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Publication numberUS2017543 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 15, 1935
Filing dateOct 16, 1933
Priority dateOct 16, 1933
Publication numberUS 2017543 A, US 2017543A, US-A-2017543, US2017543 A, US2017543A
InventorsSern Madsen
Original AssigneeCharles A Armstrong, Eugene J Curtis, George L Curtis
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Supporting and adjusting hardware for sashes and the like
US 2017543 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

1935. s. MADSEN 2,017,543

SUPPORTING AND ADJUSTING HARDWARE FOR SASHES AND THE LIKE Filed Oct. 16, 1933 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 wipe/2x 02 52m Waame argqw 1935-, s. MADSEN 2,017,543

SUPPORTING AND ADJUSTING HARDWARE FOR SASHES AND THE LIKE Filed Oct. 16, 1933 5 SheetsSheet 2 Oct. 15, 1935.

s. MADSEN SUPPORTING AND ADJUSTING HARDWARE FOR SASHES AND THE LIKE Filed Oct. 16, 1933' 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 (ff 22262290! cIZWZ Wfzrowezz 4,, 2M 73% Patented Oct. 15, 1935 UNETED STATES SUPPCRTING AND ADEUSTING HARDWARE FOR SASHES AND THE LHKE Sern Madsen, Clinton, Iowa, assignor, by mesne assignments, to George L. Curtis, Eugene J. Curtis, and Charles A. Armstrong, trustees, all

of Clinton, Iowa Application October 16, 1933, Serial No. 693,775

6 Claims.

The object of my invention is to provide supporting. and adjusting hardware for sashes and the like, which is simple, durable and comparatively inexpensive to manufacture.

A further object is to provide supporting hardware for a sash, particularly a casement sash, so that the sash swings relative to the frame in which it is mounted with the outswlnging edge moving in a substantially straight line perpendicular to the plane of the window frame, whereby my adjusting hardware, designed to have an adjusting member extended in a straight line perpendicular to the plane of the window frame, can be used on the sash.

Another object is to provide adjusting hardware including a flexible chain which can bend to some extent in one direction, but which is limited against bending in the other direction so that one end of it can be connected with the sash and the other end can extend into the window frame, with the weight of the chain intermediate the sash and frame tending to maintain the chain in a rigid straight position so that an operator can coact with it and either push or pull it for opening or closing the sash, as desired.

Another object is to provide a chain of this character so that the part of it which at any time is not extended from the window frame to the sash, can be changed in direction and thereby be concealed in a perpendicular recess in the window frame.

Another object is to provide a connector for connecting the outer end of the chain like element with the sash in such manner as to hold the outer link of the chain against bending in either direction, so as to thereby retain the portion of the chain intermediate the sash and the frame in rigid position for either thrusting or pulling even though the weight of the chain is not operable to retain it straight.

Still a further object is to provide an actuator for moving the chain longitudinally, which actuator is readily operable by means extending from the inside surface of the window frame.

A further object is to provide actuators for the chain in the form of a worm or a sprocket coacting therewith, whereby rotation of the worm or sprocket will actuate the chain to impart longitudinal movement thereto, means also being provided to lock the chain in any position to which it is adjusted.

Another object is to provide a formof construction in which the operator is pivoted to the window frame to accommodate a sash hinged in the ordinary manner.

With these and other objects in view my invention consists in the construction, arrangement and combination of the various parts of my device, whereby the objects contemplated are attained, as hereinafter more fully set forth,

pointed out in my claims, and illustrated in the accompanying drawings, in which:

Figure lis a horizontal sectional view through a window frame and sash showing my supporting and adjusting hardware applied thereto.

Figure 2 is a vertical sectional View of the same on the line 2-2 of Figure 1, except that the upper part of Figure 2 is taken on the line Za-Za of Figure 1.

Figure 3 is a side elevation of the operator shown in Figure 2 with the cover plate removed, the parts being shown on an enlarged scale and the window frame being omitted.

Figure 4 is a sectional view on the line 44 of Figure 3, showing a locking means for the operator.

Figure 5 is a sectional view on the line 5--5 of Figure 3, showing the coaction of a worm type of actuator with a chain element of the operator.

Figure 6 is a side elevation similar to the central portion of Figure 2, with parts broken away and other parts shown in section and illustrating a modified form of construction on an enlarged scale.

Figure '7 is a sectional view on the line l'! of Figure 6.

Figure 8 is a sectional view similar to Figure 1, showing a hinged operator instead of a sash mounted one, as illustrated in Figure 1, and showing the sash hinged in the ordinary manner instead of by the special supporting hardware I provide.

Figure 9 is a side elevation similar to Figure 3, showing another modified form of construction.

Figure. 10 is a sectional view on the line Ill-l0 of Figure 9.

Figure 11 is a side elevation as taken on the indicated line ||H of Figure 10, with parts of Figure 10 omitted and other parts shown dotted.

Figure 12 is a vertical sectional view similar to Figure 2 showing still another modified form of construction.

Figure 13 is an enlarged sectional view on the line I3l3 of Figure 12; and

Figure 14 is a diagram illustrating how two sashes may be associated with each other where my type of supporting and adjusting hardware is used.

Referring to Figures 1 and 2, a window frame is illustrated having side jambs lo, a sill l2 and a head jamb It. The sill l2 and the head jamb l4 have applied thereto hinge stops l6 which are identical in detail but made right and left hand. The sill E? has an outer stop shoulder l8 and the head jamb M has an outer stop 20. Aligned with the shoulders of the stops 3 and 20 are side stops 22 on the side jambs Ill. Head and side casings 24 and 26 are provided in the ordinary manner. The inside of the window frame may be trimmed in any appropriate manner as by side casings 28, a head casing 30, a stool 32 and an apron 34.

To the side jambs l0, screen stops 36 and inside stops 38 are applied. A screen 40, shown in dotted lines at the left side of Figure 1 and in Figure 2, is adapted to coact with the stops 36 and 38.

A sash A is comprised of the usual stiles and rails 42 and 44 respectively and glass 46. The outside perimeter of the stiles and rails is formed with flanges 48 adapted to engage the outer stops 22 and 20 and the stop shoulder l8 of the sill. The rabbeted or set-back portion of the rails and stiles inward of the flanges 48 is adapted to extend into the window frame with plenty of clearance to prevent binding under any weather conditions and weatherstrips 50 are applied to the rabbeted portion or may be applied to the frame.

The inner face of the sash A is adapted to substantially engage the stops I6 and 36, thus providing a two-face or stepped contact between the sash and the window frame. Immediately inward of the flange 48, a groove 52 extends around the sash. The function of this groove is to entrap and drain off any water or moisture that might get past the first joint between the flange 48 and the stops !8, 20 and 22.

The weatherstrips 58 are of flexible type and bear against the sash and frame at right angles to the contacting faces of the sash with the frame. In this manner, a weatherseal is assured in case the flange 48 and the inner face of the sash are not positively drawn up against the window frame. It will also be noted that the drain grooves 52 are located outwardly of the weatherstrips so that it is practically impossible for water to get inward further than the drain groove under any condition.

Another purpose of the drain groove is to provide a type of trap to produce eddy currents in the entering air which also tends to seal the window joint against entering air.

At the top and bottom of the sash A, hinged structures are provided. These are identical and therefore I will describe but one of them. A roller bracket 54 is secured to the left side of the sash. It extends into a rabbet 58 cut in the stop "5. The rabbet terminates in an enlarged groove 58 in which is mounted a c-shaped track 60. The bracket 54 has a pair of rollers 62 journalled thereon for travel along the track 60. The track 60 is arranged at a slight incline so that when the sash is closed, its left side tightly engages the frame, but when it is open, the left side is spaced away from the frame for the purpose of reaching out to wash the sash as well as providing opening for ventilation. This incline is also necessary because the bracket 54 swings during the opening movement and would cause the sash to bind against the window frame if the track were straight. A stop screw 64 limits the travel of the rollers 62.

About midway of the sash A, a hinge bracket 66 is provided. A hinge arm 68 has one end pivoted at in thereto. The other end of the hinge arm is pivoted at 12 in the stop It.

A suitable rah-bet 14 is provided to receive the hinge arm when the sash is in closed position.

During the opening movement of the sash, its center will be guided outwardly by the hinge arm 68, whileits left edge will be guided by the rollers '62 and the track 68. The resultant motion of the opening or right hand edge of the sash due to being guided by the hinge arm 68 and the track 60, will be substantially a straight line outwardly perpendicular to the plane of the window frame and in line with the inner face of the right hand side jamb. It is important that the hinge mechanism provide a straight line motion for this edge of the sash since my preferred form of operating must operate substantially in a straight line motion and in the path just described.

It will be noted that in the closed position of the sash, the only portions of the supporting hardware for the sash that will be visible comprise portions of the roller bracket 54 and the hinge bracket 65 extending inwardly from the facing surfaces of the stops l6 (see Figure 2).

It will be further noted that when a screen, such as 46, or a storm sash is in place as indicated, no parts of the brackets 54 and 86 will be visible. These brackets are preferably attached to the sash by means of screws and countersunk so they are flush with the inner face of the sash.

It will be readily understood from the foregoing description that the hinge parts and stop members it are assembled in right and left hand pairs, one being used at the head jamb and the other on the sill, thus providing a pair of hinges for carrying the sash. By interchanging the stops l6 and the supporting hardware carried thereby and turning the sash A (which is symmetrical) up-side-down, either a left or right 80 hand swinging window can be provided.

By arranging the track 68 at a slight angle considerable clearance is given for the sash as it swings open, inasmuch as the left side of the sash moves outwardly with respect to the window frame during the opening movement. In the closing movement, as the sash closely approaches closed position, the inclined track draws the left side against the window frame while the right side is drawn against it by the chain 18.

By locating the pivot point 10 adjacent the center of the sash, I provide a very desirable result in that any shrink or swell of the sash is equalized on both sides of the center rather than all being at one side as when a sash is hinged at the other side. This makes it easier to Weather strip the window as each side weather strip need take care of only half as much movement as would be the case for the right hand weather strip if the sash were hinged at the left side in 50 the ordinary manner.

I provide an operator B, shown in Figures 1 to 5 inclusive, for swinging the sash A outwardly and holding it in any desired position to which it is swung. The operator B includes a split housing 76, a flexible chain like element 78 and a worm 80. The housing 76 is illustrated applied to the right hand side jamb l8 and flush with the stops 38 which extend from the stops l6 to the housing 16, thus placing the housing 16 in a countersunk position with its face flush with the faces of the stops 38. The two parts of the split housing 16 are held together by screws 82 which at the same time anchor the casing to the side jambs.

Within the housing 16, a pair of guides 84 is provided which guide the chain like element 18 over a ninety degree bend. Thus one endof the chain 18 can extend horizontally outward to the. sash A while the other end can hang vertically downward, the lower stop 38 having a groove 86 to receive and conceal the down hanging end of the chain.

The chain 18 is of peculiar construction. It comprises ordinary chain links 88 and 98 with the addition of anti-back bend links 92. These permit the chain to bend in one direction as around the curved part of the lower guide 84 in Figure 3, but prevent it from bending between the housing I6 and the sash A.

The outer end of the chain I8 is provided with a bracket 94 associated with the outer link 92 to prevent the chain from bending up or down and it is allowed pivotal movement horizontally by a vertical pin 96 mounted in a bracket 98 secured to the sash A. The vertical pivot pin 96 permits swinging of the sash A relative to the chain I8 during the adjusting of the sash.

Each of the links 92 is provided with a groove I in the back thereof with which teeth I02 of the worm 80 coact. It is therefore obvious that rotation of the worm will cause longitudinal movement of the chain I8 relative to the guide 84 in the housing I6.

The worm 80 has reduced ends I04 journalled in the housing I6 whereby it may be supported rotatably relative thereto and a crank I06 is associated (detachably if desired) with the worm 80 to rotate it for adjusting the sash relative to the window frame. I have shown the crank I06 as having a slot I08 detachably coacting with a pin H0 in a socket I I2 of the worm into which the shank of the crank extends.

If the pitch of the teeth I02 is too great to prevent the worm from holding the chain I8 against movement after once being adjusted, a lock can be provided in the form of a brake band I I4 (see Figure 4) normally loose enough to permit rotation of the Worm 80, but being tightenable therearound by screwing a lock screw I I6 inwardly. It will be noted that both sides of the housing I6 are threaded, as at H8, and the brake band H4 is symmetrical so that the housing I6 can be used either on the right or left hand side of the window frame.

Adjustment of the sash A from the foregoing description will be readily apparent. The lock screw H6 is first loosened and then the crank I06 can be rotated in either direction (clockwise to close the window and counter-clockwise to open it).

During the rotation of the worm 80, the chain I8 will be retracted or expelled into or from the left hand side of the housing I6 in Figure 3, while the inner end of the chain will be expelled or retracted from the bottom of the casing and at the same time move longitudinally of the groove 86 in the stop 38. The screen stop 36 is provided with a notch I20 (see Figure 2) for the chain 78 to extend through. The frame of the screen conceals this part of the chain and the chain can be adjusted from the inside of the window frame without removing or otherwise disturbing the screen.

With the parts of the adjusting hardware being concealed as already described, a neat appearance is given to the entire assembly and thus is eliminated the unattractive usual types of casement window hardware. The supporting hardware for the sash provides for ease for washing the outside of the sash from the inside of the building.

In the modification shown in Figures 6 and '7, a sprocket I22 replaces the worm 80 in Figure 3. The sprocket may be operated by a crank or key I24 and may be locked by a sliding catch I26 engaging a selected notch I28 in the key I24. With the exception of the parts just described, the parts of this modification are the same as already described and are given the same reference numerals with the addition of the distinguishing characteristic a.

The chain construction is also slightly different as can be seen by comparing Figure 7 with Figure 4. Instead of a central link 92 between the links 88 and 90, as in Figure 4, a pair of links 92a of the same shape as the links 92 in Figure 4 but thinner is placed outside the links 90a and inside the links 88a, instead of inside the links 90, as in Figure 4. The links 92a are 1 not provided with notches like at I00 in the links 92. The purpose of this difierence is so that there will be space between the sides of the chain for the teeth of the sprocket I22.

The chain of Figure 4 can be referred to as a cable-like element since it is solid instead of having a central space for sprocket teeth.

It will be noted that the housing 16a in Figure 6 has a pair of horizontal guide grooves I30 and a vertical guide groove I32 extending the full height of the housing. This is so that the housing can be used with either side up for right or left hand application.

In Figure 8, I show how a sash A can be hinged at I34 in the ordinary manner and an operator B can be hinged, as at I36, so as to swing and thereby permit the right edge of the sash to swing on an arc rather than travel in a straight line.

In Figures 9, 10 and 11 I have shown a modification in which a sprocket I-22b is secured to a hub I38 of a bevel gear I40. The bevel gear M0 is journalled on a stud I M. Coacting with the bevel gear is a bevel pinion I42 secured to an operating shaft I44 and countersunk in a recess I43 of the housing 10b. The shaft I44 has a lock collar I46 slidably but non-rotatably mounted thereon.

The shaft I44 has a pin I48 coacting with grooves I50 of the lock collar I46 to provide such slidable but non-rotatable connection. A hub I52 is stationary relative to the housing 161) by being screwed thereinto and held by a lock nut I54. The hub I52 is provided with lugs I56 with which the slots I50 of the lock collar I46 may engage when the collar is slid inwardly from the position of Figure 9.

Other parts of this form of the invention correspond with parts of the preceding figures and accordingly reference numerals with the distinguishing characteristic b are applied thereto. It will be noted that the housing 16b is also provided with guideways I30b and I32b, the same as in Figure 6, to permit left or right hand application.

In Figure 12, I show how the worm 80 or the sprocket I22 can be dispensed with. A housing I is provided which serves merely as a guide for guiding the chain 180 through a quarter turn. The depending end of the chain is provided with an operating handle I58 extending through a 60 slotted plate I60 on the stop 380. In addition to this, any suitable means can be provided for locking the chain in any adjusted position.

It will be noted that I have located the adjusting hardware substantially midway between 55 the top and bottom of the window frame. This is the most advantageous position for it as any wind pressure against the sash is thereby balanced instead of being greater above or below the adjustor hardware when it is mounted at the top or bottom of the window. The position I illustrate is the point of greatest mechanical advantage.

The entire perimeter of the sash is available for Weatherstripping purposes. Heretofore objection to Weatherstripping casement sash has been made because it makes the sash operate with diificulty.

The sash must usually be slammed in order to close it against Weatherstripping and then it ordinarily sticks too tight due to friction or other causes to be readily opened by ordinary adjustors which do'not have the leverage inherent in my adjustor construction. Most hardware also is so located that the screen must be opened for opening andclosing the sash in addition to the usual need for opening it to lock or unlock the sash. With the mechanical leverage available by my type of adjustor, the window can be pushed open or pulled shut under the most adverse conditions. The full benefit of weatherstripping may thereby be realized and the adjustor can be used as a lock for locking the sash in closed position.

In this connection, the hub I52 of Figure 10 is made adjustable so that the lugs I56 can be rotated to the proper position for locking the shaft I44, when it has been rotated to the tightly closed position of the sash.

in Figure 14, I have shown a sash AI and a sash A2 with a tongue and groove joint at I62 in order to illustrate how a twin sash can be arranged. The supporting hardware is associated with the sashes AI and A2 so that the sash AI is a left side opening sash, while the sash A2 is a right side opening sash, as illustrated by dotted lines.

Weatherstripping can be employed in the tongue and groove joint I62 if desired. When the adjustor for each sash pulls the sashes closed, the tongue and groove J'Oint will automatically come together and be tightly engaged upon completion of the closing movement of the sashes.

In the ordinary type of casement hardware, there is nothing to prevent the sash from sagging when in closed position. The chain I8 which I use is drawn into the housing I6 and thereby the bracket 94 on the outer end of the chain is rigidly held at a predetermined elevation which effectively supports the sash and prevents any sagging. Location of the adjustor midway between the bottom and top of the sash also assures that both the upper and lower edge will be closed and this is an advantage over an adjustor at only the bottom of the sash. If either the top or the bottom of the sash strikes the window frame first, then the adjustor can be drawn up tight and will draw the other corner of the sash up tight by drawing the sash shut at the top and bottom the usual causes of warping sash are eliminated.

The entire unit of window frame, sash and hardware is designed for complete prefabrication at the shop and as already explained, is designed for universal application either right or left hand without any changes whatsoever in the parts.

When twin opening windows are required, no center mullion is needed. Two adjacent sashes can be arranged as in Figure 14 so that their outer edges will swing outwardly and their inner edges will come together with a tongue and groove joint which may be provided with weatherstripping if desired. The two sashes will swing outwardly to assume positions which will provide a sure means of catching any passing air currents and thus providing ventilation assurance.

Some changes may be made in the construction and arrangement of the parts of my device without departing from the real spirit and purpose of my invention, and it is my. intention to cover by my claims, any modified forms of structure or use of mechanicalequivalents, which may be reasonably included within their scope.

I claim as my invention:

1. In a window structure, a frame, a swingable sash and a hinge comprising a roller adjacent one edge of said sash, a track therefor on said frame and inclined relative thereto and arm means hinged to the center of the sash and to the frame whereby the opening side of the sash moves substantially in a straight line perpendicular to the plane of the frame.

2. In a window structure, a frame, a swingable sash and a hinge comprising a track on said frame adjacent one side thereof and inclined outwardly toward the center of the frame, means on one side of said sash to slide in said track and arm means pivoted to the center of the sash and to the opposite side of the window frame.

3. In a window structure, a frame, a sash, means for mounting said sash for movement relative to said frame comprising a track laterally of said frame and inclined outwardly toward the center thereof, one side of said sash being slidable relative thereto, an arm having one end pivoted to the center of said sash and the other end pivoted to said frame adjacent the opposite side of said sash whereby said opposite side moves in a straight line at substantially right angles to the plane of said frame when opening and closing and an adjustor extending at right angles to the plane of said frame and from said opposite side of said sash to said frame and movable along the path of its extension only.

4. In a window structure, a frame, a sash, means for mounting said sash for movement relative to said frame comprising a track laterally of said frame, a bracket on one side of said sash being slidable relative thereto, an arm, a bracket at the center of said sash, an arm having one end pivoted thereto and the other end pivoted to said frame adjacent the opposite side of said sash whereby said opposite side moves in a straight line at substantially right angles to the plane of said frame when opening and closing and whereby the swell and shrink at each side of said sash is relative to the center thereof, and an adjustor extending from said frame to said opposite side of said sash along the path of travel of said opposite side, said brackets being applied to said sash entirely on the inside face thereof.

5. In a window structure, a frame, a sash, means for mounting said sash for movement relative to said frame, said means comprising brackets connected with said sash and means connected with said brackets and pivotally associated with said frame, said brackets being applied to said sash entirely on the inside face thereof.

6. In a casement window, a frame, a swingable sash, hardware for guiding and adjusting said sash, so that one edge of the sash moved in a substantially straight path outwardly and perpendicularly to the plane of the window, said hardware being all applied inwardly with respect to the inner face of the sash and leaving all edges of the sash unobstructed, whereby weather stripping may be applied to the edges of the sash without interruption.

SERN MADSEN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4521993 *Aug 8, 1983Jun 11, 1985Truth IncorporatedChain operator for a window
US4605252 *Mar 27, 1985Aug 12, 1986Yoshida Kogyo K. K.Apparatus for retaining a sash in open position in a projected window
US4616443 *Dec 27, 1983Oct 14, 1986Sankyo Aluminium Industry Company LimitedReversible window structure
US5896702 *Nov 26, 1996Apr 27, 1999V. Kann Rasmussen Industri A/SOperator with at least two linkage mechanisms for opening and closing pivotal windows
Classifications
U.S. Classification49/250, 49/325
International ClassificationE05F11/00, E05F11/06
Cooperative ClassificationE05F11/06
European ClassificationE05F11/06