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Publication numberUS2014367 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 17, 1935
Filing dateMar 27, 1933
Priority dateMar 27, 1933
Publication numberUS 2014367 A, US 2014367A, US-A-2014367, US2014367 A, US2014367A
InventorsBreegle Daniel A
Original AssigneeBreegle Daniel A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Projectile for firearms
US 2014367 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 17, 1935. D. A, BREEGLE PROJECTILE FOR FIREARMS Filed March 27, 1933 .Patented Sept. 17, 1935 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE PROJECTILE FOR FIREARMS Daniel A. Breegle, Hunkers, Pa. Application March 27, 1933, Serial No. 663,033

7 Claims.

My invention has to do with the projectiles of non-globular, or elongated form for fire-arms, which, on flight from the gun-barrel will be rotated on the longitudinal axis thereof without the employment of any riing in the vbarrel itself which, accordingly is smooth bore, the projectile itself having wings or vanes which by contact with the air, in flight therethrough, will positively impart the desired rotation thereto.

An object of my invention is to utilize to the maximum, the force or propelling power of the explosion in the gun, and thus increase range and to secure, to the maximum, accuracy of night to the target or object and maximum of striking and destructive force of the projectile. In particular, my object is to supply such a projectile for shooting large game or for hunting purposes, and to utilize, in that connection, the commonly used paper-wrapped shells with which round balls are employed. Having reference to that particular object, I will describe my invention in an embodiment for that purpose. However, my invention consists in whatever is described by or is included within the scope of the appended claims.

In the drawing:

Fig. 1 is a view partly in side elevation and partly in longitudinal section, of a loaded shell, embodying my invention, for use in a gun for shooting big game;

Fig. 2 is a cross sectionon the line 2-2 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is a perspective View of the projectile.

Describing now in detail what is shown in the drawing, the shell II), is a paper-covered one of the type commonly used with a round ball, and with a powder charge I I, but instead of a round ball, the projectile I2, is of elongated form, cylindrical at the back, and tapering forward, conically, to a point, and having upon its exterior a series of spiral ribs or vanes I3, that extend from the front end rearward entirely to the flat base or rear end. Said ribs or vanes may be either right or left, and each has an abrupt face upon which air pressure acts to rotate the projectile on its longitudinal axis in its ight from the gun, and preferably a somewhat inclined face that to offer no resistance to rotation, recedes circumferentially from the outer edge of one abrupt airpressure receiving face, to the bottom of the next abrupt face.

The slug or projectile I2, reaches from the forward end of the powder or explosive charge, to the open end of the shell, and the space between its rear end and the charge and between it (Cl. B-32) and the interior ofthe shell is closed or filled by a cylindrical wrapper or jacket I4, of some soft or spongy fibrous material, such as felt, which is open at its front end, which reaches to the front end of the shell, and between which and the forward 5 tapering portion of the projectile is an open space. The jacket so to speak, is cup-shaped. Said jacket seals the charge Il, and the gun-barrel after explosion, so that no gases can escape, until the projectile and jacket leave the gun muzzle, and l0 thereby full propelling effect of the gases is assured; it constitutes `a protecting cushion between projectile and barrel, that prevents injury to the barrel walls from the vane edges, and prevents projectile retarding effect which would come from contact of the projectile with the barrel "walls, and on emergence from the muzzle, it is promptly stripped off from the projectile by air-pressure upon its open forward end, leaving full access of air to the vanes or riing on the projectile. The expansion of the forward open end of the jacket due to air-pressure there-against in its passage through the gun barrel, prevents forward escape of the gases, and thus assures maximum propelling pressure on the projectile so long as it is in the gun barrel.

Preferably the jacket has one or more longitudinal slits I5, from its open end rearward, to facilitate its outward expansion under internal air-pressure, and its quick stripping from the projectile after leaving the muzzle.

The projectile may be made of lead,.copper, steel, or any other desired metal, or of any desired metal capped with another metal. The gun may be any desired gage, be full-choke or`cylindrical'bore shot guns, and fitted for any use with which my invention is available.

The projectile body or rear part, is cylindrical from base to about midlength, and is of uniform weight and the forwardl half or portion tapers 40 from midlength to the point or nose. With these proportions and weight distribution, the air-pressure on its vanes, in flight, keeps it accurately end on, with minimum air-resistance, so that its nose strikes the object or target fair and square and the maximum effect of the shock or blow is secured, and it does not go into a drop nor glide or tumble after leaving the gun barrel, and objects, such as twigs or branches of trees or bushes do not deflect its course, as, screw-like, it cuts or bores its way through them. Its front end being free from wadding or other substance in the front end of the shell, its onward travel is not hindered, or obstructed from any such cause. Its screw-like or drilling action causes it to cut or 55 2 tear a larger hole in the object hit, and tu peiletrate farther and not glance on impact.

The point or nose may be of any desired type and the number and extent of the air-pressure vanes may be varied, these matters being dependent upon the particular uses for which the projectile is designed or put.

Projectiles embodying my invention may be easily manufactured. They can be pressed out cold by dies or heat molded, or cast. Compared with the ordinary, or so-called pumpkin ball, cost is reduced, because less metal is'requlred.

The felt wrapper or jacket, may be made in strip form of suitable length compared with the length of the projectile and wrapped or folded over the slug, but, of course, leaving the point open.

With the jacket-forming felt in strip or shee form, the projectile or slug can be applied thereto with its flat base at the center and then the two pushed into the paper wrapped shell by pushing against the slug or projectile which will result in folding the portion of the strip or sheet of felt forward of the base over the sides of the shell or projectile, the jacket thus conforming or f1tting neatly around the slug sides and against th interior wall of the shell.

What I claim is:

1. An elongated, pointed fire arm projectile having external air pressure-receiving vanes, and a jacket of yieldable, cushioning material extending lengthwise thereover, in combination with a. charge-containing shell, the charge being at the rear of the shell and the jacket being interposed between the charge and the projectile base, and the jacket reaching forward over the pointed end of the projectile within the forward end of the shell and having gas sealing contact with the shell interior forward of the charge.

2. An elongated, pointed fire arm projectile having external air'pressure-receiving vanes, and a jacket or yieldable, cushioning material extending lengthwise thereover, extending from and over the base, and open atthe pointed end of the projectile in combination with a chargecontaining shell, the charge being at the rear of the shell and the jacket being interposed between 'the charge and the projectile base, and the jacket reaching forward over the pointed end of the projectile within the forward end ofthe shell and having gas sealing contact with the shell interior forward of the charge.

3. A cartridge comprising a shell, a projectile therein having a cylindrical rear portion and a pointed front, and having external spiral ribs reaching rearwardly from its front and a jacket of fibrous material extending forward over the 5 projectile and open at its forward end and spaced from the pointed end of the projectile and enclosing such pointed end, such enclosing portion being itself surrounded by and in contact with the forward end of the shell.

4. An elongated projectile having a cylindrical rear portion substantially half the length thereof, the remainder being pointed, and having external spiral ribs reaching rearwardly from its front and a jacket of fibrous material extending forward over the projectile and open at its forward end and extended forward over and spaced from the pointed end of the projectile.

5. A cartridge comprising a shell-containing explosive charge, an elongated projectile tapering to its front end and having external spiral ribs throughout its length, and a jacket of cushioning material lling the space between the rib edges and the internal wall of the shell, and having an open front end that extends forward over and is spaced apart from the projectile point and having a portion between the inner end of the projectile and the explosive charge.

6. An elongated, pointed flre arm projectil having external air pressure-receiving vanes, and a jacket of yieldable, cushioning material extending lengthwise thereof, extending from and over the base, and open at the'V pointed end of the projectile, the jacket where it is open reaching Voverand spaced from the pointed end of the pro- Ljectile to expose its open forward end to access of air on forward movement of the projectile, said jacket being outwardly expansible under internal pressure. i

7. A cartridge comprising a shell, having an 40 explosive charge. a projectile forward of the charge, and a jacket of yieldable cushioning material interposed between the projectile and the' `interior wall of the shell and open at its forward DANIEL A. BRFEGLE.l

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3132587 *May 14, 1962May 12, 1964Fuller Frank JProjectile
US5325786 *Aug 10, 1993Jul 5, 1994Petrovich Paul AFlechette for a shotgun
US5834681 *Jun 20, 1997Nov 10, 1998Defense Technology Corporation Of AmericaReloadable high-low pressure ammunition cartridge
US7600337Feb 13, 2006Oct 13, 2009Taser International, Inc.Systems and methods for describing a deployment unit for an electronic weapon
US7891127Feb 1, 2006Feb 22, 2011Taser International, Inc.Systems and methods for deploying electrodes from a covered cavity for electronic weaponry
US7891128Feb 6, 2006Feb 22, 2011Taser International, Inc.Systems and methods for local and remote stun functions in electronic weaponry
US7980180 *Feb 23, 2005Jul 19, 2011General Dynamics Ordnance And Tactical Systems-Canada Inc.Jacketed one piece core ammunition
US7986506Nov 20, 2007Jul 26, 2011Taser International, Inc.Systems and methods for arc energy regulation and pulse delivery
US8096076 *Dec 8, 2010Jan 17, 2012Taser International, Inc.Systems and methods for a covered deployment unit for electronic weaponry
US8646388 *Sep 17, 2012Feb 11, 2014Michael S. BradburyBroadhead bullet
Classifications
U.S. Classification102/436, 102/439, 244/3.23
International ClassificationF42B10/00, F42B5/00, F42B10/22, F42B5/045
Cooperative ClassificationF42B5/045, F42B10/22
European ClassificationF42B10/22, F42B5/045