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Publication numberUS2013448 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 3, 1935
Filing dateApr 17, 1934
Priority dateApr 17, 1934
Publication numberUS 2013448 A, US 2013448A, US-A-2013448, US2013448 A, US2013448A
InventorsRoby Frank M
Original AssigneeRoby Frank M
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Gauge glass apparatus
US 2013448 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Patented Sept. 3, 1935 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE Claims.

This invention relates to water gauges, such as those, which are used on railway locomotives.

Heretofore, efforts have been made to shield water gauges, was to prevent injury to the enginemen in the event of breakage of the gauge glam.

- The srileding has taken the form of a metallic casing that surrounds the gauge glass, and has a transparent panel through which the level of the water may be observed. In some instances, the casing has been connected to a drain pipe through which the water, steam and broken glass could be drained thereby relieving the pressure in the casing until the valves could be closed. This connection however, in the past, has been made by telescoping sleeves, which being non-flexible had to fit loosely in order to allow for slight misalignment of the parts to be connected.

In modern railroad practice, the gauges are inspected at regular intervals, and so to facilitate the cleaning of the panels, the gauges generally have been provided with slots through which the panels could be slid upwardly for quick removal. The slots however, have been objectionable, for in order to accommodate a slight variation in the size of the panels, it has been necessary to allow a loose fit, and the result has been that steam and water escape into the cab around the edges of the panels whenever the water glass bursts. A further objection, which has been found to exist in such panels is the fact that they are often blown entirely out of the gauge casing, and that the escaping steam is apt to cause injury to the engine men in their hurried and blinded exit from the cab, or in their efforts to locate andclose the water gauge valves.

An object of my invention is to make a gauge glass casing with pressure tight, easily removable, transparent panels, which will automatically make a steam tight connection to the customary drain pipe when the gauge is positioned and coupled up ready for'use, so that no appreciable amount of steam or hot water, nor any broken glass can escape in case the water glass breaks while the boiler is under pressure.

Referring now to the drawing, Fig. 1 is a side view of a gauge body made in accordance with my invention and showing it, as being connected to the back head of a locomotive boiler; Figs. 2 and 3 are sections taken on the correspondingly numbered lines in Fig. 1; Fig. 4 is an enlarged front elevation of the gauge body adjacent one of the removable panels; Fig. 5 is an enlarged partial front elevation of a modified design of the removable panels, and Fig. 6 is a fragmentary sectional view showing a modification of the drain pipe connection of Fig. 3.

I have illustrated my invention in connection with a locomotive boiler, which is indicated at ID, as having conduits II and I2 leading therefrom for connection to a gauge glass unit. A valve l3 controls the flow through conduit ll, while a valve [4 controls the flow through conduit l2. A gauge glass I5 is carried by a casing l6 and is suitably packed at the top and bottom by stufling boxes I] and I8 respectively. The casing in turn is connected to the steam and water conduits by nuts l9 and respectively, as is shown in Fig. 1.

The casing in the preferred arrangement has a body portion that provides a chamber 2| in which the gauge glass is located, and another chamber 22 in which a lamp Z3 may be suspended. A wall 24 separates the two chambers, and has a slit 25 extending vertically wherein through which light may pass and be directed from the lamp onto the gauge glass. The casing also has machined openings for receiving glass panels and 3!, and in the preferred arrangement, it has a flange 31 which extends completely around each opening and thereby provides a recess into which the panel gaskets 33 are inserted. The depth of each flange is slightly more than the thickness of the panel gaskets and the flanges have projections 32 therefrom and between which the sides of the panels are sufliciently exposed to facilitate their removal. The combined depth of each projection and flange is less than the combined thickness of a gasket 33 and the superimposed glass panel, so that a cover plate 35 may be drawn tightly against each panel to make a water and steam-tight joint between the panel and the casing. Each cover plate has an aperture 36 therein through which the level of the water in the gauge glass may be observed. The cover plate is preferably wider and longer than the glam panel so as to cover the edges thereof, and is adapted to be clamped in position by nuts 40 which engage studs 4|.

To facilitate quick removal of each plate for the purpose of removing the panels for cleaning, I provide in the form shown in Fig. 4, lugs 42 on the plate adjacent the respective studs 4|. Each lug has a downwardly extending slot 43, which is sufficient in size to admit the associated stud, and as all of the slots open in the same direction, and as the width of the cover plate is less below the slots, as at 44, the cover plate may be removed after the nuts are only slightly loosened by sliding the cover plate up and to one side until the other side will swing out past the nuts. I have illustrated the members 40, as being wing nuts, although the conventional form of nut may be used. ,The outer ends of the studs are flattened after the nuts are applied to prevent the nuts being backed oif entirely.

In Fig. 5, I have shown a fragmentary view of a modified form of cover plate in which the lugs are replaced by enlarged portions 60 that have keyhole slots 6| therein, which in the preferred arrangement are inverted, and are disposed in the same relative position on the cover, as the slots 43. The enlarged part of the keyhole slots is of suflicient size to clear the nuts that are threaded onto the locking studs, while the small portions of the slots are sufilcient in size to admit only the studs. Thus, the plate maybe readily removed merely by loosening the nuts and then raising it with reference to the casing until the studs are disposed in the enlarged part of the keyhole slots, whereupon} the cover may be withdrawn.

The water and steam which escapes Into the casing whenever the gauge glass breaks, is

drained through the bottom of the chamber 2| through a passageway 49, which terminates in a conduit 50. Provision is made for connecting such conduit to a drain pipe which extends down through the cab deck. It is desirable to support the drain pipe in a fixed position which lines up the conduits 50 and 5|, and so I have illustrated a bracket 52, which is carried by the boiler wall, and which embraces the pipe 5!. A

1 normal outside diameter of the lower end of the hose. The overall length of thehose is such that when assembling the gauge, the hose is first inserted in the sleeve and then the gauge is lowered onto the cock extension so that the connection to the drain is automatically completed when the bottom stufling box nut 20 is tightened. This arrangement assures a fluid tight drain joint, for any increase in pressure within the hose tends to expand it against the wall of the sleeve.

The flexible connection between the casing and the drain pipe is advantageous, particularly when used in connection with fittings that are described in my U. S. Patent 1,984,945, copending herewith, for such fittings do not require rotation of the casing to efiect attachment to the bottom water gauge cock. It is also advantageous in that the flexibility of the hose provides for suflicient universal movement of the casing with reference to the drain pipe, and thus assures a fluid tight joint therewith, regardless of any customary variation in alignment between the conduits 50 and 5| after the nuts I9 and 20 have been tightened.

In Fig. 6 I have illustrated the flexible conduit 53, as being permanently connected to the conduit 5| and removably connected to the conduit 50. This is substantially the reverse of the arrangement previously described. In such case, the sleeve 54 is secured to or is made a part of the conduit .50 and snugly receives the upper end of the flexible conduit.

' The use of such fluid tight panels and such a fluid tight drain connection completely prevents the escape of any steam, broken glass or water into the cab upon the breakage of the gauge glass,. and at the same time facilitates quick removal of all of the parts for cleaning purposes making a-fiuid-tight joint between the window and casing, a drain pipe apart from the casing, the end of the drain pipe adjacent the said casing being enlargedand having a smooth inter-ior surface, and a flexible hose having one end thereof attached to the casing adjacent the drain opening and having the other end thereof slidably engaging the said enlarged interior surface of the drain pipe, that portion of the said hose within the drain pipe being normally slightly larger than the interior of the drain pipe, whereby any pressure within the drain pipe tends to increase the pressure between the hose and the drain pipe and to make a fluid-tight joint therebetween.

2. In a gauge glass apparatus, the combination with a tubular gauge glass of a casing therefor, the casing having a drain opening therein and having a second opening through which'the glass may be observed, a transparent window fitted over the second opening and hav- 1 ing a gasket between it and the casing, a: cover plate having an aperture therein and superimposed on the said window, the cover plate having a plurality of. open sided extensions thereon, 4

and fastening members associated with the casing and extensions for detachably positioning the cover plate against the window and making a fluid tight joint between the window and the casing.

3. In a gauge glass apparatus, the combination with a tubular gauge glass of a casing therefor, the casing having a drain openingtherein and having a second opening through which the glass may be observed, a transparent window fitted over the second opening and having'a gasket between it and the casing, a cover plate having an aperture therein and superimposed on the said window, the cover plate having a plurality of slots with the width of each narrowing in the same direction, and fastening members associated with the casing and the slots for detachably positioning the cover plate against the window and making a fluid tight joint between the window and the casing.

4. In a gauge glass apparatus, the combination of a hollow casing, having a drain opening, and a transparent window therein, and means for making a fluid-tight joint between the window and casing, a drain pipe apart from the casing, the end of the casing adjacent the drain therebetween.

5. In a water gauge apparatus, the combination of a gauge glass casing, having a drain opening and a transparent window therein, a drain pipe apart from the casing, a flexible tubing connecting the drain opening to said pipe and means for fixing one end of said tubing to the drain opening, the other end being slidably entered and snugly fitted into the said drain pipe.

6; In a water gauge apparatus, the combination of a gauge glass casing having a drain opening and a transparent window therein, a drain pipe apart from the casing, a flexible tubing connecting the drain opening to said pipe, and means for fixing one end of said tubing to said pipe, the other end being slidably entered and snugly fitted into the drain opening.

7. In a water gauge apparatus, a casing adapted to sealingly house a gauge glass and having transparent means through which the glass may be viewed, the combination of a tubular wall on the casing forming a drain passage therefrom, a drain pipe apart from the casing and having a tubular wall, a flexible drain tube, and means for fixing one end of the tube to one of said tubular walls in sealed relation therewith, the other end of the tube slidably and snugly telescoping the other tubular wall.

8. In a water gauge apparatus, a casing adapted and arranged to sealingly house and display a gauge glass, said casing having a tubular wall forming a drain passage for the casing, a drain pipe apart from the casing and having a tubular wall, a flexible yieldable drain tube, means to fixedly secure one end of the tube to one of said tubular walls, the other end being slidably entered within the other tubular wall in compressed condition.

9. In gauge apparatus, including a gauge glass and a casing surrounding the glass in sealed relation thereto, said casing having a window opening through which the glass may be observed, a transparent member and cooperating means for sealing the marginal surfaces of said member against the casing at the window opening, an apertured plate adapted to overlie the transparent member and press the same against the sealing means, threaded members in fixed positions substantially adjacent respective opposite margins of the plate and having axially movable clamping portions adapted to overlie and clamp the plate, the plate being recessed to at least partially embrace the threaded members while underlying the clamping portions, in one position of the plate, and the plate being movable in its own plane in a manner to disengage the threaded members including the clamping portions thereof tor removal of the plate, whereby the relative position of said threaded members in undisturbed in detaching the plate.

10. In gauge apparatus, including a gauge glass and a casing surrounding the glass in sealed relation thereto, said casing having draining means and a window opening through which the glass may be observed, a transparent member and cooperating means for sealing the marginal surfaces of said member against the casing at the window opening, an apertured plate adapted to overlie the transparent member and press the same against the sealing means, said plate being movable in its own plane adjacent the transparent member, threaded members in fixed positions substantially adjacent respective opposite margins of the plate, said plate having slots with relatively open and restricted portions receiving said threaded members, locking members associated with the threaded members and overhanging the plate adjacent the relatively restricted slot portions in one position of the plate and aligning with the relatively open slot portions in another position of the plate to permit removal of the plate without removing the locking members.

FRANK H. ROBY. D

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2637197 *Jun 6, 1946May 5, 1953Joseph F KaneyValve testing apparatus
US7079334 *Jan 28, 2004Jul 18, 2006Holliday Graham RInfrared sight glass for aftermarket fitment
US7286309May 19, 2006Oct 23, 2007Holliday Graham RInfrared sight glass for aftermarket fitment
Classifications
U.S. Classification73/326, 73/706, 73/293
International ClassificationG01F23/02
Cooperative ClassificationG01F23/02
European ClassificationG01F23/02