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Publication numberUS2012317 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 27, 1935
Filing dateMay 12, 1932
Priority dateMay 12, 1932
Publication numberUS 2012317 A, US 2012317A, US-A-2012317, US2012317 A, US2012317A
InventorsMuller Robert L
Original AssigneeBurroughs Adding Machine Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Paper equipment for accounting machines
US 2012317 A
Abstract  available in
Images(9)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

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Aug.`27, 1935. RLMULLER 2,012,317

PAPER EQUIPMENT FOR ACCOUNTING MACHINES Filed May l2, 1952 9 Sheets-Sheet 8 INVENTOR ATTORNEYS Y Aug. 27, 1935.

Pig. 20.

R. L. MULLER PAPER EQUIPMENT FOR ACCOUNTING MACHINES Filed May 12, 1932 9 Sheets-Sheet 9 INVENTOR dmv/2%@ ATTORNEYS LPatented Aug. 27, 1935 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE' 2,012,317 PAPER EQUIPMENT FOR ACCOUNTING y MACHINES Application May 12, 1932, Serial No. 610,788

ss ciaims.

This invention relates to paper equipment for accounting machines. It is directed particularly to an improved control for paper carriages that will enable greater speed to be obtained in certain classes of work such as the writing of public utility bills.

In making out certain classes of bills, such as public utility bills, it is often necessary to print an item several jtimes on diierent portions of the bill, some portions going to a diierent person in the accounting system and one or more portions going tolthe customer.A 'I'his duplicate printing is usually accomplished by having a machine operate through a series of automatic operations during which the paper` carriage is tabulated from one column to another across the machine in a given direction. Before a second series of itemscan be entered, the carriage must be returned across the machine to its original position, line spaced, and then actuated through thesecond series of operations. The return of the carriage across 'the machine is somewhat slow and the time required for the return is lost.

The present invention contemplates an improvement in which, instead of returning the carriage across the machine in order to get it in position for a second series of items, the second, or succeeding, series of items is entered immediately and the carriage is then returned step by step during which time the second series of items is printed. In other words, operations may be started with the carriage at either end of its travel and the carriage stepped across the malchine away from the position it happens to be in. No time is lost during the carriage return. 'I'his saving in time is important in industries where hundr/eds of bills are written per day.

The general object of the invention is to provide an improved paperequipment for accounting machines.

A more particular object is toprovide an imi proved carriagel control mechanism that will en- (Cl. 23S-60) l which, in a step-by-step return of a paper carriage, certain predetermined columns may be skipped.

A further object is to provide a carriage re- -turn mechanism in which the carriage may be automatically arrested in an intermediate position, the machine operated with the carriage in this position, and the return of the carriage then automatically completed without any attention on therpart of the operator.

Other objects are: Y

To increase the speed of the automatic carriage return mechanism by setting it into operation more quickly than has heretofore been the Case;

To provide improved means for automatically line spacing the platen at the end of the travel of the paper carriage in either direction, and f between the end of one series and the beginning of another series of automatic operations of the machine;

To provide for improved control oi non-adding and total-taking so that items or totals may be printed during each operation of a series of automatic operations of the machine without causing incorrect registration in the registe mechanism.

Still other objects will appear from the following specification and drawings.

An embodiment of the invention is shown in the drawings in which;

Figures 1 and 2 illustrate examples of the work that the machine is adapted to perform.

Fig. 3 is a right side elevationv of a machine having the invention applied thereto, the parts being shown in normal addition condition.

Fig. 4 is a partial right side elevation similar to Fig. 3 with the parts in the position they occupy `with the machine conditioned for operation immediately after the carriage has moved to its'last column in itsY movement from right to left across the machine, viewing the machine from the iront. p y

`Figs..5 and 6 are detail views of portions of the automatic repeat mechanism. i

Fig. '1 is a detail view of a portion of the mechanism that controls the automatic fline spacing to be returned step by step across the machine.

Fig. 9 is a detail view of certain of the controls in the positions they occupy for the rst machine operation after the carriage has reached its last columnar position to the right after its movement from left to right across the machine viewing the machine from the front.

Fig. 10 is a left side elevation of the machine with the parts in normal position.

Fig. 11 is a detail View of a portion of the mechanism for conditioning the carriage return mechanism for operation.

Fig. 12 is a partial section and elevation from the rear of the mechanism shown in Fig. 11.

Fig. 13 is a partial rear view of the machine with the carriage return mechanism removed, the parts being in normal condition.

Fig. 14 is a detail view of the carriage control for the automatic repeat mechanism.

Fig. l5 is a rear view of the controls for the carriage return mechanism which automatically enable and disable said mechanism whereby the carriage is returned in a step by step manner, the parts being shown in normal position.

Fig. 16 is a front View of the controls shown in Fig. 15.

Fig. 17 is a front view of the controls for the carriage return mechanism showing the parts in the position they occupy after they have been positioned to condition the carriage return mechanism for operation.

Fig. 18 is a rear view of the controls for the carriage return mechanism showing particularly the disabling mechanism for disabling the earriage return mechanism.

Fig. 19 is a view similar to Fig. 18 showing the position of the parts after the carriage return mechanism has been disabled and the carriage has reached its position of rest in the column in which it is stopped.

' Fig. 20 is a rear view of the machine with the carriage return unit removed in order to show the carriage controls more clearly.

In order that the mechanism and the purpose of the vai'ious portions thereof may be more clearly understood as the description progresses, a brief explanation will first be given. of certain examples of work that may be performed.

Examples of work Fig. 1 shows a public utility bill having four sections separable from one another, each bearing a list of the same items. After the bill is written, the accounting stub and the collection stub are separated from the bill and they go to separate departments. The customers bill and the payment stub are both sent to the customer. When the customer pays his bill the customers bill portion is receipted and returned to the customer and the payment stub is detached for the use of the cashier.

This bill requires that any given item be printed four times. The usual practice has been to supply the machine with an automatic repeat print mechanism which causes it to go through a series of operations during which the carriage is tabulated so that the item is repeated in different predetermined columnar positions of the carriage. After the series of operations has been completed the carriage is returned across the machine by hand or by power to its original starting position after which a second-entry is made and the machine is operated through a second series of operations.

In the present machine, the carriage is allowed to remain in the last columnar position to which it has been moved by the rst series of operations. The platen is automatically line spaced and the second series of operations is started with the carriage in the position it happens to occupy at the end of the first series. The second series of items is printed while the carriage is returned across the machine.

In Fig. 1 the first series of items is for service $5.00. The amount ($5.00) is entered on the keys with the carriage in its rst columnar position, it is printed in the first column, and the machine goes through a, series of automatic operations resulting in printing the item $5.00 in the second, third, and fourth columns. After the $5.00 is printed in the last column, the platen is line spaced and the next series of entries for toll $.50 begins on the accounting stub and continues across the bill to the left. The next seriesvof operations is to print lthe total of the two items. The platen is line spaced before the next series of operations, the total key is depressed, and the machine is then operated through. a third series of operations to print the total on each of the stubs. The carriage now occupies its left hand position, viewing the machine from the front, and, under former practice, the carriage would be returned to the right before another bill was inserted. In the present machine, the carriage is allowed to remain in the left hand position and the second bill is inserted immediately after the first and without changing the position of the carriage.

Fig. 2 represents a second bill in which the first item is for service $5.00. This bill is inserted while the carriage is in its left-hand position so that the first entry is printed on the accounting stub". The machine is then put through a series of operations that prints the item on each of the sections of the bill as the carriage moves to the right after which the platen is automatically line spaced and the second item is entered, namely, Toll $.50. The machine goes through a second series of operations to print the second item on each part ofthe bill while the carriage is moving to the left after which the platen is line spaced again and a third item is entered, namely, Extension $1.00. This is printed on each portion of the bill while the carriage is returning to the right after which the platen is again line spaced and a fourth item, namely, Advertising $2.00 is entered, and the machine given a fourth series of operations as the carriage moves to the left. This leaves the paper carriage in its left-hand position as viewed from the front. It is now desired to take a total. The platen is automatically line spaced, the total key depressed, and the machine operated through a fifth series of operations which results in printing the total on each part of the stub of the bill as the carriage returns step by step to the right.

It will be understood that it is not desirable to enter each of the items in the register for each of the operations of the machine although it is necessary to enter the items during one of the operations. This calls for a control that will result in entering the items once in a register no matter in which direction the carriage is traveling. Likewise, it is not desirable to clear the register for the printing of each total, but it is desirable to clear it after the last totaling operation has been performed. It is therefore necessary to cause the machine to go through subtotaling operations in all but its last total printing operation and this must occur no matter :whether the carriage is moving from left to right or right to left.

General machine features The invention is shown applied to a Burroughs calculating machine, the general features of which are well known and described in numerous patents so that only a brief outline of them will be given here.

The machine has a plurality of depressible amount keys Il) (Fig. 3) controlling the differential positions of actuator racks II. Associated with the actuator racks are type segments I2 which are differentially positioned with the actuator racks for the purpose of printing the items corresponding to the actuator rack positions.

Associated with the actuator racks is an addition-subtraction register I3 of the tumbling type in which items entered on the amount keys may ,be added or subtracted. Also associated with the racks are a plurality of counters of the interspersed-pinion type of which one is shown num-W,

bered I4 in Fig. 3.

The register I3 is rocked into and out of engagement with the actuator racks by means of a pitman I5 (Fig. '10) connected to a three-armed lever I6 carrying studs I1 and I8. The threearmed lever I6 is rocked by means of a pass-by pawl I9 carried on the end of an arm 2li which is oscillated by the shaft 2l at each operation of the machine. The arrangement is such that the register is normally in engagement with the actuator racks. At the beginning of the forward stroke of the machine the pass-by pawl i9 engages the stud I1 and rocks the register out of engagement with the racks so that the racks are diierentially positioned while the register is out of engagement with them. At the beginning of the return stroke the pass-by pawl I9 engages a stud I8 and rocks the register into engagement with the actuator racks so that the item entered on the amount key is registered during the return stroke of the machine.

The register may be non-added by disabling the pass-by pawl I9 to prevent it from engaging the stud I8 upon the return stroke oi the machine. This is accomplished by means of a pivoted member 22 urged clockwise by a spring 23 to inoperative position but movable to the operative position of Fig. 10 for disabling the pawl I9 by a pivoted member 24 which is moved by a lever 25 carrying a stud 26 which operates on a raised portion 21 of member 24. Lever 25 is controlled by one arm 23 of a pivoted yoke`29 having another arm AIII positioned to be engaged by one or more rolls III on a paper carriage.

The machine has a total key T which, when depressed downward, conditions the mechanism for total-taking. Depression of the key T lowers the pitman I5 so as to disconnect it from the stud 32 on the register frame 33 and position it for connection to the stud 34. 1f at the beginning of the forward stroke of the machine the register is already in engagement with the racks, the forward movement of the pitman I5 will not rock the register out of engagement, but, if for any reason the register is not in engagelment with the racks, the forward movement of n of engagement as would occur if the total key were not depressed. The actuator racks are then differentially positioned by the register pinions,

suitable stops being provided for arresting the register pinions in l position. At the beginning of the return stroke of the machiney the rearward movement of pitman I5 rocks the register out of engagement with the actuator racks instead oi into engagement with them as in addition so that the pinions remain inY 0" position, i. e., the register is lei't clear.

A traveling paper carriage 40 is provided supporting a platen 4I which is rotatably mounted so that it may be line spaced. The carriage is mounted to travel back and forth across the machine and it is urged from right to left as viewed from the front ofthe machine by means of a spring drum 42 and tape 43 as shown in Fig. 13. The carriage has. the usual tabulating bar, shown in Fig. 20, carrying a plurality of tabulating dogs 44 (Fig. 13) adapted to engage a stop 45. 'I'he carriage is tabulated from one column to another by momentarily rocking the bar carrying the tabulating dogs 44 so that the dog 44` immediately engaging stop 45 is raised vabove the stop. This permits the carriage to move under the influence of its spring until the next dog strikes the stop, the bar carrying the dogs having, inthe meantime, been returned. The bar may be rocked by hand or automatically by the power of the machine.

The stop 45 .is cushioned by being connected by a link 46 to one arm 41 of a yoke 48 pivoted at 49 to the back panel. The other arm 50 of this yoke is connected by a link 5I to the piston 52 of a dash pot 53. The details of this cushioning mechanism are described in Muller Patent No. 1,757,134. The paper-positioning and paper feeding means of the carriage are oi' the general type shown in Muller Patent No. 1,787,489 and need not be explained in this application.

The machine is provided with a motor drive comprising a motor (Fig. 3) controlled by a clutch in housing 56. When ythe clutch is engaged the motor gives the machine a forward and return stroke of operation by oscillating the shaft 51 (Fig. l0) to which is` flxed a crank 5I connected by a link 59 to a wrist pin 60 on a crank GI connected to a shaft driven by the motor.

The clutch 56 is conditioned to cause the motor to give the machine a stroke of operation by depressing a motor bar 62 (Fig. 4) connected to two pivoted levers 63 and 64. Depression of the motor bar 62 rocks lever 6l counterclockwse and this lever, acting through a spring B5, raises a link which conditions the clutch to cause the motor to give the machine a stroke of operation. The shaft 51 (Fig. 3), which is oscillated during each operation of the machine, is connected bya crank and connecting rod to a full stroke sector 51 carrying a stud 68 positioned to engage a projection on link as the machine is operated. During the forward stroke of the machine the full stroke sector is rocked counterclockwise and the stud i8 engages link. to move it downward to disconnect the clutch. This motor drive and the control therefor by means of the motor bar 62 are described in detail in Vincent Patent No. 866,750.

The motor also drives an automatic L.carriage return mechanism indicated generally at 69 (Figs. 3 and 10) which, except for the improvements herein shown and described, is shown and described in detail in Rinsche Patent No. 1,580,534.

Automatic repeat mechanism 'I'he machine is provided with an automatic repeat mechanism of the general type` shown in Patent No. 1,397,774. .Although this mechanism is well known, its close association and combination with the present invention, together with the modications that have been made in the control thereof, require that the mechanism be explained.

When the motor bar 62 is depressed, a latch 10 on the lever 64 normally engages over a stud 1| on lever 63 to hold the motor bar depressed. However, in normal, non-repeat, operations, the latch 10 is released by means of a slide 12 carrying the lug 13 adapted to engage the upper end of the latch 10. The slide is moved by the upper end of a pivoted lever 14 whose lower end carries a roller stud 15 adapted to be engaged by a pass-by pawl 16 on an arm 11. This pass-by pawl is mounted so that, normally, during the clockwise movement of arm 11, the pawl passes below the roller stud 15 and, then, upon the return movement of arm 11, the pawl cams stud 15 to rock the lever 14 counterclockwise. When the lever 14 is so rocked it releases the latch 10 which, in turn, releases the motor bar for return to normal. The lever 14 also carries a releasing bail 18 for releasing the latches of the depressed keys so that the keys will be normally released for movement to normal during the return stroke of the machine.

Repeat operations are obtained by preventing the pass-by pawl 16 from moving below the stud 15 during the clockwise movement of arm 11. This condition is brought about by moving a slide 8B rearward far enough to bring a shelf 8l on the slide beneath a stud 82 on the arm 11 so that the arm cannot descend to the full limit of its movement. The slide is connected through a spring 83 (Fig. 8) and by a pin and slot connection to one arm 84 of the pivoted bell crank lever having another arm 85 extending rearwardly and positioned under the end of one arm of a bell crank lever 86, pivoted on the back plate of the machine (Fig. 13.) This lever is connected by a link 81 to one arm 88 of a pivoted yoke 89 having a carriage control arm whose upper end is positioned .in the path of a roller 9! carried by a shaft 92 on the paper carriage. One of these rolls may be provided for any one or more columns of the carriage. In the machine shown a roll is provided for each column 9i, SI2, 913, and 914 and the machine is arranged for four column work.

When the roll 9| engages the end of arm 90 it rocks the yoke 89 clockwise as viewed in Fig. 13. This rocks the bell crank lever 86 counterclockwise and moves the arm 85 downwardly. Referring to Fig. 8, the downward movement of lever 86 rocks the bell crank lever 84-85 clockwise which pulls the slide 80 rearwardly to position the shelf 8| under the stud 82. Accordingly,vwhen one of thc rollers 9! on the carriage enga-ges the arm 90, the repeat mechanism is conditioned for repeat operation. Y

When the motor bar 62 is latched downward in the position of Fig. 4, the link 66 is, nevertheless, moved down at each operation of the machine by the stud 68 on the full stroke sector 61. This downward movement is permitted by the pin and slot connection between the upper end of the link 66 and the lever 63. 'I'he downward movement of the link 66 merely tensions the spring 65. After the link 66 is mcved downward by the full stroke sector, its full return is temporarily delayed by means of a latch 92 which moves over a stud 93 on the link 66 as shown in Fig. 6. This temporarily prevents the link 66 from rising again but the link must be raised in order to give the machine another stroke of operation. The link is released by means of a hook-shaped extension 94 (Fig. 4) on the slide 80, which extension is positioned to engage a stud 95 on the latch 92.

Referring now to Figs. 13 and 14, it will be observed that the end of arm 90 which controls the movement of the repeat slide 8D has a pointed portion 96 and an inclined portion 91 (Fig. 14). As the carriage moves to the left, which would be to the right in Fig. 13, the roll 9| passes over the high point 96 on the arm 9D and moves the repeat slide 8l) farther rearwardly than is necessary for repeat operations. This extra movement of the slide causes the extension 94 (Fig. 4) to engage stud 95 and moves the latch 92 to a position to release the link 66 so that the latter will move upward under the infiuence of its tensioned spring 65. After link 66 has moved upward it is releasably held in its upper position by a scissors latch, as shown in Fig. 5, said latch including the latch 92 and an associated member connected together by a spring. This extra movement of the repeat slide 80 is only a mo1nen-" tary one. As soon as the roll 9| passes over the high point 96, the repeat slide 80 returns forward under the influence of its spring 98 (Fig. 8), but it does not move forward to a released position. It is to be noted that when the carriage is at rest in a columnar position provided with a repeat roll as shown in Fig. 13 and in dotted lines in Fig. 14, the roll enges the inclined face 91 of arm 90 so as to hold the arm downward. This holding down of the arm 90 holds the repeat slide 80 rearward in its repeat position and this point must be kept in mind in connection with the subsequent description of the operation of the machine.

In order that the operation of this automatic repeat mechanism may be clearly visualized, a sequence of operations will be followed through. In this connection it must be remembered that the paper carriage moves from one column to another at the end of the return stroke of operation of the machine, that is, the machine operates to perform its calculating and printing functions after which the carriage automatically moves to the next column so as to be in position for the next machine operation. In the present machine a repeat roller is provided in the first column so that when the machine stands in its normal unoperated position in column No.

1, the lever arm 90 of yoke 89 is held down by a Q repeat roller 9| on the carriage.

Assume, now, that the motor bar 62 is depressed. As soon as it is depressed it is latched in depressed position by latch 1U. Depression of the bar raises the link 66 and causes the motor to give the machine a stroke of operation. During the latter part of the forward stroke of the machine the link 66 is moved downwardly by stud 68 and, on the return stroke, it is held from complete return movement bythe latch 92. The arm 11 is rocked clockwise as viewed in Fig. 4 during the forward stroke, but the pass-by pawl 16 does not move below the roller stud 15. On the return stroke of the machine the stud 68 on the full stroke sector releases link 66, but the latter cannot fully rise immediately because of the latch 92. The return stroke does not cause the pass-by pawl 16 to rock lever 14, and, consequently, the latch 10 is not released, nor are the depressed keys released. At the end of the return stroke of the machine the carriage is released and it moves to the next or No. 2 column under the influence of its spring. As it moves to the No. 2 column the roll 912 for the second column engages the high point 96 of the lever 90 and moves it so as to move the repeat slide rearwardly sufficiently to move latch 92 from over the stud 93. 'I'he link 66' then completes its upward movement under the influence of its spring 65 so as to condition the clutch to cause the motor to give the machine another stroke of operation. During the time this occurs the carriage has been moving to its home position and the roll 9|2 moves over the high point 96 of arm.9| tothe inclined portion 91 so as to hold the repeat slide 80 in position to cause a second repeat operation.

The machine thus continues to operate automatically as long as repeat rolls 9|, 9|3, 9|*, etc. are provided to 'keep the repeat slide 60 in its rearward position. 4

When the carriage moves to its last columnar position, which is the fourth column in the present machine, it is desired to stop the automatic repeat operations of J the machine. However, the machine must be operated in the fourth column.

Referring to Fig. 20, it will be observed that l the roll 9|4, which is operative when the carriage moves from its third to its fourth columnar po; i

sition, is located in a slightly different position than the rolls for the othercolumns.' It is positioned so that, while it will move the arm 90 down as the carriage moves from its third toxits fourth columnar position by reason of the roll engaging the high point 96 of the arm, it passes beyond the arm when the carriage reaches its final position in the fourth column. In other words, the arm 90 is not held down when the carriage is in the fourth column. The result is that, as the carriage moves from its third to its fourth columnar position, the arm 90 is moved downwardly by roll 9|* so as to move the repeat slide 00 rearwardly to release the latch 92 to enable the link 66 to move up to give the machine a stroke of operation in the fourth column, but

arm 90 andirepeat slide 00 are immediately released and they move back so that the repeat 'slide is in its forward non-repeat` position. `The result is that, as the machine is operated in the vfourth column, the pass-by pawl 16 moves below the roller stud 15 upon the forward stroke of the machine. Then, upon the return stroke of .the machine, the lever 14 is rocked which releases the depressed keys and releases latch 10 thereby -f enabling the motor bar 62 to return to `normal to condition the controls'so that no succeeding automatic operation of the machine will occur.

In this manner, the motor driving means is caused to actuate the machine through a series of automatic operations after which the machinel is automatically stopped when the carriage reaches. its last columnar position which, in the example illustrated, is the fourth column.

A delayed action mechanism is provided to pre- .vent misoperation of the automatic repeat mechfinal position of rest land means is provided for` insuring that no such thing occurs. l

Referring to Fig. 13A and to the cushioning mechanism for the carriage, it will be observed that the arm 41fof yoke 46 is connected by a pin and not connection. to a, link ino which, in tum, is connected to a pivoted bell lcrank lever |0|. 'I'his bell crank rests against one arm of a bell crank |02 (Fig. 4) urged counterclockwise by a spring |03 (Fig. 4) The other arm of bell crank |02 is connected by a link |04 to a pivoted lever |05 having a lateral lug |06 on its upper end adapted to engage over a' shoulder |01 on the link 66.

When the link 66 is moved downwardly, as it is during each operation of the machine, the lug |06 passes over the shoulder |01 and blocks the full return upward movement of the link until the lever |05 is rocked clockwise. The lever |05 is not rocked clockwise until'the lcarriage is at rest because the lever is moved only when the piston 52 (Fig. 13) is moved into the dash pot by reason of the carriage moving into engagement with the tabulating stop. When the carriage does engage and` move the tabulating stop 45, the lever 41 is rocked counterclockwise, which rocks lever |0| in the same direction. This rocks lever |02 (Fig. 4) clockwise, and the latter, acting through link |04, rocks the lever |05 clockwise to vrelease link 66. 'I'his release occurs after the carriage has reached a position of rest in the columnar position to which it has been moved. Referring to Fig. 3, it will be observed that the lug |06 on the lever |05 is positioned with reference to the shoulder |01 so that it permits a slight upward movement of the link 66 before the shoulder contacts the lug. This enables the stud 93 on link 66 to move in front of the latch 92 to prevent the latch from returning to the latched position of Fig. 6, after said latch is released by reason of a roller of the 9| series passing by the high point on the arm 90. The release of latch 92 is a very momentary release and, if the link 66 were held down in its extreme lower position, the latch 92 would m`ove back to latching position and the delayed action mechanism would result inpreventing another operation of the machine. "i, However, with the construction just explained, this is avoided by the slight upward movemen of the link.

Automatic line spacing at end of carriage movement in one direction After the machine has been given a series of automatic operations and stopped with the carriage in its left-hand position as viewed from the front of the machine (column 4, Fig'. 1), it is desirable to have the platen line spaced before thenext series of operations begins. This is necessary in order that the second line of entries shall be below 'the ilrst. Provision is made for accomplishing this result automatically after the carriage has reached its last columnar position to the left and before it returns to the right.

Pivoted to the full stroke sector 61 (Fig. 8) and extending rearwardly is alink |I0 carrying a stud III adapted to operate in an L-shaped slot I I2 in a pendant member I3 pivoted at I I4.

f 'Ihe link |I 0 is urged counterclockwise by a spring I|5 connected between it and the member I I3 so that the stud ||I normally travels in the long horizontal portion of the L-shaped slot II2 and has no effect on member ||3. The stud III is moved into the short vertical portion of the L- shaped slot |I2 by means of one arm I|6 of a V-shaped lever pivoted at II1. The other arm III of this V-shaped lever extends upwardly to a position' behind a stud ||9 on the arm\ 64 of bell crank lever` 64-65 forming a part of the train of connections for the automatic repeat mechamsm.

In columnar' positions of the carriage where the automatic repeat mechanism is conditioned for repeating, the parts occupy the position illustrated in Fig. 8. The V-shaped lever ||6| I8 is held upward by the influence of the spring ||5 acting through stud on said lever and said lever may occupy the position of Fig. 8 because the bell crank lever 84--85 carrying stud ||9 is held by one of the repeat rolls on the carriage in the position of Fig. 8.

When the carriage moves from its third to its fourth columnar position the bell crank lever 84-85 is no longer held by a carriage roll and it is rocked counter-clockwise by its spring 88 which results in the automatic repeat mechanism being disabled as previously explained. As bell crank 84-85 is rocked counterclockwise, its stud IIS rocks the V-shaped lever ||8||6 in the same directionV and the link is moved downwardly to move the stud into the vertical portion of the L-shaped slot ||2 as illustrated in Fig. 4. The spring 98 overcomes spring ||5 in this movement. This occurs as the carriage moves from its third to its fourth columnar position so that the parts are conditioned before the machine is given a stroke of operation in the fourth column. It is to be noted that the connections just described, which operate the line spacing mechanism, as will be later explained, are conditioned for operation under Jthe control of the carriage and as an incident to the disablement of the repeat mechanism.

As the machine is operated in the fourth column the full stroke sector 6'! is rocked counterclockwise during the forward stroke and it pulls the link ||0 forward. The stud being in the vertical portion of the L-shaped slot H2,

the pendant member ||3 is rocked from the position of Fig. 4 to that of Fig. 7. In the normal position of this pendant member ||3 a stud |25 on a vertically slidable member |26 occupies a notch |2`| in the pendant member, said slide |26 being urged upward by a spring |28. When the pendant member I|3 is swung from its Fig. 4 to its Fig. 7 position, said member, acting on stud |25, cams the slide |26 downward. The slide |26 has a rearward extension |29 provided with a stud |30 operating in an inclined slot |3| (Fig. 13) in the uppet end of a lever |32 pivoted at |33 to the back plate of the machine. Connected to the lever |32 is a link |34 which extends to the right, asrshown in Fig. 13, and is provided near its right hand end with an upstanding lug |35 engaging behind a member |36 pivoted on the back plate and positioned to engage a pawl |31. The pawl |37 is pivoted on a member |38 that is reciprocated up and down during each operation of the machine, said member forming a part of the usual line spacing mechanism on a Burroughs machine. Normally, the up and down movement of member |38 is an idle one but it may be made eifective for line spacing by connection to a second slide |38 connected at its upper end to the line spacing bail |40'. This connection is effected by pawl .|31 which has a lug |4| adapted to engage a notch in the slide |39. The pawl |31 is moved clockwise from its Fig. 13 position to an engaged position during the forwardstroke of operation of the machine immediately following the movement of the carriage from its third to its fourth columnar position. This movement is eiected as follows:

As the paper carriage reaches its fourth c01- umnar position, the repeat mechanism is released which releases the V-shaped lever ||8 ||6 which moves the stud into the vertical portion of slot H2. As the machine is operated the link ||0 is moved forward and the pendant H3 is rocked to its Fig. rI position which cams the slide |26 downward. The stud |30 on slide |26 causes the lever |32 (Fig. 13) to be rocked clockwise and this thrusts the link |34 to the right. The lug |35 on link |34 moves the pivoted member |36 and its rocks the pawl |31 clockwise to connect the slides |38 and |39 together. This occurs during the forward stroke of the machine in order to condition the line space mechanism for operation during the return stroke.

Accordingly during'the operation of the machine immediately following the movement of the carriage from its third to its fourth column, the connections for line spacing the platen -are automatically conditioned under control ofthe carriage and as an incident to the disablement of the repeat mechanism and the platen is automatically line spaced by power derived from operation of the machine. This line spacing does not occur until near the end of the return stroke of said machine operation in order that printing may take place before the platen is moved.

Automatic step by step return of carriage After the carriage has reached its fourth columnar position and after the machine has been operated and the platen line spaced, the machine stops. A second item is then entered, the machine is given a stroke of operation in the fourth column, and the carriage is then automatically returned from column to column until it reaches its first columnar position again. During this return of the carriage', the machine is operated automatically in each of the columnar positions of the carriage and then stopped after it operates in the No. 1 carriage position. Although the return in the machine illustrated is from column to column through four columnar positions, the number of columns can be varied as desired and one or more of them can be skipped as will later appear.

In order for the machine to be actuated through a second series of automatic operations, it is necessary to recondition the automatic repeat ditlonlng said repeat mechanism in connect1on with the automatic return of the carriage.

A return motor bar is provided as illustrated in Figs. 3 and 4. The stem |5| of this bar has a rearward extension |52 positioned over-a stud |53 von a stem of the regular operating bar 62 so that, when the return bar |50 is depressed, the regular motor bar 62 is also depressed as illustrated in Fig. 8.

An interlock between the bars is provided comprising a bell crank lever |54 pivotedon the extension |52 of stem ISI and provided with a forked end engaging over the stud 53. This lever cooperates with a stationary stud |55 on the machine frame. When the return bar |50 is depressed to the position of Fig. 8, the parts occupy the position there shown with the regular motor bar 62 locked in depressed position. Should the return motor bar start to rise again, the' bell crank laverV |54 may be turned slightly,

but it can move only a limited distance because it will engage the stud and this will block further upward movement of the return motor bar. 'I'his insures that the return motor bar will be locked in depressed position as long as the regular bar is locked in this position.

'I'his interlock also preventsthe return motor bar from being depressed when the regular motor bar has been depressed. When the regular motor bar is depressed, the bell crank lever |54 is rocked clockwise to the position of Fig. 4 where the lower portion of the lever yis over the stud |55. If an i attempt is made to depress the return bar |50,

the end of the lower branch of lever |54 engages the stud |55 and blocks downward movement of said bar. f

The stem |5| of the return motor bar |50 carries a square stud |56 near its lower end positioned to engage one end of a lever |51 pivoted at |58 to a stationary support. The lever |51 is urged into engagement with the stud |56 by a spring |59 which also acts on one end of a lever |60 pivoted to the machine frame. The other end of lever |60 acts on the stem |5| of the return l motor bar to urge said motor bar upward toward undepressed position.

The lever |51 is connected at its rear end to a second lever |62 pivoted on the stationary pivot ||4. This lever has a cam extension |63 positioned in front of the stud ||9 on the bell crank lever 84-85, which forms a portion of the train of connections for conditioning the automatic repeat mechanism f'or operation.

When the return motor bar |50 is depressed, the lever |51 rocked counterclockwise. This rocks the lever |62 clockwise and` the cam faced end |63 of the latter engages the stud I8 to roclr. the bell crank lever 84-85 clockwise. 'I'hs moves the repeat slide 80 rearwardly and positions the shelf 8| under the stud 82 so( that the automatic repeat mechanism is conditioned for operation. At the same time that this automatic conditioning takes place, the machine is conditioned for operation because depression of the return motor depresses the regular motor bar 62 to cause the motor driving means to give the machine a stroke of operation.

'Ihe return motor bar |50 is depressed with the carriage in its fourth columnar position and this causes the machine to be given a stroke of operation in said column and cau'ses the automatic repeat mechanism to be conditioned for repeating. It is to be notedthat this operation of the machine in the fourth column does not cause the platen to be automatically line spaced as did the preceding operation in the'fourth column. This is due to the fact that, when the automatic repeat mechanism is conditioned by depression of the return motor bar, the bell crank lever 64-85 is rocked clockwise and the V-shaped lever |6| Il is freed for clockwise movement. The spring ||5 acting on link |'|0 moves the stud into the horizontal portion of slot A| I2, the V-shaped lever ||6||8 being'moved by stud It is to be observed that the conditioning of the machine for operation, which involves reconditioning the repeat mechanism for operation, disables the line spacing connections which are operated by movement of member III. In other wordswthe line spacing mechanism is automatically disabled for the second machine operation in the fourth column and it is disabled as an incident to the enabling of the repeat mechanism.

Depression of the return motor bar |60 also conditions the carriage return mechanism for op- |1| xed to a shaft |12 extending beneath the machine to the opposite side thereof. Referring to Fig. l0, the opposite end of the shaft 12 has an L-shaped arm |13 fixed to it, which arm is adapted to engage a stud |14 on a pawl |15 pivoted on the end of "a lever |16 which, in turn, is pivoted at |11 to a bracket on the machine frame.

Journaled in a bracket |18 (Fig. l2) attached to the base of the machine is a shaft |19 having a crank fixed to it, `which. crank carries a stud |8| adapted, under certain conditions, t0 engage the pawl |15. 'I'he shaft |15 is rotated by being connected by means of a crank |82 to the wrist pin 60'on the crank 6| that, in turn, is connected to a shaft driven by the motor 56. As the motor operates to give the machine a stroke of operation, the shaft |16 is rotated through one revolution. 'I'he shaft starts from the position shown in Fig. 10 and rotates clockwise through one complete revolution. f

' When the parts are in normal condition with the return motor bar |50 undepressed, the pawl |15 is in the position of Fig. 10 where it is out of the path of the stud |8| so that rotation of the shaft |19 has no effect on the pawl.

When the return motor bar is depressed, the shaft |12 is rocked clockwise as viewed in Fig. l0 which moves the pawl |15 to the position of Fig. l1. Then, after the shaft |19 has rotated through about three-quarters of its revolution, during which time the machine willhavebeen operated through slightly more than one-half of its stroke, the stud |8| engages the pawl |15 and rocks the lever |16 counterclockwise. 'I'his occurs after the printing mechanism has operated and results in conditioning the carriage return mechanism for operation so asto start the carriage in its return movement before the machine operation has been completed.

An important advantage of this construction is that the return of the carriage is started before prntlng operation-is completed. Naturally, it

could not start before this, but yafter an item of a calculation is printed, the carriage can, and does.

in this machine, start at once'.

The lever |16 is connected to a vertical link |85 which, in turn, is connected to a bell crank lever |86L (Fig. 15). The link |85 is urged upward by a spring |81. When the lever |16 is rocked counterclockwise as"heretofore explained. the link |85 is pulled downward against the ten'- sion of spring |81 to rock the bell crank lever |06 clockwise as viewed in Fig. l5. The upper arm of the bell crank lev`er |86 is positioned to engage a stud |88 on a slide |89 mounted on a 'stationary plate |90 at the backyof the machine. Pivoted to' this slide |89 at |9| isan irregular-shaped member |92 urged clockwise by its spring |83. This pivoted member is normally prevented from moving clockwise by a stud |94 on plate |60 but, when the slide |89 is moved to the right, as viewed in Fig. 15, the pivoted 4member |02 `is moved to the right far enough to position av notch |95 in it under the stud |94 so that the pivoted member |92 is free to be moved a limited distance by spring |93. The free end of the pivoted member |92 has an abutment face |96 positioned under a stud |91 on a clutch lever |98 pivoted at |99. When the pivoted member |92 is moved up by the spring |93, the abutment |96 engages stud |91 and rocks the clutch member |98 counterclockwise as viewed in Fig. 15, or clockwiseV as viewed in Fig. 16. This results in moving a clutch member 200 downward into engagement with a rotating gear 20| of the carriage return mechanism. The latter mechanism is thus set into operation to return the carriage toward its righthand position as viewed from the front.

The clutch lever |98 is normally prevented from being moved by a member 203 (Fig. 16) pivoted at 204 and urged clockwise by a spring 205. The member 203 has a U-shaped slot 206 engaging over a stud 201 on the end of the clutch member |98. However, when the slide |89 is moved to the right in Fig. l5, which is to the left in Fig. 1.6, a downward extension 208 on the slide |89 engages a stud 209 on the pivoted member 203 and moves the latter to the released position shown in Fig. 17. In other Words, the clutch lever |98 is automatically released at the time that the slide releases the pivoted member |92 for action so that, when the latter member acts, it can move the clutch lever to engaged position.

The carriage return mechanism is automatically disabled after the carriage has been returned a short distance and, in the example illustrated, this distance is slightly more than one columnar space. 'Ihis disabling is effected by the following mechanism:

Referring to Fig. 15, the rack 220 on the paper carriage supports a bar 22| on which is adjustably positioned a dog 222 having a notch 223 on one of its vertical faces, and an inclined bottom edge 224. As the carriage is being returned, this dog moves from right to left as viewed in Fig. 15 and the notch 223 engages a stud 225 on a pass-by pawl 226 pivoted at 221 to a slide 228. The pass-by pawl 226 is urged counterclockwise by a spring 229. When the carriage is moved in the opposite direction, the inclined cam surface 224 rides over the stud 225 and moves the passby pawl 226 against the action of its spring without causing any movement of the slide 228.

The slide 228 is mounted on studs 230 and 23| on the stationary plate |90, the slide being urged to the right as viewed in Fig. 15 by a spring 232. 'I'he slide has an upwardly extending projection 233 provided with an abutment face 234 positioned to engage a stud 235 on the pivoted member |92.

As the carriage is returned, the dog 222 engages the stud 225 and moves the slide 228 to the left in Fig. 15. The abutment face 234 engages the stud 235 and rocks the member |92 counterclockwise out of engagement with the stud |91 on -the clutch control lever. The portion of the member |92 carrying the stud 235 has a lateral lug 236 (Fig. 16) adapted to engage the rear end of the pivoted member 203. As the member |92 is rocked clockwise from the posi- .tion of Fig. 17, the member 203 is rocked clockwise and the U-shaped notch 206 in its end engages over the stud 201 on the clutch control lever |98 and cams said lever counterclockwise to Briefly stated, the dog 222 on the carriage actuates elements that constitute a disabling mechanism for disabling the carriage return by disengaging the carriage return clutch.

The dog 222 is positioned so that this disablement occurs shortly after the carriage has been returned slightly past its third columnar position. When the disengagement of the clutch occurs the carriage is released and it immediately moves in its normal tabulating direction under the iniiuence of its spring drum. This movement is arrested by the tabulating stop 44 (Fig. 13) for the third column and the net result of the return movement just described is that the carriage is stepped from its fourth to its third columnar position.

After the carriage has been returned to its third columnar position, the machine is automatically given a stroke of operation.

It will be recalled that the return motor bar was depressed to give the machine a stroke of operation in the fourth column. This return motor bar conditions the automatic repeat mechanism so that, when the machine was operated in the fourth column, the regular motor bar 62 was not released and, by virtue of the interlock between the regular bar and the return motor bar, the latter was retained in depressed position. These motor bars, therefore, are in depressed position when the carriage reaches the third columnar position.

As the carriage returned from its fourth to its third columnar position, the high point of the roll 9|4 momentarily moved the lever 90 and thereby moved the automatic repeat slide rearward far enough to release the latch 92 to allow link 66 to raise for another operation of the machine. Immediate raising of this link was prevented, however, by the delayed action mechanism including the lever |05 (Fig. 4). This delayed action mechanism is not released until the carriage comes to a position of rest against the tabulating stop 44 for the third column. In other words, even though the carriage releases the link 66 as the carriage is being returned from the fourth to the third column, this link is not permitted to move upward until after the carrage has been released from the carriage return mechanism and moved against the third column tabulating stop. This assures that the carriage will reach a stationary position in the third column before the machine is given a stroke of operation. After the roller 9|4 has passed over the high point of the lever the carriage continues to the left in Fig. 20 until the roller 9|3 has passed over the high point of lever 90 and the stop dog 44 of Fig. 13 has assumed a position somewhat to the left of the stop 46, at which point the carriage return mechanism is disabled r,and the carriage will settle back into its third columnar position with the stop dog 44 in its home position against the stop 4l and as the carriage settles back to its third columnar position, the roll 9|:i goes over the high point of lever 90 a second time, but this does not change the position off link 88 which is still held by the delayed action mechanism. At the moment the carriage settles to its final third column position,

the link 66 is released and the roll 8|3 moves on to the inclined portion of lever 98 to help hold the Arepeat mechanismin repeat condition. It is also held in this position by the latched down motor bar |50.

l 4 As soon as the link 68 rises, the machine is given a stroke of operation in the third columnar position of the carriage. At the time this operation occurs, the automatic repeat mechanism is still in operative position and the machine operation in the third column will not result in releasing the motor bars but will condition the parts for another automatic repeat operation when the carriage reaches the second column.

During the operation of the machine with the carriage in the third column, the mechanism shown in Figs; 11 and 12 for conditioning the carriage return mechanism for operation is again operated and the carriage return clutch is engaged in the same manner as described in connection with the fourth column. As soon as this occurs the carriage is again moved in a return direction from the third column toward the second column.

As the carriage starts to return from the third column, the dog 222 moves toward the stud 225 (Fig. 15) and it will be readily appreciatedlthat, if some control were notl provided, the carriage return mechanism would be automatically disabled immediately and the carriage would settle back to its third columnar position. Provision is madeito avoid this and to cause the carriage to be returned to its second columnar position as follows: y

The slide 228 is urged to swing downwardly f about the stud 238 as a pivot by means of a spring 240. Such movement is normally prevented when the slide is in the position of Fig. v15 by the stud 23| which is in the horizontal portion of the slot 24| in slide 228. The slot 24| has a notch 242 in its upper side and, when slide 228 is'positioned `so that notch 242 is above stud 23|, the slide may be swung a limited distance by spring 240 about stud 230 as a pivot.

During the movement of the slide 228 to the left in Fig. 15 by the dog 222 inthe disabling operation heretofore described for the third column, downward movement of the slide 228 under the influence of the spring 240 was prevented by reason of the vfact that the notch 223 engaging over the stud225 held the slide 228 in horizontal position. However, when the dog 222 moved away from the stud 225 as the carriage settled back to its third columnar position, the slide 228 was freed and it was returned toward the right as viewed in Fig. l5 by the spring 232.- As the slide moved to the right, the notch 242 came over stud 23| and at this instant the spring 24|) snapped the slide to the position of Fig. 19 which placed the stud 225 below the path of travel of the dog 222. Accordingly, the slide 228 is in the position of Fig. 19 whenlthe machine is operated in the third column. As the carriage is returned from the third column, the dog 222. will not be effective and the carriage return mechanism will not be immediately disabled. j

Even though the slide 228 is always urged to the right (Fig. l5) by spring 233, said slide is freed so that the spring 240 can move it to the Fig. 19 position. In the machine to which the invention is applied there is a lost motion connection between the rack 228, with which dog 222 moves, and the carriage. When the carriage return clutch is disconnected, the spring for urging the carriage to the right (Fig. 15), which spring is quite strong, acts very quickly on rack 223 and moves it relative to the carriage far enough and with enough rapidity to free slide 228 so that spring 240 can act as the slide is moving back to the right.

It is desired to disable the carriage return mechanism to stop the carriage in its second columnar position. This is accomplished by another dog 243 (Fig. 20) similar to the dog 222. However, if the slide 228 is in the position of Fig.

19, the second dog 243 will not engage it and the 252 connected to a link 253 which, in turn, is connected at its upper end (Fig. 15) to a lever 254 pivoted on plate |90 and urged clockwise by a spring 255 against a limit stud 256. 'I'he lever 254 carries a'stud 251 adapted to engagea shelf 258 on slide 228. After the dog 222 for the third column has passed the stud 225, and, before the dog 243 for the second column reaches said stud, the cam D acts to rock the yoke 25|-252 clockwise to pull link 253 downward. This rocks lever 254 counterclockwise and raises slide 228 back to a horizontal position. As soon as the slide reaches this position, its spring 232 moves it to the right slightly and it is held in this position by,the stud 23| which is then in the horizontal portion of the slot 24|.

The islide 228 is thus automatically reconditioned so that, when the dog 243 for the second column reaches the stud 225, it will engage said stud and move the slide 228 to the left as viewed in Fig. 15 to again disable the carriage return mechanism in the manner heretofore described. This allows the carriage to settle back slightly to engage the columnar stop for the second column. After the carriage reaches this position the machine is again given an automatic operation. 'I'he carriage is provided with a repeat roll inlthe second column so that the automatic repeat mechanism is again maintained in operative position and the parts are conditioned for a repeat operation when the carriage is returned to its first column.

During the operation of the machine in the second column, the carriage return mechanism is again conditioned and the parts act in the manner heretofore described to return the carriage to the first column. The carriage is thus returned step by step from one column to another. The number of columns to which it is returned can, of course, be varied and one or more columns can be skipped by simply omitting a dog such as 222 or 243 for the column where it is not desired to have the carriage stop.

From the above description, it will be clear that when the return motor bar is depressed the machine is set into operation and it continues to go through a series of automatic operations during which the carriage is returned step by step across the machine. The carriage return mechanism is conditioned for operation at each operation of the machine and is then automatically disabled after the carriage has been returned a predetermined distance. After the carriage return is disabled, the carriage settles back to accurate columnar position, the machine is immediately operated automatically, the carriage return is again enabled and the cycle is repeated.

A cam slide 259 (Fig. 20) of the same nature as the slides 250, of which there is one for the third, second and rst columns, is provided for the fourth column in order to be sure that the slide 228 will be in operative position at the beginning of operations in the fourth column. Ordinarily, there is no need for this slide, but it has been provided for safety. When the carriage is in its fourth columnar position, the cam 259 is over the lever 25|I so as to hold the slide 228 in horizontal position.

Skip action during return of carriage The description just given has been directed primarily to a construction in which the carriage is stopped at each column during its return. But, as heretofore mentioned, the number of carriage stops 222 for arresting the return of the carriage can be varied so that one or more columns may be skipped. In this manner a skip-tab action is obtained during the return movement of the carriage, the whole action taking place automatically and without interrupting the return.

Arresting carriage at an intermediate position and then automatically completing its return In some types of work it is desirable to arrest the paper carriage at only one intermediate position during its return. Rinsche Patent 1,580,534 shows a construction in which the carriage may be arrested at an intermediate position but the carriage does not complete its return from this position. Instead it reverses again and moves in its normal feeding direction. If a further return movement is desired, the regular motor return bar must be depressed. In the present machine, the carriage may be arrested at an intermediate position, the machine operated, and the return of the carriage is then automatically completed without the attention of the operator.

This is accomplished by providing only one carriage stop y222. The carriage returns until this stop engages the stud 225 whereupon the carriage. return mechanism is disabled, as heretofore explained. The repeat mechanism then causes the machine to be given a stroke of operation. During this stroke of operation the carriage return mechanism is again enabled and the carriage return movement automatically com-- pleted without any attention from the operator such as depressing a key.

Automatic line spacing after carriage has been returned to first column After the carriage has been returned to its first column, it is desired to have the machine given a stroke of operation and then automatically stopped. The platen should be line spaced before a new series of operations is started.

Referring to Fig. 20, the carriage is provided with a cam slide 260 adapted to engage a curved lug 26| on an arm 262 pivoted at H1 (Figs. 3 and 4). This lever extends upward and forward to a point where it is provided with an abutment face 264 positioned to engage a stud 265 on a latch 266 pivoted at IM. As the carriage is returned from its Second to its first columnar position, the cam 260 rocks the lever 262 clockwise as viewed in Fig. 4 which swings the latch 266 from the position of Fig. 8 to that of Fig. 9. The corner of the shoulder on the lower end of the latch acts on a stud 261 on the V-shaped lever ||6-| I8 and rocks said lever to the position of Fig. 9 where it is held by the latch which has a shoulder that passes over the stud 261. This results in moving the stud I on the link I I0 into the vertical portion of the slot I I2 in the pendant member I|3. Accordingly, when the machine is operated with the carriage in its No. l columnar position, the pendant member I I3 will be rocked in a manner heretofore described and the slide |26 will be moved downward. It will be recalled that this slide enables the line spacing mechanism so that, as the machine is operated, the platen is line spaced automatically.

The automa-tic repeat mechanism must be disabled before the machine is operated in its No. 1 column because it is desired to have the machine stop after it has operated once in this column. Disabling of the repeat mechanism is accomplished by the same mechanism that controls the automatic line spacing in the No. l columnar position of the carriage.

Referring to Fig. 8, it will be observed that the slide |26, which is moved downwardly as above explained, carries a stud 210 operating in an inclined slot 21| in one arm 212 of a bell crank lever pivoted at 213. The other arm 214 of this bell crank lever has an abutment 'face 215 (Fig. 9) positioned behind a stud 216 on the repeat slide of the automatic repeat mechanism.

At the beginning of the stroke of operation of the machine after the carriage has moved from its second to its No. l columnar position, the slide |26 is moved downward. This immediately rocks the bell crank lever 212-214 counterclockwise which pushes the repeat slide 80 back to inoperative position as shown in Fig. 9 with the result that, as the machine is operated in its No. 1 column, the repeat mechanism is disabled, the motor bars 62 and |50 will be released and returned to normal, and operation of the machine will be stopped. This takes place in spite of the fact that the carriage is provided with a repeat roll 9| in its No. 1 column. This repeat roll bears against the lever 9U and normally conditions the repeat mechanism for repeat operation, but the bell crank lever 212--214 operating against the stud 216 can, nevertheless. move the repeat slide 80 back because of the pin and slot connection between the slide 8|] and the lever 84.

As the machine completes its operation in the No. 1 column. the slide |26 rises to normal which rocks the bell crank lever 212-214 clockwise and releases the repeat slide 8U which immediately moves under the influence of the spring 83 back to operative position. This insures that the automatic repeat mechanism is again conditioned for repeat operations for the next operation in the No. l column which is the rst operation of theA next series.

From the above description it should be clear that, when the carriage returns to its No. 1 columnar position, the carriage conditions a mechanism Jthat automatically line spaces the platen and automatically disables the repeat mechanism as the nie-chine is operated. The repeat mechanism is disabled even though the carriage has a repeat roll which tends to maintain the repeat mechanism in enabled condition.

It should be observed that, during the first machine operation after the carriage is returned to its No. l columnar position, the line spacing mechanism is disabled as an incident to the disablement of the automatic repeat mechanism because the disablement of the automatic repeat mechanism results in the motor bar |50 being released and the release of this bar causes the parts |51, |62, etc., to disable the line spacing mechanism.

As the machine completes its first operation in the No. 1 column after the carriage return, the repeat mechanism is again enabled and the line spacing mechanism disabled. During this operation the motor bars 62 and |50 are released as heretofore mentioned. Stud |56 moves upward and allows spring |58 to rock lever |51 clockwise from the position of Fig. 8 to that of Fig. 4. The rear end of lever |51 rocks lever |62 counterclockwise and the squared bent end of lever |62 engages stud 265 on latch 266 to move said latch from its Fig. 9 position to the position shown in Fig. 4. 'I'his releases the bell crank lever |6| I8 which is free to move clockwise (Fig. 9) to release stud on link ||0. I'he link |||l then moves upward and positions stud I in the hori- .zontal portion of slot ||2 so that, upon the next Operation of the machine, the slide |26 will not be moved downward. Accordingly, during the second machine operation with the carriage in its No. 1 columnar position, the line spacing mechanism will not be operated and the repeat mechanism will not be disabled.

Non-add control As previously mentioned it is not desirable to add an item into the register each time the machine is operated in the various columns where the same item is to be repeatedly printed. On the other hand the item must be added into the register during one of the operations.

In order to properly control this operation the machine is provided with a non-add roll in each of the four carriage positions, these rolls being numbered (Fig. 20) 280, 28|, 282 and 283. These rolls are adapted to engage the arm 300i? yoke 29 which swings the lever 25 (Fig. 10) to control the members 24 and 22 to disable the pass-by pawl I8 to prevent the register from being rocked into engagement with the actuator racks at the beginning of the return stroke of the machine.

Assume that operations are started with the paper carriage in its right hand position as viewed from the front of the machine, that is, its No. 1 column. The machine is non-added in the rst three columnar positions of the carriage because of rolls 288, 28| and 282. The non-add roll 283 for the fourth column is active but provision is made for disabling the non-add control in the fourth column for the first operation of the machine in this column but not for the second.

It will be recalled that when they carriage is moved from its third to its fourth columnar position/the mechanism for automatically line spacing the platen is conditioned for operation and it is conditioned by the downward movement of the slide |26. 'I'his downward movement of the slide |26 causes a link |34 on the rear of the machine (Fig. 13)Y to move to the right as viewed in said ligure. This link carries a stud 284 positioned to engage one arm 285 of a pivoted yoke 286 having another arm 281 connected to an arm 288 forming a part of the yoke 29 of a non-add control. The result is that, during theV forward stroke of the machine in the fourth column, the yoke 285- 286-281 is rocked clockwise. Referring to Fig. 10, this rocks lever 25 clockwise to its lower dot and dash position there shown. 'Ihis releases member 24 and spring 23 then moves member 22 to inoperative position. l In other words, the nonadd control is disabled so that the machine is in "addition" condition when it is operated in the fourth columnar position of the carriage immediately after the carriage has arrived in this position from the third column and the item that has been printed during the series of repeat operations is added into the register.

When the machine is againy operated with the carriage in the fourth columnar position,rthat is, the first operation before the carriage is automatically returned across the machine, it is not desired to have the item added. This is automatically taken care of as an incident to the enablement of the automatic repeat mechanism which is conditioned to operate the machine by the depression of the return motor bar. When the return motor bar is depressedthe lever |62 is rocked to engage and move stud H3 which releases bell crank ||8| I6 which allows stud to move into the horizontal portion of the slot ||2. Accordingly, the slide |26 is not moved downwardly as the machine'is operated the second time in the fourth column, and the non-add control is not disabled.

As the carriage is returned to its third, second and rst columns, it is not desired to add the item except in one column and arrangement has been made to have this addition take place only when the carriage reaches its rst column. 'I'his is accomplished by control of the non-add mechanism similar to that just described. In other words, the rolls 283, 282 and 28| are operative to non-add the machine in the fourth, third and second columns. As the carriage moves to its first columnar position the line spacing mechanism is enabled by the carriage cam 268 and its connections 26|, 262, etc. During the rst machine operation with the carriage in its No. 1 column the slide |26 is moved downward and the non-add controls are disabled as heretofore explained so that the machine is placed in addition condition to add the item in the register.

From the above it will be clear that provision has been made for normally non-adding the machine in all the four columnar positions of the carriage, and that this non-add mechanism is disabled during the iirst machine operation when the carriage reaches its fourth column but not during the second operation which is the first` of the succeeding series of operations. Likewise, the non-add control is disabled during the ilrst machine operation after the carriage has been returned from the second to the first column but it is not disabled during the second machine operation with the carriage in the first column. In each case the non-add vmechanism is disabled as an incident to the disablement of the repeat mechanism and it is again reenabled when the repeat mechanism is enabled.

Total control As previously mentioned, the total can be printed four times. This requires that the totaltaking means be maintained in operative condition during each of the operations of the machine with the carriage in its different columnar positions.

In order that the total may be printed in each column the register cannot be cleared until the last total has been printed. This means that the operation in the first three columns must be a subtotaling operation while the final operation must be a totaling operation to clear the register.

Referring to Fig. 10, when the total key T is depressed, it will rock a bell crank lever 28| which pulls a link 28| rearward and rocks a shaft 292 counterclockwise. Referring to Fig. 4, this

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2597973 *Jul 2, 1948May 27, 1952The National Cash Register CompanyRecord controlling means for
US2612315 *Dec 23, 1949Sep 30, 1952Underwood CorpAccounting machine control means
US2650759 *Dec 23, 1949Sep 1, 1953Underwood CorpAccounting machine having relatively adjustable paper and control carriages
US2809782 *Jun 17, 1953Oct 15, 1957Monroe Calculating Machine Companjfleming
US2880932 *May 19, 1955Apr 7, 1959IbmRecord card accounting machine
US5860754 *Dec 3, 1996Jan 19, 1999T.C.R. IndustriesMouth-held manipulating and writing apparatus for paralytics
Classifications
U.S. Classification235/60.26, 235/60.47, 235/60.45, 235/60.46, 235/60.00B, 400/316
International ClassificationG06C11/10, G06C11/00
Cooperative ClassificationG06C11/10
European ClassificationG06C11/10