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Publication numberUS20100229279 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 12/403,305
Publication dateSep 16, 2010
Filing dateMar 12, 2009
Priority dateMar 12, 2009
Publication number12403305, 403305, US 2010/0229279 A1, US 2010/229279 A1, US 20100229279 A1, US 20100229279A1, US 2010229279 A1, US 2010229279A1, US-A1-20100229279, US-A1-2010229279, US2010/0229279A1, US2010/229279A1, US20100229279 A1, US20100229279A1, US2010229279 A1, US2010229279A1
InventorsJohnny C. Martinez
Original AssigneeMartinez Johnny C
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method and garment for displaying composite images
US 20100229279 A1
Abstract
A garment includes two or more subordinate images which may be visually superimposed to display a composite image by placing a part of the garment with a subordinate image across another part with another subordinate image, with parts of both subordinate images aligned from a viewing direction toward the front of the garment. By positioning different subordinate images on the back sides of both sleeves of a garment with long sleeves and another subordinate image on a front side of the garment, a plurality of composite images may be displayed. Selectively forming a sequence of composite images corresponds to a simple form of animation, in which a dynamic subject changes position relative to a static subject, or alternately in which a dynamic subject is represented at different instants of time. Subordinate images may optionally include text for creating selected sequences of words in corresponding sequences of composite images.
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Claims(20)
1. A garment for displaying composite images, comprising:
a first subordinate image affixed to the garment at a first selected location; and
a second subordinate image affixed to the garment at a second selected location,
wherein a first composite image is visible when said first subordinate image and said second subordinate image are visually superimposed by placing a part of the garment at said first selected location over a part of the garment at said second selected location.
2. The garment for displaying composite images of claim 1, further comprising:
a third subordinate image affixed to the garment at a third selected location,
wherein a second composite image is visible when said third subordinate image and said second subordinate image are visually superimposed by placing a part of the garment at said third selected location over the part of the garment at said second selected location.
3. The garment for displaying composite images of claim 2, further comprising a plurality of subordinate images, wherein selected pairs of said subordinate images may optionally be visually superimposed to create a plurality of composite images.
4. The garment for displaying composite images of claim 2, wherein selected groups of three of said subordinate images may optionally be visually superimposed to create a plurality of composite images.
5. The garment for displaying composite images of claim 2, wherein said first, second, and third subordinate images comprise a static subject and a dynamic subject, and said first and second composite images are formed by positioning parts of the garment so as to visually superimpose said static subjects.
6. The garment for displaying composite images of claim 5, wherein said first subordinate image shows said dynamic subject at a first position relative to said static subject, said second subordinate image shows said dynamic subject at a second position relative to said static subject, said third subordinate image shows said dynamic subject at a third position relative to said static subject, and sequentially superimposing said subordinate images displays corresponding sequential changes in position of said dynamic subject in said composite images.
7. The garment for displaying composite images of claim 5, wherein said first subordinate image shows said dynamic subject at a first instant in time, said second subordinate image shows said dynamic subject at a second instant in time, said third subordinate image shows said dynamic subject at a third instant in time, and sequentially superimposing said subordinate images displays corresponding time-related changes in said composite images.
8. The garment for displaying composite images of claim 5, wherein the garment has long sleeves.
9. The garment for displaying composite images of claim 8, wherein the garment is a shirt.
10. The garment for displaying composite images of claim 9, wherein said first subordinate image is positioned on a back side of a right sleeve.
11. The garment for displaying composite images of claim 9, wherein said second subordinate image is positioned on a back side of a left sleeve.
12. The garment for displaying composite images of claim 9, wherein said third subordinate image is positioned on a front side of the garment.
13. A method for displaying composite images with a garment, comprising:
forming a plurality of subordinate images at a corresponding plurality of locations on the garment;
selecting a first subordinate image from among the plurality of subordinate images;
selecting a second subordinate image from among the plurality of subordinate images; and
placing a part of the garment to which the first subordinate image is affixed over a part of the garment to which the second subordinate garment is affixed, thereby visually superimposing the first and second subordinate images into a composite image visible from a selected viewing direction.
14. The method for displaying composite images with a garment of claim 13, further comprising forming the subordinate images from a combination of at least one static subject and at least one dynamic subject.
15. The method for displaying composite images with a garment of claim 14, further comprising superimposing two selected subordinate images by visually aligning parts of a static subject in a first subordinate image with parts of a static subject in a second subordinate image.
16. The method for displaying composite images with a garment of claim 15, further comprising placing a dynamic subject in different selected positions relative to a static subject in different subordinate images, thereby forming a set of subordinate images for animation of the dynamic subject in a set of composite images.
17. The method for displaying composite images with a garment of claim 15, further comprising placing a dynamic subject at different instants in time in different subordinate images, thereby forming a set of subordinate images for animation of the dynamic subject in a set of composite images.
18. The method for displaying composite images with a garment of claim 16, further comprising positioning parts of the garment in a selected sequence to create a corresponding animation sequence.
19. The method for displaying composite images with a garment of claim 17, further comprising positioning parts of the garment in a selected sequence to create a corresponding animation sequence.
20. The method for displaying composite images with a garment of claim 15, wherein the first subordinate image includes a first text message, the second subordinate image includes a second text message, and composite images may optionally be formed in a selected sequence.
Description
FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates in general to a method and a garment for displaying images in which an image on a part of the garment is aligned by a person wearing the garment with an image on another part of the garment to display a composite image, and more specifically to a method and a garment for displaying dynamic composite images.

BACKGROUND

Garments with static images such as pictures, symbols, text, artistic designs, and so on, have long been available. Images may be part of the construction of the garment, for example by weaving an image into the fabric of a garment. Or, images may be added to garments by various printing processes, by creating an image with stitching, by sewing or gluing pieces of fabric to the garment, by painting an image onto the garment, and by many other means. The resulting garment has one or more static images, that is, the content of the images are fixed and the images appear to remain stationary relative to the garment.

Garments adapted for selectively concealing and revealing images are known. For example, some garments have a flap or panel which may be opened or closed to selectively reveal or conceal an image under the flap. Other garments have an image which is revealed when the garment's wearer changes a body position, for example raising an arm to reveal an image on the underside of a sleeve. In such garments, the images are static, that is, the images are selectively revealed or concealed, and the content of the images is not altered.

Other garments combine static images with motions of a person wearing the garment to impart motion to the image. A garment may include, for example, images of an animal with parts of the animal made to move by motions of the wearer. With such garments, the wearer's motions mimic a motion of the animal in the image, such as opening and closing the animal's jaws by moving a sleeve having an image of the animal's upper jaw and a sleeve having an image of the lower jaw. As with the examples above, the viewable image is static relative to the garment. That is, the content of the image does not change from the perspective of a person viewing the image, even when parts of the image change position relative to other parts of the image by movements of the garment. Furthermore, the illusion of motion between related parts of an image may be limited to a particular viewing direction, even though all the parts of the image are visible from other directions. Patent D575,030 to Bengyak is an example of such a garment and image.

What is needed is a method for dynamically changing the content of an image on a garment by selectively positioning parts of the garment. What is also needed is an effective method for creating an illusion of movement in an image on a garment in which parts of the image are altered in content to simulate motion of the subject of the image. What is further needed is a method for creating a changeable image which may be seen over a wide range of viewing angles relative to the front side of a garment.

SUMMARY

Embodiments of the invention include a garment adapted for displaying dynamic composite images and a method for displaying dynamic composite images with the garment. Subordinate images are visually superimposed into composite messages by placing a part of the garment with a subordinate image above another part of the garment with another subordinate image. The resulting composite image includes elements from the subordinate images and may represent static subjects, dynamic subjects, or combinations of static and dynamic subjects. In a preferred embodiment, each subordinate image to be combined in a composite image includes a static element in common with other subordinate images to facilitate visual alignment of the subordinate images.

A simple form of animation may be displayed by selecting a sequence of composite images and static images. In a first animation example, a position of a dynamic element is changed relative to a static element in each of several different subordinate images. By adjusting parts of the garment to form composite images in a selected sequence, the dynamic element appears to move relative to the static element. Alternatively, a dynamic element may be shown at different instants of time in different subordinate images, or a dynamic element may be shown at different instants of time and in different positions relative to a static element in different subordinate images. By adjusting parts of the garment in a selected sequence, the dynamic element appears to change with time, or alternately to change position and change with time.

A method for displaying composite images includes selecting a set of subordinate images to be combined into composite images, affixing the subordinate images to selected locations on a garment, and positioning the garment to superimpose selected subordinate images over other subordinate images. The method and related variations are useful for sending visual messages which may be adapted to particular circumstances, for entertainment, or for coordinating the movements of people performing cheers at athletic events, dancing, exercise, and the like.

This section summarizes some features of the embodiments of the invention. These and other features, aspects, and advantages of the embodiments of the invention will become better understood with regard to the following description and upon reference to the following drawings, wherein:

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIGS. 1-3 show an example of a garment for displaying at least two composite images. FIG. 1 illustrates a view toward the front of a shirt in which the right sleeve is placed over the left sleeve so that an image on the back side of the right sleeve and another image on the back side of the left sleeve are visually superimposed to form a first composite image.

FIG. 2 is a view toward the front of the shirt of FIG. 1, in which the right sleeve has been moved to reveal a second composite image. In FIG. 2, the image on the back side of the left sleeve is superimposed over part of another image on the front of the shirt, and the image on the back of the right sleeve is not visible.

FIG. 3 is a view toward the front of the shirt of FIGS. 1-2, with both sleeves have been moved to the sides of the shirt to reveal a third image on the front of the shirt. In FIG. 3, the image on the back of the left sleeve and the image on the back of the right sleeve are not visible.

FIG. 4 is an example of a first graphical element for forming composite images. The graphical element example of FIG. 4 is the same as the image shown on the front of the shirt in FIG. 3.

FIG. 5 is an example of a second graphical element for forming composite images. The graphical element example of FIG. 5 is the same as the image shown on the back of the left sleeve in FIG. 2.

FIG. 6 is an example of a third graphical element for forming composite images. The graphical element example of FIG. 6 is the same as the image shown on the back of the right sleeve in FIG. 1.

FIGS. 7-9 illustrate an example of a shirt with images for giving the appearance of motion by sequentially forming composite images representative of a subject at different selected instants of time. In FIG. 7, a first sequential image on the right sleeve is superimposed over part of an image on the front of the shirt to form a composite image representative of a person in motion at a first instant in time.

FIG. 8 is a front view of the example shirt of FIG. 7 in which the motion of a person at a second instant in time is represented by a second sequential image.

FIG. 9 is a front view of the example shirt of FIGS. 7-8 in which the motion of a person at a third instant in time is represented by a third subordinate image superimposed over part of the subordinate image of FIG. 8.

FIGS. 10-12 illustrate an example of a shirt with images for giving the appearance of motion by sequentially forming composite images representative of a dynamic subject at different locations relative to a static background design. In FIG. 10, an image on the right sleeve of the shirt shows a soccer ball, the dynamic element, on a static element including a background design and part of a text message. The image on the right sleeve is visually superimposed over an image on the front of the shirt to show the soccer ball in a first position relative to the background design on the front of the shirt.

FIG. 11 is a front view of the shirt of FIG. 10 showing a second position of a soccer ball relative to the static element.

FIG. 12 is a front view of the shirt of FIGS. 10-11. In FIG. 12, an image on the left sleeve of the shirt shows a soccer ball on a background design which includes part of the text message of FIG. 10 and FIG. 11. The image on the left sleeve is visually superimposed over the image on the front of the shirt to show the soccer ball in a third selected position relative to the background design on the front of the shirt.

FIGS. 13-15 illustrate an example of a shirt with images for presenting a dynamic text message. FIG. 13 shows a first composite image including a first part of the dynamic text message superimposed over part of an image on the front of the shirt.

FIG. 14 is a front view of the shirt of FIG. 13 showing an image with a second part of the dynamic text message.

FIG. 15 is a front view of the shirt of FIGS. 13-14 showing a second composite image including a third part of the dynamic text message superimposed over part of the image of FIG. 14.

DESCRIPTION

The present invention includes a garment and a method for displaying dynamic composite images. A garment in accord with the invention includes at least two separate images on different parts of the garment. A person wearing the garment selectively combines the separate images by placing corresponding parts of the garment on top of or alternately next to each other to form one or more composite images. The content of a composite image may optionally be changed according to the individual images selected for forming the composite image.

An image adapted for combination with other images, referred to herein as a subordinate image, optionally includes a subject which may be given an illusion of motion by varying a position of the subject in sequentially displayed composite images. Alternatively, subordinate images include a subject which is given an illusion of motion by sequentially displaying the subject at different instants of time in different composite images, or a subject may be shown at different instants of time without any implied motion, for example by changing colors associated with the subject.

Subordinate images may optionally include, but are not limited to, pictures of objects, people, animals, or plants, graphic designs, geometric shapes, drawings, sketches, symbols, words or phrases, and areas of uniform or mixed colors. Subordinate images may be permanently or removably attached to the garment and may be formed by, for example but not limited to, painting, printing, stitching, appliqué, knitting, weaving, or combinations thereof. Subordinate images may optionally include static subjects, dynamic subjects, or a combination of static and dynamic subjects. A static subject is one which does not change location relative to the underlying part of the garment from one composite image to another. A dynamic subject is one which changes shape, size, color, location, or combinations thereof, from one composite image to another.

Garments suitable for displaying dynamic composite images include, but are not limited to, shirts, blouses, sweaters, sweatshirts, jackets, overcoats, and the like, preferably with long sleeves. Other suitable garments include trousers, dresses with sleeves, and skirts that are full enough to permit a person wearing the skirt to fold part of the skirt over another part of the skirt. Furthermore, belts, scarves, and other clothing accessories could optionally include subordinate images for combining with subordinate images on a garment to display dynamic composite images.

Embodiments of the invention are well suited for displaying composite images including static and dynamic subjects, for example, a sequence of words forming a phrase, a ball bouncing across a field, a person performing a sport-related activity, a moving animal, a movable part of a machine, a vehicle traversing a segment of road, a time-lapse sequence, and the like. Advantages of the disclosed method and garment include selective communication of changeable images for safety, education, or entertainment reasons. Other advantages include displays of composite images coordinated with music, cheers, chants, and so on, either by one person or in group activities related to education, entertainment, or exercise.

An example of a garment in accord with an embodiment of the invention is shown in FIG. 1. FIG. 1 illustrates a view toward the front of a shirt 100 with the right sleeve 104 crossed over the left sleeve 106. The positions of the sleeves in FIG. 1 are representative of sleeve positions resulting from a person wearing the shirt crossing his or her arms in front of the shirt. An example of a first subordinate image 112 is shown on the right sleeve 104. The back side of the right sleeve 104 is visible in FIG. 1. An example of a second subordinate image 114 is shown on the back side of the left sleeve 106. By positioning the left and right sleeves over the front side 102 of the shirt 100 with the back sides of the sleeves facing outward, that is, toward the viewer as in FIG. 1, the first subordinate image 112 is visually superimposed over the second subordinate image 114. Part of the second subordinate image 114 remains hidden and part is visible. The visible part of the second subordinate image 114 and the first subordinate image 112 together create a first composite image 116. It is preferred that the sleeves of the garment be positioned so that parts of one subordinate image are aligned with corresponding parts of another subordinate image. For example, in FIG. 1 the left wrist of the first subordinate image 112 is aligned with the left forearm in the second subordinate image 114.

FIG. 2 shows the example of a shirt 100 from FIG. 1 with the right sleeve moved away from the front side 102 of the shirt 100 and the front side 108 of the right sleeve facing the viewer. The left sleeve 106 in FIG. 2 remains in the same position as in FIG. 1. The first subordinate image 112 from FIG. 1, being on the side of the right sleeve away from the viewer, is not visible in FIG. 2. Moving the right sleeve away from the left sleeve 106 and front side 102 of the shirt 100 reveals the entire second subordinate image 114 and further reveals part of another subordinate image 118 on the front side 102 of the shirt 100. As shown in FIG. 2, the second subordinate image 112 is visually superimposed over the third subordinate image 118, thereby creating a second composite image 120. A preferred position of the left sleeve 106 causes corresponding parts of the second and third subordinate images (114, 118) to be aligned in the second composite image 120.

FIG. 3 shows a third subordinate image 118 that is fully revealed when both sleeves are moved away from the front side 102 of the shirt 100. In FIG. 3, the view is toward the front 102 of the shirt 100, with the front side 108 of the right sleeve and the front side 110 of the left sleeve visible. The first and second subordinate images, being on the back sides of the sleeves, are not visible from the front in FIG. 3.

Subordinate images from the example of FIGS. 1-3 are shown in FIGS. 4-6. FIG. 4 illustrates the subordinate image 118 visible in FIG. 3 and partly visible in the composite image 120 of FIG. 2. FIG. 5 shows the subordinate image 114, visible in the composite image 120 in FIG. 2 and partly visible in the composite image 116 of FIG. 1. Phantom lines in FIG. 5 show an example of a placement of the subordinate image 114 on the left sleeve 106. FIG. 6 shows the subordinate image 112, visible in the composite image 116 of FIG. 1. Phantom lines in FIG. 6 show an example of a placement of the subordinate image 112 on the right sleeve 104.

The right sleeve 106 is shown at an acute angle across the front side 102 of the shirt 100 in FIG. 1. Similarly, the left sleeve 106 is shown at an acute angle across the front side 102 of the shirt 100 in FIGS. 1-2. One will appreciate that many alternative sleeve positions may be used according to a desired visual effect. For example, one or both sleeves could be placed approximately horizontally across the front side of a garment. One or both sleeves could alternatively be placed either higher or lower than the positions shown in FIGS. 1-2. Furthermore, either the left sleeve or the right sleeve may optionally be chosen to be the topmost sleeve when forming a composite image.

Variations of sleeve positions relative to the front side of the shirt 100 give at least six optional composite images, plus one image on the front side of the shirt, for a total of a least seven different images. Two different composite images may be formed by superimposing an image on either the right sleeve or the left sleeve over an image on the front of the shirt. Two more composite images may be formed by either crossing the left sleeve over the right sleeve or by crossing the right sleeve over the left sleeve. Another composite image may be formed by placing the sleeves in contact with each other and approximately parallel to each other across the front of the shirt, and yet another composite image may be formed by placing the sleeves approximately parallel to each other but separated to show in the space between them part of an image on the front of the shirt.

By rapidly repositioning the sleeves of the shirt 100 in FIGS. 1-3, the composite image 116 could be made to rapidly change into the composite image 120 of FIG. 2 or the image 118 of FIG. 3. Such rapid image changes represent a simple form of animation, with each composite image analogous to a still frame in a motion picture. Such an animation may optionally include a sequence made from at least seven different dynamic images formed as earlier described. An animation may optionally include selected subordinate images with a sequence of composite images.

An animation made from a sequence of three subordinate images is shown in the example illustrated in FIGS. 7-9. In the example of FIGS. 7-9, a subject common to all three subordinate images, a baseball player, is shown at three different instants in time. FIG. 7 illustrates a first sequential image 200 made from a combination of dynamic (baseball player) and static (home plate and a line representing the ground) subjects in a subordinate image on the right sleeve 104. In FIG. 7, the subordinate image on the right sleeve is visually superimposed over another subordinate image on the front side 102 of the shirt 100 to form a composite image of the baseball player preparing to swing. FIG. 8 illustrates a second sequential image 210, and FIG. 9 illustrates a third sequential image 212 which is also a composite image. In the animation sequence represented by positioning the sleeves of the shirt 100 to display the composite image of FIG. 7, then the image of FIG. 8, then the composite image of FIG. 9, a baseball player appears to strike a ball.

In the example of FIGS. 7-9, motion of a dynamic subject is represented by a change in the appearance of the subject at different selected instants of time. Motion of a subject may alternatively be represented by changing a position of the subject relative to another part of the image in each of several sequential images. In the example of FIGS. 10-12, a soccer ball is given the appearance of motion by changing a position of the soccer ball relative to a background design. In FIG. 10, a first subordinate image 214 includes an image of a soccer ball 214A at a first selected position relative to part of a text message 214C and a background design 214B. The soccer ball 214A is representative of a dynamic subject in a subordinate image, and the text message 214C and background design 214B are representative of static subjects. A first composite image, corresponding to a first image in an animation sequence, is formed by superimposing the first subordinate image 214 and a second subordinate image 216 on the front side 102 of the shirt 100.

Animation of a dynamic subject continues in FIG. 11, which shows a second subordinate image 216, which is also the second image in the animation sequence, on the front side 102 of the shirt 100. The second subordinate image 216 includes static and dynamic elements corresponding to the static and dynamic elements in FIG. 10, that is, a soccer ball 214A representative of an object in motion at a second selected position relative to a text message 216C and a background design 216B. A third subordinate image 218 on the left sleeve 106 shows the soccer ball 218A in a third selected position relative to the background design 218B and part of a text message 218C. A second composite image, corresponding to a third image in the animation sequence, is formed by superimposing the third subordinate image 218 and second subordinate image 216 on the front side 102 of the shirt 100. In the example of FIGS. 10-11, the soccer ball appears to move up and down across the front side 102 of the shirt 100 as the left and right sleeves are sequentially positioned over the front of the shirt to form composite images.

FIGS. 13-15 show an example of words which may be displayed in a sequence selected by a person wearing the illustrated garment. In FIG. 13, a first dynamic composite image is formed by superimposing a subordinate image 220 on the right sleeve of a shirt 100 over another subordinate image on the front side 102 of the shirt. FIG. 14 illustrates a second subordinate image 222 for displaying another word in a selected sequence. A third subordinate image 224 is shown on the left sleeve of the shirt in FIG. 15. In FIG. 15, the third subordinate image is superimposed over the second subordinate image 222 of FIG. 14 to create a second composite image. A shirt with a dynamic text message, as in the example of a shirt 100 in FIGS. 13-15, can be used, for example, in a display of words or phrases coordinated with music, a cheer, or a chant, and can further be used in synchronized cheers, dancing, or exercises performed simultaneously by two or more people.

Composite images in the examples described herein are visible and effective for conveying dynamic and static subjects over a wide range of viewing angles. For example, the composite images shown in FIGS. 1 and 3, FIGS. 10 and 11, and FIGS. 13 and 15 are visible over an angle of at least 60 degrees from a direction perpendicular to the front of a shirt. Furthermore, the maximum viewing angle at which a composite image is effective for conveying changes in a dynamic subject may be increased by increasing the size of a subordinate image until it extends beyond the back side of a sleeve and partway onto the front side of the sleeve.

A method for displaying composite images with a garment begins with the step of creating a group of related subordinate images to be visually superimposed in one or more composite images as in, for example, FIGS. 4-6. Next a garment is selected and locations on the garment which may be folded or moved to align or overlap other parts of the garment are chosen. Then the images are attached to the garment at the chosen locations, as in, for example, FIGS. 1-3.

After images are affixed at selected locations on the garment, a person wearing the garment (the “wearer”) selects a first composite image to be displayed from among the set of composite images available with the garment. Next, the wearer moves one, or alternately both, sleeves to create the selected composite image. Optionally, the wearer may then reposition one, or alternately both, sleeves to create another composite image. A composite image may optionally be displayed to present a subject that differs from a subject in any of the subordinate images from which the composite image is made. A composite image may optionally be displayed to show a subject of the image displaced from a position in one image to another position in another image, as in the example of FIGS. 10-12. Alternatively, a composite image may be displayed to show a subject of the image at different instants in time, as in FIGS. 7-9, or to show a subject at different instants of time and at different positions. The wearer may optionally vary a sequence of forming and displaying composite images, for example to vary the sequence and repetition of words in a phrase, as in the example of FIGS. 13-15.

The present disclosure is to be taken as illustrative rather than as limiting the scope, nature, or spirit of the subject matter claimed below. Numerous modifications and variations will become apparent to those skilled in the art after studying the disclosure, including use of equivalent functional and/or structural substitutes for elements described herein, use of equivalent functional couplings for couplings described herein, or use of equivalent functional steps for steps described herein. Such insubstantial variations are to be considered within the scope of what is contemplated here. Moreover, if plural examples are given for specific means, or steps, and extrapolation between or beyond such given examples is obvious in view of the present disclosure, then the disclosure is to be deemed as effectively disclosing and thus covering at least such extrapolations.

Unless expressly stated otherwise herein, ordinary terms have their corresponding ordinary meanings within the respective contexts of their presentations, and ordinary terms of art have their corresponding regular meanings.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US8434164 *Dec 14, 2011May 7, 2013Nike, Inc.Message-conveying interlocking athletic gloves
US20120073029 *Dec 14, 2011Mar 29, 2012Nike, Inc.Message-Conveying Interlocking Athletic Gloves
US20120204312 *Apr 17, 2012Aug 16, 2012Prairie PrinceNovelty shirt
Classifications
U.S. Classification2/125, 2/244
International ClassificationA41D27/10, A41D27/08
Cooperative ClassificationA41D27/10, A41D27/08
European ClassificationA41D27/10, A41D27/08