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Publication numberUS2014993 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 17, 1935
Filing dateAug 17, 1931
Priority dateJul 3, 1930
Publication numberUS 2014993 A, US 2014993A, US-A-2014993, US2014993 A, US2014993A
InventorsWilliam H Stayton
Original AssigneeWilliam H Stayton
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Golf game
US 2014993 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

` Sept 17, i935. W H, STAYTON 2,014,993

GOLF GAME Original Filed July 3, 1930 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 pt@ 17, 1935., w. H. sTAYToN @,mw

GOLF GAME Original Filed July 5, 1950- 3 Sheets-:Sheet 2v HIV? Sept. 17, 1935. w. H. sTAYToN GOLF GAME 5 sheets-sheet 5 Original Filed July 3, 195C Patented Sept. 1 7, 17935.

Unirse srarss ENT @Fifi Original application lluly 3, 1930, Serial No. 465,759. Divided and this application August 17, 1931, Serial No. 557,703. Renewed December 8 Claims.

This invention relates to games and more particularly toa game providing a miniature variation and close simulation of the well known outdoor game of golf. This application is a division of application Serial No. 465,759, led

July 3, 1930.

It has been heretofore proposed to provide games in imitation of golf which might be played on a sufficiently small scale to provide indoor 10 amusement, but all of these games, to applicants knowledge, have, by their reduction in scale, resulted in the elimination of most of the elements which combine to make outdoor golf such a popular, competitive sport. Personal judgment,

physical skill, knowledge of the rules oi the game and other psychological factors, all of which contribute greatly to the enjoyment of the outdoor game, have largely vanished in the miniature reproductions previously provided.

It is therefore one of the objects of the present invention to provide a game which is highly instructive as well as entertaining, and which requires and encourages the useV of individual skill.

Another object is to provide a novel game of miniature golf in which the usual conditions and problems of actual outdoor play are closely simulated, and which requires a degree of skill comn parable to that exercised in the regular game.

A further object is to provide a game of golf which, although greatly reduced in scale, affords the same opportunities for enjoyment and instruction, and accurately presentsY the same problems as the outdoor gamethereby constituting a most desirable means of practice and study with respect to the physical movements, exercise of judgment and rules of play ofthe game in general.

Another object is to provide a manikin golf player of novel construction with which a game of 40 golf may be played in a manner closely resembling that of the regular game.

A further object is to provide a novel manikin golfer whose members are widely adjustable at the will of the player of the game, and which is adapted to be actuated by a maximum of personal skill on the part of the player andV a minimum of mechanical movement derived from the structure itself.

50 Still another object is to provide a novel manikin golfer whose stance, choice of club length and angle of club face, length and force of swing, and other physical characteristics entering into a golf shot may be individually adjusted or determined 55 by the player of the game, thus affording maximum opportunity for the exercise of his own judgment, and golfing ability.

A still further object is to provide a novel game of miniature golf in which the movements of a manikin golfer may be completely controlled by 5 the player of the game, and the shots played upon a game board which reproduces actual playing conditions with utmost iidelity.

These and other objects will appear more fully from a considerati-on of the detailed description lo of the invention which follows. Although two embodiments each of the game board and manikin are described and illustrated in the accompanying drawings, it will be expressly understood that the drawings are for the purpose of illustration only, l5 and are not to be construed as a limitation of the scope of the invention, reference being had for this purpose to the appended claims.

In the drawings:

Fig. 1 is a plan View of one embodiment of a. 2O playing surface constituting a miniature golf course on which the game may be played;

Fig. 2 is a sectional View taken on line 2 2 of Fig'. l;

Fig. 3 is a sectional view taken on line 3--3 of 25 Fig. 1;

Fig. 4 is a plan view of another embodiment of the playing surface;

Fig. 5 is a sectional View taken on line 5 5 of Fig. 4; 30 Figs. 6, 7 and 8 are perspective views, taken at different angles showing one embodiment of the manikin according toI the present invention; and

Fig. 9 is a detail View partially in section of Y another embodiment of the manikin.

Referring now to the drawings, wherein like reference characters indicate like parts throughout the several views, there is disclosed therein a miniature golf game comprising three novel, cooperating game pieces-a playing board or sur- 40 face, a ball, and a manikin player.

The playing board or surface (Figs. 1 5) con prises, in general, a base or mat upon which are accurately reproduced in miniature the physical characteristics of a golf course. The board may be made in sections, each section being a complete unit in itself of any desired number of holes, with suitable means being provided for joining a plurality of sections in order to construct a course of any desired length and layout, or, if desired and if sumcient space is available, an entire course may be laid out and constructed as a unit. The base or mat may be either per-V manently attached to a table or other suitable support, Vor adapted for temporary attachment and ready portability. The preferred construction, however, embodies portable sections of a rigid base of slightly smaller size than the ordinary card table, both sides of the base being finished to represent a portion of a golf course, and means for supporting and joining a plurality of such sections. An alternative construction comprises similar portable sections of a flexible mat of substantially the same size as an ordinary card table, each of which sections can be rolled up into a small package of convenient size for easy transportation, and then spread out and temporarily secured by suitable means to any available table.

Referring now in detail to Figs. l, 2 and 3, the playing board as shown therein comprises a plurality of portable sections I0 supported in any suitable manner as on card tables Il, and novel means for joining the various sections to constitute the desired layout. Each section I9 has a base I2, of any suitable material such as wood, in each corner of which is secured a supporting pillar I3 projecting on each side thereof. These sections I0 may be of any desirable size, but as shown are slightly smaller than the top of an average card table II.

Both sides of base I2 are prepared in simulation of a golf course by reproducing in miniature thereon, by any suitable means, the physical characteristics of the tees, fairways, rough, hazards and greens of any known or imaginary course. The contour of the surface may rst be prepared by applying to base I2 a suitable amount of padding I4, such as felt, and then a fabric covering I5 placed thereover and secured to base I2 at the edges thereof. Fabric covering I5 may be of any desired material but preferably is provided with a pile in simulation of grass, the height of which can be varied by cutting so as to be short in the fairways and long in the rough. Miniature trees, fences and other similar hazards may be placed on the surface of fabric covering I5, and, if desired, secured thereto as by sewing.

If desired, the greens and large hazards, such as ponds or sand traps and bunkers, may be constructed as units removable from base I2 and interchangeable one with the other, thus again increasing the number of possible variations in the layout of the course. As shown, each green and large hazard comprises a base member i6, preferably of the same material as base I2, which is appropriately surfaced similarly to base I2, but on one side only. The greens are surfaced with a thin layer of padding I4 and a substantially smooth fabric covering I5, and are each provided with a cup I'I representing the hole, in which is removably supported the staff I8 of a ag I9. Those units representing ponds and sand traps may be provided with suitable depressions 28 in base members I6 in which water and sand may be placed.

All units are of the same size and shape so as to be interchangeable, and are adapted to be seated in suitable recesses ZI formed in base I2. For convenience, the units have been shown as circular with a shouldered ange 22 engaging an inwardly projecting collar 23 formed integrally with base I2, but it is to be understood that other forms of construction may be utilized.

Novel means are also provided for joining together the various sections of the playing surface which not only make possible a complete, ccntinuous layout, but also prevent the transmission of vibrations or shocks from one section to another which might disturb the play. Two forms of such connecting means are shown in the drawings, that in Fig. 2 illustrating a flexible or resilient trough which might be utilized to represent a stream, and that in Fig. 3 showing a strip of surface similar to that of the adjoining sections I0.

The exible trough of Fig. 2 comprises a pair of rods or strips 24, equal in length to base l2, and a trough 25 of resilient material such as rubber, equal in length to the distance between pillars I3 and secured to rods 24 by any suitable means such as sewing.

The connecting strip shown in Fig. 3 has a thin base plate 26 of suitable material on which is formed a surface of padding I4 and fabric covering I5 similar to that formed on base I2. Base plate 26 is equal in length to trough 25 and slightly narrower than the space which it is to cover so as to allow a small movement of one section I0 without disturbing the adjacent section.

A second embodiment of the playing board is disclosed in Figs. 4 and 5, differing from that just described in that the base comprises a exible mat which may be rolled up for ready transportation, and is provided with a playing surface on only one side, the base being adapted to rest directly upon the supporting table and to be temporarily secured thereto by suitable means.

As shown, a base I2', of any suitable iiexible material such as rubber, is made substantially equal in size to the top of card table II and is provided with suitable straps 21 in each corner thereof which are adapted to slip under the corners of table II and thus temporarily secure the playing board thereto. The upper surface of base I2 is prepared in simulation of a golf course by means of padding I4 and a fabric covering I5 in a manner similar to that previously described. The greens and large hazards are also made as removable, interchangeable units similar to those shown in Figs. 1 and 2, suitable shouldered recesses 2| being provided in base I2 to receive the flanged base members I6. It will be understood that these units are removed from recesses 2I when base I2 is rolled up for transportation.

The miniature golf course thus provided may be laid out as a replica of any actual course, or may be a combination of famous holes of various courses. The fairways, greens, hazards and other physical characteristics of the course are accurately constructed to scale, the scale used also being an important factor to be considered in the construction of the ball and manikin player later to be described.

Since the present game is intended to be as close a simulation as possible of the actual game of golf, a ball 28 is used instead of a disc or any of the other artificial means heretofore proposed. The ball may be made of any suitable material, cork, aluminum and steel each having been utilized by applicant, but it is preferable to construct it from hard rubber and to provide it with a cover painted and marked in a manner similar to ordinary golf balls. The size and weight of the ball are, of course, dependent upon the size of the playing board and that of the manikin.

In order to propel the ball around the miniature golf course above described, a novel, portable manikin golf player has been provided which is so constructed as to allow maximum control by the player of the game and all movements of the manikin, thus rendering the element of individual skill the most important factor in the CTI 1 means of screw 39.

lsuccessful playing of the game. To this end the body and members of the manikin are made flexible in simulation of the joints and muscles of the human body, and a golf club is provided which is fully adjustable. as to length of the shaft and angle of face of the Vclub head. Novel means for actuating the club have also been devised which permit full personal control of the force and length of the stroke of the club by the player of the game.

As shown in Figs. 6, 7 and 8, the manikin player comprises a torsol or trunk 29, substantially cylindrical in shape and made of any suitable material, either wood or metal, which is adjustably supported at its lower end in a hip plate Sil to which are secured flexible legs 3l terminating in weighted feet 32, and which at its upper end carries a rotatable shoulder band or disc 33 to which is secured a flexible arm 3d holding a miniature golf club 35.

The adjustable connection between torso 29 and hip plate 3@ is preferably of the ball-andsocket type so as to allow a maximum of ad* justability, and as shown, (see Fig. 9 for details), comprises a hemispherical base 36 for torso 29 which rests upon a concave seat or socket 3l formed in hip plate 3i! and is secured thereto by means of a dished washer 33 held against the bottom of socket 3l and secured to base 36 by Socket 3l is provided with an enlarged central opening lil through which screw 39 extends, thereby allowing a wide range of movement of torso 2% relative to hip plate 3%. The flexibility of the joint thus formed may be easily adjusted by screw 39.

The legs 3l of the manikin are preferably made of flexible tubing lsufficiently stiif to support the weight of the rest of the manikin and yet flexible enough to enable the player of the game to adjust the legs to any desired position. The lower ends of the legs are provided with weighted feet 32 which may be cast of lead and swiveled thereto in any suitable manner, while the upper ends are provided with ferrules @l which are rigidly secured to hip plate 3l).

The upper end of torso 2Q is provided with suitable means for rotatably supporting shoulder disc 33 and for adjusting its plane of rotation relative to the torso. As shown, shoulder disc 33 is rotatably mounted on a shaft 42 and rests against a collar llt secured to said shaft intermediate its ends. The lower end of shaft i2 below collar li3 is provided with a bifurcated portion t@ which engages the upper end of a stud i5 threaded into the upper end of torso 29.

A bolt it 4extends through suitable openings in bifurcated portion it and stud d5 and is provided with a butterfly nut l, thereby affording an easily adjustable means for varying the plane of rotation of disc 33 relative to torso 29.

Arm 3d is made of tubing similar to that co-mprising legs 3l but is preferably slightly more exible. The upper end of arm 34 is provided with a ferrule lil which is threaded into the `periphery of shoulder disc 3, and its lowerend is provided with a chuck t@ in which is frictionally gripped the upper end of the shaft of golf club 35. The effective length of the shaft may `thus be adjusted by sliding it through chuck G9,

ball or handle 53 which is adapted to be grasped by the player in making the stroke. In order to decrease the effect of weighted ball 53 in assisting the stroke and to thus require that the actuating lever 52 be positively moved by the player throughout the stroke, a coil spring 54 is provided surrounding therupper .end of shaft l2 and exerting a dampening force against shoulder disc 33. The other end of spring 5d is seated ina recess 55 formed in a detachable head 5S of the manikin which is threaded onto the upper end of shaft 42.

In Fig. 9 there is shown a variation which may be made in the construction of the torso and the` connection therewith of the shoulder disc in the interest of Igreater iiexibility and closer simulation of the human body. As disclosed therein, the substantially cylindrical, rigid torso 29 of Figs. 6, 7 and 8 is replaced by a length of exible tubing 5l which is secured at its lower end by a ferrule 58 to Va hemispherical base 36', and at its upper end by another ferrule 5t to the collar 113' of shaft s512' on which shoulder disc 33 is rotatably mounted. The ball-and-socket connection of base 36 to hip plate 39, the mounting of shoulder disc 33 on shaft ii2, and all other details of the manikin not specifically shown in Fig. 9 are similar to those shown in Figs. 6, 7 and 8.

As mentioned above, a head 56, representing that of a man or woman, is adapted to be screwed onto the upper end of shafts 4l and si to complete the structure of the manikin. It is also contemplated that the manikin will be provided with clothing of any suitable character, such as indicated in the drawings, so dressed upon the figure as not to interfere with its mechanical functioning. .The clothing, of course, may be changeable, as are the heads, so that the manikins used in a match may be appropriately dressed to represent the various players. In this connection, it mayl also be desirable to correlate the colors of t. e clothing of the various manikins with the markings of the balls so that each player will easily be able to identify his ball at any time during the game.

In playing this game, the usual rules of golf obtain although it is permissible to formulate additional local rules as is common practice in the outdoor game. The game board or course is first prepared for play by setting it up in any suitable place where adequate space is available. In cases where the game is installed in clubs, hotels, amusement parks, etc., the layout will 'usually be permanently attached to its support and no preparation of the board will be necessary, but in the preferred embodiment, the individual, portable sections will be placed upon card tables, or other suitable supports, and connected together to form a course of any desired length and layout. If exible mats of the form shown in Figs. 4 and 5 are used, they would rst be unrolled and spread out on the tables, have their green and hazard units inserted in the proper recesses, and then be temporarily secured to the tables by the means provided.

The game is then played in the usual manner starting from Number 1 tee. The ball is teed up and the manikin placed in the proper position to make the drive, all operations being performed by the individual playing the game. The stance, or position of the feet, is first -adjusted and then the position of the arm and body. The angle of the club head and the length of the shaft are also xed in accordance with the judgment of the player and the ball is addressed. In making the stroke, the player grasps the actu-ating arm of the rotatable shoulder disc in one hand, using the other to steady the manikin, if necessary, and positively moves the clutch throughout a complete stroke.

Should the stroke be poorly executed due either to an error in judgment as to stance, etc., or to an improper use of physical force, a sliced, hooked, topped or dubbed shot will result just as in the regular game, due to the novel construction of the manikin.

After the drive has been made, the manikin will be moved by the player up to Where the ball lies, the stance, club head, and length of shaft again adjusted and the second shot played, the

amount of force used and the length of the swing again depending upon the judgment of the player. When the ball reaches the green, the club is adjusted for putting, and a slight tap used to put the ball in the hole.

The score is recorded in the same way as in the regular game, and any desired number of holes may be placed in the above described manner to constitute the gaine. It will be understood that a plurality of manikins and balls mays be provided so that the game may be played by twosomes, threesomes or foursomes as well as by single players, and matches arranged as in the regular game.

There is thus provided by the present invention a novel game of miniature golf which closely simulates in all its details the well known outdoor game and which is instructive as well as enter# taining, requiring a degree of personal skill comparable to that exercised in the regular game and thus affording a desirable means of practice and study of the game in general. A manikin golf player is provided of novel flexible construction such that maximum adjustability is afforded of body, members and the golf club, thereby allowing great opportunities for the exercise of personal skill by the player, and making individual ability a true measure of the successful playing of the game.

It will be obvious that the invention is not limited to the exact forms described and illustrated in the drawings, but is capable of a variety of mechanical embodiments. For example, it is contemplated that the playing board may be permanently attached to its support and that an entire I8 hole comse may be constructed as a unit. Such a layout would be well adapted for use in a club, hotel or amusement park, in which case it would probably be preferable to provide the manikin with a coin-operated locking device whereby it would be unlocked by the deposit of a coin and would automatically re-lock after the elapse of a predetermined period of time, or after a certain number of strokes have been played. Various other changes, which will now appear to those skilled in the art, may be made in the form, details of construction and arrangement of the parts without departing from the spirit of the invention, and reference is therefore to be had to the appended claims for a definition of the limits of the invention.

What is claimed is:

1. In a golf game, a manikin golf player comprising a torso, a support for said torso, an adjustable connection between said torso and said support permitting movement of the former in a plurality of planes with respect to the latter, a flexible arm carried by the torso, and a golf club held by said arm.

2. In a golf game, a manikin golf player comprising a torso, a support for said torso, an adjustable connection between said torso and said support permitting movement of the former in a plurality of planes with respect to the latter, a shoulder disc mounted at the upper end of said torso and rotatable relatively thereto, an arm carried by said shoulder disc, and a golf club held by said arm.

3. In a golf game, a manikin golf player comprising a torso, a support for said torso, an adjustable connection between said torso and said support permitting movement of the former in a plurality of planes with respect to the latter, a shoulder disc mounted at the upper end of said torso and rotatable relatively thereto, an arm carried by said shoulder'disc, a golf club held by said arm, and means for manually rotating said shoulder disc thereby swinging the golf club.

4. In a golf game, a manikin golf player comprising a torso, flexible legs for said torso, an adjustable connection between said torso and said legs permitting movement of the former in a plurality of planes with respect to the latter, a shoulder disc mounted at the upper end of said torso and rotatable relatively thereto, a flexible arm carried by said shoulder disc, a golf club held by said arm, and means for manually rotating said shoulder disc thereby swinging the golf club.

5. In a golf game, a manikin golf player comprising a flexible torso, flexible legs for said torso, said legs having weighted feet, an adjustable connection between said legs and said torso, a rotatable shoulder disc at the upper end of said torso, a flexible arm carried by said shoulder disc, a golf club held by said arm, and means for manually rotating said shoulder disc thereby swinging the golf club.

6. In a golf game, a manikin golf player comprising a torso, a support for said torso, an adjustable connection between said torso and said support permitting movement of the former in a plurality of planes with respect to the latter, an arm carried by the torso, a golf club held by said arm, and manually actuatable means for rotating said arm about the axis of the torso independently of said torso, thereby swinging said golf club.

7. In a golf game, a manikin golf player comprising a body, a flexibly adjustable arm and legs connected to said body, a golf club held by said arm, and means for adjusting the angle of loft and the length of the shaft of said golf club.

8. In a golf game, a manikin golf player comprising a body, flexibly adjustable legs for said body, an adjustable connection between said legs and said body permitting movement of the former in a plurality of planes with respect to the latter, a rotatable shoulder disc at the upper end of said body, an arm carried by said shoulder disc, a golf club held by said arm and means for adjusting the angle of loft and the length of shaft of said golf club.

WILLIAM H. STAYTON.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3871650 *Jun 8, 1973Mar 18, 1975William J CaseyGame apparatus
US4095793 *Apr 4, 1977Jun 20, 1978Otis Eugene RayMarble game resembling golf
US5393058 *May 5, 1993Feb 28, 1995Rowland; BruceRobot golf game
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/108.22
International ClassificationA63B67/02
Cooperative ClassificationA63F7/2472
European ClassificationA63F7/24B5