Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS20100252464 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 12/161,525
PCT numberPCT/US2007/001239
Publication dateOct 7, 2010
Filing dateJan 17, 2007
Priority dateJan 18, 2006
Also published asCA2675851A1, EP1993932A2, WO2007084565A2, WO2007084565A3
Publication number12161525, 161525, PCT/2007/1239, PCT/US/2007/001239, PCT/US/2007/01239, PCT/US/7/001239, PCT/US/7/01239, PCT/US2007/001239, PCT/US2007/01239, PCT/US2007001239, PCT/US200701239, PCT/US7/001239, PCT/US7/01239, PCT/US7001239, PCT/US701239, US 2010/0252464 A1, US 2010/252464 A1, US 20100252464 A1, US 20100252464A1, US 2010252464 A1, US 2010252464A1, US-A1-20100252464, US-A1-2010252464, US2010/0252464A1, US2010/252464A1, US20100252464 A1, US20100252464A1, US2010252464 A1, US2010252464A1
InventorsMichael J. Belitz
Original AssigneeKablam! Corp. D.B.A Eblitz Audio Labs, Llc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Gas-Cushioned Musical Instrument Case System
US 20100252464 A1
Abstract
A musical instrument case and a guitar case and a drum case with a pliable outer shell (5) and with an inflatable bladder system (22) permit protected storage and transportation of the items. The outer shell (5) may be made of woven ballistic fabric (7) with an inflator (21) and a deflator (38) internal to the outer shell (5) and may have a surface protective liner (34) between the inflatable bladder system (22) and the item for protection.
Images(14)
Previous page
Next page
Claims(35)
1-16. (canceled)
17. A device storage and transportation case system comprising:
a pliable substantially closable topology device conforming outer shell defining an interior space and having an outer surface;
an oppositional inflatable bladder system situated within said interior space of said pliable substantially closable topology device conforming outer shell and having at least two oppositional interior surfaces;
a device protective liner positioned over at least a portion of said oppositional interior surfaces of said oppositional inflatable bladder system and capable of defining a size-alterable device shaped topology containment;
an inflator to which said oppositional inflatable bladder system is fluidically responsive;
an openable access for said pliable substantially closable topology device conforming outer shell configured accessible to said size-alterable device shaped topology containment;
a detachable closure system situated to restrict operability of said openable access affixed to said pliable substantially closable topology device conforming outer shell;
a deflator fluidically connected to said oppositional inflatable bladder system of said pliable substantially closable topology device conforming outer shell; and
at least one grip attached at some location on said outer surface of said pliable substantially closable topology device conforming outer shell.
18. A device storage and transportation case system as described in claim 17 and further comprising an automatic pneumatic pressure release to which said oppositional inflatable bladder system is pneumatically responsive.
19. A device storage and transportation case system as described in claim 17 wherein said pliable fabric substantially closable topology device conforming outer shell comprises a woven ballistic fabric.
20. A device storage and transportation case system as described in claim 19 wherein said openable access comprises a nearly direct flexure end point openable access that substantially splits said pliable closable topology device conforming outer shell about a line into mirror image components, said mirror image components comprising:
a larger pliable main compartment device conforming outer shell bottom; and
a smaller mirror image pliable device conforming outer shell top.
21. A device storage and transportation case system as described in claim 17 wherein said oppositional inflatable bladder system comprises adjacent chambers.
22. A device storage and transportation case system as described in claim 21 wherein said adjacent chambers comprise:
a plurality of parallely adjacent top tubular chambers; and
a plurality of parallely adjacent bottom tubular chambers,
and wherein said device protective liner comprises:
at least one top cover liner which covers a plurality of said parallely adjacent top tubular chambers; and
at least one bottom cover liner at least one of which covers a plurality of said parallely adjacent bottom tubular chambers.
23. A device storage and transportation case system as described in claim 22 wherein said parallely adjacent tubular chambers comprise linear row chambers.
24. A device storage and transportation case system as described in claim 23 wherein said parallely adjacent tubular chambers comprise concentrically arranged chambers.
25. A device storage and transportation case system as described in claim 17 wherein said inflator comprises an exhale activated inflator selected from a group consisting of: an inflation tube, a manual valve system, a stopper valve, a check valve, a flap valve, a pincher flap valve, a turn lock valve, a valve stem system, and any permutations or combinations of the above.
26. A device storage and transportation case system as described in claim 17 wherein said inflator comprises an alternative inflation element.
27. A device storage and transportation case system as described in claim 17 wherein said inflator comprises an inflator selected from a group consisting essentially of: an electrical pump and a pressurized canister inflator.
28. A device storage and transportation case system as described in claim 17 and further comprising an automatic operation switch to which said inflatable bladder system is fluidically responsive.
29. A device storage and transportation case system as described in claim 17 wherein said size-alterable topology device shaped containment is conformationally configured to device protectively accommodate a together with a device accessory product.
30-108. (canceled)
109. A method of storing and transporting a device comprising the steps of:
opening an at least minimally access dimensioned openable access integral to a pliable substantially closable topology outer shell;
pliably encasing said device in said pliable substantially closable topology outer shell;
oppositionally surrounding at least a portion of said device by an oppositional inflatable bladder within said pliable substantially closable topology outer shell;
liner protecting at least a portion of said device adjacent said inflatable bladder by a surface protective liner positioned over at least a portion of said inflatable bladder and between said inflatable bladder and said device and that defines a size-alterable topology containment having a minimal access dimension within said surface protective liner;
detachably closing said at least minimally access dimensioned openable access integral to said pliable substantially closable topology outer shell;
fluidically inflating said oppositional inflatable bladder system;
reducibly altering said size-alterable topology containment within said surface protective liner to conform to an exterior shape of said device as a result of said step of fluidically inflating said oppositional inflatable bladder system;
manually engaging said pliable substantially closable topology outer shell by at least one grip attached at some location on an outer surface of said pliable substantially closable topology outer shell;
moving said device within said pliable substantially closable topology outer shell through action of said at least one grip;
deflating said oppositional inflatable bladder system;
expansively altering said size-alterable topology containment within said surface protective liner as a result of said step of deflating said oppositional inflatable bladder system; and
accessing said device from said size-alterable topology containment within said pliable substantially closable topology outer shell through said minimally access dimensioned openable access integral to said pliable substantially closable topology outer shell.
110. A method of storing and transporting a device as described in claim 109 wherein said step of fluidically inflating said oppositional inflatable bladder system comprises the step of pneumatically inflating said oppositional inflatable bladder system, and further comprising the step of automatically pressure relieving said oppositional inflatable bladder system.
111. A method of storing and transporting a device as described in claim 109 wherein said step of pliably encasing said device in said pliable substantially closable topology outer shell comprises the step of utilizing a woven ballistic fabric.
112. A method of storing and transporting a device as described in claim 111 wherein said step of opening an at least minimally access dimensioned openable access integral to a pliable substantially closable topology outer shell comprises the step of parting a nearly direct flexure end point openable access that substantially splits said pliable closable topology outer shell about a line into mirror image components comprises the step of parting a larger pliable main compartment outer shell bottom and a smaller mirror image pliable outer shell top.
113. A method of storing and transporting a device as described in claim 109 wherein said step of oppositionally surrounding at least a portion of said device by an oppositional inflatable bladder within said pliable substantially closable topology outer shell comprises the step of oppositionally surrounding at least a portion of said device by adjacent chambers in an oppositional inflatable bladder.
114. A method of storing and transporting a device as described in claim 113 wherein said step of liner protecting at least a portion of said device comprises the steps of:
establishing a top cover liner at least part of which covers a plurality of said parallely adjacent tubular chambers; and
establishing a bottom cover liner at least part of which covers a plurality of said parallely adjacent tubular chambers.
115. A method of storing and transporting a device for use as described in claim 114 wherein said step of oppositionally surrounding at least a portion of said device by parallely adjacent tubular chambers comprises the step of oppositionally surrounding at least a portion of said device by linear row chambers.
116. A method of storing and transporting a device as described in claim 115 wherein said step of oppositionally surrounding at least a portion of said device by parallely adjacent tubular chambers comprises the step of oppositionally surrounding at least a portion of said device by concentrically arranged chambers.
117. A method of storing and transporting a device as described in claim 109 wherein said step of fluidically inflating said oppositional inflatable bladder system comprises the step of exhaling into an inflator selected from a group consisting of: an inflation tube, a manual valve system, a stopper valve, a check valve, a flap valve, a pincher flap valve, a turn lock valve, a valve stem system, and any permutations or combinations of the above.
118. A method of storing and transporting a device as described in claim 109 and further comprising the step of providing an alternative inflation element.
119. A method of storing and transporting a device as described in claim 109 and further comprising steps selected from a group consisting of:
providing an electrical pump; and
providing an exhale activated inflator, and
providing pressurized canister inflator; and
providing an exhale activated inflator.
120. A method of storing and transporting a device as described in claim 109 and further comprising the step of automatically operating a switch to which said inflatable bladder system is fluidically responsive.
121. A method of storing and transporting a device as described in claim 109 wherein said step of reducibly altering said size-alterable topology containment within said surface protective liner to conform to an exterior shape of said device comprises the step of reducibly altering said size-alterable topology containment within said surface protective liner to conform to an exterior shape of said device together with a device accessory product.
122-185. (canceled)
186. A device storage and transportation case system as described in claim 17 wherein said device is a musical instrument.
187. A device storage and transportation case system as described in claim 186 wherein said musical instrument is a guitar.
188. A device storage and transportation case system as described in claim 186 wherein said musical instrument is a drum.
189. A method of storing and transporting a device as described in claim 109 wherein said device is a musical instrument.
190. A method of storing and transporting a device as described in claim 189 wherein said musical instrument is a guitar.
191. A method of storing and transporting a device as described in claim 189 wherein said musical instrument is a drum.
Description
    TECHNICAL FIELD
  • [0001]
    Generally, the technology described herein relates to musical instruments, particularly musical instrument cases utilizing protective gas-pressurized chambers. More specifically, the technology involves storing and transporting a guitar, drum, or other musical instrument in a case that inflates such chambers with a gas to alter fit and protection characteristics of the storage case. The technology may be particularly suited for providing storage cases for guitars and drums with accessories included.
  • BACKGROUND
  • [0002]
    In everyday situations, it often may be desirable to transport a musical instrument from one location to another location in a case. The use of a case may perform a variety of functions, for example perhaps by providing protection of the encased instrument or more generally item from damage during transit or perhaps providing convenient grips or other handling devices to facilitate hand transport of the item.
  • [0003]
    One particular application in which the use of a case to transport an item often may be particularly convenient is for musical instruments. Musical instruments may have characteristics that set them apart from more typical everyday objects. For example, musical instruments often may have delicate or intricate construction. Moreover, musical instruments also often may be peculiarly dimensioned or shaped. Further, musical instruments often may be very expensive. For these reasons, the convenience and protection afforded by a case may make the use of musical instrument cases a widely-used manner for transporting instruments.
  • [0004]
    Many types of cases for transporting musical instruments may be known. For example, traditional hard-shell cases may provide a rigid casing in which to place a musical instrument. Often, the interior of a traditional hard-shell case may have padding or a plush liner to aid in cushioning the musical instrument. Alternatively, traditional soft-shell cases may provide a flexible casing in which to place a musical instrument, again often with padding or a plush liner.
  • [0005]
    However, these kinds of traditional cases may entail certain drawbacks. For example, the protection afforded by a traditional hard-shell case may come at the cost of a case that may be heavy and unwieldy to move about. On the other hand, a traditional soft-shell case may be more convenient to move about, but may lack the protection of a traditional hard-shell case.
  • [0006]
    Moreover, both types of cases may have an upper limit on the ability to withstand shocks, stresses, and the like. This may result in an effective limit on the protection of a musical instrument held within the case.
  • [0007]
    In addition, the sizing of traditional hard-shell and soft-shell cases may pose problems. Specifically, these kinds of cases may need to be sized to fit the specific dimensions of the musical instrument to be carried. This may limit the ability to use one case for multiple musical instruments. For example, a single case may not be able to carry different examples of even the same kind of instrument, such as guitars of different types, drums of different types, and the like. Further, even a case dimensioned to carry a specific musical instrument may pose problems with fit. In particular, if the fit of the case is not precisely coordinated to the dimensions of the musical instrument, the musical instrument may tend to slide or shift position within the case. This may increase the chance of damage to the instrument should the case be subject to shocks, stresses, or the like.
  • [0008]
    The use of inflatable bladders to protect devices contained in cases has been known for some time. Hard cases with an inflatable bladder contained therein are often used to protect a variety of items. For example, U.S. Pat. No. 4,762,231 shows a Pneumatic Device for Holding Articles in Containers. This general device shows a hard case with spring controlled air chambers. In addition, U.S. Pat. No. 5,570,780 shows a Portable Computer Carrying Case with an inflatable bladder. Similarly, U.S. Pat. No. 6,513,658 shows a Protective Package, which includes an inflatable bladder in a hard case. This inflatable technology has been applied to protecting musical instruments as well. For instance, U.S. Pat. No. 4,215,778 shows an Inflatable Instrument Case in which a heart shell contains an inflatable section. The external surface of the hard shell may even be covered by a leather like simulation to present a desirable appearance. An improvement of such a case is shown U.S. Pat. No. 5,833,051 for a Multifunctional Musical Instrument Case. This case, has both an inflatable interior as well as a stand function to permit its use such as on stage or the like. In addition, U.S. Pat. No. 4,574,953 for a Container for Fragile Articles specifically shows devices for musical instruments. As shown in the case may be shaped, as appropriate for a particular instrument such as an alto saxophone. As shown, the case is disclosed as particularly rigid in and rigidly retains its peculiar shade, even when empty.
  • [0009]
    One of the challenges that remains, however, he is the use of a soft case with an inflatable bladder. This is particularly challenging because the inflatable bladder presses on the soft case which by its very nature, can then become deformed. This drawback hands to some degree prevented the use of inflatable bladders in conjunction with a soft case for a musical instrument.
  • [0010]
    The foregoing problems regarding the drawbacks associated with traditional storage cases, perhaps particularly as exemplified by their use with musical instruments, may represent a long-felt need for an effective solution to the same. While implementing elements may have been available, actual attempts to meet this need may have been lacking to some degree. This may have been due to a failure of those having ordinary skill in the art to fully appreciate or understand the nature of the problems and challenges involved. As a result of this lack of understanding, attempts to meet these long-felt needs may have failed to effectively solve one or more of the problems or challenges here identified. These attempts may even have led away from the technical directions taken by the present inventive technology and may even result in the achievements of the present inventive technology being considered to some degree an unexpected result of the approach taken by some in the field.
  • DISCLOSURE OF THE INVENTION
  • [0011]
    The inventive technology relates to a gas-cushioned storage musical instrument case system and may include one or more of the following features: techniques for providing gas-pressurized liners for musical instrument storage cases; techniques for variably inflating such gas-pressurized liners with gas to various pressures for a case for musical instruments; techniques for cushioning a musical instrument held within such a case by using such a gas-pressurized liner; techniques for providing a high degree of protection to a musical instrument stored within such a case from shocks, stresses, and the like to which the case may be subjected; techniques for adjusting the fit of such a case to match the particular size and shape of a musical instrument stored within the case; techniques for providing gas-pressurized liners having multiple individual gas pressure chambers for a musical instrument; and techniques for linking such multiple individual gas pressure chamber into a single gas pressure system. Accordingly, the objects of the gas-cushioned storage case system described herein address each of the foregoing problems in a practical manner. Naturally, further objects of the inventive technology will become apparent from the description and drawings below.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF DRAWINGS
  • [0012]
    FIG. 1 is a conceptual example of one kind of drum case in a flattened, unassembled state.
  • [0013]
    FIG. 2 is a conceptual example of one kind of guitar case.
  • [0014]
    FIG. 3 is a conceptual example of one kind of keyboard case.
  • [0015]
    FIG. 4 shows embodiments of additional kinds of drum cases.
  • [0016]
    FIG. 5 shows embodiments of additional kinds of drum cases.
  • [0017]
    FIG. 6 shows additional embodiments of a guitar case.
  • [0018]
    FIG. 7 shows additional embodiments of a guitar case.
  • [0019]
    FIG. 8 shows additional embodiments of a keyboard case.
  • [0020]
    FIG. 9 shows additional embodiments of a keyboard case.
  • [0021]
    FIG. 10 shows the interior containment of a drum case.
  • [0022]
    FIG. 11 shows one type of inflator in a pocket of a soft case.
  • [0023]
    FIG. 12 shows an opened guitar case containing a guitar.
  • [0024]
    FIG. 13 shows a closed guitar case standing upright.
  • MODES FOR CARRYING OUT THE INVENTION
  • [0025]
    The present inventive technology includes a variety of aspects, which may be combined in different ways. The following descriptions are provided to list elements and describe some of the embodiments of the present inventive technology. These elements are listed with initial embodiments, however it should be understood that they may be combined in any manner and in any number to create additional embodiments. The variously described examples and preferred embodiments should not be construed to limit the present inventive technology to only the explicitly described systems, techniques, and applications. Further, this description should be understood to support and encompass descriptions and claims of all the various embodiments, systems, techniques, methods, devices, and applications with any number of the disclosed elements, with each element alone, and also with any and all various permutations and combinations of all elements in this or any subsequent application.
  • [0026]
    Referring to the figures, generally, it can be seen that in some embodiments, a gas-cushioned musical instrument storage case system may include an outer shell (5). It may be appreciated that such an outer shell may be made from a variety of materials known in the art depending on the specific properties desired or the uses to which the storage case may be put. In certain embodiments, such materials may include ballistic or standard nylon. The material that the outer shell (5) is made of may be pliable, such as a pliable fabric. The term “ballistic” is meant in its popular, not technical, sense. As shown in some figures, the outer shell (5) may include some woven ballistic fabric (7). Such a materials may, for example, represent merely a high durability, impact resistant, protective, or even “tough” material. These tough materials may include or be higher denier woven fabrics and, in terms of today's technology, may even be limited to heavier woven fabrics such as 600D or 800D nylon. A variety of fabrics perhaps including anything greater than or equal to 500D, 600D, 800D fabrics can be used. These may include equivalent tex, decitex or dtex SI values. Of course many other materials may be used as well. Thus, the outer shell (5) may be made utilizing for all or at least some of the outer shell (5) a ballistic fabric material, a nylon material, a molded cloth material, a formed pliable surface material, a neoprene material, a fabric mesh material, a foam material, a plastic fabric material, a stitched fabric material, and/or a rubber-like material.
  • [0027]
    The ballistic or standard nylon may perhaps'also be combined with other materials such as neoprene, mesh, foam padding, plastics, rubbers, Velcro, woven straps, glue, stitching, and the like. By using a flexible coated material (8) as shown in some figures, the soft, pliable character of the outer shell (5) may be retained. As shown in some figures, by flexibly coating at least a portion of the outer shell (5) different looks can be achieved. Further, the coating aspect may actually be accomplished by attaching a separate material to the outer shell (5). This separate material may be attached to appear highlighted such as with a raised neoprene. This can be both for protective and aesthetic purposes. Various materials, such as neoprene, as well as a foam, such as foam padding (17) can be used. The foam padding (17) can be a padding, perhaps with a limited thickness such as 3-5 mm thick. There may even be a rubber coating or attachment such as a rubber logo (10). An identifier such as raised neoprene graphics (9) may be included for product or individual identity purposes. Aesthetic indicia, perhaps such as a piping accentuation (11) or the like may be included perhaps even in an offsetting bright color (such as yellow or the like as shown in the provisional priority document).
  • [0028]
    The outer shell (5) may serve a variety of functions, including perhaps providing an overall shape for: the case (though not in a manner that restricts the form-fitting function of the gas pressure chambers, discussed below), providing gripping or other handling surfaces for moving the case, providing protection against adverse weather conditions, and contributing a degree of protection against shocks, stresses, and the like. The outer shell may further include an opening for access to the interior of the gas-cushioned storage case system, for example perhaps in the manner of a hinged surface as may be typically found on conventional musical instrument cases.
  • [0029]
    The outer shell (5) may have a substantially closable topology so that it forms a closed or nearly closed surface that fully or nearly fully encases or covers the items or musical instrument. Thus, the outer shell (5) may pliably encase the item. It may form a pliable fabric substantially closable topology outer shell. The outer surface, that is, the exterior of the outer shell (5) may have rounded corners or other attributes for both functional and aesthetic purposes. Other aspects may be included or attached in, on, near, at some location on, or integral to the outer shell (5). These may include: a grip (4) such as a handle, a neoprene handle, or some other strap; feet (13) to hold and protect when resting on the ground: some identification feature (14), such as a card holder or the like; accessory compartments (15), which may be of varying sizes and depth, perhaps with thicker/deeper on ‘bottom’ areas and that can be mesh pockets (19) (such as to provide visual access to their interior, etc); and even backpack straps. The entire case may be used for either or both storage or transportation. For moving the instrument or item, the case may be configured with any desired wheels, handles, straps, or other feature.
  • [0030]
    In various embodiments, all or certain portions of the interior space (6) or interior surface of the outer shell may fitted with one or more gas pressure chambers (30), which in some embodiments may be air bladders or an inflatable bladder system (22). It may be appreciated that such gas pressure chambers (30) may be made from a variety of known materials depending on the specific properties desired, including perhaps urethane or nylon of suitable qualities or thickness consistent with the functions of the gas pressure chambers described herein. In various embodiments, two or more gas pressure chambers (30) may be connected or interconnected to form the inflatable bladder system (22) or to form a gas-pressurization system. It may be appreciated that connecting such multiple gas pressure chambers (30) may be accomplished in a variety of suitable manners, including for example by stitching, gluing, or creating compartments in a single chamber by sealing off various sections to create sub-chambers, perhaps such as by heat-sealing a urethane chamber.
  • [0031]
    In order to protect the musical instrument, the inflatable bladder system (22) may be arranged to be oppositional or to oppositionally surround the musical instrument. Thus there may be bladders or inflatable protect on or near to or from opposite directions for full protection. The inflatable bladder system (22) may present two oppositional interior surfaces (23) that support the instrument from nearly different opposing directions. The chambers (30) may be pneumatically responsive do air or other fluid enlarges them. This may be by inflating them to cause a more secure hold on the instrument. For construction and use purposes, the inflatable bladder system (22) may be designed as a detachable bladder system and may be detachably positioned within the interior space (6) of the outer shell (5). Further, the inflation of the inflatable bladder system (22) may be accomplished by using buoyancy compensator componentry, such as the inflator shown. In fact inflating, reducing the internal size of the containment, conforming to the instrument, and deflating can all occur through some involvement or through utilizing buoyancy compensator componentry.
  • [0032]
    The inflatable bladder system (22) may include adjacent chambers (24). These adjacent chambers (24), perhaps such as shown in cross section in FIG. 1, may be configured as parallely adjacent tubular chambers (31) for manufacturing or Other purposes. Such parallely adjacent tubular chambers (31) may have any shape and it should be understood that the term tubular can include square, long, round on one axis, or other shapes. In one embodiment, the parallely adjacent tubular chambers (31) may be linear row chambers (32) so that the chambers are relatively straight and perhaps next to each other. These can present manufacturing and prototype or other advantages. The parallely adjacent tubular chambers (31) may also be concentrically arranged chambers (33). These concentrically arranged chambers (33) may or may not be circular and the concentrically arranged chambers (33) may even be shaped similar to the outer case (such as in the shape of a guitar or the like). The linear row chambers (32) may be linear row end chambers such as on the ends of a case, or may be linear row side chambers such as on the side of a case. There may also be concentrically arranged end chambers. These can be seen in the drum case design where there are linear row side chambers and concentric end chambers for functional purposes. There may also be pleasing aesthetic purposes for such arrangements.
  • [0033]
    Gas may be admitted to a gas pressure chamber or gas-pressurization system in various embodiments through the use of a gas inlet. It may be appreciated that such a gas inlet may take a variety of forms, including for example an inflation tube or any of various known valve systems, such as turn lock valves or string-pulled release valves. Some embodiments may include separate inlets for admitting gas to the system and releasing gas from the system, while other embodiments may combine these two functions in a single inlet. Moreover, a gas pressure chamber or gas-pressurization system may be inflated in any suitable manner, including for example perhaps by using compressed air, CO2 cartridges, orally, or with various hand held or electric pumps and valve stem inlet systems. In general, the system may include an inflator (21) that is some element that can be used in inflating the inflatable bladder system (22). The inflator (21) may include a valve stem and cap. It may also have a governer element if appropriate. By the inflator (21), the inflatable bladder system (22) may be fluidically responsive. For a compressible fluid, especially air, the inflator may be considered a pneumatic inflator. A variety of means to inflate can be used, these can include an exhale activated inflator (36). This exhale activated inflator (36) can include a variety of aspects, perhaps such as: an inflation tube, a manual valve system, a stopper valve, a check valve, a flap valve, a pincher flap valve, a turn lock valve, and a valve stem system or any combinations of these. The inflator (21) may also be a pressurized canister inflator that can consist of: a compressed air cartridge, a CO2 cartridge, a utility air bottle, a detachable cartridge system, a disposable cartridge system, a commonly available hardware system, a shell-contained cartridge system, or a remotely rechargeable canister cartridge system. Generally available cartridges such as utility air can be used. These can be available form various office supply locales such as duster “air” (even of containing difluoroethane or the like). The outer shell (5) can include or have established to it, a shell internal canister element, such as in a pocket (18) or the like to contain such an item for repetitive use and easy replacement. Similarly, there can be an inflation access (such as a tube, etc.). There can also be a wholly or partially internal inflator such as a pump, a canister, etc.) Material can also fold into an externally accessible pocket (18) or the like. This pocket (18) may be Velcro closable. Given the pliable nature of the case, particular functions can be accommodated from outside the case. Thus the system can include a soft cover operable internal canister pocket that can serve to activate inflation internal to the pliable outer shell (5). In canister-based systems, for the variety of canisters that may be used there may be provided a universal canister connector system, such as one or more connections that can accommodate and connect to more than one style of canister (even though not necessarily all styles).
  • [0034]
    Some embodiments may include a mechanical pump (37) to permit inflation. This may consist of a powered pump, an electric pump, a battery powered pump, an automatic battery powered pump, a shell-contained battery system, a remotely rechargeable pump system, and a shell internal mechanical pump. As above, the soft case may permit operation through the case such as from outside with internal activation, such as by pressing a flexible button or switch or the like. Thus the system may include a soft cover operable internal mechanical pump. These may act to fluidically inflate all or some of the inflatable bladder system (22) expansively (from the perspective of inflating the bladders) or reducibly (from the perspective of making the containment smaller) altering and conforming the containment to an exterior shape of the musical instrument. This can be pneumatically inflating of the inflatable bladder system (22). One way to accomplish inflation is by exhaling into the oppositional inflatable bladder system (22) through some inflator (21).
  • [0035]
    In any system precautions can be taken to avoid overpressurization. This can include an automatic pneumatic pressure release (40) for relieving pressure if it were to get too high through too exuberant inflation activities, from air cargo pressure changes, or otherwise. As mentioned later, automatically pressure relieving can also act upon opening.
  • [0036]
    As mentioned, in some embodiments of a gas-pressurization system having perhaps two or more gas pressure chambers connected together, it may be possible to link each gas pressure chamber with an open passageway to create an equal pressure throughout the gas-pressurization system. It may be appreciated that such an open passageway may be established in variety of manners, including perhaps by tubing, stitching, or gaps established in a heat-sealed joint. Moreover, it may be possible to establish a single gas inlet into such a equal pressure gas-pressurization system. In this manner it may be appreciated that the equal pressure gas-pressurization system may be uniformly inflated and deflated to a desired pressure by blowing gas into the gas-pressurization system. Such embodiments may include chamber interconnects (25) that may even serve as pressure equalization passageways or air channels. These may consist of: tubing passageways, stitched passageways, gap passageways (26), joint passageways (28), heat-sealed joint passageways, and perhaps even heat sealed separators (29) between chambers (30). By interconnecting at least two gas-pressure chambers within the inflatable bladder system (22), embodiments may use a plurality of pressure equalization passageways to permit equal or even intentionally unequal pressure distribution.
  • [0037]
    In other embodiments of a gas-pressurization system having perhaps two or more gas pressure chambers connected together, it may be possible to seal off the individual gas pressure chambers from one another. Moreover, it may be possible to establish a single gas inlet into each such gas pressure chamber. In this manner, it may be appreciated that a differential gas-pressurization system may be established, in which each gas pressure chamber perhaps may be capable of inflation or deflation to a differing degree of pressure. It may be appreciated that such a capability to achieve such differing degrees of pressure may confer added flexibility and functionality to the differential gas pressurization system. Differential gas-pressure chambers can serve relatively permanent or relatively transient purposes and differential inflation can be just at an initial time (and later equalize). There can be intentionally differential inflation of a plurality of gas-pressure chambers and embodiments may include one or more selectable chamber seal-off interconnects (27). Thus there can be interconnecting of the gas-pressure chambers with a selectable chamber seal-off interconnect such as to avoid end inflation (for unusually long items) or to avoid locational inflation (for particularly sensitive or delicate portions of the instrument if desired).
  • [0038]
    Various embodiments may involve affixing one or more gas pressure chambers of a gas-pressurization system to the outer shell (5), for example perhaps by adhering or heat-sealing, or perhaps in a manner analogous to a buoyancy compensator used in SCUBA diving. In this manner, the gas-pressurization system and the outer shell perhaps may form a single casement structure, which may be understood perhaps to be a single structure providing a casing for an item stored within a gas-cushioned storage case system. Alternatively, embodiments may include the ability to completely detach one or more gas pressure chambers or perhaps an entire gas-pressurization system from the outer shell, for example, so as to permit repair or replacement of the outer shell without discarding the gas-pressurization system.
  • [0039]
    Moreover, a gas-pressurization system in some embodiments may be fitted to all or only a portion of the interior space (6) or surface of the outer shell (5). In this manner it may be appreciated that the gas-pressurization system may be capable of supplying pressure at selected points within a gas-cushioned storage case system. Additionally, embodiments may include providing additional padding or liners such as a surface protective liner (34) to further protect the gas-pressurization system itself or perhaps an item stored in the gas-cushioned storage case system from damage. The surface protective liner (34) may be positioned over at least a portion of the oppositional inflatable bladder system (22). It may be situated between the inflatable bladder and the musical instrument. The surface protective liner (34) may thus present or create or define a size-alterable topology containment (35). The surface protective liner (34) may be a collection of separate liners such as unitary cover liners. These unitary cover liners may cover a plurality of parallely adjacent tubular chambers to present a uniform appearance.
  • [0040]
    In various embodiments, a gas-cushioned storage case system may be designed and manufactured to a variety of shapes and sizes, perhaps to conform to a variety of items. In particular, a gas-cushioned storage case system may be designed and manufactured to fit any of a variety of musical instruments or related equipment, including perhaps guitar products, keyboard products (including acoustic and electric), piano and organ products, drum products, cymbal products, stick products, external hardware, live reinforcement, studio products, computer recording products, and band and orchestra instrument products (including wind, reed, percussion, and the like). Embodiments perhaps may even include designing individual gas pressure chambers or gas-pressurization systems to be specifically configured for a given use of a gas-cushioned storage case system.
  • [0041]
    The interior space (6) may include a securement strap (47) to hold the item involved. In configurations specifically for a guitar, the system may present a guitar storage and transportation case system (2). This guitar storage and transportation case system (2) may even have a guitar conforming outer shell that may perhaps be an appropriate length such as 46″ for a guitar, and an appropriate height such as 6″ for a guitar. In configurations specifically for drums, the system may present a drum storage and transportation case system (1). This drum storage and transportation case system (1) may even have a drum conforming outer shell that may perhaps have an appropriate dimension (20), perhaps a diameter such as 18″ for a snare drum or 26″ for a kick drum and an appropriate height such as 22″ for a kick drum and 9 inches for a snare drum. In configurations specifically for a keyboard, the system may present a keyboard storage and transportation case system (3). This keyboard storage and transportation case system (3) may even have a keyboard conforming outer shell that may perhaps be an appropriate length such as 49.5″ for a keyboard, an appropriate height and width such as 10.5″ and 21″ for a keyboard, and may have an appropriate interior length for a keyboard and an appropriate interior heights for a keyboard. In all sufficient bladder thickness may be such as top/bottom 2″ thick, and sides 2.5″ thick. These may be conformationally configured to accommodate the item such as a musical instrument. These may include a great variety of items and their accessories including but not limited to: a guitar product, a keyboard product, a piano product, an organ product, a drum product, a cymbal product, a musical instrument external hardware product, a music studio product, a musical recording computer product, a band instrument product, an orchestra instrument product, a wind instrument product, a brass instrument product, a reed instrument product, a percussion instrument product, and a musical instrument together with a musical instrument accessory product.
  • [0042]
    In operation, an item for storage may be placed within the gas-cushioned storage case system. This can be accomplished by opening or accessing the case. To open the case, a user may operate a detachable closure system (49) that may be affixed to the pliable case or outer shell (5). This detachable closure system (49) may be a substantially full length linear attachment such a zipper (16). This substantially full length linear attachment may substantially surrounding an openable access to permit insertion of the item into the case. The detachable closure system (49) may include a substantially full length linear zipper, a substantially full length linear hook and loop fastener system, and a substantially full length periodic snap system, a substantially full length periodic magnet system, or the like. The opening (50) may permit access and may be integral to the pliable case. The opening (50) should have at least a minimal access dimension so that the largest dimension of the item can be met to permit insertion and removal. Thus the design can present a minimally access dimensioned openable access to permit access to the size-alterable topology containment (35). Once the item is placed in the case, the user can act to detachably close the case. Again, this may occur by operating a substantially full length linear attachment such as a zipper (16) or the like.
  • [0043]
    In opening the case, designs can present total access. This can be accomplished by having a nearly direct flexure end point openable access. This can substantially split the case about a line (39) into mirror image components (41). These mirror image components (41) can be a larger pliable main compartment outer shell bottom (42) and a smaller mirror image pliable outer shell top (43). Of course, the terms top and bottom are relative only and can be revered or ignored without effect. By parting the case with nearly direct flexure end points or end points in a line from one to another, the openable access can fold or act to hinge itself open.
  • [0044]
    An individual gas pressure chamber or perhaps a gas-pressurization system may be inflated to a desired pressure. In this manner, it may be appreciated that an empty volume of space within the storage case may become occupied by the pressurized system. As a consequence, the interior surface of the gas-cushioned storage case system may form a tight fit to the item placed inside, perhaps even becoming form-fitted. The item may then be transported within the gas-cushioned storage case system from location to another. To remove the item, the individual gas pressure chamber or gas-pressurization system may be deflated and the item removed from the gas-cushioned storage case system.
  • [0045]
    Deflation can occur in a variety of manners. generally, the system can include a deflator (38) to permits air or the like to escape from the inflatable bladder system (22). This can reducibly alter the size of the size-alterable topology containment (35). It can be fluidically connected to the inflatable bladder system (22). The deflator (38) may be a manual deflator such as might include a string-pulled release valve, a pressure activated release valve, a pincher valve, a zip-lock valve, an intermittent valve, an automatic return sealing valve, or the like. Consistent with the internal operability mentioned earlier, embodiments may include a soft cover operable internal release. This may be manually engaged to permit deflating and thus it may permit manually deflating of the system. This may be internal and may be activated through a soft cover and may thus present a soft cover operable internal release.
  • [0046]
    Use of the gas-cushioned storage case system may have several advantages, which perhaps may be particularly suited to the special characteristics of musical instruments. For example, the tight fit created may confer an additional degree of protection from shocks, stresses, or the like that a traditional storage case may not be able to provide. Such additional protection perhaps may come from the cushioning of the pressurized volume of air within the individual gas pressure chamber or chambers. Such additional protection perhaps may also come from a reduction in the tendency of an item stored within the gas-cushioned storage case system to slide around, in as much as any extra volume within the case may be reduced or even eliminated by the tight fit provided by the inflated gas pressure chambers. Moreover, it may be possible to use a single gas-cushioned storage case system to fit a variety of similarly shaped items, such as guitars or drums of slightly varying dimensions, in as much as the gas-pressurized storage case system may be adjustable to accommodate differing interior space volumes.
  • [0047]
    Both inflation and deflation can also occur somewhat automatically. Upon opening the case, the pressure in the inflatable bladder system (22) can be automatically reduced. Similarly, upon closing the case, the pressure in the inflatable bladder system (22) can be automatically increased. Either or both can occur through an automatic operation switch. This automatic operation switch may even be a selectively automatic operation switch so as not to permit operation when inappropriate. The switch can be a valve, a mechanical operation aspect, an electrical operation aspect, or otherwise. A selectively automatic deflation operation valve may act if the case is opened. A selectively automatic inflation operation switch may act if the case is closed. These may be items such as a detachable closure system interconnect that makes the selectively automatic operation switch responsive to the detachable closure system (39), that is the closure system that can attach (close) and detach (open). Such can be on a zipper (16) perhaps as a zipper terminus interconnect. By terminus, this includes items tending toward one or the other ends, even in not situated precisely or even near such an end. As can be appreciated, may be a closed end and an open end to an items such as a one way zipper. (A two way zipper may have a terminus in the middle, or course.) As but one example, by situating switches at ends embodiments may have an open zipper end deflation operation valve (44) to which a deflator is selectively responsive, and a closed zipper end inflation operation switch (45) to which an inflator is selectively responsive. Naturally there may be a combination of both. In acting on the zipper or the like, the user may automatically operate a switch. Further, the system may be selectively responsive by the user just not closing the system all the way, and thus not triggering a conductive flap or the like. Similar operation can exist for an opening aspect as well.
  • [0000]
    Thus operating a zipper (16) may automatically deflate the oppositional inflatable bladder system (22) and opening a zipper (16) may automatically inflate the oppositional inflatable bladder system (22). Thus embodiment may utilize a closure system interconnect. This can be particularly appropriate for electrically battery powered or rechargeable pump systems. Further, embodiments may include an alternative inflation element (46). This can be available if batteries run low, if a charged canister is not available, or the like. This alternative inflation element (46) may be an providing an exhale activated inflator (36) such as for systems with a pressurized canister inflator, or an electrical pump, as well.
  • [0048]
    As can be easily understood from the foregoing, the basic concepts of the present invention may be embodied in a variety of ways. It involves both gas-cushioned storage techniques as well as devices to accomplish the appropriate gas-cushioned storage. In this application, the gas-cushioned storage techniques are disclosed as part of the results shown to be achieved by the various devices described and as steps which are inherent to utilization. They are simply the natural result of utilizing the devices as intended and described. In addition, while some devices are disclosed, it should be understood that these not only accomplish certain methods but also can be varied in a number of ways. Importantly, as to all of the foregoing, all of these facets should be understood to be encompassed by this disclosure.
  • [0049]
    The discussion included in this patent is intended to serve as a basic description. The reader should be aware that the specific discussion may not explicitly describe all embodiments possible; many alternatives are implicit. It also may not fully explain the generic nature of the invention and may not explicitly show how each feature or element can actually be representative of a broader function or of a great variety of alternative or equivalent elements. Again, these are implicitly included in this disclosure. Where the invention is described in device-oriented terminology, each element of the device implicitly performs a function. Apparatus claims may not only be included for the device described, but also method or process claims may be included to address the functions the invention and each element performs. Neither the description nor the terminology is intended to limit the scope of the claims available in or through this patent.
  • [0050]
    It should also be understood that a variety of changes may be made without departing from the essence of the invention. Such changes are also implicitly included in the description. They still fall within the scope of this invention. A broad disclosure encompassing both the explicit embodiment(s) shown, the great variety of implicit alternative embodiments, and the broad methods or processes and the like are encompassed by this disclosure. Language changes and broader or more detailed claiming may be accomplished at a later date. With this understanding, the reader should be aware that this disclosure is to be understood to support as broad a base of claims as deemed within the applicant's right and may address numerous aspects of the invention both independently and as an overall system.
  • [0051]
    Further, each of the various elements of the invention and claims may also be achieved in a variety of manners. Additionally, when used or implied, an element is to be understood as encompassing individual as well as plural structures that may or may not be physically connected. This disclosure should be understood to encompass each such variation, be it a variation of an embodiment of any apparatus embodiment, a method or process embodiment, or even merely a variation of any element of these. Particularly, it should be understood that as the disclosure relates to elements of the invention, the words for each element may be expressed by equivalent apparatus terms or method terms—even if only the function or result is the same. Such equivalent, broader, or even more generic terms should be considered to be encompassed in the description of each element or action. Such terms can be substituted where desired to make explicit the implicitly broad coverage to which this invention is entitled. As but one example, it should be understood that all actions may be expressed as a means for taking that action or as an element which causes that action. Similarly, each physical element disclosed should be understood to encompass a disclosure of the action which that physical element facilitates. Regarding this last aspect, as but one example, the disclosure of an “inflator” should be understood to encompass disclosure of the act of “inflating”—whether explicitly discussed or not—and, conversely, were there effectively disclosure of the act of “inflating”, such a disclosure should be understood to encompass disclosure of an “inflator” and even a “means for inflating”. Such changes and alternative terms are to be understood to be explicitly included in the description.
  • [0052]
    Any patents, publications, or other references mentioned in this application for patent, including the following reference table, are hereby incorporated by reference. In addition, as to each term used it should be understood that unless its utilization in this application is inconsistent with a broadly supporting interpretation, common dictionary definitions should be understood as incorporated for each term and all definitions, alternative terms, and synonyms such as contained in the Random House Webster's Unabridged Dictionary, second edition are hereby incorporated by reference. Finally, all references listed in any prior list of References information listed are hereby appended and hereby incorporated by reference, however, as to each of the above, to the extent that such information or statements incorporated by reference might be considered inconsistent with the patenting of this/these invention(s) such statements are expressly not to be considered as made by the applicant(s).
  • REFERENCES
  • [0053]
  • [0000]
    I. U.S. PATENT DOCUMENTS
    DOCUMENT NO. & PUB'N DATE PATENTEE OR
    KIND CODE (if known) mm-dd-yyyy APPLICANT NAME
    4,215,778 Aug. 05, 1980 Kovins
    4,574,953 Mar. 11, 1986 Garbuzov
    4,762,231 Aug. 09, 1988 Kiselewski
    5,570,780 Nov. 05, 1996 Miller
    5,833,051 Nov. 10, 1998 Tiefenbrun et al.
    6,513,658 B1 Feb. 04, 2003 Adkins
  • [0000]
    II. NON-PATENT LITERATURE DOCUMENTS
    US Provisional application number 60/760,200, filed Jan. 18, 2006
    http://www.amazon.com/Mosquito-Control-Product-Accessory-Replacement/dp/B0002VQR0E; Mosquito Control
    Product Accessory: Mosquito Magnet Replacement CO2 Cartridge-3 Pack
    www.usa.safckids.org/ticr3_cd.cfm?content_item_id=21191&folder_id=302&CFID=4915057; Safe
    Kids USA: Product Recalls, Paintball Markers Recalled for Ejecting CO2 Cartridges, Hits Users
    www.bonthronebikes.co.uk/112-0; Innovations Second Wind Mtb Hybrid 2007
    http://www.asco-co2.com; ASCO Carbon Dioxide Ltd; Co2 Equipment; ASCO CO2 Catridge/Cylinder Filling
    System
    www.ofitc.com/products/Restaurant/143-05.htm; Ofite Carbon Dioxide Gas Charters: OFI Testing
    Equipment, Inc.
    www.pyramydair.com/site/articles/co2/; Pyramyd Air Gun Mall; What about CO2?
    Nelson Office Supply, Inc. 2007 Office Products Catalog, page 1201; Computer Cleaning Supplies: compressed
    gas dusters
  • [0054]
    Thus, the applicant(s) should be understood to have support to claim and make a statement of invention to at least: i) each of the gas-cushioned storage case devices as herein disclosed and described, ii) the related methods disclosed and described, iii) similar, equivalent, and even implicit variations of each of these devices and methods, iv) those alternative designs which accomplish each of the functions shown as are disclosed and described, v) those alternative designs and methods which accomplish each of the functions shown as are implicit to accomplish that which is disclosed and described, vi) each feature, component, and step shown as separate and independent inventions, vii) the applications enhanced by the various systems or components disclosed, viii) the resulting products produced by such systems or components, ix) each system, method, and element shown or described as now applied to any specific field or devices mentioned, x) methods and apparatuses substantially as described hereinbefore and with reference to any of the accompanying examples, xi) the various combinations and permutations of each of the elements disclosed, and xii) each potentially dependent claim or concept as a dependency on each and every one of the independent claims or concepts presented.
  • [0055]
    With regard to claims presented, it should be understood that for practical reasons and so as to avoid great expansion of the examination burden, the applicant may at any time present only initial claims or perhaps only initial claims with only initial dependencies. Support should be understood to exist to the degree required under new matter laws—including but not limited to European Patent Convention Article 123(2) and United States Patent Law 35 USC 132 or other such laws—to permit the addition of any of the various dependencies or other elements presented under one independent claim or concept as dependencies or elements under any other independent claim or concept. In drafting any claims at any time whether in this application or in any subsequent application, it should also be understood that the applicant has intended to capture as full and broad a scope of coverage as legally available. To the extent that insubstantial substitutes are made, to the extent that the applicant did not in fact draft any claim so as to literally encompass any particular embodiment, and to the extent otherwise applicable, the applicant should not be understood to have in any way intended to or actually relinquished such coverage as the applicant simply may not have been able to anticipate all eventualities; one skilled in the art, should not be reasonably expected to have drafted a claim that would have literally encompassed such alternative embodiments.
  • [0056]
    Further, if or when used, the use of the transitional phrase “comprising” is used to maintain the “open-end” claims herein, according to traditional claim interpretation. Thus, unless the context requires otherwise, it should be understood that the term “comprise” or variations such as “comprises” or “comprising”, are intended to imply the inclusion of a stated element or step or group of elements or steps but not the exclusion of any other element or step or group of elements or steps. Such terms should be interpreted in their most expansive form so as to afford the applicant the broadest coverage legally permissible.
  • [0057]
    Finally, any claims set forth at any time are hereby incorporated by reference as part of this description of the invention, and the applicant expressly reserves the right to use all of or a portion of such incorporated content of such claims as additional description to support any of or all of the claims or any element or component thereof, and the applicant further expressly reserves the right to move any portion of or all of the incorporated content of such claims or any element or component thereof from the description into the claims or vice-versa as necessary to define the matter for which protection is sought by this application or by any subsequent continuation, division, or continuation-in-part application thereof, or to obtain any benefit of, reduction in fees pursuant to, or to comply with the patent laws, rules, or regulations of any country or treaty, and such content incorporated by reference shall survive during the entire pendency of this application including any subsequent continuation, division, or continuation-in-part application thereof or any reissue or extension thereon.
Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2715231 *Sep 3, 1953Aug 16, 1955Marston Oliver FFlexible buoyant article
US3685069 *Mar 8, 1971Aug 22, 1972Bernhardt Apparatebau Gmbh CoDevice for opening the protective cover of an inflatable body
US4215778 *May 29, 1979Aug 5, 1980Michael KovinsInflatable instrument case
US4573202 *Jan 20, 1984Feb 25, 1986Aaron LeeContainer with inflatable, floating liner of uniform thickness
US4574953 *Oct 30, 1984Mar 11, 1986Oleg GarbuzovContainer for fragile articles
US4762231 *Aug 10, 1987Aug 9, 1988Kiselewski Donald LPneumatic device for holding articles in containers
US5570780 *Apr 17, 1995Nov 5, 1996Codi, Inc.Portable computer carrying case
US5833051 *Mar 21, 1997Nov 10, 1998Tiefenbrun; JonathanMultifunctional musical instrument case
US6182826 *Apr 13, 1999Feb 6, 2001Harvey A. SlepianInflatable protective cover for golf club bags
US6513658 *Jun 13, 2001Feb 4, 2003Adkins Collectable Toys, Ltd.Protective package
US20050284791 *Jun 28, 2004Dec 29, 2005Sadow Bernard DComputer carrying case with inflated cushioning
US20060027472 *Aug 1, 2005Feb 9, 2006Selma GokcenTransportation device for a musical instrument
US20060207849 *Mar 15, 2006Sep 21, 2006Bbs Licensing, Inc.Inflatable air frame for soft-sided luggage and article of luggage incorporating same
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US8212134 *Feb 16, 2010Jul 3, 2012Daniel Watson KushnerCases for the protection of stringed musical instruments
US8978884Sep 12, 2012Mar 17, 2015Daniel Watson KushnerAutomatic musical instrument neck support in hybrid cases
US9355626Sep 12, 2012May 31, 2016Mono Creators Inc.Musical instrument case with protective boot
US20100147711 *Feb 16, 2010Jun 17, 2010Daniel Watson KushnerCases for the protection of stringed musical instruments
US20130312586 *Mar 18, 2013Nov 28, 2013Robert D. BrunnemerProtective cover and cleaning system for musical instruments
US20170040008 *Aug 8, 2016Feb 9, 2017Thomas Ray ByrneSoft outer case for carrying two hard-shell guitar cases together as one travel item
DE102013011471A1 *Jul 5, 2013Jan 8, 2015Eberhard BristleTransportbehälter für ein Fahrzeugrad
DE102013011471B4 *Jul 5, 2013Feb 12, 2015Eberhard BristleTransportbehälter für ein Fahrzeugrad
Classifications
U.S. Classification206/314, 53/428, 53/473, 206/522
International ClassificationB65B1/04, B65D81/02, A45C11/00
Cooperative ClassificationA45F3/04, A45C13/021, G10G7/005
European ClassificationA45C13/02B, G10G7/00B
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Feb 20, 2007ASAssignment
Owner name: KABLAM! CORP. D/B/A EBLITZ AUDIO LABS, LLC, CALIFO
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:BELITZ, MICHAEL J.;REEL/FRAME:018914/0796
Effective date: 20070117
Sep 23, 2008ASAssignment
Owner name: KABLAM! CORP. D/B/A EBLITZ AUDIO LABS, LLC, CALIFO
Free format text: NUNC PRO TUNC ASSIGNMENT;ASSIGNOR:BELITZ, MICHAEL J.;REEL/FRAME:021569/0409
Effective date: 20070117