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Publication numberUS2018651 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 29, 1935
Filing dateNov 12, 1934
Priority dateNov 12, 1934
Publication numberUS 2018651 A, US 2018651A, US-A-2018651, US2018651 A, US2018651A
InventorsBates Thomas F
Original AssigneeBates Thomas F
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Sterilizing and operating instrument tray
US 2018651 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

OctZQ, 1935. T. F. BATES 2,018,651

STERILIZING AND OPERATING INSTRUMENT TRAY Filed NOV. 12, 1954 Patented Oct. 29, 1935 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE STERILIZING AND OPERATING INSTRUMENT TRAY 6 Claims.

The present intention relates to improvements 'in sterilizing and operating instrument trays and relates to an improved tray more particularly for dental and surgical instruments.

An object of the invention is to" provide an improved tray for containing a set of instruments in position for cleaning, sterilizing and storage in cabinet drawers, instrument cabinets, etc.

Another object of the invention is to provide an improved tray of non-corrosive metal adapted to hold instruments after the same have been dipped in sterilizing solutions or water, such tray having an arrangement for drainage and for readily receiving and supporting the instruments.

A further object of the invention resides in providing a tray for a variety of instruments in which the instruments may be held securely in the tray or simply allowed to rest therein whereby the same may be easily picked up and replaced in the proper order while operating.

With the foregoing and other objects in view, the invention will be more fully described hereinafter, and will be more particularly pointed out in the claims appended hereto.

In the drawing, wherein like symbols refer to like or corresponding parts throughout the several views,

Figure 1 is a perspective view of an improved tray constructed according, to the present invention.

Figure 2 is a plan view of the same.

Figure 3 is a section taken on the line 3-3 in Figure'2.

Figure 4 is also a section taken on the line 4-4 in Figure 2.

Figure 5 is a top edge view.

Figure 6 is a section taken on the line 6-6 in Figure 2.

Figure '7 is a bottom edge view and Figure 8 is a, sectional view showing a modification.

Referring more particularly to the drawing, the improved tray is preferably constructed of stainless steel or some non-corrosive metal such for instance as Allegheny metal. A sheet of such metal of relatively thin gauge and of adequate length and breadth for forming the size of tray desired is selected and subjected to a corrugating operation whereby to provide a metal tray base It] having troughs ll therein for the reception of the shanks or handles of the instruments indicated at l2. Between the troughs, as shown more particularly in Figure 6, are the crests l3 formed of the corrugated or wave like construction of the base plate I0, such crests forming divisions or partitions between the troughs II and maintaining the instruments separate from one another. The corrugated formation will not induce cracks in the metal but will form a smooth undu- 5 lating structure of an extremely smooth and highly polished surface not conducive to the lodgment of germs.

To one end of the tray is afllxed an angle metal strip consisting of flanges l4 and IS. The flange 10 I14 extends across the troughs or pockets II and is riveted, as indicated at Hi, to crest portions I3 of the base plate [0. The other flange l5, which is turned over at substantially right angles to the flange I4, lies across the ends of the pock- 15 ets or troughs II and acts as an abutment for the heels of the handles of the instruments l2 so as to restrict movement of the instruments in the troughs or pockets.

It will be noted particularly from Figure '7 that the flange I5 is not as deep as the pockets l I whereby the base portions of the pockets H extend beyond the upper edge of the flange l5 thus forming drain ways for the sterilizing solutions or water to drain off from the tray.

At the other end of the tray are elastic loops having constricted necks or collars II which necks or collars are secured by rivets or other fastenings H! in the base portions of the troughs or pockets H. The necks or collars l1 are of smaller diameter than the diameters of the pockets II and such necks or collars have wings l9 and 20 flaring out in divergent relation whereby to guide the instrument through the constricted jaws 2| of such necks. These wings I9 and 20 extend upwardly beyond the plate "I and they serve as supports for the instruments I2 it being necessary to force the instruments downwardly to expand the jaws 2! before the necks will receive the same.

An angle strip may also be secured beneath the base plate I0 opposite the elastic loops, such strip being composed oi flanges 22 and 23. The flange 22 lies along the underneath side of the base plate Ill and is riveted, welded or otherwise secured to the lower portions of the pockets or troughs II. The flange 23extends outwardly or downwardly and forms a rest or foot for engaging the table or other supporting surface whereby the tray may be supported at an inclination. so

In Figure 8 elastic loops or clips 24 are shown at the bottom of the tray as wellas at the top, in which case the angle strip l4, l5 may be dispensed with.

In the use of the device, the instruments will ll loops.

upper portions of the instrument handles are pushed down within the necks ll of .the elastic In performing this operation the handles will encounter the wings l9 and 20 forcing same apart until such handles pass inwardly within the jaws 2 l; whereupon the inherent resiliency of the metal will cause the neck I! to contract about the handles and the constricted jaws 2| will close preventing the ready withdrawing of the handles so that the tray may be carried upright or in an inverted position without likelihood of the instruments falling out of the tray. The instruments are removed by grasping the portions thereof extending beyond the tray and forcibly lifting the same from the tray which willcause the jaws 2| to spring apart thus letting the handles escape from the elastic loops. These loops grasp the instruments'andhold them firmly in place for cleaning, sterilizing and storing. By withdrawing the instruments from the loops they may be permitted to rest upon the wings l9 and 20, as shown in Figure 1. From this position they are easily picked up and replaced in proper order while operating. 7

Such trays will keep the instruments at all times in proper order and save much time in sorting. The trays protect the sharp edges by holding the instruments securely apart. These trays are much lighter than porcelain trays and are unbreakable, more compact, sightly and will last indefinitely. The trays may be made to hold various numbers of instruments to suit the sets or convenience of the operator. The loops may be shaped so as to grasp different forms of dental and surgical instruments and support them while operating. These trays may be useful for equipping'all instrument cabinets and drawers, students oases, visiting cases or'bags, hospitals, infirmaries, nurses and for supplying with sets of instruments for sale. The stripof metal 22, 23

secured under the front edge of the tray acts to reinforce and strengthen the corrugated construction along with the lower strip I 4, IS. The

flange 23 also acts as a leg to elevate the front of the tray which is an advantage in operating. This elevation may be regulated by the length of the leg 23; moreover this construction will greatly stiflen the tray yet leaving it lighter than a thick :bar would do.

Referringmore particularly to Figure 8, in case the tray is intended for double-ended instruments, the elasticloops would be used at both ends of the tray instead of the angled strip l4, l5.

It will be noted that the corrugatedconstruction lends itself well to flatness inthe tray and that the height of the tray from the supporting surface is not greatly in excess of the diameter of the'handles of the instruments. Of course the tray is not so long as the instrumentsand the construction admits of holding the instruments relativelyclose together whereby the construction is compact.

' Itwill be obvious that various changes may be made in the construction, combination and ar- 7 rangement of parts, which could be used without departing from the spirit ofmy invention and I do not mean to limit the invention to such de- Having thus described my invention, what I claim and desire to secure by Letters Patent of V the United States is:

1. An improved sterilizing and operating instrument tray comprising a thin corrugated base i 5 of the pockets for retaining the instruments in 10 said pockets.

2. An improved sterilizing and operating instrument tray comprising a thin flat base plate having pockets therein for receiving the handles of'instruments, and an L-shaped reinforcing strip secured across one end of such pockets with one leg thereof at right angles to the length of the pocketsand acting as an abutment for the heels of the handles.

3. An improved sterilizing and operating instrument tray comprising a corrugated base plate forming pockets for receiving the handles of in,- struments, a reinforcing strip having a flange secured across the open sides of the pockets and V fastened to the base plate, said strip having a flan e folded over upon the open ends of the pockets but/being shallower than the pockets are deep whereby not to interfere with drainage, and resilient loops in the pockets at the other end portion of the tray for releasably grasping the V handles of the instruments.

e. An improved sterilizing and operating instrument tray comprising a corrugated plate adapted to receive the handles of instruments in the corrugations thereof, and an L-shaped strip secured to an endof the plate with one leg thereof engaging over the peaks of the corrugations and extending inwardly of the adjacent end of the plate, theother leg of the strip closing one 7 one end of the pockets formed by the valleys 4 of the corrugations, said other leg having such a' construction asto-permit draining of liquid from said pockets;

5. An improved sterilizing and operating instrument tray comprising a corrugated plate "adapted toreceive thehandles of instruments in the corrugations thereof, an L-shaped strip secured to an end of the plate with one leg thereof engaging over the peaks of the corrugations and extending inwardly of the adjacent end of the plate, the other leg of the strip closing one end of the pockets formed by the valleys of the corrugations, said other leg having such a construction as to permit draining of liquid from said pockets, and means secured to the underside of the plate for holding the plate at an angle relative to the horizontal. V

6. An improved sterilizing and operating instrument tray comprising ,a corrugated plate adapted to receive the handles of instruments in the'corrugatl'ons thereof, anL-shaped strip secured to an end of the plate with one leg thereof engaging over the peaks of the corrugations and V 7 extendinginwardly of the adjacent end of the plate, the other leg of the strip closing one endioo of the pockets formed by the valleys of the corrugations, said other leg having such a, construction as to permit draining of llquid from said pockets,' and a second L-shaped strip secured to the underside of the plate for holding the plate at an angle relative to the horizontal.

THOMAS r'. BATES.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2736428 *Nov 20, 1953Feb 28, 1956Wenger Harvey RGlove compartment pad
US2929117 *Mar 25, 1958Mar 22, 1960Kosswig Ernest HSterilizing holder for syringe parts
US3925014 *Jun 26, 1974Dec 9, 1975Langdon Robert SInstrument sterilization
US4229420 *Mar 26, 1979Oct 21, 1980American Hospital Supply CorporationSurgical instrument rack
US5097963 *Apr 12, 1990Mar 24, 1992Preven-A-Stik, Inc.Sterile protective system for surgical instruments during a surgical operation
US5145655 *Dec 4, 1989Sep 8, 1992Mariann DarlakSurgical instrument rack and facilitator
US5772031 *Feb 15, 1996Jun 30, 1998Zimmer, Inc.Package for an elongated medical product
US5792422 *Dec 20, 1996Aug 11, 1998Ethicon, Inc.Liquid/vapor sterilization container systems
US6968961 *Feb 7, 2003Nov 29, 2005Elizabeth PeeteOrganizer for tools
US20060076254 *Oct 12, 2005Apr 13, 2006Corbitt John D JrSurgical instrument organizer
US20060254994 *Mar 17, 2006Nov 16, 2006Lg Electronics Inc.Dish receiving member of dishwasher
Classifications
U.S. Classification206/370, 206/564, 206/565, 422/300
International ClassificationA61C19/00, A61C19/02
Cooperative ClassificationA61C19/02
European ClassificationA61C19/02