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Publication numberUS2020679 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 12, 1935
Filing dateOct 7, 1933
Priority dateAug 19, 1933
Publication numberUS 2020679 A, US 2020679A, US-A-2020679, US2020679 A, US2020679A
InventorsDonald Fitzpatrick Hugh
Original AssigneeClifton Ltd
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Golf club
US 2020679 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

H. FITZPATRICK GOLF CLUB Filed Oct. 7, 1955 Nov. 12,1935.

2 Sheets-$heet 1 NOV. 12, 1935. H, D i zp cK 2,020,679

GOLF CLUB Filed Oct. '7, 1933 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Patented Nov. 12, 1935 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE assignor to Clifton Li Man mited, Douglas, Isle-of- Application October 7, 1933, Serial No. 692,657 In Great Britain August 19, 1933 16 Claims.

It is well known, at present, to provide golf clubs with what is termed a cushion between the shaft and the golf club head this cushion being made of resilient material, such as rubber, in the form of a sleeve and to arrange for the sleeve to be located between the shaft and the socket of the club head so as to give a cushioning effect when the ball is struck. It has been found this is a decided advantage in certain cases and, especially, when steel shafted clubs are used.

The object of the present invention is to improve golf clubs of the class above stated the invention consisting essentially in winding elastic material, under tension, that is, in a stretched condition, round the part of the shaft adapted to fit into the socket so as to form an elastic covering for this part of the shaft and thereby to give a better cushioning effect than heretofore the windings exerting a substantial gripping effect on the shaft owing to the stretched condition of the material.

The term material as hereinafter used in the description and claims is to be understood as covering and including elastic thread, cord, tape or the like.

In order to retain the elastic material in position after being wound it may be held in position by rubber solution or by latex and/or it may have a thin coating or covering of gutta-percha, or such like. If so desired the elastic material may be held at the ends by small pins, screws, rings or clamps.

The winding may be effected by rotating the club shaft so that the material, while held at tension and consequently in a stretched condition, is wound helically thereon; or the material may be wound helically on to and round the shaft.

The material may consist of rubber thread, cord, tape, or the like, with or without the addition of cotton, cellulose, or other threads or fibres.

If so desired, after the elastic material has been wound tightly, at tension, upon the club shaft, the gutta-percha, or other suitable covering for the same, may be moulded thereon or thereover so as to form a smooth outer surface. If so desired the covering may be treated with a halide.

The end of the shaft with its elastic covering or coating can be fitted and secured in place in any well known manner, preferably by screwing or pinning. In the latter case a certain amount of play may be provided so as to allow the rubber covering full resilient action when a ball is struck by the club.

In order topreserve the correct formation of the elastic covering the shaft end may have a helical screw thread or groove and the material be wound thereon.

In some cases a metal or other sleeve may be used and the windings .of elastic material be effected thereon, this sleeve with the windings thereon, being thereafter fitted on the shaft or into the socket.

The shaft may be stepped down to reduced diameter at its end so as to accommodate the elastic covering.

In some cases two or more lengths of elastic material may be used.

In some cases, if so desired, after the elastic material has been wound upon the shaft and effectively secured and coated or covered, if necessary, a thin rubber sheathing may be drawn under tension over the windings so as to hold the same tightly under compression. 20

The invention will now be of example, with reference to drawings wherein:

Fig. 1 shows the end of a steel shaft with windings thereon in accordance with the invention, the windings being broken away for clearness.

Fig. 2 is a similar view but showing an outer cover on the windings.

Fig. 3 shows a modified form of windings.

Fig. 4 illustrates the winding operation and shows a modified form of shaft.

Fig. 5 shows a modified form of the invention.

Fig. 6 illustrates the invention as applied to a wooden club,

Fig. '7 shows a modification of Fig. 6 and Fig. 8 illustrates the invention as applied to an iron.

Referring to the drawings, the steel shaft l is reduced at the shoulder 2 to form a tapered part 3 of reduced diameter (except in Fig. 5) which 40 is adapted to receive the elastic windings 4. These are formed by winding rubber thread 5 helically upon the reduced part 3 in order to form the desired number of layers, or windings 4, the thread being under tension, that is, in a stretched condition. As illustrated in the drawings, there are three windings, these being formed preferably by rotating the shaft in a lathe, as indicated by the curved arrow in Fig. 4, or like madescribed, by way the accompanying chine, and traversing the thread bobbin, or other 7 thread carrier, along the part 3 forwards and backwards three times as indicated by the straight arrows in Fig. 4 by means of a carriage which operates in synchronism with the speed of rotation of the shaft in well known manner. The part 3 or the thread 5, or both, may be treated with rubber solution, or other adhesive, in order to cause the thread to adhere to the part 3, particularly at the beginning of the winding operation when the thread tends to come off.

During the winding operation a drag is imposed upon the thread bobbin or other carrier, or upon the thread itself, this ensuring that the thread 5, when wound upon the part 3, is under tension and consequently in a stretched condition so that it tends to cling tightly to said part.

As shown in Fig. 2 a covering 6 is provided for the windings and may consist of a coating of rubber solution or latex, of a gutta percha covering moulded on position, or a thin rubber sleeve which is drawn over the windings 4. The windings 4 and said covering are retained securely in position by metal clips I which are clamped over the ends of the windings the outer surfaces of the rings being below the outer surface of the cover 6 in order to'allow the same to contact with the wall of the socket in the club head.

As illustrated in Figs. 1 and 2 the windings 4 are truly helical, but they may be wound as illustrated in Fig. 3 where they are obliquely wound or they may be wound after the manner of textile cops where the thread is traversed backwards and forwards during winding, the purpose in both cases being to ensure firmness, and to prevent their spreading out.

In Fig. 4 the part 3 of the shaft I is formed in known manner with a rolled helical thread 8 upon which the thread 5 is wound and which serves to maintain the windings securely in position and prevents longitudinal displacement of the threads.

Fig. 5 shows a modification wherein the windings 4, instead of being wound upon the shaft proper, are wound upon a metal or other ferrule I 9 which is then fitted upon the end of the shaft and attached by rivets 20 or otherwise.

Referring to Fig. 6, the wooden head is formed with a conical or tapered socket or bore 9 which has a reduced part 917. at the sole Iii of the club. The end of the shaft I with the wound, elastic sleeve thereon, is driven into the socket 9, in which it becomes firmly wedged owing to the elasticity of the windings 4 and their taper, which the windings assume from the part 3. After the shaft has been sufficiently driven into the head to obtain the necessary grip, the projecting end is cut flush with the sole IQ of the head, and a hole II, of slightly oval shape, is formed in the part 3 with its major axis at right angles to the axis of the shaft I. A screw nail I2 is then screwed into the club head through said hole in order to secure the shaft positively in position. The oval shape of the hole I I is to permit the slight torsional play between the head and the shaft which the clastic wound sleeve provides but if this is not desired the hole is made of the usual circular shape. Fig. 7 illustrates a modified method of securing the shaft and head together. The part 3 is formed with a rolled screw thread I3 in known manner, and is engaged by a screwed ferrule I4, whose head engages a shoulder I5 in the socket 9. By turning the ferrule E4, the shaft can be drawn tightly down into the socket 9 and firmly secured therein. In order to prevent loosening under impact the thread I3 is preferably left-handed in the case of an ordinary right-handed club, and right-handed in the case of a left-handed club.

Referring to Fig. 8, the invention is shown applied to an iron or similar club. The neck I6 of the head is provided with a tapered socket or bore I5 into which the end of the shaft I with the elastic sleeve is firmly driven. The extreme end of the shaft I engages the reduced portion 511 of the socket I5. When the head and the shaft are firmly secured, a rivet IT is passed through in order to secure the head and shaft positively in position. The holes I8 in the neck I5 are slightly oval in order to provide torsional play as previously explained with reference to the screw I2 in Fig. 5 but if no torsional play is desired the 10 holes may be made circular.

The methods of attaching the shafts and heads as shown in Figs. 6, 7, and 8 may also be employed where a ferrule is provided as in Fig. 5.

With a resilient sleeve in accordance with my invention, an improved cushioning effect is obtained, and the torsional stresses which occur during impact with the ball do not cause shear strains in the rubber.

With this invention when the club head strikes the ground the jarring efi'ect ofttimes felt with the usual steel shaftedclubs is avoided.

The improved cushioning effect is due to the improved elasticity of the wound sleeve as compared with a solid rubber sleeve. A further advantage of the wound over the solid sleeve is that it retains its elasticity longer since the windings ,do not appear to beso liable as the solid rubber sleeve, to undergo mechanical fatigue, i. e; become dead, or to undergo physical deterioration which may be caused by climatic conditions and which destroys the elasticity of the rubber.

The invention has been described with reference to metal shafts for which it is more particularly intended, but it will be understood that it may be used with wooden shafts.

It will be seen, with this invention there is interposed between the socket for the shaft and the shaft itself an elastic lining consisting of resilient material which is not in its normal or initial compression condition but is under tension,: that is, stretched so that the maximum elastic and gripping effect is obtained.

I claim:

1. In a golf club, a shaft, a head having e socket to'receive the shaft end; and a resilient sleeve comprising elastic material wrapped in a series of convolutions at tension, the sleeve being positioned between the walls of the socket and the shaft and exerting a substantial gripping effect due to the elasticity of the windings.

2. In a golf club, a shaft, a head with a neck portion having a socket to receive the shaft end, and a resilient sleeve comprising a thin strip or thread of rubber wound in a series of convolutions held under tension on the shaft, the sleeve being positioned between the walls of the socket and the shaft and exerting a substantial gripping effect due to the elasticity of the windings. 3. In or for a golf club, a shaft having thereon a resilient sleeve comprising a thin strip or thread of elastic material wrapped in a series of super imposed convolutions and held under tension on the shaft and, exerting a substantial gripping effect 'due to the elasticity of the windings.

4. In or for a golf club, a shaft having a resilient sleeve comprising superimposed'helical windings of elastic material wound under tension in opposite directions on the shaft, said windings being held in a stretched condition on the shaft and exerting a substantial gripping effect due to the elasticity of the windings.

5. In or for a golf club, a shaft having thereon a resilient sleeve comprising superimposed" windings of elastic material wound under tension on the shaft, and outer covering material on said windings which are held in a stretched condition within the covering.

6. In a golf club, a head with a neck portion having a socket, a shaft adapted to fit in said socket, a resilient sleeve comprising superimposed helical windings of elastic material on the shaft wound under tension in opposite directions and securing means at the end of said windings to maintain same under tension on the shaft and prevent unwinding, the sleeve being positioned between the circular walls of the socket and the shaft.

7. In a golf club, a shaft, a head with a neck portion having a socket to receive the end of the shaft, a resilient sleeve comprising superimposed helical windings of rubber thread on the shaft wound under tension alternately in opposite directions, clamping members at the ends of said windings to secure same, and a covering member on the outer winding, the sleeve being positioned between the circular walls of the socket and the shaft and exerting a substantial gripping effect on the shaft due to the windings being in a stretched condition.

8. In a golf club, a shaft, a head with a neck portion having a socket to receive the shaft end, a resilient sleeve comprising superimposed windings of rubber under tension on the shaft end and wound obliquely with reference to the axis of the shaft and alternately in opposite directions, the sleeve being positioned between the walls of the socket and the shaft, and exerting a substantial gripping effect on the shaft due to the windings being in a stretched condition.

9. A golf club comprising, a metal shaft, a striking head mounted thereon, a neck portion on the head having a socket for the end of the shaft,

and a plurality of superimposed coils of rubberwound under tension on the end of the shaft, the coils being alternately wound in opposite directions, and forming a resilient sleeve which acts as a cushioning member between the wall of the socket and the shaft and which exerts a substantial gripping effect on the shaft due to the windings being in a stretched condition.

10. A golf club comprising, a metal shaft, a striking head mounted thereon, a neck portion on the head having a socket for the end of the shaft, a plurality of superimposed coils of rubber wound under tension on the end of the shaft, the coils being alternately wound in opposite directions, and a screwed part on the shaft for receiving the innermost coil windings, the coils forming a resilient sleeve which acts as a cushioning member between the wall of the socket and the shaft and which exerts a substantial gripping effect on the shaft due to the windings being in a stretched condition.

11. A golf club comprising, a metal shaft, a striking head mounted thereon, a neck portion on the head having a socket for the end of the shaft,

a plurality of superimposed coils of rubber wound under tension on the end of the shaft, the coils being alternately wound in opposite directions, and a reduced part at the end of the shaft for receiving said coils which form a resilient sleeve 5 shaft, a plurality of superimposed coils of rubber wound under tension and in a stretched con- 15 dition, the coils being alternately wound in opposite directions upon the shaft, a reduced part at the end of the shaft for receiving said coils which form a resilient sleeve that acts as a cush ioning member between said reduced part and 20 the wall of the socket, clamping means for securing the ends of the coils, a flexible covering for the outside coil, and a fastening member passed through a non-circular hole in said reduced part into the socket for positively connect- 25 ing same and the shaft, but allowing torsional play.

13. In a golf club, a shaft, a head with a neck portion having a socket to receive the shaft end, and a resilient sleeve comprising a thin strip 30 or thread of elastic material wrapped in a series of convolutions at tension and held in a stretched condition encircling the shaft end.

14. In a golf club, a shaft, a head with a socket to receive the shaft end, and a cushioning sleeve 35 adapted to be positioned between the shaft and the walls of the socket and comprising a thin strip or thread of resilient material wrapped under tension in a series of convolutions upon a ferrule which is adapted to fit on to the end of the shaft, said windings being in a stretched condition and thus exerting a substantial gripping effect on the ferrule.

15. In a golf club, a shaft, a head with a neck portion having a socket to receive the shaft end, and a cushioning sleeve adapted to be positioned between the end of the shaft and the walls of the socket and comprising a metal ferrule, a thin strip or thread of rubber wrapped in a series of convolutions upon said ferrule under tension, and means for securing the ferrule on the end of the shaft, said windings being in a stretched condition and thus exerting a substantial gripping effect on the ferrule.

16. In or for a golf club, a cushioning sleeve which is adapted to'fit on the end of the shaft of the club, this sleeve consisting of a member upon which a thin strip or thread of elastic material is wrapped in a series of convolutions under tension and in a stretched condition so as to form a resilient outer covering which tightly grips said member.

H. D. FITZPATRICK.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3253071 *May 26, 1964May 24, 1966Hings Donald PMethod of making a golf club
US5335909 *Apr 16, 1993Aug 9, 1994Green Jr RobertWood head no hosel golf club
US5354056 *Mar 18, 1993Oct 11, 1994Bradley K. StoneGolf club and method
US5390922 *Mar 17, 1994Feb 21, 1995Bradley K. StoneGolf clubs and methods
US7083529 *Nov 17, 2004Aug 1, 2006Callaway Golf CompanyGolf club with interchangeable head-shaft connections
US7465239Oct 29, 2007Dec 16, 2008Callaway Golf CompanyInterchangeable shaft for a golf club
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US7530900Feb 4, 2008May 12, 2009Callaway Golf CompanyIron-type golf club with interchangeable head-shaft connection
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US7611422Oct 30, 2007Nov 3, 2009Callaway Golf CompanyInterchangeable shaft for a golf club
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Classifications
U.S. Classification473/310
International ClassificationA63B53/02
Cooperative ClassificationA63B53/02
European ClassificationA63B53/02