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Publication numberUS2018961 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 29, 1935
Filing dateJul 20, 1934
Priority dateJul 20, 1934
Publication numberUS 2018961 A, US 2018961A, US-A-2018961, US2018961 A, US2018961A
InventorsKuhn Frederick A
Original AssigneeLyman Gun Sight Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Telescope sight mounting
US 2018961 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Patented Oct. 29, 1935 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE 2,018,961 7 TELESCOPE SIGHT MOUNTING Frederick A. Kuhn, Meriden, The Lyman Gun Sight Conn., assignor to Corp., Middlefield,

My invention relates to a telescope sight mounting and in a more specific aspect to a mounting for hunting types of telescope sights. Telescope sights are usually mounted on firearms was to be adjustable vertically and horizontally, in order that the point of aim, and the Hint of impact of the bullet on the target, may be made to coincide at the desired range. In the case of telescope sights for target shooting, it is necessary to provide'mounts which may be freely adjustable, so that the sights may be brought into alignment with the point of impact at various ranges. In the case of hunting telescope sights, the adjustments are made to set the sight for one particular distance which is governed more or les'sby the "trajectory of the firearm on which the sight is mounted. Beyond the range for which the sight is set the hunter holds over the desired point of impact'and at relatively short ranges it may be necessary to hold under the point of impact. For the purpose of aligning the hunting telescope sight at the desired range the usual sight is provided with a vertically adjustable reticule, lateral or windage corrections being made by means of the mount in which the sight issupported. In certain instances the mounts have been made so as to be adjustable vertically as well as laterally.

Modern improvements in '.22' caliber'rim fire ammunition have greatly increased the effectiveness of these cartridges for hunting purposes and as a result the use of rifles bored and chambered for .22 caliber rim fire cartridges has been extended. The usual type of hunting telescope sight mount is designed towithstand the heavy recoil of high power rifles and as a result is relatively heavy and complicated by many details of de sign intended to prevent changes in sight setting or adjustment, due to the recoil. I have found that the usual mount, by reason of its weight, is entirely unsuited for use on .22 caliber or other light rifles. In addition the constructional details of these mounts'are such that they usually cost a great deal more than the amount necessary for the purchase of a reasonably good .22 caliber or other light rifle.

One of the"principal objects of the present invention is to bring about a form of'telescope sight mounting which is suitable for use on .22 caliber or other relatively light rifles, without unduly increasing the weight thereof.

Another object of the invention is to bring about a form of telescope sight mounting in which vertical as well as horizontal adjustments may be effected, thus dispensing with the use of movable reticules, the latter being usually troublesome and telescope sights embodying them are expensive to manufacture. V V I e A feature of the invention resides in a form of telescope sight mounting which, while having the l necessary rigidity and ease of adjustment, is relatively simple and, through ease of manufacture, may be produced at low cost.

To these and other ends, the invention consists in the novel features and combinations of parts 10 to be hereinafter described and claimed.

In the drawing, 7

t Fig. 1 is a side elevational view of a telescope sight mounting embodying the invention;

Fig. 2 is an end view of the mounting taken 15 from the left hand end as viewed in Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is a plan view of the mounting;

Fig. 4 is a sectional view taken along line 4-4 of Fig. 3;

Fig. 5 is'a sectional view taken along line 5-520 of Fig. 3;

Fig. 6 is a sectional view taken'along line 6-6 of Fig. 3

Fig. 7 is a sectional view taken along line 1-1 of Fig. 3; a V

Fig. 8 is a view similar to Fig. 3 but broken away to show a part of the improved structure, and V Fig. 9 is a plan view of a spring used as a part of the improved structure.

Referring now to the drawinggin which I have 30 illustrated my invention by showing'a preferred embodiment of thesame, the reference numeral It] indicates in general the improved telescope sight mounting, which includes a generally vertical longitudinally extending. fixed plate ll, having an integrally formed arm l2, extending at right angles thereto, the arm l2 being bent at H, to form a seat for the receiver of a rifle, not shown hereinin detail, the arm l2 being secured to re-. 7 ceiver M by screws l5 and-l6. Preferably the 4.0 arm I2 is somewhat shorter than the vertical part of plate II and maybe secured on the usual receiver bridge. I r

The vertical part II, of plate H, is on the left side of the? receiver l4, when looking to! 45 wards the muzzle of the rifle, and forms a rigid support for the vertically adjustable elongated lower base I 8. Lower base |8is pivotally mounted on the forward end of the vertical part II, of plate II, by means of screw 19. The cylin- 50 drical stem 20', of screw l9, fits the opening 2|, of lower base l8, and forms .the'pivotal'support therefor, the screw having a, reduced threaded end 22, screwed into plate ll. A shoulder 23, on screw l9, bears against the outer surface of the plate, the shoulder 23 being spaced from the head 24, of screw |9, a distance sufficient to hold the base tightly against the outer surface of the plate but permitting swinging movement of the base l8, on the cylindrical stem 20.

The lower base I8 is L-shape-in cross-section and provided with a horizontal arm 25, coextensive in length with the base IS, the arm extending inwardly over the vertical part [1, of the plate, at right angles with respect to the outer surface thereof. near the rear end thereof and immediately above the vertical part I1, is an elevation adjusting screw 26, the screw 26 being at the opposite end of base l8, from pivot screw- I9. The lower end of adjusting screw 26 bears against the'upper end 21, of the vertical part VH, .and may be r0.- tated by means of knurled head 28. As the screw 26 is rotated, so as to move downwardly in the threaded opening 29, of arm 25, the lower endof the screw, bearing against the face 21, 6f plate swings the base! about screw l9 and elevates the rear end pf the base |B. A clamping screw 39, passing through an enlarged opening 3|, in base l8, isthreaded into plate andlserves to clamp the base l8, against the plate H, to lock the base and plate together against relative movement, the enlarged opening 3| permitting the base l8 to swing on plate 1|, an amount sufiicient to take care of any'necessary vertical sight adjustment.

Mounted on the flat horizontal upper face. 32, of lower base I8, is horizontally adjustable elongated upper base 33, the forward end of which is secured to the lower base l8, by pivot screw 34, while the rear end of the upper base 33 is securedto the lower base by means of clamp screw 35. The cylindrical stem 36, of screw 34,

. fits the opening 31, of the upper base '33, and

forms the pivotal support therefor, the screw having a reduced threaded end 38,.screwed into the lower base I3. A shoulder 39, on screw 34, bears against the upper surface of base I8, the shoulder being spaced from screw head 49 a distance sufiicient tohold the upper base against movement upwardly from the lower. base, but permitting swinging movement on the stem-3'6.

Extending outwardly and then downwardly from the upper base 33, at a point near the rear end thereof, is an arm 4|, in which lateral or windage adjusting screw 42 is threaded, screw 42 bearing against the outer side surface of lower base I8 and serving to swing the upper base about pivot screw .34. Clamping screw 35 passes through the enlarged opening 43, of base '33, and is threaded into lower base l8, to holdthe upper. base against movement with respect to the lower base, the enlarged opening 43 permitting sufficient horizontal swinging movement of the upper base, to take care of any necessary horizontal or windage adjustment. r

Extending inwardly and upwardly, from the ends of upper base 33, are semi-cylindrical telescope sight seats 44 and 45, in which a telescope sight 4! is received, the telescope being cradled in the curved portions '46, of seats 44 and 45, and held against movement by clamps 48 and 49, the lower ends of which extend downwardly through openings 59 and 5|, in seats 44 and 45. (Figs. 3,

4, and 5.) Clamps 48 and 49 are made of relatively thin metal and are provided with T-shape heads, the branches 52 and 53 of'the heads extendingto either side of the openings 50 and 5| and engaging the under sides of seats" 44 and Threaded in the arm 25,"

- upwardly around the telescope, the branches on the T-shape heads restricting such movement and co-operating with the screws to force the clamps against the telescope.

The adjustment of the improved mounting will 15 be readily understood from the foregoing description butv will now be more fully described. The telescope sight 's placed in the seats and clamped against movement. Clamping screw 39 may be loosened slightly and the vertically ad- 20 justable lower base 18 'swung'ab'out pivot screw l9, by means of elevation adjusting screw 26,'to give the telescope the proper elevation, for the range at which the rifle is to beuse'di It may be found convenient to press downwardly on the 25 rear end of the upper base '33, as the lower base is adjusted, in order to keep the lower end of .the adjusting screw 26 in contact with plate I]. When the proper elevation has been found, the clamping screw 39 may be tightened or set up 30* to hold the lower base against movement with respect tothe plate ll. 7 V

In similar manner the clamping screw '35may be loosened and the horizontally adjustable upper base 33 swung, about pivot screw 34, to e1' 83"- fect such lateral or windage adjustment as may be necessary. In this case the windageadjusting screw 42 is rotated, in one or the other, direction, to cause the movement of the upper base, the rear end of the upper base being pressed in- (.0 wardly, to maintain the inner end of screw 42 in contact with the lower base Upon the lateral or windage adjustment being completed the clamping screw 35 may be tightened. V In some instances it maybe more convenient 5 to start the vertical adjustment with the sight fully depressed and toiloosenthe clamping screw 30 an amount barely suff cient to permit the base l8 to be swung or elevatedby the adjusting screw 26. In this manner the sight may be elevated 50" by rotation of screw 25, during theilring of sighting shots, until the proper. elevation is ob tained, whereupon the clamping screw 39 may be "fset up to lock the base I8 against further movementwith respect to plate Ina similar 68 manner the clamping screw 35 maybe slightly.

loosened and the upper horizontally adjustable base. swung inwardly to the limit of adjustment,

or to such an extentthat the shots will strike to the left of the point of aim, the adjusting 0 screw 42 being rotated to bring the sight into exact lateral or windage alignment, whereupon the clamping screw 35 may be fset up. It will be noted that the opening 58, in'upper base 33,

is enlarged so that the adjusting screw 26, which 4! adjusting screw 26, and an end of arm 63 extending downwardly into the groove 64 of screw 42, the end of arm 63 being likewise bifurcated. It will be readily understood that outward movement of either screw is arrested by the ends of the spring riding in the respective grooves.

The improved mount consists of three main parts each of which may be struck out of sheet metal and pressed into shape. The two clamps and the spring may likewise be struck out of sheet metal and pressed to shape while the remaining parts of the mount are screw machine products. Thus the machine work necessary on the mount has been reduced to a minimum without, however, any sacrifice of rigidity or adjustability. It will be noted that the space between the arm I2 and the telescope seats is unobstructedso that the usual metallic sights of the rifle may be used without interference by the telescope sight or its mount.

While I have shown and described a preferred embodiment of my invention, it will be understood that it is not to be limited to the details shown, but is capable of modificationand variation within the spirit of the invention and the scope of the appended claims.

What I claim is:

1. In a telescope sight mounting, a plate having a vertical part and an arm formed at right angles thereto, said am adapted to be attached to the receiver of a rifle, a lower base having a vertical part supported on the vertical part of the plate for vertical swinging movement, and a horizontal arm extending over the vertical part of the plate at right angles thereto, an upper base supported on the last named arm for pivotal movement in a horizontal direction, and means for attaching a telescope sight to the upper base.

2. In a telescope sight mounting, a plate adapted to be attached to the receiver of a rifle, a lower base having a vertical part supported on the plate for pivotal movement in a vertical direction and having an elongated generally horizontal arm extending inwardly therefrom, an upper base mounted for pivotal movement in a horizontal direction on said arm and means for attaching a telescope sight to the upper base.

3. In a telescope sight mounting, a plate adapted to be attached to the receiver of a rifle, a lower base having a vertical part supported on the plate for pivotal movement in a vertical direction and having an elongated generally horizontal arm extending inwardly therefrom, an upper base mounted for pivotal movement in a horizontal direction on said arm and having a pair of integrally formed inwardly extending and upwardly curving telescope sight seats one at each of the ends thereof.

4. In a telescope sight mounting, a plate adapted to be attached to a rifle, a lower base mounted on the plate for pivotal movement in a vertical direction, an upper base mounted on the lower base for pivotal movement in a horizontal direction, said upper base being formed out of sheet metal and having a pair of integrally formed telescope sight seats one at either end thereof and extending inwardly therefrom and an integrally formed arm extending downwardly at a spaced lower base, and an upper base, each of said parts 5 being formed out of sheet metal, said plate comprising a vertically directed part andan inward- 'ly bent arm generally at right angles thereto,

said arm being adapted to be attached to a rifle, said lower base comprising a vertical part mount- 10 ed for pivotal movement in a vertical direction on the vertical part of the plate and a part bent at right angles thereto and extending inwardly over the vertical part of the plate, and said upper base being mounted on the inwardly directed 15 part of the lower-base for pivotal movement in a horizontal direction and means on the upper base adapted to support a telescope sight.

6. A telescope sight mounting comprising, a lower base having vertically and horizontally di- 20 rected faces, an upper base seated on the horizontal face for pivotal movement in a horizontal direction and having a part extending downwardly at a spaced interval from the vertical face, and a screw threaded in the downwardly extend- 2 ing part and engaging the lower base to effect the pivotal movement.

7. A telescope sight mounting comprising, a lower base having verticallyand horizontally directed faces, an upper base formed out of sheet 30 metal and having an elongated part mounted for pivotal movement in a horizontal direction on the horizontally directed face of the lower base, a pair of integrally formed telescope sight seats one at either end of the elongated part, and a 35 downwardly bent arm normally at a spaced interval from the vertically directed face, and an adjusting screw threaded in the arm and bearing against the lower base to effect the pivotal movement of the upper base.

8. In a telescope sight mounting, a base and means for supporting a telescope sight thereon,

said means comprising a pair of semicircular seats one at either end of said base and a pair of clamps one for each seat, said clamps having 45 T-shape heads extending downwardly through slots in the base and engaging an under side thereof to prevent upward movement of the clamps, said clamps having elongated parts extending upwardly around the telescope sight, and means for 50 V urging the clamps towards the seats to clamp the telescope against movement.

9. In a telescope sight mounting, a base, means for attaching the base to a rifle, a second base, means for mounting a telescope second base, a pivotal connection between the bases, a screw threaded in the second base and having an end bearing against the first base, and means engaging the screw to prevent the lat-- ter from unthreading from the second named base, said last named .means comprising a spring, the spring having a relatively flat bifurcated end, the screw having a groove in which the bifurcated end of the spring is received to straddle the screw, 65 and means for securing the spring on the second named base.

FREDERICK A. KUHN.

sight on the 55V

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2782508 *May 24, 1954Feb 26, 1957Jessie T IvyDetachable side mount
US4531321 *Jan 12, 1983Jul 30, 1985Bechtel Daniel LScope-mounting devices for firearms
US5086566 *Nov 9, 1990Feb 11, 1992Fontaine IndustriesAdjustable telescopic sight mount
Classifications
U.S. Classification42/126, 24/19
International ClassificationF41G1/00, F41G11/00, F41G1/387
Cooperative ClassificationF41G11/001
European ClassificationF41G11/00B