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Publication numberUS2019248 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 29, 1935
Filing dateMay 23, 1935
Priority dateMay 23, 1935
Publication numberUS 2019248 A, US 2019248A, US-A-2019248, US2019248 A, US2019248A
InventorsMonroe Blumgardt
Original AssigneeMonroe Blumgardt
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Draped garment and belt therefor
US 2019248 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 29, 1935. M, BLUMGARDT 2,019,248

DRAPED GARMENT AND BELT THEREFOR Filed May 23, 1935 INVENT OR,

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Patented Oct. 29, 1935 UNITED Claims.

My present invention relates generally to garments, and has particular reference to a draped garment such as a bathrobe or dressing gown, and to a belt associated therewith.

5 The conventional belt or sash employed with a bathrobe or the like is of a much greater length I than is necessary to encircle the waistband. Customary practice requires that the ends of the belt be tied in a bow or knot, thereby producing long depending free ends or tassels.

It is a general object of the present invention to provide a garment of the character mentioned, in which the belt is of a character which permits it to be tightened and loosened by means of cooperating fastening elements, in a manner which avoids the usual resultant depending ends.

A more particular object of my invention is to provide a construction in which the belt in normal unextended condition is insufficient in length to encircle the waistband; and to provide a means whereby a limited resilient extensibility of the belt is permitted so as to enable it to be tightened by bringing the complementary fastening elements at the free ends into cooperating relation.

One of the main objects of my invention is to provide a garment of the foregoing characteristics, in which means are provided for permanently retaining the belt in irremovable association with the garment, whether the belt is in tightened or loosened condition.

In-accordanoe with my present invention, the garment is provided with a pair of vertical loops at the waistline, symmetrically positioned on op- 35 posite sides of the middle of the back, preferably at'the side seams of the garment; and the belt is provided with a pair of horizontal loops on its inside surface, adapted to engage, respectively; with said vertical loops. This inter-en- 40 gagement of loops keeps the belt in irremovable association with the garment; and it is a particular feature of my invention to arrange and construct the loops in such cooperative relation ship. with one another and with the means for stretching the belt that the natural hang of the garment, and hence its contemplated attractive appearance, remain unimpaired.

V The provision of a belt on a draped garment, such as a bathrobe, presents certain prob- 50 lems and difficulties which are not present or encountered in the application of a belt to a tailored or relatively tight-fitting garment,

such as an ordinary coat. A bathrobe or dressi-ng gown, to look well, must hang naturally, with the excess material accommodated in natural,

vertical folds. Horizontal adjustments of a belt must be of a character which leave the garment in its naturally draped condition at all times.

One of the main features of my invention lies in arranging the horizontal loops on the belt in 5 a predetermined spaced relationship, and constructing these loops of such predetermined in-' dividual lengths that the belt may be tightened and loosened without in any way impairing the normal hang of the garment. 1

Another feature of my invention lies in providing, on the belt, between the horizontal loops,

a means for permitting a predetermined limited extensibility of the belt. More particularly, the belt is of a tubular construction and the stretchability is imparted to it by arranging an elastic element entirely within the tube, between the proximal ends of the horizontal loops.

The successful accomplishment of the present objective involves, also, mounting the horizontal 20 loops on the belt in a manner whereby the distance between the proximal ends of these loops is no greater, when the belt is extended, than the normal distance between the vertical loops on the garment; and arranging the distance between the distal ends of the horizontal loops when the belt is unextended, so that it is no less than the spacing between the vertical loops of the garment.

I achieve the foregoing objects, and such other objects as may hereinafter appear or be pointed out, in the manner illustratively exemplified in the accompanying drawing, wherein- I Figure 1 is a rear view of a draped garment, such as a bathrobe, constructed in accordance with my present invention and showing the belt in unextended condition;

Figure 2 is a view similar to Figure 1, showing the belt in extended or tightened condition;

Figure 3 is an enlarged cross-sectional view taken substantially. along the line 3-3 of Figure 1;

Figure 4 is a cross-sectional view taken substantially along the line l-fl of Figure 3, this view including the belt ends; and

Figure 5 is a View similar to Figure 4, showing the belt in extended condition.

The garment It of Figure 1, when worn, adjusts itself into the natural hang illustrated, the material falling into and forming the natural 5 and graceful folds and the convolutions indicated by the reference numeral M. It is provided with a belt H2 at the waistband, permanently associated with the garment in a manner presently to be described. 55

In Figure 2, the belt is shown in extended condition, the free ends being fastened together at the front of the garment. It is to be observed that the natural folds and convolutions II are substantially the same as they were in Figure 1. In other words, the loosening and tightening of the belt have no effect upon the natural hang of the garment.

This desirable result is accomplished in the manner most clearly illustrated in Figures 3, 4, and 5. The garment It, at the waistband, is provided with a pair of vertical loops which are symmetrically positioned'on opposite sides of the middle of the back. One of these loops, I3, is illustrated in Figure 3. This same loop is shown in cross-section in Figures 4 and 5, and these figures show also the other vertical loop I4. The loops I3 and I4 have a normal spacing between them, when the garment is worn, which is substantially constant, independent of the size of the garment. This spacing difiers only by perhaps one-half inch or one inch as between a garment for a very small person and a garment for a very large person.

The loops I3 and I4 are fastened to the garment by stitches I5.

The belt I2 is composed of an outer ply I6 and an inner ply II, the edges being turned in and stitched together, as at l8, thereby forming a substantially tubular construction. The width of the belt is purposely made greater than the length of the loops I3 and I4, so that these loops are totally concealed when the belt is associated with the garment.

On the inner ply or surface of the belt, I provide the longitudinal loops I9 and 20, the width being substantially less than the width of the belt, and the loops being attached to the inner ply II at their ends, as by stitches 2I and 22.

The loop I9 is permanently inter-engaged with the loop I3, and the same relationship obtains with respect to the loops 2i] and I4. When once assembled, the garment is thus a unitary device, with the belt in permanent association therewith.

Between the horizontal loops, and on the interior of the tubular belt construction, a length of elastic material 23 is arranged. This material is stitched on its four sides, as indicated at 24, to the inner ply II of the belt, and this stitching is accomplished with the elastic in stretched condition, so that when the assembly is completed, and the elastic 23 permitted to contract, the material of the belt plies I6 and I1 becomes shirred, as indicated in Figure 4.

At the free ends of the belt I provide complementary fastening elements which may be of any suitable character, such as clasps, a buckle, snap fasteners, or the like. I have illustratively shown a hook 25 at one end and a complementary loop 26 at the other.

The belt and the elastic member 23 are of such size and character that when the belt is in uneXte-nded condition, as shown. in Figure 4, it is insufficient in length to encircle the waistband of the garment. The contraction of the belt causes the horizontal loops I9 and 2G to position themselves, relative to the loops I3 and I4, substantially as shown in Figure 4. It will be observed that the loops I3 and I4 are near the outer or distal ends of the belt loops. In accordance with my invention, the points of attachment ZI of the distal ends of the horizontal loops are spaced apart by a distance which is at least as great (when the belt is unextended) as the normal spacing between the vertical loops I3 and I4.

This prevents the contraction of the belt, when in the condition shown in Figure 1, from undesirably drawing together the rear of the waistband portion of the garment. This leaves the folds II in normal unimpaired condition, as shown most I clearly in Figure 1.

The elastic 23 permits a predetermined limited extensibility of the belt which is sufficient to perrm't the belt to be tightened. When this is done, the horizontal loops I9 and 20 position them- 10 selves, relative to the loops I3 and I4, substantially as shown in Figure 5. In accordance with my invention, the points of attachment, 22, of the proximal ends of the horizontal loops are spaced apart by a distance which is no greater 15 (when the belt is extended) than the normal spacing between the vertical loops I3 and I4. This prevents the tightening of the belt from pulling outwardly on the back of the garment when the belt is tightened. The result is that 20 the normal folds I I remain in their normal position, as before, and. the natural hang of the garment is unimpaired.

The foregoing desirable results require, also, that the length of each of the horizontal loops I9 25 and 20 be of a predetermined magnitude. The length of each horizontal loop must be at least as great as one-half of the total belt extensibility. While, theoretically, this length will be suflicient,

I have found that the most desirable and practical 30 results are achieved by making the length of each horizontal loop approximately twice this minimum theoretical value. Accordingly, each horizontal loop has a length substantially equal to the total belt extensibility. Y 35 I am aware of the fact that extensible belts, per se, are old in the art, and I make no claim broadly to a stretchable belt, either alone or in association with the garment. I am also aware of the fact that inter-engaging loops of varying characters have been attempted, heretofore, to retain a belt in permanent association with a garment.

I believe I am the first, however, to devise a. draped garment of the present character in which a belt is permitted resilient extensibility; in which ,5 such a belt is permanently associated in irremovable manner with the garment; and in which the tightening and loosening of the belt may be accomplished without in the least impairing the natural attractive hang" of the garment. I at- 5 tribute the successful accomplishment of this result to the predetermined and unique manner in 'which the loops are cooperatively sized and spaced; the manner in which the extensibility is provided for in the region between the longi- 5 tudinal belt loops; and the relationship between the length of each horizontal loop and the total belt extensibility.

It will be obvious that changes in the details, herein described and illustrated for the purpose 60 of explaining the nature of my invention, may be made by those skilled in the art without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention as expressed in the appended claims. It is, therefore, intended that these details be interpreted as illustrative, and not in a limiting sense.

Having thus described my invention, and illustrated its use, what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is- 1. In a draped garment such as a bathrobe, a pair of vertical loops at the waistline symmetrically positioned on opposite sides of the middle of the back, a belt having complementary fastening elemen s at it ends and. being insufllcient in length, when in unextended condition, to encircle the waistline, means associated with the belt for permitting a limited resilient extensibility thereof to enable the belt to be tightened by bringing said fastening elements into cooperating relation, and a pair of horizontal loops on the inside surface of the belt and engaging, respectively, with said vertical loops, said horizontal loops being so spaced and being of such individual lengths that the belt may be tightened and loosened without horizontal pull in either direction on the vertical loops and without impairing the normal hang of the garment.

2. In a draped garment such as a bathrobe, a pair of vertical loops at the waistline symmetrically positioned on opposite sides of the middle of the back, a belt having complementary fastening elements at its ends and being insufhcient in length, when in unextended condition, to encircle the waistline, means associated with the belt for permitting a limited resilient extensibility thereof to enable the belt to be tightened by bringing said fastening elements into cooperating relation, and a. pair of horizontal loops on the inside surface of the belt and engaging, respectively, with said vertical loops, the length of each horizontal loop being at least as great as one-half of the total belt extensibility, and said horizontal loops being arranged for movement relative to the vertical loops without applying horizontal pull to the latter.

3. In a draped garment such as a bathrobe, a pair of vertical loops at the waistline symmetrically positioned on opposite sides of the middle of the back, a belt having complementary fastening elements at its ends and being insuflicient in length, when in unextended condition, to encircle the waistline, means associated with the belt for permitting a limited resilient extensibility thereof to enable the belt to be tightened by bringing said fastening elements into cooperating relation, and a pair of horizontal loops on the inside surface of the belt and engaging, respectively, with said vertical loops, the length of each horizontal loop being at least as great as one-half of the total belt extensibility, and the distance between the proximal ends of the horizontal loops, when the belt is extended, being no greater than the distance between said vertical loops when the garment is worn.

4. In a draped garment such as a bathrobe, a pair of vertical loops at the waistline symmetrically positioned on opposite sides of the middle of the back, a belt having complementary fastening elements at its ends and being insuflicient in length, when in unextended condition, to encircle the waistline, means associated with the belt or permitting a limited resilient extensibility thereof to enable the belt to be tightened by bringing said fastening elements into cooperating relation, and a pair of horizontal loops on the inside surface of the belt and engaging, respectively, with said vertical loops, the distance between the proximal ends of the horizontal loops, when the belt is extended, being no greater than the spacing between said vertical loops when the garment is worn, and the distance between the distal ends of the horizontal loops, when the belt is unextended, being no less than said spacing.

5. In a, draped garment such as a bathrobe, a pair of vertical loops at the waistline symmetrically positioned on opposite sides of the middle of the back, a belt, means associated with the belt for permitting a resilient extensibility thereof to enable the belt to be fastened and tightened, and a pair of horizontal loops on the inside surface of the belt and engaging, respectively, with said vertical loops, the distance between the proximal ends of the horizontal loops when the belt is extended being no greater than the spacing between said vertical loops when the garment is worn, and the distance between the distal ends of the horino less than said spacing.

MONROE BLUMGARDT.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3594818 *Jan 2, 1969Jul 27, 1971Kimberly Clark CoFolded belt package for hospital gowns
US4819846 *May 19, 1987Apr 11, 1989Nils HannemannSportsman's belt having a plurality of pockets
US7788738 *Sep 27, 2007Sep 7, 2010Scarlett HaworthVersatile self-adjusting accessories and methods thereof
US8141173 *Oct 13, 2009Mar 27, 2012Sterling Stephen MShower garment
US8291514 *Jun 11, 2008Oct 23, 2012Morning Pride Manufacturing, L.L.C.Protective garment for use by a firefighter or other emergency worker and including a belt tunnel
US20090307822 *Jun 11, 2008Dec 17, 2009Morning Pride Manufacturing, L.L.C.Protective garment for use by a firefighter or other emergency worker and including a belt tunnel
US20100107296 *Oct 13, 2009May 6, 2010Sterling Stephen MShower garment
US20110179554 *Jan 26, 2011Jul 28, 2011Marni BumstedLow profile concealed belt
US20140230120 *Jan 24, 2014Aug 21, 2014Ping WuTransformable Clothing
Classifications
U.S. Classification2/93, 2/312
International ClassificationA41D3/02, A41F9/02, A41D3/00, A41F9/00
Cooperative ClassificationA41F9/02, A41D3/02
European ClassificationA41F9/02, A41D3/02