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Publication numberUS20110019919 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 12/721,477
Publication dateJan 27, 2011
Filing dateMar 10, 2010
Priority dateFeb 15, 2004
Also published asEP1747508A2, EP1747508A4, EP1749260A2, EP1749260A4, EP1756704A2, EP1756704A4, EP1756729A2, EP1756729A4, EP1759272A2, EP1759272A4, EP1759273A2, EP1759273A4, EP1759274A2, EP1759274A4, EP1759275A2, EP1759275A4, EP1759276A2, EP1759276A4, EP1759277A2, EP1759277A4, EP1759281A2, EP1759281A4, EP1761841A2, EP1761841A4, EP1763842A2, EP1763842A4, EP1880301A2, EP1880301A4, EP2490152A1, US7421155, US7437023, US7593605, US7596269, US7599580, US7599844, US7606741, US7702624, US7706611, US7707039, US7742953, US7818215, US7831912, US8005720, US8019648, US8064700, US8214387, US8447144, US8515816, US20050234851, US20060023945, US20060026078, US20060026140, US20060029296, US20060036462, US20060036585, US20060041538, US20060041590, US20060041828, US20060047639, US20060050996, US20060061806, US20060078207, US20060087683, US20060119900, US20060294094, US20070011140, US20100183246, US20110044547, WO2005096750A2, WO2005096750A3, WO2005096755A2, WO2005096755A3, WO2005098596A2, WO2005098596A3, WO2005098597A2, WO2005098597A3, WO2005098598A2, WO2005098598A3, WO2005098599A2, WO2005098599A3, WO2005098600A2, WO2005098600A3, WO2005098601A2, WO2005098601A3, WO2005098602A2, WO2005098602A3, WO2005098603A2, WO2005098603A3, WO2005098604A2, WO2005098604A3, WO2005098605A2, WO2005098605A3, WO2005098606A2, WO2005098606A3, WO2005098607A2, WO2005098607A3, WO2005098610A2, WO2005098610A3, WO2005114380A2, WO2005114380A3
Publication number12721477, 721477, US 2011/0019919 A1, US 2011/019919 A1, US 20110019919 A1, US 20110019919A1, US 2011019919 A1, US 2011019919A1, US-A1-20110019919, US-A1-2011019919, US2011/0019919A1, US2011/019919A1, US20110019919 A1, US20110019919A1, US2011019919 A1, US2011019919A1
InventorsMartin T. King, Clifford A. Kushler, James Quentin Stafford-Fraser
Original AssigneeKing Martin T, Kushler Clifford A, James Quentin Stafford-Fraser
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Automatic modification of web pages
US 20110019919 A1
Abstract
Systems and methods for quickly and easily getting information about, or included in, a paper document into a public or private digital page. One embodiment of an example system includes a scanner that generates scan information from at least a portion of a paper document and a processing system that receives the generated scan information from the scanner, accesses a database of digital documents, searches the database based on the received scan information, locates a digital document corresponding to the paper document, and sends either the digital content or a hyperlink to the digital content to a predetermined web page.
Images(5)
Previous page
Next page
Claims(20)
1-19. (canceled)
20. A method in a computing system for automatically modify a distinguished document, comprising:
receiving a text string recognized in an image captured from a rendered document;
identifying a document containing the received text string; and
modifying the distinguished document to include a link to the identified document.
21. The method of claim 20 wherein the distinguished document is a web page.
22. The method of claim 20 wherein the capture is performed by a distinguished user, the method further comprising identifying the distinguished document as corresponding to the distinguished user.
23. The method of claim 20, further comprising modifying the distinguished document to include a contiguous portion of text in the identified document that contains the received text during.
24. The method of claim 20 wherein the link that the distinguished document is modified to include comprises a URL.
25. The method of claim 20, further comprising analyzing the captured image to recognize the received text string.
26. The method of claim 25, further comprising capturing the image from the rendered document.
27. A computer-readable medium having contents capable of causing a computing system to perform a method for automatically modifying a distinguished document, the method comprising:
receiving an image captured from a rendered document;
on the basis of the received image, identifying a document corresponding to the rendered document from which the image was captured; and
modifying the distinguished document to include a link to the identified document.
28. The computer-readable medium of claim 27 wherein the distinguished document is a web page.
29. The computer-readable medium of claim 27 wherein the capture is performed by a distinguished user, the method further comprising identifying the distinguished document as corresponding to the distinguished user.
30. The computer-readable medium of claim 27, the method further comprising modifying the distinguished document to include a contiguous portion of text in the identified document that is shown in the received image.
31. The computer-readable medium of claim 27 wherein the link that the distinguished document is modified to include comprises a URL.
32. The computer-readable medium of claim 27, the method further comprising capturing the image from the rendered document.
33. A computing system for automatically modifying a distinguished document, comprising:
a receiver that receives an image captured from a rendered document;
an identification subsystem that, on the basis of the received image, identifies a document corresponding to the rendered document from which the image was captured; and
a distinguished document modification subsystem that modifies the distinguished document to include a link to the identified document.
34. The computing system of claim 33 wherein the distinguished document is a web page.
35. The computing system of claim 33 wherein the capture is performed by a distinguished user, further comprising a distinguished document identification subsystem that identifies the distinguished document as corresponding to the distinguished user.
36. The computing system of claim 33 wherein the distinguished document modification subsystem further modifies the distinguished document to include a contiguous portion of text in the identified document that is shown in the received image.
37. The computing system of claim 33 wherein the link that the distinguished document modification subsystem modifies the distinguished document to include comprises a URL.
38. The computing system of claim 33, further comprises an image sensor that captures the image from the rendered document.
Description
    BACKGROUND
  • [0001]
    The use of printed books and documents (hereafter referred to as simply “documents”) has been commonplace for many hundreds of years. Over the centuries, various tools and strategies have evolved to try to make more effective use of printed documents. These range from handwritten (or typed) notes on the contents of documents (either on the document itself or in a separate but related document), to highlighting passages in a document deemed to be of greater significance, to manually copying passages from a document (or using a scanning copier, despite the fact that copyrights are often so infringed), to the simple act of including a printed index at the end of a document to facilitate locating information on a specific topic. Many new tools and strategies are needed now that a document can be accessed in an electronic, searchable format such as a file on a local computer or a web page that can be accessed with a browser.
  • [0002]
    The relatively recent innovation of providing a searchable electronic copy of a document that can be accessed using a standard personal computer is quite powerful in increasing the ease with which the desired contents can be accessed and utilized. When a traditional index is provided in such a context, once an entry is found, a single click of the mouse can take the user directly to the desired entry in the electronic text. Once a relevant entry has been found, its location can be retained as a “bookmark” and filed according to the user's choice, making future access to the location in the electronic document quick and easy.
  • [0003]
    It is a problem that these very useful tools for working with electronic documents cannot be used with the vast existing reserve of printed books and documents. Even though there are tremendous advantages that accrue with access to an electronic version of a document, these are obviously only available when such an electronic version is available (and a computer is available to access the electronic document). Even in those instances where such an electronic version is available, this still does nothing to enhance the actual use of the paper document itself. Furthermore, when newer revisions and updated versions of either the paper or the electronic version of a document become available, the owner of a previous version generally has little recourse but to go and purchase a new, updated copy of the material.
  • [0004]
    As is well known in the art, by using traditional methods for document processing (such as, for example, a flatbed scanner combined with appropriate computer software for optical character recognition), a user can create an electronic version of a paper document. However, in addition to the fact that such a task is laborious, time-consuming, and generally error-prone, it usually involves infringement of the copyright held by the author of the textbook in question. Further, even when an electronic version of a document is thus created, it is still subject to the limitations mentioned above—a computer is required to make any use of the additional features offered, and no additional utility is provided for the paper document itself. Despite the prevalence of computers, and despite the advantages conveyed by searchable electronic versions of documents, the continued widespread preference for creating and using paper documents is a clear indication of how attractive they remain to the average user. The portability, convenience, ease of viewing, and even the “feel” of paper documents clearly retain a powerful appeal to most individuals.
  • [0005]
    Therefore, there exists a need to allow users to easily navigate between printed and electronic versions of documents. There also exists a need to allow users to easily access electronic document versions or links of a paper document or article.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0006]
    FIG. 1 is a system diagram illustrating a typical environment in which embodiments of the system operate.
  • [0007]
    FIG. 2 is a diagram of an example scanner used in the system shown in FIG. 1;
  • [0008]
    FIG. 3 is a flow diagram of an example process performed by the system of FIG. 1;
  • [0009]
    FIG. 4 is a diagram of an example paper document scanned by the scanner of FIG. 2; and
  • [0010]
    FIG. 5 is a display of an example web log produced by the system of FIG. 1.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • [0011]
    Systems and methods for quickly and easily getting information about, or included in, a paper document into a public or private digital page are described. An example system includes a scanner that generates scan information of at least a portion of a paper document and a processing system in data communication with the scanner over a network. The processing system stores digital content corresponding to a plurality of paper documents into a database, receives the generated scan information from the scanner, searches the database to identify digital content associated with the received scan information, and sends at least one of a portion of the identified digital content or an address associated with the identified digital content to a network-accessible location being associated with the user, if results of that database search are positive. In one embodiment, the network-accessible location is a web log page associated with the user.
  • [0012]
    In another embodiment of the disclosed innovations, a blogger could scan some text from a paper document with a portable scanning device. The scanning device could either perform optical character recognition (OCR) on the scanned image or transmit either the raw image data or a partially processed version of the image data to a computer for remote OCR processing. The computer would submit at least a portion of the text to a search engine that would locate an electronic version of the paper document and return a hyperlink to the computer. The computer could then modify a predetermined blog page by adding an entry having at least a portion of the scanned text followed by a hyperlink to the electronic document. By optionally including a portion of the scanned text in the blog entry, the hyperlink can be put in context without requiring the blogger to type any explanatory text.
  • [0013]
    FIG. 1 illustrates a typical environment 100 in which some embodiments of the system operate. As illustrated, the example operating environment 100 includes a scanning device 102 (operative to graphically capture a portion of a document 104), a computer 106, wireless device 125, an account server 108 (having an account database), one or more document servers 110 (having document databases 112), vendor server (having an item database), aggregator server 160 (having an aggregator database 165), all interconnected via a network such as the Internet 110.
  • [0014]
    The computer 106 may include a memory containing computer executable instructions for processing an order request from scanning device 102 by obtaining an order. An example of an order could include an identifier (such as a serial number of the scanning device 102 or an identifier that uniquely identifies the user of the scanner), scanning context information and/or scanned information that serves as the basis for a search of one or more document databases 112 to uniquely identify the digital document corresponding to the document 104 being scanned. The computer 106 also includes a processor and memory. In alternative embodiments, operating environment 100 may include more or less components.
  • [0015]
    In other embodiments, the system 100 includes a wireless device 118, a vendor server 120 and an aggregator server 126. The servers 120 and 126 are coupled to each other via various sorts of networks (e.g., the Internet 130 or wireless network 132). Regardless of the manner by which the devices are coupled to each other, the scanning device 102, the computer 106, the wireless device 118, the account server 108, the document server 110, the vendor server 120 and the aggregator server 126 may be operable in accordance with well-known commercial transaction and communication protocols. In various embodiments, the functions and capabilities of the scanning device 102, the computer 106, and the wireless device 118 may be wholly or partially integrated into one device. Thus, the terms scanning device, computer and wireless device, could refer to the same device depending upon whether the device incorporates functions or capabilities corresponding to the roles of the scanning device 102, the computer 106 and the wireless device 118.
  • [0016]
    Additionally, in various embodiments, the computer 106 and the account server 108 may be wholly or partially integrated. Thus, the terms computer and account server, as used herein, for the purpose of this specification, including the claims, shall be interpreted with the meaning of an appropriately equipped device, operating in accordance with either a computer or an account server role.
  • [0017]
    In accordance with another embodiment, an operating environment 100 includes a document server 110 that has speech recognition capabilities. In this environment, no scanning device 102 is required, and in lieu of scanning a portion of a rendered document, the user reads aloud the portion of the document and the document server 110 performs speech recognition of the spoken text portion to generate the search query to be processed. For example, the user may place a telephone call from wireless device 118 directly to an access number for document server 110, and in response to automated prompts, reads aloud the portion of the rendered document. Because the ultimate task of the server is to identify a document within its database corresponding to the spoken text (that may be assumed to occur within the known corpus of text within the database), the task of correctly recognizing the spoken words is vastly easier than the task of correctly recognizing spoken text when no such information is available to constrain the search domain. This speech-recognition-based approach also has the advantage that it can be implemented using the currently available technology infrastructure, and does not require a user base of individuals who possess a scanning device 102. Thus, in the following disclosure, functions described as being performed by a scanner can alternatively be performed using a speech-recognition-based approach. The unique user identity associated with the scanner may equivalently be associated with, for example, a cellular phone used to call document server 110.
  • [0018]
    FIG. 2 is a block diagram of an embodiment of a scanner 102. The scanner 102 may include various means for ascertaining a context of a scan. In FIG. 2, the scanner 102 includes a scan port 150 to scan information from rendered documents, and various environmental sensors. The environmental sensors include one or more of a lens 156 (e.g. an aperture to a camera or light-sensitive device), a pixelator 160 to convert visual information of the environment into machine-compatible signals, a microphone 162 to convert sound of the environment (including spoken words) into machine-compatible signals, a Global Positioning System (GPS) 166 to provide a location function, and a tactile sensor 170 to provide sensitivity to contact signals. The scanner 102 also may include logic 172 to interact with the various sensors, possibly processing the received signals into different formats and/or interpretations. The logic 172 may be operable to fetch data and program instructions stored in associated memory such as RAM, ROM, or other suitable memory. The scanner 102 includes an interface 178 to communicate scanned information and environmental signals to a network and/or an associated computing device.
  • [0019]
    As an example of one use of the scanner 102, a reader may scan some text from a newspaper article with scanner 102. The text is scanned as a bit-mapped image via scan port 150. The logic 172 causes the bit-mapped image to be stored in memory 180. The logic 172 may also perform optical character recognition (OCR) or other post-scan processing on the bit-mapped image to convert it to text or an intermediate form of processed image data. The scanner 102 may then upload the bit-mapped image (or text or processed image data, if post-scan processing has been performed by the logic 172) to the computer 106 via the interface 178.
  • [0020]
    The scanner 102 further includes a velocity sensor 182 to sense velocity aspects of a scan action (e.g. how fast and in what direction a scan action occurs), an acceleration sensor 184 to detect acceleration aspects of a scan action, and a temperature sensor 188. Of course, not all scanner embodiments may include each of these features, and some embodiments may include additional features not found in the exemplary embodiment.
  • [0021]
    FIG. 3 illustrates an example process 200 performed by the system shown in FIG. 1. First, at a block 202, a user scans a document using the scanning device 102. At a block 204, information generated by the scanner 102 from the block 202 is sent to the document server 110 or some other searching system. Information uniquely identifying the scanner and/or the user (e.g., equipment serial numbers, billing information, subscription account number, etc.) is sent with the scanned information. At a block 206, the document server 110 or the searching system performs a search of documents stored in the database 112 or stored in a database distributed across the network 130 at various locations. At a decision block 210, the system 200 determines if there are results of the search. If there are no results of the performed search, then at a block 212, the document server 110 or the searching system sends a message that is presented to a user at the scanning device 102 or at the computer 106 or wireless device 118. The transmitted message is an error message that indicates to the operator of the scanning device 102 that the search based on the scan that they performed failed to identify at least one corresponding document in the database.
  • [0022]
    If there are results from the search, then the process 200 determines if the results are to go to one or more of a public or private location associated with the operator of the scanning device 102, see decision block 216. The results of the search, whether they be a link to a network-based location of the found results (e.g., a hyperlink) or an actual document (or portion thereof) identified in the search, are sent to a public location, at a block 220. The public location associated with the user can be in a number of different formats. A web log (blog) is one example of a public location that receives the results of the search. In one embodiment, the blog is automated to automatically post the results of the search in various formats. Blogs are described in more detail below. If the results of the search determined at the decision block 216 go to a private location, then a private location associated with the user receives the results of the search, see block 218. Whether the search results go to a public or private location associated with the user, various information of the search and the user may be recorded for later use, see block 224. The information recorded may be used, for example, to establish or modify a ranking within the document database 112 of any of the information or associated documents that were scanned and searched, and also to provide various demographic information with regard to the searcher (e.g., location, age, sex, etc.) and the items scanned by the searcher (which may be used by the document server 110 to create other useful databases).
  • [0023]
    A blog is an online journal (the contraction of “web log”) or a website. A blog usually shows the following primary characteristics:
  • [0024]
    frequently updated with new content;
  • [0025]
    content unit is a “post” or an “entry”—it may not necessarily be text but also pictures, sounds, videos, etc.;
  • [0026]
    posts are dated;
  • [0027]
    full posts or summaries are displayed on the blog home page with the last or freshest ones on top—that posts are listed in reverse chronologic order makes it very easy to see if a blog has been updated recently, or appears to be stalled, it is therefore an incentive (along with dated posts) for authors to publish frequently in order to keep the content fresh; and
  • [0028]
    posts are accessible through a permanent link and/or chronological archives (daily/weekly/monthly, or a linear previous/next navigation).
  • [0029]
    A blog may show the following secondary characteristics, which are not necessarily distinctive of blogs but are instrumental in their adoption:
  • [0030]
    the publication process is supported by a microcontent or personal publishing system—the emergence of those free or cheap systems which help people without knowledge of web technologies to easily publish content on the web has been the key factor in the spread of blogs outside the web-savvy, geek community;
  • [0031]
    a news feed is available for use with a news aggregator;
  • [0032]
    visitors may comment on posts, with or without registration, and their comments may appear publicly along with the post. At any time, a blog author may decide on a post-by-post basis if comments are allowed (most blogs allow comments while most web sites do not). Because most blogs allow comments, a blog may provide a newsfeed that includes visitor comments to improve interaction between publishers and their audience;
  • [0033]
    posts may be classified by categories;
  • [0034]
    each post may display a list of external links that point to it allowing readers to discover more sources around a particular topic—techniques known as TrackBacks, Pingbacks and Referrer tracking allow for the automatic creation of such back links between two websites;
  • [0035]
    display a list of other blogs (blogolist) and websites of interest—this is a great way to discover new blogs and also gives a better idea of who are the authors by seeing who they link to; and
  • [0036]
    each time a blog is updated, the blog may “ping” (i.e. signal to) a server that indexes and publishes a list of recently updated blogs (e.g. daypop).
  • [0037]
    FIG. 4 illustrates an article that is presented in a publication that a user may scan. The scan of a portion of the text may record enough information to perform an accurate search for an electronic copy of the associated document that is stored in the document database 112 or at a database associated with a vendor (e.g., publisher). After the user has scanned a portion of the document, the search is performed and the results of the search are sent to either a private or public location associated with the user depending upon some preset criteria.
  • [0038]
    In another embodiment, the article includes an icon 300 or other type of graphic image or text that when highlighted by the scanner 102 automatically sends any of the results of the search directly to the blog associated with the user. Of course, the control icon 300 does not necessarily have to be on the paper document that includes the article. The control icon 300 may be scanned from any document. For example, the user may carry a wallet-sized card with various control icons that the user may scan to cause the system 100 to perform certain actions. For example, the user may scan a control icon 300 which causes the text from the next scan to be submitted to a search engine and the search results automatically posted to a predetermined blog.
  • [0039]
    FIG. 5 illustrates a blog 320 associated with the user of the scanner. The results of the scanning of the article as shown in FIG. 4 may result in a link to that article being automatically entered and stored into the blog as a hyperlink 322. When a viewer selects the hyperlink 322, the digital article or a web page associated with the article is presented. This may also occur if the user scanned the icon 300 from the publication. Also, if the user has recorded his voice over the microphone 162 of the scanner 102, and desires that this voice recording be accessible through his blog 320, an audio (e.g., voice) icon 326 is presented on his blog 320. When a visitor viewing blog 320 activates the voice icon 326, the user's previously stored voice recording is played back to the visitor who activated the voice icon 326.
  • [0040]
    While the system has been illustrated and described, as noted above, many changes can be made without departing from its spirit and scope. Accordingly, the scope of the invention is not limited by such illustration and description. Instead, the invention should be determined entirely by reference to the claims that follow.
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