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Publication numberUS2016520 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 8, 1935
Filing dateApr 20, 1934
Priority dateApr 20, 1934
Publication numberUS 2016520 A, US 2016520A, US-A-2016520, US2016520 A, US2016520A
InventorsShort Amy H
Original AssigneeShort Amy H
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Collapsible bag
US 2016520 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 8, 1935. A. H. SHORT 2,016,520

COLLAPS IBLE BAG Filed April 20, 1934 v 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 FIG? gwuentoz Mr H. SHORT W W W duomq Oct. 8, 1935.

A. H. SHORT COLLAPS IBLE BAG Filed April 20, 1934 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 AM) H. SHORT dag 4 m/W Oct. 8, 1935. A. H. SHORT 2,016,520

COLLAPS IBLE I BAG Filed April 20, 1934 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 AMY H. SHORT jU. tiAliU/WL Patented Oct. 8, 1935 UNITED STATES Search Room PATENT OFFICE COLLAPSIBLE BAG Amy H. Short, Brooklyn, N. Y.

Application April 20, 1934, Serial No. 721,595

16 Claims.

My invention relates to handbags or luggage carriers.

An object of the invention is to devise a bag having a flexible or pliant casing and a frame for supporting the casing and rendering the bag selfsustaining.

A further object is to provide a collapsible frame so the bag may be folded into a small, compact bundle convenient for carrying, or for packing in other luggage carriers, or for storage.

Another object is to devise a bag of the type described in which the collapsible frame is readily removable from the flexible casing.

A further object is to devise a collapsible bag of light construction and one which is easily collapsed or extended.

Still another object is to devise a bag of the type described in which the removable collapsible frame, standing alone, is not self-sustaining, but when associated with the flexible casing produces a self-sustaining structure.

Three different modifications of my invention are illustrated in the accompanying drawings in which Figure 1 is a perspective view of a wardrobe type of bag in extended position;

Figure 2 is a perspective view of the supporting framework for the bag shown in Figure 1;

Figure 3 shows the folded position of the collapsible frame of Figure 2;

Figure 4 shows the bag of Figure 1 in collapsed or folded position;

Figure 5 is a perspective view of a second form of bag;

Figure 6 is a perspective view of the supporting framework for the bag of Figure 5;

Figure 7 shows the bag of Figure 5 in collapsed position;

Figure 8 shows the framework of Fig. 6 in collapsed position;

Figure 9 is a perspective view of a third form of bag; and

Figure 10 illustrates the supporting framework for the bag of Figure 9.

A wardrobe type of handbag is illustrated in Figures 1 to ,4. In this construction, the outer casing is formed of any suitable flexible or pliant material, such as leather, artificial leather, canvas, rubberized cloth or the like, and comprises a bottom wall la, two side walls lb and lo, a back wall lcZ, an arched top la and a front wall if. The front wall If is in the form of a flap sewed along its bottom edge to the front edge of the bottom wall and is secured to the front edges of side walls lblc and the top Ie by a zipper connection of well known construction. The zipper pull-tab is indicated at 2. The bottom portion of the front wall I f is sew-ed to the front edges of the side walls |b--lc for a short distance from the bottom of the bag, and suitable reinforcing tabs 3a and 3b are provided at the point where the zipper connection begins and ends to prevent the flap from ripping away from the side walls. The bottom wall la is formed of two sheets of flexible material between which is arranged a 5 stiffening or reinforcing board Ia which may be of stiff cardboard, sheet metal, wire frame, or other suitable material. The arched top wall I e is secured to and reinforced by a wire frame, the details of which are clearly shown in Figure 2. 10 This frame comprises an arched rectangular frame 4, provided with transverse bars 4a and 4b to which a flexible handle 5 is secured in any suitable manner and by which the bag is supported while being carried. One method of at- 15 taching the handle to the bars 4a and 4b is by loop-tabs 5a and 5b passing through rings at each end of the handle and riveted on each side of the bars 4a and 4b to reinforcing pieces placed over the bars on the inside of the bag. A stiff 20 wire 6 bent in zigzag form is secured to the frame i at the center of the arched portion and serves as a bar for supporting a plurality of coat or garment hangers 1. A supporting hook 6a is pivotally secured to the bar 6 at the center and 25 projects through the top wall Ie for supporting the entire bag and its contents upon a suitable fixed support. The hook 6a may be folded flat against the top Wall Ie when the bag is collapsed.

A suitable pocket construction I g is provided on 30 the back wall as shown in Figure l.

Arranged within the bag is a collapsible frame for rendering the bag self-sustaining and holding the reinforced top wall in spaced relation with the bottom wall. This collapsible frame comprises a 5 rectangular base frame 8, which may be formed of stiff wire and is substantially co-extensive with the bottom wall la, and two U-shaped side or sub-frames 9 and I 0 hinged to opposite ends of base frame 8 as shown. The side frames are 40 hinged to frame 8 by simply looping the ends of the U-frames around the end portions of frame 8. Rectangular frames 8, 9 and ID are of substantially the same width as the top frame 4, but side frames 9 and I0 are reduced in Width at their upper ends to permit the ends to be inserted between the side members of frame 4 in the manner shown in Figure 2, the bent-back portions of the side members of frame 4 resting upon the shoulders formed at the upper ends of frames 50 9 and I0. Transverse bars 40 and 4d are arranged on frame 4 so that they engage the outside upper ends of frames 9 and I 0 respectively. The arrangement is such that the end portions 4e and 4; of the frame 4 engage the in- 55 side of the reduced end portions of frames 9 and I0 respectively, and, in cooperation with transverse bars 40 and 4d, provide sockets for receiving and bracing the reduced ends of frames 9 and ID. The bent-back ends of frame 4 form so hook elements which serve to prevent side frames 9 and II) from folding down upon base frame 8, and for this purpose it is not necessary that the reduced end portions of the side frames extend entirely up to transverse bars 40 and 4d. The entire frame-work of the bag is shown assembled in Figure 2, and part of the framework may be seen in association with the bag in Figure 1. A stiff wire cross-bar II is hooked over the end portions 4e and 4,1 of the top frame 4 and serves to maintain the frame 4 in the bowed or arched position. As heretofore explained, the arched frame 4 is secured to the top wall Ie in any suitable manner and serves to reinforce the top wall and provide suitable anchor points for the handle 5.

The stiff bar I I may be used to support the lower ends of long garments such as dresses. In packing the bag, it is hung upon a suitable hook or support by either handle 5 or hook 6a so that dresses on coat-hangers I may hang down full length outside of the bag. Then the bar II is removed from the bag, passed behind the dress about onethird way from the bottom, and then brought up and hooked over the bars 4e and 4f, the lower portions of the dresses being folded over and supported by the bar I I.

In order to collapse the bag, the cross-bar II is unhooked from the frame 4 and placed in the bottom of the bag. The coat hangers I are also removed from the bar I5 and stored in the bottom of the bag. The ends of side frames 9 and III are then disengaged from their sockets in the frame 4 and are folded flat against the bottom frame 8 in the manner illustrated in Figure 3. The bag may now be rolled into a compact bundle by folding the front flap I inside of the bag and then rolling the bag up by folding the bottom Ia against the back Id. Continued rolling of the bottom wall will wind the flexible casing around the stiffened bottom wall until the bottom wall comes into juxtaposition with the top wall and the folded bag assumes the form indicated in Figure 4, which gives some idea of the relative size of the folded bag as compared with the bag extended as shown in Figure 1. It will be understood that when the cross-bar II is removed the top frame 4 may be flexed from the arched position into a substantially flat position, and this permits the bag to be folded and stored in a very small space.

While the flexible casing engages the collapsible frame sufficiently closely to render the bag self-sustaining, there is sufllcient play or give between the casing and frame to permit the frame members to be disengaged and collapsed.

In Figures 5 to 8 I have illustrated the details of construction of a collapsible bag especially designed as a hat bag. In this construction the flexible bag casing has a generally hexagonal shape and is formed of a bottom wall IZa, top wall I2b, four side walls I2c, I2d, I2e and I2 back wall I2g and a front wall I2h formed as a flexible flap secured to the front edge of the bottom wall I'M. A zipper connection is provided to secure the edges of the flap I272. to the side and top walls of the casing. The bottom wall In is formed of two sheets of flexible material be tween which is arranged a suitable reinforcing board I2a' such as stifi cardboard, sheet metal or the like. The stiffening board may be secured in place by rivets I2i passing through from the bottom and being braded to the board, the braded ends being covered by the inside sheet of the bottom wall. The enlarged heads of the rivets form nubs for supporting the bag when resting on the bottom wall. The top wall I2!) is likewise preferably formed of two sheets of flexible material with a reinforcing board or frame arranged between these sheets to provide a suitable base for 5 securing the handle I3 to the bag. The handle I3 is secured to the stiffened top wall in any suitable manner as by loops I3a and I3b passing through rings at the ends of the handle and being riveted or otherwise secured to the reinforcing board or 10 frame. The construction just described renders bottom wall IZa and top wall I2b substantially rigid throughout their entire area, while the side walls and the front and back walls are flexible and incapable of self-support.

Arranged within the flexible casing is a collapsible wire framework provided to render the bag self-sustaining so that it may be handled with the same convenience as a bag of rigid construction. The arrangement of this framework in the extended position is illustrated in Figure 6, and Figure 8 shows the framework in collapsed position. The supporting framework comprises a hexagonal wire base frame I4 to alternate sides of which are hinged three rectangular wire subframes I 4a, I4b and I40. A stiff wire bar I4d is hinged at one end to a wire loop secured to one corner of the frame I4a, and the other end of the bar M11 is formed as a hook to engage a wire loop formed at the adjacent corner of the frame Mb. Similar bar hooks Me and I4! are arranged to connect adjacent corners of frames I4b--I4c and I 4c-I4a as shown in Figure 6. This construction presents a fairly rigid framework which maintains the flexible bag casing in extended position without interference with the use of the bag. When it is desired to collapse the bag, bar hooks Md, Me and I4 are unhooked, and the rectangular frames Me, I 4b and Mo are folded down into the plane of the hexagonal base frame I4 as shown in Figure 8. The front wall or flap I2h is folded into the bag, and side walls I20, I2d,

I 2e and I2 I are folded into the bag on top of the flap IZh. The reinforced bottom and top walls I21: and I2b are next folded inward, and the general arrangement of the folded bag is as shown in Figure 7, thus presenting a substantially flat bundle slightly larger than the base frame I4.

In the construction shown in Figures 5 to 8, the supporting collapsible frame is formed entirely separate from the flexible casing and may be readily removed therefrom, but it will be understood that one of the hinged rectangular subframes I4a, I41), Me or I4d, may form the reinforcing construction for either the bottom wall I2a or the top wall I2b. It will be noted that the hooks formed at the ends of bars 11, He and I4) are arranged so that the front wall when closed will prevent the bars from becoming unhooked.

A third form of my invention is illustrated in Figures 9 and 10. This bag has the same general construction as the bag illustrated in Figures 1 to 4, and like reference numerals will be used to indicate like parts, however, Figures 9 and 10 are on a larger scale than Figures 1 to 4. As in Figure 1, the flexible casing is formed in a boxlike shape but instead of having an arched top, the top wall Ie is flat. Also, the reinforcing frame 4 for this construction is flat instead of being arched, and the end portions are not turned back. The collapsible framework 89I0 has the same general construction as in Figure 2, but the frames 9 and I0 do not have reduced end portions. The arrangement for retaining the side frames 9 and III in extended position com- 76 prises hook elements to and 4h secured to transverse bars 4a and 4b respectively and passing over the ended the frame 4 and arranged to receive the outer ends of the frames 9 and ID, as shown in Figure 10. Each hook is provided with a spring keeper :2: to prevent the frames 5 and It struction as employed in Figure 1, or any other suitable construction.

When the bag is to be collapsed, the side frames 9 and I0 are unhooked from the hooks lg-and 4h and are folded flat against the bottom wall of the bag. The flap if is then folded insideof the bag, and by rolling the stiffened bottom Ia onehalf turn, it will come in juxtaposition with the top le, thus forming a small convenient bundle for storing or carrying the bag when not in use.

It is to be noted that the principal function of the collapsible frames for the three forms of bags herein shown and described is to maintain the flexible casing in extended position for convenience in packing and unpacking the bag, and very little of the weight of the contents of the bag is supported or carried by the frame, but

substantially the entire weight is carried by the flexible casing. It will be understood that, if desired, the removable part of the collapsible framework may be taken out of the bag, and the utility of the bag will not be substantially impaired, since it may then be used as a flexible type of bag.

In the appended claims the term fsubstantially rigid is intended to cover rigid as well as semirigid constructions which might be flexed or bent to a limited degree. In other words, the term is to include any construction which may be flexed,

is self-supporting, and will return to its original shape if not flexed beyond its elastic limit.

What I claim is: I

1. In a collapsible bag, the combination of a casing formed of flexible material and having top, bottom, front, back and side walls, means secured to each of said top and bottom walls for rendering said walls substantially rigid, and a removable, collapsible framework arranged within said casing for holding said top and bottom walls in spaced relation and for maintaining said bag in extended position.

2. In a collapsible bag, the combination of a casing formed of flexible material and having top, bottom, front, back and side walls, means for reinforcing and rendering substantially rigid said top wall, a handle secured to said top wall, and a removable, collapsible framework arranged within said flexible casing comprising a wire frame of polygonal shape substantially coextensive with one wall of said casing, and a plurality of rectangular frame members hinged to the sides of said polygon frame and arranged to lie substantially co-extensive with a plurality of walls of said casing in one position, and to lie substantially in the plane of said polygonal frame when collapsed.

3. In a collapsible bag, the combination of a casing formed of flexible material and having top,

bottom, front, back and side walls, means for re-- within said flexible casing comprising a rectangular wire frame substantially co-extensive with the bottom wall of said casing, a rectangular wire frame hinged to each end of said bottom wire frame and arranged substantially co-extensive 5 with the side walls of said casing in the extended position and adapted when collapsed to lie substantially in the plane of said bottom frame, and said reinforcing means embodying means for holding said hinged frames in spaced relation when in extended position. v

4. In a collapsible bag, the combination of a casing formed of a flexible material and having top, bottom, front, back and side walls, said' front wall being formed as a flap secured to the bottom wall and having zipper hooks for securing the edge of said flap-to the side and top walls to completely close said casing, :means for reinforcing and rendering substantially rigid said top wall, a handle secured to said top wall, and a. go removable collapsible frameworkarranged within said casing comprising a base frame substantially co-extensive with one wall of said casing, and a plurality of sub-frames hinged to said base frame and arranged co-extensive with aplurality :5 of walls in said casing when in an extended position, and adapted to lie substantially in the plane of said base frame when in folded position, and means for maintaining said hinged frames in extended position. 30

5. In a collapsible bag, the combination of a casing formed of flexible materialand having top, bottom and side walls, means for reinforcing and rendering substantially rigid said top wall comprising a wire frame secured thereto, two spaced 35 transverse bars secured to said reinforcing frame, a handle anchored to said transverse bars, and a collapsible wire framework arranged within said casing and arranged to support said reinforcing frame to render said bag self-sustaining.

6. In a collapsible bag, the combination of a flexible outer casing formed of two spaced hexagonal wallsconnected by six rectangular walls, and a collapsible framework arranged within said casing for rendering the same self-.supporting, said framework comprising a hexagonal base frame substantially co-extensive with one of said hexagonal walls, and three rectangular subframes hinged to alternate sides of said hexagonal frame and arranged when in extended position to lie co-extensive with three of said rectangular walls and to lie substantially in the plane of said base frame when collapsed, and spacer bars connecting adjacent outer corners of adjacent subframes for maintaining said framework in ex- 55 tended position.

'7. In a collapsible bag, the combination of a flexible outer casing formed of two spaced hexagonal walls connected by six rectangular walls, means for reinforcing and rendering substantially rigid one of said rectangular walls, a handle secured to said reinforced rectangular wall, and a collapsible framework arranged within said casing for rendering the same self-supporting, said framework comprising a hexagonal base frame substantially co-extensive with one of said hexagonal walls, and three rectangular sub frames hinged to alternate sides of said hexagonal frame and arranged when in extended position to lie co-extensive with three of said rectangular walls and to lie substantially in the 70 plane of said base frame when collapsed, and spacer bars connecting adjacent outer corners of adjacent sub-frames for maintaining said framework in extended position, one of said hexagonal 76 am a collapsible m, the combination or a casing formed of flexible material and having top, bottom and side walls. means for reinforcing and rendering substantially rigid said top comprising a wire frame secured thereto,

transverse bars secured to said reframe, a handle anchored to said transand a collapsible wire framework .arthin said casing for supporting the in spaced relation with the bottom said framework comprising a base frame tially co-extensive with the bottom wall casing and two sub-frames hinged to frame and arranged when in extended to be substantially coextensive with opside walls of said casing, and means emin said top wall reinforcing means for -frames in extended posi- 'ticn.

- 9. In a collapsible bag, the combination of a casing formed of flexible material and havin bottom and side walls, means for reinforcing and rendering substantially rigid said bottom wall, means for reinforcing and rendering .a removable collapsible wire framework arranged within said casing for supporting the top wall in spaced relation with the bottom wall, said framework comprising a base frame substantially coextensive with the bottom wall of said casing and two sub-frames hinged to said base frame and arranged when in extended position to be substantially coextensive with opposite side walls ranged within said casing for supporting the top wall in spaced relation with the bottom wall, and

means engaging the ends of said rectangular frame for maintaining said top wall in arched position, said means being disengageable so that said top wall may be collapsed into flat position.

ii. In a collapdble bag, the combination of a casing formed of flexible material and having top. bottom and side walls, means for reinforcing and rendering substantially rigid said top wall comprising a rectangular wire frame. secured thereto, a transverse bar secured at the center of opposite sides of said wire frame for supporting garment hangers, supporting means for said bag secured to said wire frame, a collapsible framework arranged within said casing for supporting the top wall in spaced relation with the bottom wall, and means engaging the ends of said rectangular frame for maintaining said top wall in arched position, said means being disengageable so that said top wall may be collapsed into flat position.

l2..In a collapsible bag, the combination of a casing formed of flexible material and having top, bottom and side walls.means for re inforcing and rendering substantially ri id said topwallcomprisingareetangularwiref secured thereto. a transverse bar secured at center of opposite sides of said wire frame f supporting garment hangers, two spaced transverse bars secured to said reinforcing frame, handle anchored to said spaced transverse a collapsible framework arranged within casing for supporting the top wall 'in spaced relation with the bottom wall, and means enga ing the ends of said rectangular framefor maintain- 'ingsaidtopwallinarchedpositiomsaidmeans being disengageable so that said top will may be coi lapsed into flat position.

13. In a collapsible bag, the combination of a casing formed of flexible material and having top, bottom and side walls, means for reinforc- 5 ing and rendering substantially rigid said top wall comprising a rectangular wire framesecured thereto, 'a transverse bar secured at the center of opposite sides of said wire frame for supporting garment hangers, a supporting hook 25 secured to the center of said transverse bar and extending out of said top wall, a collapsible framework arranged within said casing for supporting the top wall in spaced relation with the bottom wall, and means engaging the ends of said rectangular frame for maintaining said top wall in arched position, said means being disengageable so that saidtop wall may be collapsed into flat position. 7

14. In a collapsible bag, the combination of a casing formed of flexible material and having top and side walls, means for reinforcing and rendering substantially rigid said top wall'comprising a rectangular wire frame secured thereto, supporting means for said bag secured to said wire frame, and means engaging the ends of said rectangular frame for maintaining said top wall in arched position, said means being disengageable so that said top wall may be collapsed into flat position.

I 15. In a collapsible bag, the combination of a casing formed of flexible material and having top and side walls. means for reinforcing and rendering substantially rigid said top wall oomprising a rectangular wire frame secured there- 60 to. a transverse bar secured at the center of opposite sides of said wire frame for supporting garment hangers, supporting means for said bag secured to said wire frame, a still! bar engaging the ends of said rectangular frame for 55 maintaining said top wall in arched position, said bar being disengageable so that said top wall may be collapsed into flat pontion.

16. he collapsible bag, the combination of I a casing formed of flexible material and havw ing top and side walls, means for reinforcing and rendering substantially rigid said top wall comprising a rectangular wire frame secured thereto, a transverse bar secured at the center of opposite sides of said wire frame for supporting gar- 5 ment hangers, two spaced transverse bars secured to said reinforcing frame, a-handle anchored to said spaced transverse bars. and .a still wire bar hooked over the ends of said rectangular frame for maintaining said top wall in arched position, 10 said bar being disengageable so that said top wall may be collapsed into flat position.

"an! n. snoar.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
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Classifications
U.S. Classification206/289, 220/9.2, 190/122, 190/107, 190/115
International ClassificationA45C7/00, A45C13/03, A45C13/00
Cooperative ClassificationA45C13/03, A45C7/0077
European ClassificationA45C7/00D3