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Publication numberUS2016438 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 8, 1935
Filing dateApr 16, 1932
Priority dateApr 16, 1932
Publication numberUS 2016438 A, US 2016438A, US-A-2016438, US2016438 A, US2016438A
InventorsKealoha Ylan K
Original AssigneeKealoha Ylan K
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Finger pick
US 2016438 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Y. K. KEALOHA FINGER PICK Filed April 16, 1932 w ENIVENTQR jimmy Manama.

AWORNEY5 Patented Oct. 8, 1935 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFliS 4 Claims.

The present invention relates to new and useful improvements in finger picks for use in the playing of stringed instruments.

Devices of this character with which I am familiar have several disadvantages. Such devices which I have used are not possessed of sufiicient resiliency to produce the best results as pertains to tone quality and volume.

Another disadvantage inherent in such devices as generally constructed is the manner in which these devices are attached to the fingers in use, they being extremely difficult to maintain in proper position on the finger under severe conditions of use.

It is an object of the present invention so to construct a finger pick that the pick in its engagement and disengagement with the strings of the instrument will produce a clear resonant tone of the proper volume and without harsh tones so commonly apparent when picks as generally constructed are employed.

A further object of the invention is to provide a new and novel form of attaching band which will be comfortable during the playing opfinger pick in proper position upon the finger even under severe conditions of use.

With the above and other objects in view, reference is had to the accompanying drawing, in which:

Figure l is a perspective view illustrating a pick constructed in accordance with one form of the present invention,

Figure 2 is a view in side elevation thereof showing the pick attached to the finger of a user,

Figure 3 is a top plan view showing the pick in operating position.

Figure 4 is a bottom plan View thereof,

Figure 5 is a longitudinal sectional View taken in perspective,

Figure 6 is a top plan view of the blank from which the pick is formed,

Figure 7 is a bottom perspective view of the pick, the pick being of slightly modified form,

Figure 8 is a bottom plan view of that form of pick illustrated in Figure 7, and

Figure 9 is a longitudinal sectional view.

In the illustrated embodiment of the invention, the pick comprises a main body portion Iii which terminates in a picking tip I l at one end. At the other end of the main body portion there is a finger encircling band I5.

In the present illustration, the body portion is shown in two different forms, one of which forms eration, and which will at all times maintain theis illustrated. in Figures 1 to 6 and Figure 9, the other form being illustrated in Figures 7 and 8.

In that form of the invention illustrated in Figures 1 to 6 inclusive, and Figure 9, the main body portion I0 is narrower than in that form of the invention illustrated in Figure 8. In each form, however, the body portion to has curved side edges l2, and these side edges curve from a point approximately at the center of the body portion toward the picking end thereof at which they terminate in the picking tip ii. In both forms, the body portion also is of slightly disked form. This construction provides a curved outer face for the pick and this construction together with the curved side edges I2 of the body portion insures such co-action between the body portion and the string struck or picked thereby, as to at all times, lead the string to the picking point and thus insure proper action of the pick upon the string.

The pickingtip H is of a comparatively rigid nature, and this rigidity is obtained by thickening the material from which the body portion is formed as indicated at M in the drawing. This thickened tip may be provided by the adding of 25 material at this point, or it may be formed by cutting away a portion of the material from which the body portion is formed in order that body portion will be thinner than the picking tip and thus give considerable rigidity to the picking 30 tip. The thickened portion it may be of any desired shape, but I prefer to provide this thickened portion in the form of a lug by the addition of a small amount of material immediately behind the picking point.

By reference to the drawing, it will be noted that the body portion I6 is longitudinally curved in an are substantially conforming to the curvature of the end of a human finger and the body portion is of such length that the picking tip ll 40 thereof will be positioned in a plane above the top line of the finger in use, thus permitting of free insertion and withdrawal of the picking tip between strings of aninstrurnent without interference with the-strin gs.

The retaining band !5 consists of two winglike portions I6 which project from the rear end of the body portion [0 and are connected thereto by a relatively narrow portion ll. By reference to Figure 6 it will be noted that the wing portions are curved in such a manner that when they are bent to form the retaining band i5, the free ends thereof designated [8 in the drawing will extend forwardly in the direction of the picking point to a point where they overlie the nail of the finger to which thepickisattached as best illustrated in the plan view in Figure 3. The curvature of these winglike extensions is such that as best illustrated in Figures 2 and 4 of the drawing, they pass in a rearward direction immediately they leave the body portion and then turn abruptly to a forward direction until their free ends overlie the nail of the finger at a point well in advance of the first knuckle thereof.

This construction of securing band has two distinct advantages. First, it provides a circular rear end for the body portion as indicated at 20 in the drawing which, when pressure is applied to the body portion by the finger, causes distension of the finger as indicated at 2| in Figure 2 to aid in maintaining the pick in proper position. Second, it throws the point of contact of the retaining band and the finger well forward of the first knuckle of the finger 'thereby giving freedom of action to said knuckle.

The reference character 30 indicates a reinforcing rib which extends longitudinally of the body portion I0 of the pick. This reinforcing rib 30 is preferably punched from the body portion and extends longitudinally forwardly from a point 3| closely adjacent the relatively narrow neck portion of the body portion to a point substantially central of the ends of the body portion.

This reinforcing rib provides rigidity or stiffness to this particular area of the body portion and provides a relatively high degree of resiliency in that area of the body portion of the pick which lies between the forward end of this rib and the picking tip of the pick and thus insures proper action of the picking tip relative to the string which it engages.

The pick functions in the following manner:

The finger is passed into the retaining band and the wing portions which form this band may either be spread or contracted to the proper point so that the pick will comfortably fit the finger.

This position of the pick is best illustrated in Figure 2 of the drawing and by examination of said figure, it will be noted that the picking tip of the pick is spaced from the end of the finger and projects to a point above the plane of the top thereof. If new pressure is applied to the picking tip H, as in the picking of one or more strings of a musical instrument the body portion of the pick flexes at that portion forward of the reinforcing bead 30 causing the string to lead to the picking tip H which being reinforced gives the proper action to the string to produce the proper tone quality as the string clears the picking point. The pressure of the finger upon the body portion of the pick causes distension of the finger at the rear of the retaining band as indicated at 2| and in front of the retaining band as at in the drawing and thus prevents shifting of the pick upon the finger and insures its proper position at all times. Furthermore, pressure of the finger upon the body portion of the pick causes the retaining band I5 to rock forwardly so that the free ends 58 thereof transmit pressure to the finger nail and do away with all binding on the finger proper and its attendant discomfort. Also, this rocking forward of the retaining band still further insures freedom of action of the first knuckle of the finger upon which the pick is mounted.

That form of the invention illustrated in Figure 8 of the drawing is substantially the same in every respect as that of the form heretofore described, except that in this form of the invention, the body portion is slightly wider and the curve of the side edges thereof is less abrupt as is evident from the drawing and this construction provides a pick especially adapted for use upon the second finger as distinguished from the other form which is especially adapted for use upon the index finger.

From the foregoing, it will be readily apparent to one skilled in the use of picks of the general type herein disclosed, that the present invention provides a new and novel pick which is highly efiicient in operation and which will maintain its proper position under operating conditions.

Having thus described the invention, what is claimed as new, and what it is desired to secure by Letters Patent of the United States, is:

l. A. pick for stringed musical instruments comprising a body portion terminating at one end in a picking point, and a securing band for retaining pick in operative position upon the finger of a user, said securing band comprising two wing extensions having their free ends curved forwardly, each wing extension being connected to the body portion by a relatively narrow portion whereby to provide resiliency between the body portion and the securing band.

2. A pick for stringed musical instruments comprising a body portion terminating at one end in a picking point, and a securing band for retaining said pick in operative position upon the finger of a user,saidsecuring band comprising two wing extensions having their free ends curved forwardly, each wing extension being connected to the bodyportion bya relatively narrow portionwhereby to provide resiliency between the body portion and the securing band, and a reinforcing rib extending longitudinally of the body portion from a point immediately forward of the juncture of the wingswith the body portion.

3. A pick for stringed musical instruments, comprising a body portion terminating at one end in a picking-point and a securing band for retaining said pick in operative position upon the finger of the user, said securing band comprising two wing extensions connected to the body portion by relatively narrow portions and having substantial portions of their free ends curved forwardly into overlapping relation at a point one end in a picking-point and a securing band 50 for retaining said pick in operative position upon a finger of the user, said securing band comprising two winged extensions, having their free ends curved forwardly into overlapping relation at a point which will overlie the finger nail, when the 55 pick is in position for use.

YLAN K. KEALOHA.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4625615 *Sep 3, 1985Dec 2, 1986Lukehart Donald WPick for stringed instruments
US4691609 *Dec 9, 1986Sep 8, 1987Robert G. RiceStylus pick for stringed musical instruments
US4711150 *Dec 4, 1984Dec 8, 1987Hyduck Steven JPick for stringed instruments
US4879940 *Oct 3, 1988Nov 14, 1989Pereira Mark LPick for stringed musical instruments
US5323677 *Apr 13, 1993Jun 28, 1994Knutson John APick for plucking stringed musical instruments
US6335477 *Mar 30, 1999Jan 1, 2002Frederic Smith MillerMusical instrument picks and novel methods of use
US6346662Sep 15, 2000Feb 12, 2002Drayth S. SielaffErgonomic pick for stringed instrument
US7718874 *Feb 25, 2009May 18, 2010Ka C. CheokGuitar pick
WO2012142379A1 *Apr 13, 2012Oct 18, 2012Leneman MichaelGuitar pick
Classifications
U.S. Classification84/322, 984/123
International ClassificationG10D3/16, G10D3/00
Cooperative ClassificationG10D3/163
European ClassificationG10D3/16B