, and received by the wagering game machine, may be recorded by the wagering gaming machine, perhaps in a non-volatile memory, at block 353.
  • [0061]
    In some embodiments, the method 311 may include activating an activity function actuator included in the wireless key (e.g., to reset the wagering game machine) at block 357, and receiving some indication that an actuator has been activated at block 361. The method 311 may also include recording attendant activity associated with the wagering game machine in a memory included in the wireless key at block 365.
  • [0062]
    The method 311 may include configuring the wagering game machine at block 369, perhaps by displaying a menu in response to receiving the authorization information. As noted previously, the menu may be displayed on a display included in the wagering game machine, or a display included in the wireless key, or both. Configuring the wagering game machine may also include navigating a configuration menu using one or more activity function actuators included in the wireless key.
  • [0063]
    In some embodiments, the method 311 may include conducting a number of activities associated with the wagering game machine at block 373, including but not limited to granting access to a compartment of the wagering game machine to replace supplies, verifying winnings associated with the wagering game, perhaps in response to receiving an activation indication associated with an activity function actuator included in the wireless key. Others may include clearing the control system memory, changing paytables and games, verifying firmware and software, downloading media, obtaining game play history, clearing tilts, resetting the wagering game machine, unlocking game features, obtaining information regarding money moved in and out of the wagering game machine, and verifying winnings.
  • [0064]
    Advantages that may accrue include presenting attendants with a small fob that is programmed to correspond to their identity. Without using a physical metal key, they are able to access the administration menu of a wagering game machine, or even reset it after a payout. The machine can be quickly accessed while a record of the attendant that performs each task is produced and stored, either within the key or the machine, or both (as a means of additional security).
  • [0065]
    FIG. 5 comprises a flow diagram illustrating a method 450 according to various embodiments of the invention that may be employed by a wagering game machine 102. In an embodiment the method 450 may include compiling attendant or user access information or identification (activity 452) and transmitting the compiled information to one or more waging game servers 252 or casino servers 256 (activity 454). The compiled information may include wireless key 100 machine unique identification, attendant access codes, key fob codes, or attendant biometric information. The compiled information may be received from the wireless key 100 or wagering game machine 102. In an embodiment a server 252 or casino server 256 may generate an access denial or grant message in response to an access information/identification message.
  • [0066]
    The method 460 may include passing control to the block 321 of method 311 shown in FIG. 3A when a deny access message is received from a server 252 or casino server 256. The method 460 may include granting access to the attendant operating the wireless key 100 when a server 252 or casino does not transmit a deny access message or transmits a grant access message. A grant access message may also include a task list specific to the wireless key 100 or user requesting access via the wireless key 100.
  • [0067]
    FIG. 6 comprises a flow diagram illustrating a method 500 according to various embodiments of the invention. In one embodiment, the method 500 may be employed by a server 252 or casino server 256. The method 500 may include reviewing compiled identification or access information (activity 504) when an access request or information message is received (activity 502). In an embodiment the method 500 may include determining whether to grant or allow the requested access (activity 506). The method 500 may include reviewing the received information to determine whether the key machine 100 (based on its identifier) is registered to an authorized attendant.
  • [0068]
    The method 500 may review a captured or authorized wireless key database to determine whether the wireless key is currently authorized to gain access to a wagering game machine. The method 500 may also include determining whether the attendant that is requesting access is currently authorized to use the wireless key 100 including currently employed or scheduled to be maintaining wagering game machines. When the access information includes attendant biometric information the method 500 may include determining whether the biometric data matches recorded attendant biometric data.
  • [0069]
    In an embodiment the method 500 may include generating low level notification (activity 508) and forwarding a grant access message (activity 512) when access is granted (activity 506). In an embodiment the low level notification may include visual or audio notification to one or more server 252 or casino 256 attendants. The method 500 may review an active task database to determine whether active tasks have been assigned to the wireless key or attendant associated with the access request. The method 500 may insert active task information in the grant access message. In an embodiment the method 500 may include generating high level notification (activity 514) and forward a prevent access message (activity 516) when access is denied (activity 506). In an embodiment the high level notification may include visual or audio notification to one or more server 252, casino server 256 attendants, local wagering game machine 102 attendants, security personnel, or regional police stations.
  • [0070]
    The methods described herein do not have to be executed in the order described, or in any particular order. Moreover, various activities described with respect to the methods identified herein can be executed in repetitive, serial, or parallel fashion. Information, including parameters, commands, operands, and other data, can be sent and received in the form of one or more carrier waves. The information may also be stored in tangible media, including a variety of memory devices, such as volatile and non-volatile media, including CD-ROMs, DVDs, and disk drives.
  • [0071]
    One of ordinary skill in the art will understand the manner in which a software program can be launched from a computer-readable medium in a computer-based system to execute the functions defined in the software program. Various programming languages may be employed to create one or more software programs designed to implement and perform the methods disclosed herein. The programs may be structured in an object-orientated format using an object-oriented language such as Java or C++. Alternatively, the programs can be structured in a procedure-orientated format using a procedural language, such as assembly or C. The software components may communicate using a number of mechanisms well known to those skilled in the art, such as application program interfaces or interprocess communication techniques, including remote procedure calls. The teachings of various embodiments are not limited to any particular programming language or environment.
  • [0072]
    Thus, other embodiments may be realized, including a machine-readable medium encoded with instructions for directing a machine to perform operations comprising any of the methods described herein.
  • Example Wagering Game Machine
  • [0073]
    FIG. 4 is a perspective view of a wagering game machine, according to example embodiments of the invention. Referring to FIG. 4, the wagering game machine 402 (which may be similar to or identical to the machines 102, 104, 202, 204 described above) may be used in gaming establishments, such as casinos. According to some embodiments, the wagering game machine 402 can be any type of wagering game machine and can have varying structures and methods of operation. For example, the wagering game machine 402 may comprise an electromechanical wagering game machine configured to play mechanical slots, or it may comprise an electronic wagering game machine configured to play video casino games, such as blackjack, slots, keno, poker, blackjack, roulette, etc.
  • [0074]
    The wagering game machine 402 may comprise a housing 401 and include input devices, such as wager input devices 444 (perhaps coupled to a wager input unit 120, shown in FIG. 1), and a player input device 416. For output, the wagering game machine 402 may include a primary display 410 for displaying information about a basic wagering game. The primary display 410 can also display information about a bonus wagering game and a progressive wagering game. The wagering game machine 402 may also include a secondary display 412 for displaying wagering game events, wagering game outcomes, and/or signage information. While some components of the wagering game machine 402 are described herein, numerous other elements can exist and can be used in any number or combination to create varying forms of the wagering game machine 402.
  • [0075]
    The wager input devices 444 can take any suitable form and may be located on the front of the housing 401. The wager input devices 444 can receive currency and/or credits inserted by a player. The wager input devices 444 can include coin acceptors for receiving coin currency and bill acceptors for receiving paper currency. Additionally, the wager input devices 444 can include ticket readers or barcode scanners for reading information stored on vouchers, cards, or other tangible portable storage devices. The vouchers or cards can authorize access to central accounts, which can transfer money to the wagering game machine 402. Some wagering game machines 402 may utilize RFID technology to identify players and accept payment using an RFID carried by a player without having to enter anything physical into the game.
  • [0076]
    The player input device 416 may comprise a plurality of push buttons on a button panel 426 for operating the wagering game machine 402. In addition, or alternatively, the player input device 416 can comprise a touch screen 428 mounted over the primary display 410 and/or secondary display 412.
  • [0077]
    The various components of the wagering game machine 402 can be connected directly to, or contained within, the housing 401. Alternatively, some of the wagering game machine's components can be located outside of the housing 401, while being communicatively coupled with the wagering game machine 402 using any suitable wired or wireless communication technology.
  • [0078]
    The operation of the basic wagering game can be displayed to the player on the primary display 410. The primary display 410 can also display a bonus game associated with the basic wagering game. The primary display 410 may include a cathode ray tube (CRT), a high resolution liquid crystal display (LCD), a plasma display, light emitting diodes (LEDs), or any other type of display suitable for use in the wagering game machine 402. Alternatively, the primary display 410 can include a number of mechanical reels to display the outcome. In FIG. 4, the wagering game machine 402 is shown as an “upright” version in which the primary display 410 is oriented vertically relative to the player. Alternatively, the wagering game machine can be a “slant-top” version in which the primary display 410 is slanted at about a thirty-degree angle toward the player of the wagering game machine 402. In yet another embodiment, the wagering game machine 402 can be a bartop model, a mobile handheld model, or a workstation console model.
  • [0079]
    A player may begin playing a basic wagering game by making a wager via the wager input device 418. The player can initiate play by using the player input device's buttons or the touch screen 428. The basic game can include arranging a plurality of symbols along a payline 432, which indicates one or more outcomes of the basic game. Such outcomes can be randomly selected in response to player input. At least one of the outcomes, which can include any variation or combination of symbols, can trigger the occurrence of a bonus game.
  • [0080]
    In some embodiments, the wagering game machine 402 can also include an information reader 418, which can include a card reader, ticket reader, bar code scanner, RFID transceiver, or computer readable storage medium interface. In some embodiments, the information reader 418 can be used to award complimentary services, restore game assets, track player habits, etc.
  • [0081]
    Implementing the apparatus, systems, and methods disclosed herein may operate to provide a more enjoyable game playing experience. This is because attendants that make use of the wireless keys described herein can be more attentive to players and spend less time locating mechanical keys.
  • [0082]
    The personal service of the attendant can also improve the overall impression of customer service given by a casino. Rapid access to administrative game features means games can be returned to play more quickly after payouts or tilts—downtime is therefore less. Security may be improved, since wireless keys provide the ability to monitor attendants and their activities. The decreased need for mechanical keyholes on wagering game machines may permit the use of more games in the same amount of floor space. This also means fewer openings may exist in the walls of the wagering game chassis, lessening the chance of game penetration via destroying the lock cylinder with a screwdriver (or similar device), as a means of accessing various components inside the game.
  • General Comments
  • [0083]
    In the following detailed description, reference is made to specific examples by way of drawings and illustrations. These examples are described in sufficient detail to enable those skilled in the art to practice the inventive subject matter, and serve to illustrate how the inventive subject matter may be applied to various purposes or embodiments. Other embodiments are included within the inventive subject matter, as logical, mechanical, electrical, and other changes may be made to the example embodiments described herein. Features or limitations of various embodiments described herein, however essential to the example embodiments in which they are incorporated, do not limit the inventive subject matter as a whole, and any reference to the invention, its elements, operation, and application are not limiting as a whole, but serve only to define these example embodiments.
  • [0084]
    Such embodiments of the inventive subject matter may be referred to herein individually or collectively by the term “invention” merely for convenience and without intending to voluntarily limit the scope of this application to any single invention or inventive concept, if more than one is in fact disclosed. Thus, although specific embodiments have been illustrated and described herein, any arrangement calculated to achieve the same purpose may be substituted for the specific embodiments shown. This disclosure is intended to cover any and all adaptations or variations of various embodiments. Combinations of the above embodiments, and other embodiments not specifically described herein, will be apparent to those of skill in the art upon reviewing the above description.
  • [0085]
    The Abstract of the Disclosure is provided to comply with 37 C.F.R. 1.72(b), requiring an abstract that will allow the reader to quickly ascertain the nature of the technical disclosure. It is submitted with the understanding that it will not be used to interpret or limit the scope or meaning of the claims. In addition, in the foregoing Detailed Description, it can be seen that various features are grouped together in a single embodiment for the purpose of streamlining the disclosure. This method of disclosure is not to be interpreted to require more features than are expressly recited in each claim. Rather, inventive subject matter may be found in less than all features of a single disclosed embodiment. Thus the following claims are hereby incorporated into the Detailed Description, with each claim standing on its own as a separate embodiment.
Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4993068 *Nov 27, 1989Feb 12, 1991Motorola, Inc.Unforgeable personal identification system
US5179517 *Sep 22, 1988Jan 12, 1993Bally Manufacturing CorporationGame machine data transfer system utilizing portable data units
US5578808 *Feb 28, 1995Nov 26, 1996Datamark Services, Inc.Data card that can be used for transactions involving separate card issuers
US5590038 *Jun 20, 1994Dec 31, 1996Pitroda; Satyan G.Universal electronic transaction card including receipt storage and system and methods of conducting electronic transactions
US5917913 *Dec 4, 1996Jun 29, 1999Wang; Ynjiun PaulPortable electronic authorization devices and methods therefor
US6016476 *Jan 16, 1998Jan 18, 2000International Business Machines CorporationPortable information and transaction processing system and method utilizing biometric authorization and digital certificate security
US6041410 *Dec 22, 1997Mar 21, 2000Trw Inc.Personal identification fob
US6110041 *Dec 30, 1996Aug 29, 2000Walker Digital, LlcMethod and system for adapting gaming devices to playing preferences
US6138814 *Jun 19, 1998Oct 31, 2000Sigma Game, Inc.Front loading cash box assembly
US6439966 *Aug 2, 2001Aug 27, 2002Danville Manufacturing Inc.Hand-holdable gas/abrasion apparatus
US6609969 *Sep 13, 2000Aug 26, 2003Sierra Design GroupApparatus and method for dispensing of awards
US6709333 *Apr 14, 2003Mar 23, 2004Sierra Design GroupPlayer identification using biometric data in a gaming environment
US6843720 *Jan 24, 2001Jan 18, 2005Sierra Design GroupApparatus and method for dispensing prizes
US7310734 *Feb 1, 2001Dec 18, 20073M Innovative Properties CompanyMethod and system for securing a computer network and personal identification device used therein for controlling access to network components
US7460863 *Feb 27, 2002Dec 2, 2008Google Inc.Method and apparatus using geographical position to provide authenticated, secure, radio frequency communication between a gaming host and a remote gaming device
US20020026575 *Aug 6, 2001Feb 28, 2002Wheeler Lynn HenryAccount-based digital signature (ABDS) system
US20020029254 *Sep 5, 2001Mar 7, 2002Davis Terry L.Method and system for managing personal information
US20030046552 *Aug 29, 2001Mar 6, 2003Larry HamidMethod and system for providing access to secure entity or service by a subset of N persons of M designated persons
US20030149662 *Feb 9, 2001Aug 7, 2003Jon ShoreApparatus, systems and methods for wirelessly transacting financial transfers , electronically recordable authorization transfers, and other information transfers
US20030233458 *Feb 19, 2003Dec 18, 2003Hwang-Sub KwonSystem and method for providing service in wireless network environment using customer relation management
US20040023721 *Jul 30, 2003Feb 5, 2004Giobbi John J.Portable data unit for communicating with gaming machine over wireless link
US20040044627 *Nov 29, 2000Mar 4, 2004Russell David C.Methods, systems and apparatuses for secure transactions
US20040098597 *Nov 17, 2003May 20, 2004Giobbi John J.Digital content security system
US20040127277 *Oct 9, 2003Jul 1, 2004Walker Jay S.Method and apparatus for authenticating data relating to usage of a gaming device
US20040132528 *Jan 8, 2003Jul 8, 2004Atronic Intrnational GmbhBill stacker and hopper access technique for a gaming device
US20050114149 *Nov 20, 2003May 26, 2005International Business Machines CorporationMethod and apparatus for wireless ordering from a restaurant
US20060136742 *Nov 30, 2005Jun 22, 2006Giobbi John JPersonal digital key and receiver/decoder circuit system and method
US20060143441 *Dec 20, 2005Jun 29, 2006Giobbi John JBiometric personal data key (pdk) authentication
US20070220272 *Jun 25, 2003Sep 20, 2007Campisi Steven ETransaction authentication card
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US8078880Jul 28, 2006Dec 13, 2011Microsoft CorporationPortable personal identity information
US8087072Sep 17, 2007Dec 27, 2011Microsoft CorporationProvisioning of digital identity representations
US8104074Feb 24, 2006Jan 24, 2012Microsoft CorporationIdentity providers in digital identity system
US8117459Jul 28, 2006Feb 14, 2012Microsoft CorporationPersonal identification information schemas
US8231455 *Sep 14, 2007Jul 31, 2012IgtMethod and apparatus for providing a bonus to a player
US8380865 *Nov 5, 2008Feb 19, 2013Acei AbGaming system and a method of managing bandwidth usage in a gaming network
US8407767Sep 17, 2007Mar 26, 2013Microsoft CorporationProvisioning of digital identity representations
US8689296Dec 7, 2007Apr 1, 2014Microsoft CorporationRemote access of digital identities
US8768843 *Jan 15, 2009Jul 1, 2014IgtEGM authentication mechanism using multiple key pairs at the BIOS with PKI
US9141952Apr 9, 2014Sep 22, 2015IgtEGM authentication mechanism using multiple key pairs at the bios with PKI
US9521131Feb 10, 2014Dec 13, 2016Microsoft Technology Licensing, LlcRemote access of digital identities
US20070204325 *Jul 28, 2006Aug 30, 2007Microsoft CorporationPersonal identification information schemas
US20080289020 *May 15, 2007Nov 20, 2008Microsoft CorporationIdentity Tokens Using Biometric Representations
US20090197683 *Nov 5, 2008Aug 6, 2009Tobias SvennebringGaming system and a method of managing bandwidth usage in a gaming network
US20090325714 *Jun 27, 2008Dec 31, 2009Bryan KellyGaming machine triggering system events
US20090325715 *Jun 27, 2008Dec 31, 2009Bryan KellyMethods for gaming machine triggering system events
US20100178977 *Jan 15, 2009Jul 15, 2010IgtEgm authentication mechanism using multiple key pairs at the bios with pki
US20130035168 *Aug 6, 2012Feb 7, 2013Ami Entertainment Network, Inc.System and method for management of settings groups in amusement devices
US20130130804 *Jan 16, 2013May 23, 2013Tobias SvennebringGaming System and a Method of Managing Bandwidth Usage in a Gaming System
Classifications
U.S. Classification463/29, 463/42
International ClassificationA63F9/24
Cooperative ClassificationG07F17/32, G07F17/3218, G07F17/3223
European ClassificationG07F17/32C4B, G07F17/32C6, G07F17/32