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Publication numberUS2015490 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 24, 1935
Filing dateNov 8, 1934
Priority dateNov 8, 1934
Publication numberUS 2015490 A, US 2015490A, US-A-2015490, US2015490 A, US2015490A
InventorsMcallister Raymond C
Original AssigneeIngersoll Rand Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Separator for heat exchangers
US 2015490 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 24, 1935.

R. C. M ALLISTER SEPARATOR FOR HEAT EXCHANGERS Filed Nov. 8, 1954 H15 A TTORNEY Patented Sept. 24, 1935 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE 'SEPARATOR FOR HEAT EXCHANGERS Application November 8, 1934, Serial No. 752,005

6 Claims.

This invention relates to separators, and more particularly to a separator for heat exchangers, as for instance a compressor intercooler, through which compressed fluid flows from onecylinder to another.

One object of the'invention is to effect the removal of entrained moisture from the pressure fluid.

Other objects will be part obviousarid in part pointed out hereinafter.

The drawing accompanying this specification and forming a part thereof is a section or the separator showing it applied to an intercoo-ler.

Referring more 'particularly'to the "drawing, 28 designates, in general, a compressor system comprising low and high pressure cylinders 2| and 22 and a vertically disposed intercooler 23 through which compressed fluid flows from-the former to the latter. The low pressure cylinder is accordingly connected to the casing 24 of the intercooler by-a discharge conduit 25 which registers with-an inlet opening 26 adjacent the upper end of the intercooler 23.

The intercooler 23 may be of a well known construction comprising a series of tubes 21 which extend longitudinally of the casing 24 and are supported at their upper and lowerends by tube sheets-28 and 29,.respectively. The tube sheet 28 is seated upon the upper end of the casing 24 and supports a cover 30 the interior of which serves as a discharge chamber 3| for liquid issuing from the tubes 21. A conduit 32 connected to the cover 39 conveys the cooling liquid from the chamber 3| to a suitable destination.

Preferably, the tube plate 29 is of slightly smaller diameter than the interior of the casing 24, wherein it lies, to provide an annular passage 33 between these elements for the escape of condensate separated from the air as a result of its contact with the cool surfaces of the tubes 21. The tube plate 29 may be supported in any suitable manner and carries a head 34 having a chamber 35 through which cooling liquid passes to the tubes 21. A conduit 36 connected to the head 34 conveys cooling liquid to the chamber 35 from a source of supply (not shown).

In order that the fluid intended to be cooled may be brought repeatedly into intimate contact with a maximum cooling area of the tubes 21 the casing is provided with a series of baiiles 31 which are arranged in staggered formation so that the fluid flowing through the casing is directed transversely of the tubes. Any suitable number of baflles may be provided for this purpose. Four baffles are shown in the drawing, two being disposed on one side of the casing and two on the opposite'side. Thus,"as' the fluid flows through the casing it is caused to'follow a serpentine path and, therefore, to traverse the tube nest repeatedly before-issuing from an outlet opening or openings 38 located near the lower end of the casing 24, andpreferably on the side opposite-to that containing the inlet opening 26.

In accordancewith the practice of the invention, meansare provided for effecting the re- 1 moval of moisture entrained in the compressed fluid prior to the entry of the fluid into the high pressure cylinder 22. The means selected for illustrative purposes comprising a casing 39' arranged about the lower portion of the casing-24 to which a plate 49, constituting a closure' for the upper end of the casing 39, may be suitably secured to form a fluid tight joint at this point. The plate 49 supports a tubular'baflle- 4| Which encircles the casing 24 and extendswith its lower end to a point below the outlet openings 38. Thus, as the compressed fluid issues from-the outlet openings 38 it-is first directed downwardly, thence curves upwardly around the lower edge of the space between the casing 39 and bafile 4| and continues through an intake conduit '42- connecting the highpressure cylinder with the .upper portion :of the casing 39, andabove the :outlet openings 38. The annular channel 43 defined by 30 the baffie 4| and the casing 24 and through which the compressed fluid flows from the inlet openings 38 into the casing 39 is preferably of somewhat restricted area in order to accelerate the velocity of the fluid entering the casing 39. 35

In the lower end of the casing 39 is a compartment 44 to receive the condensate extracted from the pressure fluid. The compartment 44 is defined by an intermediate wall 45 in the casing and an end head 46, the latter containing a packing device 41 for effecting a seal about the conduit 36 which extends through the head 46. A valve 48 threaded to the head 46 provides a convenient means for periodically draining the the compartment 44. Preferably the lower por- 50 tion of the casing 24 is in the form of a skirt 50 which extends to, a point near the wall 45. The skirt conveys the condensate from the annular passage 33. It terminates below the baffle 4| and itself acts as a baffle to avoid intermingling 55 of the stream of pressure fluid flowing around the end of the baflle 4| and the condensate issuing from the annular passage 33.

The operation of the device, briefly summarized, is as follows: Upon being discharged into the upper end of the intercooler the compressed air zig-zags downwardly around the battles 31, thence flows through the outlet openings 38 into the passage 43 around the lower end of the bafiie 4| and upwardly through the casing, 39 to and through the conduit 42 into the high pressure cylinder 22. During the passage of the pressure fluid through the intercooler moisture is condensed through contact of the fluid medium with the tubes 21. The condensate thus formed precipitates to the bottom of the intercooler, whence it passes through the annular passage 33, the skirt portion and the opening 49 into the compartment 44.

Any residue of condensed moisture entrained in the pressure fluid issuing from the outlet openings 38 will, of course, pass therewith through the annular restricted passage 43. Owing, however, to the highly accelerated velocity of the pressure fluid issuing from the annular passage 43, and t0 the further fact that at this point the direction of the air stream is sharply reversed, the moisture is cast out of the fluid stream into the lower or inactive portion of the casing, whence it passes through the opening 49 into the compartment 44.

I claim:

1. In a separator, the combination of a heat exchanger having inlet and outlet openings for pressure fluid, a casing to receive the discharge output of the heat exchanger, and means overlying the outlet opening for deflecting the fluid issuing therefrom to dynamically project moisture from the fluid stream into the casing.

2. In a separator, the combination of a heat exchanger having inlet and outlet openings for pressure fluid, a casing encircling the heat exchanger to receive its discharge output, and an annular bafiie in the casing overlying the outlet opening for deflecting the fluid stream, thereby causing entrained moisture to be dynamically projected into an inactive portion of the casing.

3. In a separator, the combination of a heat exchanger having inlet and outlet openings for pressure fluid, a casing encircling a portion of the heat exchanger to receive the fluid issuing from the outlet opening, and means in the casing for accelerating the velocity of the fluid issuing from the outlet opening and to deflect the fluid stream and thereby cause entrained condensate to be dynamically projected from the fluid stream into the casing.

4. In a separator, the combination of a heat exchanger having inlet and outlet openings for pressure fluid, a casing encircling a portion of the heat exchanger to receive the fluid issuing from the outlet opening, and an annular baflle in the casing for deflecting the fluid and cooperating with the heat exchanger to define a restricted passage for accelerating the velocity of the fluid and thereby cause entrained moisture to be cast from the fluid into an inactive portion of the casing.

5. In a separator, the combination of a vertical heat exchanger having inlet and outlet openings for pressure fluid, said heat exchanger having an outlet at its lower end for condensate, a casing encircling a portion of the heat exchanger to receive the pressure fluid and the condensate, a; compartment within the casing for condensate, and an annular baffle encircling the heat exchanger and cooperating therewith to deflect the fluid and to define an annular restricted passage for accelerating the velocity of the fluid and; thereby cause entrained moisture to be cast from the fluid into the casing.

6. In a separator, the combination of a vertical heat exchanger having inlet and outlet openings for pressure fluid, said heat exchanger having an outlet at its lower end for condensate, a casing encircling a portion of the heat exchanger to receive the pressure fluid and the condensate, a compartment within the casing for condensate, an annular bafile encircling the heat exchanger and cooperating therewith to deflect the fluid and to define an annular restricted passage for accelerating the velocity of the fluid and thereby cause entrained moisture to be cast from the fluid

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2514894 *Dec 4, 1947Jul 11, 1950Ingersoll Rand CoHeat exchanger
US2986012 *Jul 25, 1955May 30, 1961Union Carbide CorpMethod and apparatus for producing sterilized heat sensitive materials
US3031131 *Mar 6, 1957Apr 24, 1962Joy Mfg CoCompressor
US4506513 *Jun 17, 1983Mar 26, 1985Max John KCold trap
EP1836446A2 *Dec 15, 2005Sep 26, 2007Api Heat Transfer, Inc.Compressed air aftercooler with integral moisture separator
Classifications
U.S. Classification55/434.4, 55/434
International ClassificationF04B39/16
Cooperative ClassificationF04B39/16
European ClassificationF04B39/16