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Publication numberUS20110272305 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 12/776,680
Publication dateNov 10, 2011
Filing dateMay 10, 2010
Priority dateMay 10, 2010
Publication number12776680, 776680, US 2011/0272305 A1, US 2011/272305 A1, US 20110272305 A1, US 20110272305A1, US 2011272305 A1, US 2011272305A1, US-A1-20110272305, US-A1-2011272305, US2011/0272305A1, US2011/272305A1, US20110272305 A1, US20110272305A1, US2011272305 A1, US2011272305A1
InventorsChristopher Q. Lee
Original AssigneeLee Christopher Q
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Laptop computer protector
US 20110272305 A1
Abstract
A laptop computer protector system includes a fluid bladder system including fluid bladders. Fluid pressurization means is operatively associated with the fluid bladders for inflating them. A sleeve is positioned about the fluid bladder system. The fluid pressurization means includes an air pump and fluid conduits for fluidly interconnecting the fluid bladders.
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Claims(20)
1. A laptop computer protector system, comprising:
a) a fluid bladder system, comprising:
i. a plurality of fluid bladders; and,
ii. fluid pressurization means operatively associated with said plurality of fluid bladders for inflating said plurality of fluid bladders; and,
b) a sleeve positioned about said fluid bladder system.
2. The laptop computer protector system of claim 1, wherein said fluid pressurization means comprises an air pump.
3. The laptop computer protector system of claim 1, wherein said fluid pressurization means comprises a CO2 cartridge.
4. The laptop computer protector system of claim 1, wherein said fluid pressurization means comprises a plurality of fluid conduits for fluidly interconnecting said plurality of fluid bladders.
5. The laptop computer protector system of claim 1, wherein said plurality of fluid bladders comprises:
a) a main bladder positionable about a main portion of a laptop computer;
b) a first side bladder positionable about a first side portion of the laptop computer; and,
c) a second side bladder positionable about a second side portion of the laptop computer.
6. The laptop computer protector system of claim 1, wherein said plurality of fluid bladders comprises:
a) a first main bladder positionable about a first main portion of a laptop computer;
b) a second main bladder positionable about a second main portion of the laptop computer;
c) a first side bladder positionable about a first side portion of the laptop computer;
d) a second side bladder positionable about a second side portion of the laptop computer;
e) a third side bladder positionable about a third side portion of the laptop computer; and,
f) a fourth side bladder positionable about a fourth side portion of the laptop computer.
7. The laptop computer protector system of claim 1, wherein said fluid pressurization means, comprises an air release mechanism for depressurizing said plurality of fluid bladders.
8. The laptop computer protector system of claim 1, wherein at least one of said plurality of fluid bladders comprises at least one anchor patch for stabilizing the shape of its associated fluid bladder.
9. The laptop computer protector system of claim 1, wherein said bladders are preferably made of latex rubber material.
10. The laptop computer protector system of claim 1, wherein said sleeve substantially fully encompasses said fluid bladder system.
11. A system for protecting an object being transported, comprising:
a) a fluid bladder system, comprising:
i. a plurality of fluid bladders; and,
ii. fluid pressurization means operatively associated with said plurality of fluid bladders for inflating said plurality of fluid bladders; and,
b) a sleeve positioned about said fluid bladder system.
12. The system of claim 11, wherein said object comprises a portable computer.
13. The system of claim 11, wherein said fluid pressurization means comprises an air pump.
14. The system of claim 11, wherein said fluid pressurization means comprises a CO2 cartridge.
15. The system of claim 11, wherein said fluid pressurization means comprises a plurality of fluid conduits for fluidly interconnecting said plurality of fluid bladders.
16. The system of claim 11, wherein said plurality of fluid bladders comprises:
a) a main bladder positionable about a main portion of a laptop computer;
b) a first side bladder positionable about a first side portion of the laptop computer; and,
c) a second side bladder positionable about a second side portion of the laptop computer.
17. The system of claim 11, wherein said plurality of fluid bladders comprises:
a) a first main bladder positionable about a first main portion of a laptop computer;
b) a second main bladder positionable about a second main portion of the laptop computer;
c) a first side bladder positionable about a first side portion of the laptop computer;
d) a second side bladder positionable about a second side portion of the laptop computer;
e) a third side bladder positionable about a third side portion of the laptop computer; and,
f) a fourth side bladder positionable about a fourth side portion of the laptop computer.
18. The system of claim 11, wherein said fluid pressurization means, comprises an air release mechanism for depressurizing said plurality of fluid bladders.
19. The system of claim 11, wherein at least one of said plurality of fluid bladders comprises at least one anchor patch for stabilizing the shape of its associated fluid bladder.
20. The system of claim 11, wherein said bladders are preferably made of latex rubber material.
Description
BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of the Invention

The present invention relates generally to laptop computer protection, and more particularly to a laptop computer protector system utilizing a fluid bladder system.

2. Description of the Related Art

Accidents such as dropping a laptop computer account for a significant amount of all notebook related insurance claims. Business travelers and students commonly place laptops in a laptop case or a school bag that has a laptop compartment during transportation. The cases or compartments generally utilize thick foams that protect the laptop computers. However, the protection offered may be deficient when the bag is accidentally dropped or slammed against hard floor, doors, or desk corners.

The shock-absorbing materials used range from Open Cell Foams to Closed Cell Foams to Dual Density Foam. According to White Mountain Precision Backpacks, a backpack manufacturer based in Melbourne Australia, “while the (Open Cell Foam) padded straps may look great and feel wonderfully soft at the time of purchase, this will not be the case when the backpack is under full load.” (http://www.whitemountain.com.au/backpack_construction/material_faqs.html) Open Cell Foam is highly compressible and can cause the shoulder and hip belts to over compress under heavy loads, providing minimum comfort. Thus, it does not provide a very good solitary padding material for backpacks or laptop cases.

Closed Cell Foam, e.g. Ensolite® foam, prevents full compressibility. Ensolite® has rubber based materials and completely encapsulates air chambers for excellent insulation. Although Ensolite® is used by many better to high end backpack and laptop case designers for comfort at the shoulder, hip, and lower portion of the back; and, sometimes used in laptop compartments, Ensolite® still fails to effectively protect the computer laptop when the bag is accidentally dropped to the ground or slammed against desk corners or walls.

Another material used by laptop case and backpack manufacturers is a combination of Ensolite and Open Cell Foam, which is known as Dual Density Foam. Dual Density Foam is more compressible, therefore, softer. Backpacks and laptop cases with Dual Density Foam capitalize on the advantages of both foams, placing the cell foam against the body and the Ensolite® against the load. Although Dual Density Foam offers both comfort and ease on loads, it is still not sufficient to offer complete protection to the laptop. Furthermore, none of the manufacturers, brands, or designers utilize this Dual Density Foam material specifically in the laptop compartment for the purpose of protecting the laptop computer.

These are the three materials commonly used by better to high-end backpack manufacturers, however, none of the brands or manufacturers has innovated any features similar to the present invention for the purpose of providing more complete protection of the laptop. The present invention is a multipurpose innovation to help protect the laptop by more completely absorbing shocks, lessening the impact when the bag is accidentally dropped to the ground, hit against walls, or slammed against table corners. The inventive principles disclosed herein offer comfort to the shoulder, lower back, and hip while the bag is transported.

There are numerous patents that have issued that have involved innovations in the field of computer protection and storage. These include, for example, the following:

U.S. Pat. No. 5,706,992, entitled “Backpack for Carrying a Laptop Computer,” discloses a backpack for carrying a laptop computer comprising: flexible front, rear, bottom and side panels the interior surfaces of which define the interior of the backpack, wherein the side panel extends along each side and across the top of the backpack and the front, rear and side panels are joined together along their perimeters; a compartment for storing a laptop computer in the interior of the backpack; a first closure means extending longitudinally along the side panel and transversely across the top to control access to the compartment; at least one adjustable interlocking assembly joined to the backpack so as to bridge the first closure at the bottom half of the backpack whereby pivotal separation of the first closure along the side and the top panels is restricted to a predetermined interval when the closure means is opened; and, a pair of adjustable shoulder straps connected to the exterior of the rear panel for carrying the backpack.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,676,223, entitled “Business Case,” discloses a business case including a front compartment, middle compartment, an expandable rear compartment, a removable portable computer carrying case designed to carry a portable computer, and a suit carrier. The bag member can be dropped into one of two panels located on the front face of the front compartment. The panels additionally allow for easy access to a portable computer and related accessories stored within the carrying case. Alternatively, the carrying case can be closed and stored in the expandable rear compartment when the suit carrier is stored in the front compartment of the case. The middle compartment is sized to hold clothing and travel related items for business trips and is equipped with pouches for smaller items. Furthermore, the middle compartment of the housing may include wheels, handles, and feet for easily moving and balancing the case.

These prior systems include complicated, expensive systems and/or utilize materials discussed above that do not provide adequate computer protection.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

In one broad aspect, the present invention is a laptop computer protector system. It includes a fluid bladder system including fluid bladders. Fluid pressurization means is operatively associated with the fluid bladders for inflating them. A sleeve is positioned about the fluid bladder system. The fluid pressurization means includes some type of air pump and fluid conduits for fluidly interconnecting the fluid bladders.

The present invention protects laptops (or many other breakable objects) from being damaged when dropped from even a 5-6 foot height, slammed against other hard objects such as table corners, walls, or office desks; or, shifted during transportation.

Additionally, when fully inflated and placed inside a backpack, the present invention, which will be marketed under the trademark AEROTEK™, also offers cushion against the user's back to reduce stress on the upper and lower back, shoulders and hips. It can reduce pain in the upper and lower back, shoulder, and hips. It shifts the weight to preferred locations of the back to help reduce future disc rupture.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a first embodiment of the laptop computer protector system of the present invention with a laptop computer shown being partially positioned therein.

FIG. 2 is a perspective view showing the laptop computer positioned therein to reveal a portion of the fluid bladder system.

FIG. 3 shows the laptop computer protector system closed about the laptop computer.

FIG. 4 is a perspective view of the first embodiment of the laptop computer protector system in an unfolded configuration, with the sleeve removed to show the fluid bladder system.

FIG. 5 is a perspective view of the first embodiment of the laptop computer protector system in a folded configuration, with the sleeve removed to show the fluid bladder system.

FIG. 6 is a view taken along line 6-6 of FIG. 1.

FIG. 7 is a view taken along line 7-7 of FIG. 3.

FIG. 8 is a perspective view of a second embodiment of the laptop computer protector system in an unfolded configuration, with the sleeve removed to show the fluid bladder system, this second embodiment being a six bladder configuration.

FIG. 9 is a view taken along line 9-9 of FIG. 8.

FIG. 10 illustrates the use of a fluid cartridge for providing fluid pressurization.

FIG. 11 is a perspective view of the laptop computer protector system being utilized in a backpack.

The same elements or parts throughout the figures of the drawings are designated by the same reference characters, while equivalent elements bear a prime designation.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

Referring now to the drawings and the characters of reference marked thereon, FIG. 1 illustrates a first preferred embodiment of the laptop computer protector system of the present invention, designated generally as 10, shown with a laptop computer 12 being inserted therewithin. The laptop computer 12 is shown fully inserted in FIG. 2. The laptop computer protector system 10 includes a fluid bladder system, designated generally as 14; and, a sleeve, designated generally as 16. The fluid bladder system 14 is preferably covered and sown up with the sleeve 16, and as such can be easily slipped into any laptop compartment of, for example, a laptop case, a school bag, duffel bag, or handbag. A lid 18 of the laptop computer protector system 10 is shown in a closed position in FIG. 3. The sleeve is preferably formed of nylon fabric.

Referring now to FIG. 4, the laptop computer protector system is shown in an unfolded configuration, with the sleeve removed to reveal the fluid bladder system 14. In this embodiment, the fluid bladder system 14 includes a main bladder 20 that is positionable about a main portion of a laptop computer. A first side bladder 22 is positionable about a first side portion of the laptop computer; and, a second side bladder 24 is positionable about a second side portion of the laptop computer. An air pump 26 provides a fluid pressurization means for inflating the fluid bladders 20, 22, 24. This fluid pressurization means also includes fluid conduits 28, 30, 32, that interconnect the fluid bladders 20, 22, 24. The bladders are preferably made of smooth but strong latex rubber material. When standing the laptop protector system upright, each bladder is preferably in a range of about 13 to 15 inches in height, preferably about 1 to 1.5 inches in width, and 10.5 inches in length. The fluid conduits 28, 30, 32 are preferably formed of plastic or latex tubes. Fluid conduits 28, 30, and 32 preferably have diameters in a range of about 0.06-0.25 inches, most preferably about 0.125 inches in diameter. The air pump may comprise, for example, a squeeze bulb. An air release mechanism 34 is utilized to depressurize the fluid bladders. The air release mechanism may be a button or other suitable valve.

The main bladder 20 preferably includes anchor patches 36 for stabilizing the shape of the bladder. Each of the four anchor patches 36 may be formed of silicon latex or rubber.

FIG. 5 shows the laptop computer protector system 10 in a folded configuration, with the sleeve removed to show the fluid bladder system 14. This figure also shows how the anchor patches 36 stabilize the form and shape of the laptop protector system. FIG. 6 and FIG. 7 show additional views taken along lines denoted in FIGS. 2 and 3, respectively.

It is noted that the sleeve 16 of the laptop computer protector system may include additional features for ease in use, for example, a handle 38, pouches 40, VELCRO® attachments 42, and latch 44; all best seen in FIGS. 1-3. The sleeve 16 may be designed to substantially fully encompass the fluid bladder system 14 including the air pump 26.

Referring now to FIGS. 8-9, another preferred embodiment of the laptop computer protector system, designated generally as 46. In this embodiment, the laptop computer protector system 46 is embodied as a six bladder configuration. It is shown in this figure unfolded, with the sleeve removed to expose the fluid bladder system. Laptop computer protector system 46 splits the main bladder into a first main bladder 48 positionable about a first main portion of a laptop computer (not shown); and, a second main bladder 50 positionable about a second main portion of the laptop computer. It includes first, second, third, and fourth side bladders 52, 54, 56, 58, each positionable about a respective side portion of the laptop computer. As in the previous embodiment, the bladders are inflated by a suitable air pressurization means, including conduits 60, pump 62 and valve 64.

Instead of squeeze bulb air pump other suitable pressurization means can be used. For example, referring now to FIG. 10, another embodiment designated generally as 66, utilizes a CO2 cartridge 68.

FIG. 11 illustrates how the laptop computer protector system 10 can be inserted into a suitable carrying case, such as a backpack 70.

Although the inventive features herein have discussed relative to their application with a laptop computer they can apply equally well with other sensitive objects that are desired to be transported, such as desktop monitors, china, ceramics, glass, crystals, etc.

Other embodiments and configurations may be devised without departing from the spirit of the invention and the scope of the appended claims.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US8205744 *Sep 16, 2010Jun 26, 2012Richard TashjianLaptop shield carrying case and cellular shield holster
US8607977 *Sep 14, 2012Dec 17, 2013Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd.Keyboard unit with cradling function
US8746447 *Mar 27, 2012Jun 10, 2014Acrox Technologies Co., Ltd.Protector for portable electronic device and method for manufacturing the same
US8789731 *May 13, 2011Jul 29, 2014Robert D. HartApparatus and method for storing and transporting electronic devices
US20110273820 *May 10, 2010Nov 10, 2011Nazim TemizPortable Electronic Device Case
US20110284607 *May 13, 2011Nov 24, 2011Hart Robert DApparatus and method for storing and transporting electronic devices
US20130256160 *Mar 27, 2012Oct 3, 2013Acrox Technologies Co., LtdProtector for portable electronic device and method for manufacturing the same
Classifications
U.S. Classification206/320, 206/522
International ClassificationB65D81/02, B65D85/00
Cooperative ClassificationA45C13/021, A45C2011/003, A45C5/03, A45C2013/025
European ClassificationA45C5/03, A45C13/02B