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Publication numberUS2012929 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 27, 1935
Filing dateNov 6, 1933
Priority dateNov 6, 1933
Publication numberUS 2012929 A, US 2012929A, US-A-2012929, US2012929 A, US2012929A
InventorsKnowland Richard G
Original AssigneeBigelow Sanford Carpet Co Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Floor covering and method of making same
US 2012929 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 27, 1935. R. G. KNOWLAND FLOOR COVERING AND METHOD OF MAKING SAME Original Filed Nov. 6, 1953 2 Sheets-Sheet l INVENTOR $0.4M 2 {2110401427.

ATT OR NEY Ax lg. 27, 1935. R. G. KNOWLAND 2,012,929

FLOOR COVERING AND METHOD OF MAKING SAME Original Filed Nov. 6, 1933 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 //\1 l/ENTO R $40M &

ATTORNEY P mzzms """"2,01z ,9z9T

UNITED STATES PATENT oFi-"ic-E;

' FLOOR COVERING AND METHOD OF I MAKINGBALIE Richard G. Knowland, Pelham, N. Y., assignor to Bigelow-Sanford Carpet 00., Inc.,"1hompsonville, Conn, a corporation of Massachusetts Application November 6, 1933, Serial No. 696,826

- Renewed March 2, 1935 5 Claims. (Cl. 154-2) This invention relates to floor coverings as typiplaced upon the floor the floor covering presents fled in woven carpets and rugs and the method no seams and unequal stretching is prevented. of making such floor coverings. The adhesive for connecting the pile fabric It has been the usual practice heretofore to breadths or strips and the underlying fabric may 5 combine several breadths or strips of carpet edge be applied either to the pile fabric strips or to- 5 to edge to form a coverage area suitable to the the underlying fabric or to both, but in the preiloor'to be covered and the adjacent edges of the ferred form of the invention the adhesive will be breadths of carpet whether in rug form or plain ordinarily applied to the back of the pile fabric, so carpeting have been secured together by a seam, that portions of such pile fabric may be removed such for instance assewing. Such a seam, howand complemental portions of another pile fabric 10 ever, is open to the objection that it produces a similarly supplied with an adhesive on its back ridge or bulge in the floor covering extending may be substituted for the removed portions of lengthwise of the carpet breadths or strips. the first pile fabric, thus producing a pattern or This matter has been recognized and attempts decorative effect, which becomes a permanent have been made to eliminate the objectionable part of the floor covering when the underlying 15 seam and secure the breadths of floor covering fabric is applied. together by an underlying narrow strip of tape The invention and novel features thereof will cemented to the backing along the adjoining best be made clear from. the following description edges. This expedient has eliminated the objecand accompanying drawings showing one good tionable seam but is itself open to a further obpractical form thereof. 7 20 jection in that unequal stretching of the fabric In the drawings:- is liable to detach the adjoining edges from the Fig. 1 is a disassembled perspective view showunderlying narrow strip, thus causing the sepaing a floor covering in the form of a rug with ration of adjoining edges. ,Further attempts the parts ready to be assembled;

5 have been made to overcome this defect by secur- Fig. 2 is a perspective view of a rug containing ing the narrow strip of tape to the underlying the present invention and in its completed and portions of the carpet breadths or strips by metal assembled form; and clips in addition to the cement. I Fig. 3 is an enlarged detail showing the under- In its broader aspect the present invention prolying fa a the superposed P b c vides a floor covering and method of making the breadths. 30

same whereby stretching apart of the edges of As shown the floor covering is formed of a pluadjacent breadths of fabric, unequal stretching rality of woven fabric strips I, of which there thereof, and many of the difficulties encounmay be any suitable number, and each comprises tered with other types of similar fabrics will a backing fabric 2 to which the pile forming yarns be overcome,- and to this end the floor cov- 3 are secured. The'pile fabric strips I are each 35 ering is composed of breadths of pile fabric provided on its back in the construction shown assembled edge to edge and having cemented to with an adhesive and are assembled with their the back thereof by suitable adhesive, breadths adjacent edges in abutting relation, as indicated of a cheaper fabric arranged crosswise of the pile by the dotted line 4.

40 fabric breadths, with the result that the under- Since the pile fabric strips are provided with 40 lying or backing fabric not only crosses the strips an adhesive on the back thereof the pile forming of the carpet or rug but likewise extends transyarns are held from ravelling or falling out when .versely of the adjoining edges thereof and the adthe pile fabric strips themselves are cut orhave hesive connections between it and the pile fabric portions removed.

strips permanently secure the edges of such strips It may be desirable at times to provide orna- 5 or breadthsflin close abutting relation. The mental borders 5 and 6 and in order that the backing or underlying fabric is thus co-extensive edges of the pile fabric strips themselves and the with the floor area to be covered, that is, the borders may be closely assembled in abutting rebacking fabric and superposed strips of pile fabric lation, the selvage edges on the several strips may are substantially of the same area. be removed. 50

Afloor covering constructed in accordance with The construction thus far described lends itthe present invention may be produced at the self favorably to ornamentation by removing pormanufacturing plant and rolled and shipped in tions of the pile fabric strips and inserting into substantially the same manner as the standard the removed portions complemental pile fabric or broad loom fabrics so that when unrolled and other character of fabric, the back of which has 2 been similarly treated, in other words, supplied with an adhesive. 4

As shown in Pig. 1 the pile fabric strips have had removed therefrom a portion representing the outline of a sheep as at 'I and since the pile fabric strips are provided with an adhesive on the back the pile yarns are prevented from ravelling or becoming detached.

Similarly, the ornamental insert may be formed of another pile'fabric similarly treated, that is, the backing of the ornamental pile fabric will be supplied with an adhesive so that the pile forming yarns of the insert will remain undisturbed when the ornament is died out from a second pile fabric. In the present instance, the ornamental insert is shown in the form of a sheep i which is complemental to the removed portion at 'I in the pile fabric strips. In order that the assembled parts may be held in their assembled relation with the edges of the several parts abutting there is another underlying fabric formed of a cheaper material which may or may not be provided with an adhesive surface. The strips 9 of the underlying fabric extend crosswise or transversely with relation to the pile fabric strips and such strips of the underlying fabric are co-extensive with the pile fabric strips, so that when the pile fabric strips, as indicated in Fig. 1, are assembled with the edges of the strips and ornaments in abutting relation and the assembly is applied to the underlying transversely extending fabric and adhesively secured thereto, the parts constituting the tread surface of the floor covering will be held with their edges in close abutting relation and present no seam.

The underlying fabric may be conveniently formed of canvas which is not only flexible but of suflicient strengh to afford a backing to the tread surface of the floor covering throughout its extent.

Since the lengthwise dimension of the strips constituting the'underlying fabric extend transversely to the pile fabric strips and their abutting edge portions any unequal stretch or pulling apart of any of the edges of the assembled parts will be prevented. This results from the well known fact that the warp threads of a fabric are under tension when woven and consequently any tendency of the floor covering to become distorted finds resistance in the counteracting effect of the underlying fabric strips.

When the tread surface constituted by the pile fabric strips has been assembled with the ornamentation and borders and adhesive applied to the underlying fabric, as hereinbefore described,

the resulting floor covering takes the aspect as indicated in Fig. 2.

In assembling the pile fabric strips'and its 01'- namentation, a suitable solvent may be employed to condition the adhesive on the back ofv the pile fabric strips and/or underlying canvas, so that when completed either at the manufacturing plant or in the fleld a floor covering is formed in which there is no visible seam and in case it be desired to contrast the ornamental insert with the rest of the floor covering the pile of the insert may be longer or shorter than the pile of .the pile fabric strips or it may be differently colored, thus presenting a highly ornamental eifect.

What is claimed is: l. A floor. covering comprising strips of woven fabric having pile forming yarns constituting one.

face. thereof and a backing to which the pile forming yarns are secured, and an underlying flexible fabric co-extensive with the floor covering and formed of strips of fabric extending crosswise relative to the'pile supporting strips, and a flexible adhesive connecting the pile forming strips to the crosswise underlying fabric strips and serving to secure the pile forming strips with their edges in close abutting relation.

2. As an article of manufacture, a floor covering comprising a plurality of strips of woven fabric having a pile surface and arranged with their edges in abutting relation, and an underneath fabric coextensive with the floor covering and formed of fabric strips whose longitudinal dimension extends crosswise of the pile fabric strips and their abutting edges, and an adhesive connecting the underlying strips to the pile fabric strips and serving to secure the pile fabric strips to the underlying fabric strips with the edges of the former in close abutting relation.

3. A floor covering comprising strips of woven fabric having pile forming yarns constituting one face thereof and a backing to which the pile forming yarns are secured, and an underlying flexible fabric co-extensive with the floor covering and formed of strips of canvas extending crosswise relative to the pile supporting strips, and a flexible adhesive connecting the pile forming strips to the crosswise underlying canvas strips and serving to secure the pile forming strips with their edges in close abutting relation.

4. The method of making a floor covering which consists in applying an adhesive to the back of pile fabric strips, applying an adhesive to the back of another pile fabric, assemblying portions of the two pile fabrics to complete the pile area of the floor covering and adhesively securing both of the assembled pile fabric portions to a separate underlying fabric with its longitudinal dimension and warp threads crossing the abutting edges of the pile fabric strips.

5. A floor covering comprising strips of woven abutting relation.

RICHARD G. KNOWLAND.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2760895 *Mar 23, 1954Aug 28, 1956Holgerson Arvid RFloor covering block
US2763587 *May 7, 1953Sep 18, 1956Masland C H & SonsTile floor covering
US2952577 *May 31, 1955Sep 13, 1960Allen IndComposite carpet tiles
US3484316 *Sep 15, 1966Dec 16, 1969Dirrim Patricia AMethod for making throw rug
US3524254 *Jan 4, 1966Aug 18, 1970Commercial Carpet CorpCutting tool
US3884743 *Oct 16, 1972May 20, 1975Atteny IncProcess for producing decorative pile fabrics
US5656109 *Aug 28, 1995Aug 12, 1997Collins & Aikman Floorcoverings, Inc.Method of making inlaid floor coverings
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US6460303Jul 14, 2000Oct 8, 2002Tac-Fast Georgia L.L.C.Hook and loop anchor sheet module with overlapped edges and sufficient mass to resist buckling
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US20100124630 *Nov 14, 2008May 20, 2010Michael AssilAutomobile floor mat
US20100323169 *Dec 13, 2007Dec 23, 2010Jong-Seok SonCustom mosaic flooring and method for constructing the same
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Classifications
U.S. Classification428/62, 428/16, 156/299, 156/88, 15/217, 428/189, 428/187, 156/63
International ClassificationD04G3/02, D04G3/00
Cooperative ClassificationD04G3/02
European ClassificationD04G3/02