Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2017865 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 22, 1935
Filing dateApr 29, 1933
Priority dateApr 28, 1932
Publication numberUS 2017865 A, US 2017865A, US-A-2017865, US2017865 A, US2017865A
InventorsEverette K Morgan
Original AssigneeIngersoll Milling Machine Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Machine tool
US 2017865 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

E. K. MORGAN MACHINE TOOL original Filed April 428, 1932 s sheets-sheet 1 rllilL Oct. 22, 1935. E. K. MORGAN MACHINE TOOL s sheets-snede Original Filed April 28, 1932 yal/ OC- 22, 1935- E. K. MORGAN 2,017,865

MACHINE TOOL Ori inal Filed April )28, 1.932 3 SheetS-Sheet 3' Raatenied st. 22, 1935 Mimet MACHINE TOOL Everette K. Morgan, Rockford, Ill., assignor to The Ingersoll Milling Machine Co., Rockford, Ill., a corporation of Illinois Original application April 28, 1932, Serial No. 608,040. Divided and this application April 29, 1933, Serial No. 668,519

26 Claims.

This invention relates generally to machine tools and more particularly to the control of the power driven mechanism by which the work piece and tools are moved toward each other to bring them into operative association.

The general object of the invention is to provide a machine having a novel mechanism for preventing relative approaching movement between the tools and work piece until the latter has been positioned correctly relative to its support.

In carrying out the foregoing object, the invention contemplates the provision of novel means for disabling or preventing eiective operation of the starting controller of the power actuated feed mechanism until the work piece has been located in a predetermined Working position relative to its support.

Another object is to provide a disabling mechanism of the above character which insures correct positioning of the work piece in two transverse directions.

The invention also resides in the novel construction of the disabling mechanism and the means for detecting the correct position of a worlr` piece.

Other objects and advantages of my invention will appear in the course of the following detailedl description in which reference is made to the accompanying drawings, wherein- Figure 1 is a front view of a press embodying my invention;

Fig. 2 is a fragmentary side view partly in vertical section showing the pedal-operated valve controlling the operation of. the platen;

Fig. 3 is a horizontal section on the line 3 3 of Figure 1 showing an engine block in plan and illustrating part of the block locating means and electric circuit control;

Fig. 4 is a plan view of the dowel pin operating means;

Fig. 5 is a sectional detail on the line 5-5 of Fig. 3 illustrating the operation of the dowels;

Fig. 6 is a view on the line 6 6 of Fig. 3 illusstrating Ythe electrical control provided in connection with the dowel operating means, and

Fig. l is an oil and electrical circuit diagram for the press. In the drawings, the invention is embodied for purposes of illustration, in a press for inserting valve guide bushings I0 in aninternal combustion engine block II, the press. shown forming the subject matter of my copending application Serial No. 608,040, led April 28, 1932, of which the present application is a division. It is obvious,

' however, that the invention is not limited in its use to such machines, and therefore I do not, by such exemplary disclosure, intend to limit the invention,-but aim to cover all adaptations falling within the spirit and scope of the invention as expressed in the appended claims.

The press as shown in Figure l comprises a base I2 having side columns I3 supporting a horizontal vhead or cross rail It'. Guides I5 on the columns I3 have a work carrying platen or table I6 slidable thereon for vertical movement toward 1o and away from the head. A plunger Il extends downwardly from the platen into the working cylinder I8 in the base for movement with the double-acting piston I9 operating in the cylinder. is an apron depending from the platen 15 simply to enclose the upper end of the cylinder and the plunger, for the sake of appearance. The head I4 carries plungers 2l on which holders 22 are provided for the valve guide bushings I0. The holders 22 are stems made to lit snugly in 20 the bushings and having any suitable means for irictionally gripping the same. ln the present case the lower ends of the stems are shown as split and slightly spread toprovide the desired rictional hold on the bushings. From this much 25 description it will be seen that a set of bushings can -be placed on the holders 22 in alignment with the suitably reamed holes 23 provided therefor in the engine block Il, and then inserted by an upward movement of the platen I6 under hydraulic pressure applied to the piston I9. The holders 22 in the return of the platen will, of course, slip out of the bushings, leaving them in place in the block. The holes 23 are, of course, all reamed at one time in a multiple spindle machine, There is, however, a certain amountof' variation in the size-of these holes due to the difference in the reamers. On the other hand, the bushings to be inserted in these holes are all machined within a certain tolerance. Naturally, 40 then, a medium sized bushing when entered in a medium sized hole will have the correct press t, but a small sized bushing, that is, one below medium size, will undoubtedly be too loose if entered in a hole above medium size. There is no objection to bushings having something above a correct press lt, but there is a decided objection to a bushing having anything below a correct press t. Thelpresent machine, as fully described in the parent application, embodies means for infiel I8 through ,a pipe 2li from a pump 25 by 55" t chamber.

shifting the valve 26 by means of a foot pedal 21. A compression spring 28 cooperates with one end of the valve to normally hold it in the position illustrated in Fig. 2, in which the delivery is through the pipe 29 to the upper end of the cylinder I8 to return the platen I6 to the lowermost position. In other words, the depression of the pedal 21 takes care of the raising of the platen, and it is only necessary to release the pedal to secure the return of the platen. The pump 25 is continuously operated by means of the electric motor 30 so long as the press is in use.

As indicated in Fig. 1, the head I4 is cored out to provide an oil pressure chamber 3| and an air chamber or accumulator 32 to afford a place for the oil to back up when the plungers 2| back up in the head against the pressure of the oil in the chamber 3|, due to the resistance to movement of the bushings into their holes, as will soon appear. The oil in the chamber 3| is maintained at a predetermined pressure by communication with the pump 25 through the line 33 and check valve 34 (see Fig. 7). The plungers 2| project through stufling boxes into the chamber 3| and, hence, are normally urged outwardly under the pressure of the oil in said Outward movement, however, is prevented by reason of stems 36 extending upwardly from the plungers 2| through holes in the top wall of the chamber 3| and` having nuts 38 threaded on the projecting ends thereof for abutment with said wall. Any other suitable means could be provided for holding the plungers against outward movement. A chamber 3|' has the stems 3B projecting into it and any leakage past the stems from the chamber 3| is conducted from the chamber 3| through a pipe 39 back to the sump of the pump 25. Nuts (not shown) are threaded on the plungers 2| outside the chamber 3| in a predetermined spaced relation to the gland nuts on the stuiing boxes. This is to limit the inward movement of the plungers when the bushings have the correct press fit in their holes and accordingly overcome the pressure of the liquid in the chamber 3|. An indicating means, designated generally by the reference numeral 42 in Figure l, is provided for indicating those bushings which because of their loose t should be replaced. The nature of this means is fully set forth in the parent application, so that it will sulce for the present purposes merely to state that the series of windows indicated at 45 have electric lights behind them with switches normally completing electric circuits through these lights to illuminate the windows, the switches being arranged to be opened by the action of the plungers 2| when the latter are backed up by pressure upon bushings that have more than a minimum fit in the holes in the block. Thus, it will be understood that at the commencement of the upstroke of the platen I6, all of the windows 45 are illuminated because all of the switches are closed at that time. In that way, if any one of the lights is defective, it is immediately apparent to-the operator and given attention so that he can rely later upon the lights for indication of the loose`bushings requiringweplacement. Then, later, at the end of strokeof the platen, the only lights that will appear will be those associated with loose bushings. The loose bushings are marked and are subsequently removed and bushings of the proper size to nt the holes are entered.

Coming now to those features of the press with which the present invention is particularly concerned, it will be observed in Figs. 1 and 3-7 that the engine block I is arranged to be located accurately on the platen I6 by means of a plurality of dowels 12. Two are sufficient, although 5 I have illustrated four, one at each corner. It is, of course, important to have the block accurately located because it would make it necessary to replace the spindles or plungers 2| if the platen I 5 were raised with an engine block 10 improperly positioned thereon. The dowels are guided through accurately ground bushings 13 in accurately located bores 14 provided therefor in the platen I6. Rack teeth 15 are formed on the enlarged Shanks 16 from the pins and have lo pinions 11 meshing therewith which, when turned, raise or lower the pins as desired. The pinions 11 are carried on shaft 18 arranged to be turned in unison by the meshing engagement of beveled gears 19 on one end thereof with bev- 20 eled gears on a transverse shaft 8| arranged to be turned by means of a hand lever 82. It is, therefore, clear that all of the dowel pins 12 are raised or lowered simultaneously by operation of the lever 82, the pins being raised by 25 clockwise movement of the lever and lowered by counterclockwise movement (see Fig. 4). Now, in order to insure, rst of all, that a block II has been placed on the platen, and secondly, that the dowel pins I2 have been raised to prop- 30 erly locate the block, before the pedal 21 is depressed to raise the platen, I have provided two control switches 83 and 84 connected'in series with a solenoid 85. The solenoid is not enerlgized, is disposed in its lowermost position in 35 the path of a lever 81 arranged to be operated by the pedal 21 to shift the valve 26, whereby to prevent such operation. The switch 83 is normally held open by a spring 88 and has a plunger B9 projecting therefrom for engagement by a40 portion of the block when the latter is placed on the platen I6 in abutment with stops 90, which are provided to roughly position the block. In this way, the switch 83 is closed when the block is placed on the platen in approximately 45 the right position. The switch 84 likewise has a spring 9| normally holding the same in open circuit position, and a plunger 92 projects from the switch in the path of movement of an adjustable set screw 93 provided on a lug 94 formed 50 on the hub of the lever 82, as clearly appears in Fig. 6, so that the switch is arranged to be closed when the lever 82 is moved in a clockwise direction from a substantially horizontal position to a substantially Vertical, limit position. In that 55 way, the circuit is completed through the two switches 83 and 84 to energize the solenoid 85 and raise the armature 86 to retracted position with respect to the lever 81, so that the pedal 21 can be depressed. The spindles of the press are, 60 therefore, fully protected against jamming.

It will be observed from the foregoing that the hydraulic motor including the cylinder I6 and the piston I9 constitutes a -power actuator for moving the Work support to bring the work II and 65 the spindles 22 into operative association, and that the solenoid and the control mechanism therefor operate to disable the starting controller 21 and prevent starting of the actuator thereby until the work has been positioned correctly on the support I6 as determined by the feelers 12 and 89. By employing at least two spaced feclers or dowels 12, the work piece must be located correctly along two transversely extending paths before the power actuator can be started. The 'I5 dowels 12 are preferably tapered in an upward direction as shown in Fig. 5 so as to avoid the necessity of locating the work piece with precision before the lever 82 can be actuated. Thus with the work piece located With suilicient accuracy to position the smaller upper ends of the dowels for entry into the holes inthe crank case flange of the work piece, the dowels will act as cams as they are raised and will shift the work piece laterally on the platen into a position accurately dened by the larger ends of the dowels. The feeler 89 acts to detect the presence of a work piece on the supporting platen I6 while the feelers 12 operate to determine the location of the Work piece in a predetermined position relative to the platen.

The pump 25 is known as the oilgear QW pump, made by the Oilgear Co., Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and comprises a gear pump section and a piston pump section 96, preferably inside a single housing. The piston pump in the QW pump happens to be what is known as a self-centering' pump because of its being arranged to build up to a predetermined pressure in the line and then automatically shift to a position of little or no delivery, whereby to merely maintain the predetermined pressure and no more. However, that phase of the piston pump is of no special significance so far as the present invention is concerned, and the circuit diagram has not been complicated by a showing of that feature; so far as the present operation is concerned the piston pump need not be self-centering, because a blow-olf valve could be provided to open at the predetermined pressure so as to by-pass excess oil to the sump. The sump is indicated at 91. 98 indicates a suction line leading from the sump to the gear pump 05, and it will be observed that the gear pump primes the piston pump by delivery thereto from the discharge line 99. The piston pump discharges through a line |00 communicating with the pressure port |0| of the 'valve 26. The valve 26 determines by its position whether the oil is delivered to the line 24 or the line 29. Assuming that the valve 2B is in the position shown in Fig. '7, the delivery is to the line 29 to the upper end of the cylinder I8 to lower the platen by means of piston I9. The oil below the piston is drained through line 24 back to the valve, and from there through line |02 leading back to the discharge side of the gear pump so as to'be delivered to the intake of the piston pump, or, if there is an excess of oil, to be returned to the sump through the line |03 and a low pressure relief or foot valve |04. The latter oiTers suiicient back pressure on the piston to insure smooth operation. When the piston I9 has moved as far as it will go, pressure in the line |00 builds up until it overcomes the high pressure relief valve |05 which then allows drainage to the sump through the line |06. On. the up-stroke of the piston 9, when the valve 26 delivers oil from the pressure port |0| to the line 24, the foot Valve |04 offersV sufficient back pressure on the piston I9 in the drainage of oil from above the piston to insure smooth operation. The valve 26 is shown in position for delivering oil to the upper end of the cylinder I8 so as to keep the platen in lowered position, that being the normal position of the valve secured by action of the spring 28.

It is believed the foregoing description conveys a good understanding of the objects and advantages of my invention. The appended claims have been drawn to cover all legitimate modica` tions and adaptations.

I claim:

l. In a machine of the class described, comprising a work support, a tool support, one of said supports being movable toward and away from the other, a working cylinder operatively associated with the movable support, and a source of pressure fluid supply for delivering fluid under pressure to said cylinder to cause movement of the support, a valve controlling communication between the source and the cylinder, manually operable Work locating means for said Work support, and manually operable means for operating the valve, the two last mentioned means being so related whereby to permit manual operation of the valve only after manual operation of the work locating means.

2. In a machine of the class described, comprising a work support, .a tool support, one of said supports being movable toward and away from the other, a working cylinder operatively associated with the movable support, and a source of pressure uid supply for delivering fluid under pressure to said cylinder for movement of the support, a valve to cause controlling communication between the source and the cylinder, a

manually operable member having connection,

with the valve to move the same., an electrical solenoid having an armature so disposed with respect to the manually operable member to prevent movement thereof When the solenoid is not energized, manually operable, work locating means for the work support, and means operable in the operation of the last mentioned means to -complete an electrical circuit through said solenoid.

3. A machine as set forth in claim 2 wherein the last mentioned means comprises a switch normally disposed in open circuit position but closed upon operation of the work locating means.

4. A machine as set forth in claim 2 wherein the last mentioned means comprises a switch normally disposed in open circuit position but closed uponl operation of the work locating means, the machine including another switch on the work support normally disposed in open circuit position but arranged to 'be closed when work is placed on the support substantially in the normal operating position, the second switch being connected in series with the first switch whereby the two switches jointly control an electric circuit through the solenoid.

5. In a machine of the class described, comprising a work support, a tool support, one of said supports being movable toward and away from the other, a working cylinder operatively associated with the movable support, and a sourceof pressure fluid supply for delivering fluid under pressure to said cylinder to cause movement of the support, a valve for controlling communication between the source and the cylinder, a manually operable member having connection with the valve to move the same, manually operable work locating means for the Work support, asignal to indicate when the work locating means has not been operated, and prevent movement of the valve, and means operable in the operation of the manually operable Work locating means to operate said signal to another position allowing movement of the valve. I

6. A machine as set forth in claim 5 wherein the signal is electrical and the last mentioned means comprises a switch normally disposed in open circuit position but closed upon operation oi the work locating means to complete an electric circuit through said signal.

7. A machine as set forth in claim 5 wherein the signal is electrical and the last mentioned means comprises a switch normally disposed in open circuit position but closed upon operation of the work locating means to complete an electric circuit through said signal, the machine including another switch on the work support normally disposed in open circuit position but arranged to be closed when work is placed on the support substantially in the normal operating position, the second switch being connected in series with the first switch whereby the two switches jointly control an electric circuit through the signal.

8. Work locating means for a machine of the character described comprising in combination a work support in a substantially horizontal plane, a pair of spaced stops on said support for determining location of work in a predetermined plane by abutment with the stops, and an electrical contact device positioned between said stops for actuation thereof by the work when it comes into abutment with the stops, said contacting device serving to indicate when there is not proper location of the work.

9. Work locating means for a machine of the character described comprising in combination with a work support, a plurality of dowels movable relative to said support for engagement with the work resting thereon, manually operable means for moving said dowels, and an electrical contacting device operable with the dowels in the movement thereof by the manually operable means, whereby to indicate when the work is not properly positioned on the support.

10. Work locating means for a machine of the character described comprising, in combination with a work support, a pair of spaced stops for determining location of work` on said support in a predetermined plane by abutment with the stops, a plurality of dowels movable relative to said support for engagement with the work resting thereon to accurately locate the work in a desired position, 'manually operable means for moi ing said dowels, an electrical contacting device operable with the dowels in the movement thereof by the manually operable means so as to indicate if the work is not properly positioned on the support, and an electrical contact device positioned between the rst mentioned stops for actuation by the work when it comes into abutment with the stops, said contacting device serving to indicate further if there is not proper positioning of the work.

l1. Work locating means as set forth in claim 10 wherein the electrical contacting devices are connected in series in a single circuit to give a single indication of improper placing of the work.

12. IIn a machine tool, a Work support, a tool support, one of said supports being movable relative to the other, a working cylinder operatively associated with the movable support, and a source of pressure uid supply for delivering fluid under pressure to said cylinder to cause movement of the support, a valve controlling communication between the source and cylinder, manual means for operating the valve, and other means for preventing delivery of pressure fluid to the working cylinder until work to be operated upon is properly placed on said work support.

13. In a machine tool, a work support, a. tool support, one of said supports being movable relative to the other, a working cylinder operatively associated with the movable support, and a source of pressure uid supply for delivering fluid under pressure to said cylinder to cause movement of the support, a valve controlling communication between the source and cylinder, said valve being movable from closed to open position when oper- 5 ation of the machine is to occur, and means for preventing operation of the machine movable from an operative to an inoperative position by the placement of work in a predetermined operating position on the work support.

14. In a machine tool, a Work support, a tool support, one of said supports being movable relative to the other, a working cylinder operatively associated with the movable support, and a source of pressure uid supply for delivering 15 fluid under pressure to said cylinder to cause movement of the support, a valve controlling communication between the source and cylinder, manual means for operating the valve, and a two position signal indicating in one position, 20

adjacent the last mentioned manual means, that the work has not been properly placed on the work support, said signal being movable to a retracted position by proper placement of the work.

15. In a machine tool, a Work support, a tool 25 support, one of said supports being movable re1- ative to the other, a working cylinder operatively associated with the movable support, and a source of pressure fluid for delivering -fiuid under pressure to said cylinder to cause movement 30 of the support, a valve controlling communication between the source and cylinder, manual means for operating said valve, manually operable worklocating means for said Work support. and a two'position signal connected with the 35 locating means an-d disposed in one position adjacent the manual valve operating means when the work locating means has not been properly operated, said signal being movable to a retracted position by proper operation of the work lo- 4u eating means.

16. In a machine tool comprising a work support, a tool support, means for moving one of said supports relative to the other, a manually operable means controlling movement of said 45 support, and a manually operable work locating means for the Work support, the two last mentioned means being inter-related in such a way that the former is operable only after the completion of an operation of the latter, whereby to 50 insure proper location of thework prior to movement of the movable support.

17. A machine as set forth -in claim 16 including other means on the work support engaged and moved by the work when placed on the work 55 support in proper operating position, said means y further controlling operability of the manually operable means for controlling movement ol.' said movable support. 1

18. In a machine tool comprising a port, a tool support, means for moving one oi' said supports relative to the other, a manually oper" able means controlling movement of said support, and means on the work support engaged and moved by the work when placed on the work 55 support in proper operating position, the two last mentioned means being inter-related in such a' way that the former is operable only after the completion of an operation of the latter, whereby to insure proper location of the work prior to 70 movement of the movable support.

19. A machine tool having, in combination, relatively movable work and tool supports, a power driven actuator for eiecting relative movement between said supports to bring a tool on worli` sup- 60l the tool support into 'and out of ioperative engagement with the work piece on the work support, a controller governing the starting of said actuator, a feeler engageable with the work piece placed on said work support and movable relative thereto in one direction when the work piece is disposed in a predetermined position relative to the work support, said feeler being held against movement when the work piece is incorrectly positioned, and means responsive to the movement of said feeler and operating to disable said controller and prevent operation of said actuator until the work piece has been located in said predetermined position.

20. A machine tool having, in combination, relatively movable work and tool supports, a power driven actuator for relatively moving said supports toward each other, control means by which the operation of said actuator may be initiated, and means engageable with said work piece moved onto said Work support and operating to maintain said control means inoperative until the work piece has been located in a predetermined position relative to said work support.

21. A machine tool having, in combination, relatively movable work and tool supports, a power driven actuator for effecting relative -movement between said supports to bring a tool on the tool support into and out of operative engagement with the work piece on the work support, a controller governing the operation of said actuator, means operable to detect the presence of a work piece disposed in a predetermined position relative to said work support, and means controlled by said detecting means and operating to disable said controller and prevent movement of said supports into operative relation by said actuator when said work piece is disposed on said work support in any other than said predetermined position.

22. A machine tool having, in combination, relatively movable work and tool supports, a power driven actuator for effecting relative movement between said supports to bring a tool on the tool support into operative association with the .work piece on the work support, a controller governing the operation of said actuator, means operating to detect the location of a Work piece on said work support in a predetermined position relative thereto and with reference to two transversely extending directions, and means controlled by said detecting means and operable to disable said controller and prevent operation of said actuator until the work piece is disposed in said predetermined position.

23. A machine tool having, in combination, relatively movable work and tool supports, a power driven actuator for moving one of said supports to bring a tool on the tool support into operative association with the work piece on the work support, a control member movable into an active position to initiate the operation of said actuator, a stop normally blocking said member against movement to said active position, and means responsive to the location of a work piece in a predetermined position relative to said work support and acting to retract said stop out of blocking position when the work piece is disposed 5 ln said position.

24. A machine tool having, in combination, relatively movable work and tool supports, a power drivenactuator for effecting relative movement between said Supports toward and away from each other to bring a tool on the tool support into and-out of operative engagement with a work piece on the work support, a controller governing the operation of said actuator in initiating the movement of said supports toward each other, feeler means operable to detect the presence of a work piece disposed on said work support approximately in operating position relative to said tool support, independent feeler means movable relative to the work support into and out of engagement with a Work piece thereon to detect accurate location of .the work piece in two transverse directions relative to said Work support, and means controlled by the joint action of said feeler means to disable said controller and prevent operation of said actuator until the work piece is accurately positioned with respect to the work support.

25. For use with a work piece having spaced locating apertures therein, a machine tool having, in combination, relatively movable work and tool supports, a power driven actuator for effecting relative movement between said supports to bring the tool on the tool support into operative engagement with the work piece on the work support, a controller governing the operation of said actuator, feelers mounted for movement relative to said work support to enter said recesses in said work piece when the latter is positioned on the work support, and means controlled by 4u said feelers and operating to disable said controller against effective operation until said feelers have entered said recesses to a predetermined position.

26. A machine tool having, in combination, 4.3 relatively movable work and tool Isupports, a power driven actuator for effectingA relative movement between said supports to bring a tool on the tool support into operative engagement with a Work piece on the work support, a controller governing the operation of said actuator to initiate operation of 4said actuator in moving said supports toward each other, spaced feelers movable into engagement with spaced portions of a work piece mounted on said support to eiect accurate lateral positioning of the Work piece relative to the work support in two directions, and means responsive to the movement of said feelers and operable to disable said controller against eiective operation until said feelers have moved' a predetermined distance and positioned the work piece relative to said work support.,

EVERETTE K. MORGAN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2437022 *Dec 2, 1942Mar 2, 1948Harold G KendallApparatus for using adhesive tape
US2438842 *Mar 7, 1944Mar 30, 1948Lockheed Aircraft CorpAutomatic dimpler
US2461753 *Sep 1, 1944Feb 15, 1949Mcewen Norman SSafety control for presses
US2472968 *Jun 26, 1942Jun 14, 1949Herman GoldbergDrilling machine
US2494984 *Feb 8, 1945Jan 17, 1950Gleason WorksQuenching press
US2507581 *Feb 26, 1945May 16, 1950Cincinnati Milling Machine CoSafety device for broaching machines
US2593254 *Aug 2, 1946Apr 15, 1952Ingersoll Milling Machine CoMachine tool
US2614275 *Mar 9, 1949Oct 21, 1952United Shoe Machinery CorpLasting machine
US2679307 *Aug 22, 1951May 25, 1954Todd CProtective system for punch presses or other machines
US2782486 *Jul 7, 1954Feb 26, 1957Foote Burt CoLocating pin
US2907233 *Oct 29, 1956Oct 6, 1959Gen Motors CorpMechanism for inspecting and establishing machining location points on a workpiece
US2918116 *Mar 29, 1955Dec 22, 1959Vendo CoTire trueing apparatus
US3120136 *May 18, 1960Feb 4, 1964Harry G BiekerSemi-automatic drill press assembly and method of drilling stacked sheets
US6708385Dec 31, 1990Mar 23, 2004Lemelson Medical, Education And Research Foundation, LpFlexible manufacturing systems and methods
US7065856Nov 10, 1987Jun 27, 2006Lemelson Jerome HMachine tool method
US7343660May 13, 1987Mar 18, 2008Lemeison Medical, Education & Research Foundation, Limited PartnershipMachine tool system
Classifications
U.S. Classification192/125.00E, 192/142.00R, 409/903, 269/21, 29/33.00P
International ClassificationB21D22/00
Cooperative ClassificationB21D22/00, Y10S409/903
European ClassificationB21D22/00