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Publication numberUS2020870 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 12, 1935
Filing dateDec 24, 1934
Priority dateDec 24, 1934
Publication numberUS 2020870 A, US 2020870A, US-A-2020870, US2020870 A, US2020870A
InventorsLeon Benoit
Original AssigneeLeon Benoit
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Cellular carton
US 2020870 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

L. BENOIT CELLULAR CARTON Nov. 12, 1935.

Filed Deo. 24, 1934 4 Sheets-Shee't 2 Nov. 12, 1935. BENQIT 2,020,870

CELLULAR CARTON Filed Dec. 24, 1934 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 l i gewag Patented Nov. 12, 1935 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE 2,020,870 oLLULAn can'roN Leon Benoit, New York, N. Y.

Application December 24, 1934, Serial No. 758,970

19 Claims. (Cl. 22S-29) My present invention relates to a cellular carton formed desirably from a single piece of paper stock such as chip board or the like. It is designed with a view to economy in production,

ease in assembly, and to protection of the contents. In addition the present carton is so constructed as to be severable into two or more components each complete in itself whereby to provide a plurality of like cartons of smaller capacity. A cellular carton of this kind is adapted to receive articles. such as eggs, fruits, and other commodities which require protection in shipping, storage, and handling.

Certain exempllcations of my invention are p set forth in the accompanying drawings wherea Figure 1 is a view in perspective of the coinpleted carton with the cover open to exhibit the interior thereof;

Fig. 2 is a perspective view showing the filler component in an exterior position;

Fig. 3 which is a transverse section on line 3 of Fig. 4 shows the filler component moved toward, but short of, its final position;

Fig. 4 is a view in plan of the carton with the ller component in a position corresponding to that shown in Fig. 3;

Fig. 5 which is a transverse section on line 5 of Fig. 6 shows the filler component in its nal position;

Fig. 6 is a view in plan of the carton with the filler component in its final position;

Fig. 7 is a developed plan view of the blank from which the various carton components are produced;

Fig. 8 which is a similar View on a reduced scale shows the preferred folding of the blank for storage or shipping purposes;

Fig. 9 which is a perspective view shows a modified completed carton with a 3 x 4 arrangement of cells;

Fig. 10 is also a perspective view showing a further modliication of the carton, the iiller component being disposed in an exterior position; and

Fig. 11 is a developed plan view of the carton shown in Fig. 10.

One of the features of the present cartonv is the construction from a single blank of tray and illler components one cooperating with the other, and both divisible, if desired, into smaller units each complete in itself. For conveniencein terms, I shall refer to the structure, completely erected for use, as a carton; to the rectangular enclosure having sides, ends, and a'bottom, as a tray; and to the longitudinal angular walls which t within the tray and sustain the load therein, as a filler. These terms which are to be understood in a relative sense are herein employed primarily for convenience in differentiating the principal components of the carton structure. 5

The blank from which I produce the present carton is shown in Fig. 7. As by means of parallel scores a to h inclusive which denne certain lines of bend, I provide sections extending from one end of the blank to the other. When bent 10 along these score lines and erected in final position the section A provides a iiap or tongue, B a cover, C a rear wall, D a bottom, E a front wall,

F and G front trough walls, and H and I rear trough walls. The fold line b between the cover 15 and rear wall may be further weakened, if desired, as by perforationswhereby to facilitate tearing of the cover, or any part thereof, from the carton in case it is desired to expose the contents thereof during use. The terms front and 20 rear are relative only, and should be understood as employed only for convenience in differentiation.

The opposite ends of the several sections, save only the bottom D, are defined by parallel edges 25 I5. In line with these edges are scores a' running across the ends of the bottom D which connects integrally with end sections J to opposite ends of which are joined other sections K. Between the end sections J and the connected sections 30 K are scorelines Ic. To one end of one or both sections K lying adjacent the trough sections may be added a further section L each of which, as shown, is notched to provide a pair of angular heads IG and I1. Between the sections K and L 35 are score lines l and near the extremity of each section L is a further score line m defining an end piece M. One of these end pieces may be further equipped, if desired, with an outstanding double faced hook I8 adapted in the completed 40 structure to cooperate with a slit I9 in the section K remote therefrom.

A blank which is cut and scored in accordance with this description may be once folded as along the line d (see Fig. 8) to reduce its overall di- 45 mensions and thereby render a number of such blanks, when stacked, more convenient for storage or shipping. When erected, each blank will produce two rectangular trays, arranged end to end, with the bottom D common to both of them. On the front and rear sides these trays will be faced by outer walls E and C respectively, the latter of which may support` a swinging cover B, all as best shown in Figs. 1 and 2. In such a QQnStruction the blank is bent along the several Vparallel score lines a, b, c and d, the end tions J are bent up along the lines i and the SCC- sections K are bent around along the lines k to lie in parallel relation. The sections J lbecome the outer ends of the two trays, the sections K extend inwardly therefrom toward each other, and the sections L are turned transversely of the carton at approximatelyits center. These end sections L, if two of them be used, lie in adjacent relation and provide for the carton a cross Wall of double thickness. The extremities of the end sections are bent along the lines m so that the end pieces M may be pasted or interlocked with the proximate walls K, as clearly indicated in Fig. 2. When so erected, the heads I6 and I1 of the two cross walls will register.

The remaining blank sections F, G, Hand I lie exteriorly of the trays when positioned as shown in Fig. 2. By swinging the front wall E up against the proximate tray walls, the four angular walls of the ller may be moved over the two trays into which they are insertible, proceeding first into the position shown in Fig. 3, and nally to that which is indicated in Fig. 5. So that the iiller Walls may be enabled to advance into the enclosures provided by the two trays, I provide a pair of slots 25 and 26 in end to end relation, the former extending transverse- 1y of the front trough sections F and G, and the latter transversely of the rear trough sections H and I, and both slots located substantially in a center position lengthwise of the ller. These two slots are wide as compared to the combined thickness of the cross walls L which they are designed to receive. Into each of these slots is projected a laterally extending lug having opposed shoulders 21 between which the lug is recessed anguiarly at 28. The lug in the slot 25 proceeds laterally from a side thereof which is opposite to the side of the slot 26 from which the lug therein is extended, and both of these slots are slanted slightly with respect to the transverse center line of the illler along which I may provide a score or line of perforations 30. In thus fitting the filler into the carton enclosure, viz., the two trays, the heads I6 and I'I' of the transverse walls L are required to move through the slots 25 and 26 and by reason of the oppositely extendinglugs in such slots, and more particularly because of the angular-'faces between the opposed shoulders thereof, the transverse walls L may be bowed slightly in opposite directions (see Fig. 4). 'Ihese lugs finally reach a position below the lower edges 3| of the cross walls which, as shown in Fig. 5, are elevated some little distance above the bottom' of the carton. To provide for this elevation the lower edges of the cross walls are cut away between their ends, as best shown in Figs. 5 and 7 When so disposed 'the lugs serve as locks. to hold the filler in place withinthe carton enclosure. The bottoms of the iiller troughs may rest on or oil' the carton bottom. 'Ihis is a point of relative unimportance inasmuch as these troughs will bow outwardly, as required to accommodate articles placed therein, the elevation of the trough 'bottoms being shifted in consequence.

n With the ller component locked' down in place, the carton structure is rigidified 'and ready for use. 'I'he heads I6 and l1 form cross lwalls which extend transversely at or about the center line of the carton and so divide the two troughs which are produced by the four angular walls of the ller. In addition, these heads prevent transverse shifting of the filler walls along the cross walls upon which they are supported. The score or perforated line 30 which may be provided transversely of the filler is desirably extended for the length of the blank, as shown in Fig. 7.

Eggs, fruit, or other commodities when placed 5 in the iiller troughs are suspended thereinand so are protected against shocks from below, in front, or in rear. 'I'he carton in its entirety may be easily separated in two, or severed as with a knife, along the center score or perforated line to provide two smaller cartonsI each complete in itself. When so severed, one transverse wall L remains with each smaller carton unit to provide therefor an end wall whereby an enclosed receptacle is afforded. This Severability of the carton into two smaller units is made possible by reason of the two transverse walls which, while lying in adjacent relation, have no connection with each other, thereby permitting of a ready separation along a line between such walls.

When so separated, the retention of the filler component in each carton unit is assured by reason of the locking lugs which remain engaged with one of the cross walls, as before.

To keep eggs or other contents in a deiinite position within the suspension troughs, I may provide for'each such article a slit 35 proceeding transversely in each of the four angular walls of the filler, and extending angularly away from such slit and in communication therewith other slits 36, as best shown in Fig. 4. The tongues which are formed by such slits are yieldable, as required, to aiiord a resilient suspension for the load. This is one expedient that may be employed. Another is the provision of an opening 31, elliptical, circular, or otherwise, in place of a series of slits. Either or both of such .expedients may be used, as shown in the drawings. An egg, article of fruit, or other object, when introduced into the iller may be rested within the resilient seat aiorded by the several tongues where it is supported by the angular walls of the iiller and maintained in suspension away from the articles in the adjacent trough and from the proximate front or rear walls of the carton. If the article be placed within a seat in the form of an opening, the effect is the same.

When the cover is swung down over the carton, the ap section A will lie to the outside of the front wall thereof. A lock by which to hold the cover in closed position may be provided, and for this purpose the free edge of the iiap may be notched togprovide a pair of spaced tongues 40 having, if desired, oppositely facing shoulders forming, in eil'ect, hooks. For cooperation with 55 such tongues the front wall E may be appropriately hump-slitted as at 42, permitting the tongues to enter therein and interlock therewith. As best shown in Fig. '7, two such tongues and cooperating slits are provided, one on each side of the center line of severance whereby the carton, when divided into two` units, provides for each a lockable cover.

The preceding description has dealt with the carton of Figs. l to-8 inclusive, wherein the eggs 65 or other articles lie in a 2 x 6 arrangement. In` Fig. 9 I have shown a generally similar construction adapted for a 3 x 4 arrangement of eggs or other commodities. The main difference in this carton resides in the proportioning of the parts, whereby three, instead of two, troughs are provided, each having a capacity for four eggs or other articles. The iiller component accordingly comprises six instead of four walls, the visible one of the two extra ones being designated as as an end wall therefor.

R. When divided into two carton units along the medial score or perforated line l0, the arrangement of articles in each smaller unit will be 2 `x 3 with the longer dimension transversely of the carton.

In Figs. l and ll, I have illustrated a further modification of the carton structure in which a 2 x 6 arrangement again obtains. The blank from which this carton is provided is shown in Fig. l1, wherein I have 'applied reference characters the same as those appearing in the blank of Fig. '1, insofar as there is correspondence in parts and relationships. The main difference which characterizes the carton of Fig. is that I provide one tray, instead of two arranged end to end, there being no cross walls or other transverse partitions. The filler troughs accordingly extend uninterruptedly from one end oi' the carton to the other. In this construction there is an end wall section J afllxed to one end of the bottom section D, the opposite end of the bottom having projected therefrom a tongue 45 equipped with a head 46. At one end of the end section J is an end piece N with a score n defining a bend line therebetween. To the opposite end of the end wall J is connected a section K whose length is substantially equal to the length of the several carton sections A, B, C, D and E. Beyond the section J is a further section O with a score o defining a bend line therebetween. The section O is the same in length as the end section J and in the erected carton provides an end wall complementary to the wall J. Beyond the section O is a further section P the same in length as the section K, with a score p defining a bend line between the sections O and P. When the end wall J is swung upwardly, the remaining walls K, O. and P are moved into the positions shown in Fig. 10 with the end piece N adhered or interlocked to the proximate end of the wall section P. Inasmuch as there is only one point of connection between the four walls J, K, O andP on the one hand and the carton bottom on the other, viz., at

the bend line i, it is desirable to have a further connection at the opposite end of the tray. This I have provided by forming a slit 41 in the end wall O wherein may be received the head 4B at the end of the tongue 45 which is upwardly bent for this purpose. When so entered in the slit the oppositel-y extending shoulders adjacent the head will serve as a lock to prevent movement of the tray relative to the remaining parts of the carton.

In each of the several constructions described herein. the carton may be produced from a onepiece blank. Its erection may not require the use oi' any adhesive, inasmuch as locking tongues are available in substitution thereof, according to the structural features disclosed herein. Each carton comprises in its assembly a filler component with angled walls to provide a suspended support for the load, and this ller is itself protected, front and rear, by (1) the inner enclosure in the form of one or more trays and (2) the outer walls which extend upwardly to support the ller and cover respectively. In addition such a construction lends itself to divisibility along a medial line of severance, particularly where two tray enclosures are used because of the presence of double cross walls one of which re' mains with each divided carton unit to serve And nally, the erection and locking up of the carton is an operation that may be'performed speedily and easily by hand',

probably without any mechanical aid such as would be atlorded by a form or other appliance.

I claim:

1. A carton produced from a single blank and formed to provide a bottom supporting a tray divided by double walls, there being to the outside of opposite walls of the tray and upstanding from the bottom other walls from one of which is supported a cover and from another of which is sup ported a iiller comprising angular walls receivable 10 within the tray together with means for locking engagement with the double walls therein.

2. A carton produced from a single blank and formed to provide a bottom supporting a bodily movable tray member having continuous side and l5 end walls, there being to the outside of opposite walls of the tray and upstanding from the bottom other walls from one of which is supported a cover and from another of which is supported a filler comprising angular walls receivable within the tray member, said iiller cooperating with a wall of said tray member to hold said member in trayforming position upon said bottom, and coacting means on the cover and one of the carton walls for securing the cover in closed position over the filler and tray.

3. A carton produced from a single blank and formed to provide an elongated bottom and a tray member having continuous side and end walls, one end wall of said tray member having an integral connection with one end of the bottom with the other end and side wallssupported upon said bottom to provide therewith a tray, there being to the outside of opposite walls of the tray member and upstanding from opposite sides of the bottom other walls from one of which is supported a cover and from another of which is supported a filler receivable within the tray member, means for locking the illler to the tray member, whereby said tray member is held in tray-forming position with said bottom, and means for locking the cover to the carton in closed position over the filler and tray member. i

4. A carton produced from a single blank formed to provide an elongated bottom from opposite ends of which are upturned ends each in connection with other walls arranged to provide a tray divided by independent double walls, there being to the outside of opposite walls of the tray and upstanding from the bottom other walls 60 from one of which is supported a cover and fromanother of which is supported a ller receivable within the tray and slotted to straddle the double walls thereof, means for locking the ller to the tray, and means for locking the cover to the carton in closed position over the ller.

5. A carton produced from a single blank and formed to provide a bottom supporting a tray divided by independent double walls, there being to the outside of one of the tray walls another wall from which is supported a filler receivable within the tray and slottedto accommodate the division walls therewithin, and coacting means on the double walls and filler for locking the latter in place within the tray. a5

6. A carton produced from a single blank formed to provide a bottom supporting a tray divided centrally by independent double walls in juxtaposition, there being to the outside of the tray a further wall upstanding from the bottom from which is supported a cover adapted to overlie the tray to be secured in closed position thereupon, and a weakened line of severance extending from edge to edge of the blank between the double walls of the tray along which the 'carton 75 may be divided into two smaller cartons each complete in itself with a tray enclosure of its own.

7. A carton produced from a single blank and formed to provide a bottom supporting a tray divided by independent double walls, there being to the outside of opposite walls of the tray and upf standing from the bottom other walls from one of which is supported a cover and from another of which is supported a filler receivable within the tray, and a weakened line of severance extending from edge to edge of the blank and passing between the double walls of the tray defining a line along which the cartons may be divided into two smaller cartons each complete in itself with a tray enclosure of its own.

8. A carton produced from a single blank and formed to provide a bottom supporting a bodily movable tray, there being to the outside of one of the walls of the tray and upstanding from a bottom a further wall which supports a filler receivable within the tray, and co-acting means on the ller and tray for securing the filler in positio'n within the tray and the tray in position upon the bottom.

9. A carton produced from a single blank and formed to provide a bottom supporting a tray divided into two compartments by independent double walls, there being to the outside of the tray and upstanding from the bottom a further wall from which is supported a ller receivable within both compartments of the tray, there being in the filler a slot through which the double walls of the tray may extend, and there being co-acting means on the filler and double walls for locking the filler in place within the tray.

10. A carton produced from a single blank and formed to provide a bottom supporting a tray sub-divided by adjacent independent double walls, there being to the outside of the tray and upstanding from the bottom another wall which supports a filler receivable within the tray and slotted to accommodate the sub-dividing double walls thereof, two sets of means on the filler one in engagement with each of the double Walls for locking the filler in position Within the tray, and a weakened line of severance extending from edge to edge ol' the blank and between the double Walls of the tray to facilitate separation of the carton into two smaller cartons each complete in itself with its own enclosing tray and with means for retaining the filler therewithin.

11. A cellular carton produced from a single blank formed to provide a bottom supporting a tray having a vertical division wall, there being to the outside of the tray and upstanding from the bottom another wall which supports a ller receivable within the tray over the division Wall, the filler being slotted to accommodate the division wall.

12. A cellular carton produced from a single blank formed to provide a bottom supporting a tray having a division wall, there being to the outside of the tray and upstanding from the bottom another wall which supports a filler receivable Within the tray and slotted to accommodate the division wall thereof, and a weakened line ,of severance extending from edge to edge of the blank adjacent the division wall of the tray to facilitate separation of the carton into two smaller cartons each complete in itself and one withits own enclosing tray.

13. A cellular carton produced from a single blank formed to provide a bottom and supporting a tray having a division wall from which upstands two spaced heads, there being to the outside of the tray and upstanding from the bottom another wall which supports a filler receivable within the tray and slotted to straddle the division wall upon which the filler is supported, the two heads of the division wall extending through the slots to present cross walls for the ller.

14. A cellular carton having a bottom supporting a tray sub-divided by adjacent independent double walls, a filler receivable within the tray and slotted to accommodate the subdivided walls thereof, two sets of means on the filler, one in engagement with each of the double walls for locking the filler in position within the tray, and a weakened line of severance extendl5 ing from edge to edge of the blank and between the double walls of the tray to facilitate separation of the carton into two smaller cartons each complete in itself with itsown enclosing tray and with means for retaining the filler therewithin.

15. A carton having a bottom supporting a tray witha division wall, there being another wall upstanding from the bottom supporting a illler receivable within the tray and slotted to accommodate the division wall thereof, the filler comprising interconnected walls in angular relation providing adjacent troughs suspended from an upper edge of the division wall, there being heads upstanding from the division wall, one lying within each trough to provide a cross wall therefor, and co-acting means on the filler and division vwall for locking the filler in place within the tray.

16. A carton having a bottom from which rises a wall supporting a troughed filler which is -movable into position overthe bottom, there -being formed in the illler aligned slots, one for each trough thereof, both slanted slightly from a line which Vproceeds transversely acrossthe tray, and a further wall upstanding from the bottom extending transversely thereof and formed with heads one adapted to enter each slot of the 1111er to engage therewith at onecorner thereof.

17. A carton produced from a single blank formed to provide a bottom supporting a tray with a division wall, there being another wall upstanding from the bottom supporting a filler receivable within the tray and slotted to accommodate the division wall thereof, the tlller comprising interconnected walls in angular relation providing adjacent troughs supportedfrom an upper edge of the division wall whereon are means coacting with the filler walls to prevent transverse shifting thereof within the carton.

18. A carton produced from a single blank formed to provide a bottom supporting a bodily movable tray member having continuous side and end walls, filler means extending from the bottom exterior of the walls of said tray mem- 00 berand into the space between said walls to securely hold said tray member in position upon the bottom, there being a wall upstanding from the bottom to the outside of the tray and hingedly supporting a severable cover portion adapted to swing down over thewalls of the tray to provide a closure therefor.

19. A carton produced from a single blank formed to provide a bottom supporting a tray with double division walls in adjacent' but inde- 70 pendent relation, there being another wall upstanding from the bottom to the outside of the tray and hingedly supporting a cover adapted to swing down over the tray to provide a closure therefor. means forming a weakened line oi' sev- 75 erance transverselyvof the carton between the double division walls of the tray and extending for substantially the entire distance between opposite edges of the blank, means for releasablxlr locking the cover to the carton at points upon opposite sides of the transverse line of severance whereby the carton, when separated along such line, will present two smaller cartons each complete with an enclosing tray and lockable cover of its own, the hinged connection between the cover and supporting wall being specially weakened to facilitate separation of the cover 5 along the line of such connection.

A LEON BENOIT.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2451806 *Nov 13, 1945Oct 19, 1948Gen ElectricCushioned display container
US2457291 *Feb 10, 1945Dec 28, 1948Hummel & Downing CompanyCarton and display stand
US2510591 *Jun 14, 1949Jun 6, 1950Albert F ListmanBottle carrier
US2518779 *Jan 26, 1946Aug 15, 1950Waldorf Paper Prod CoDisplay carton
US2605952 *Jan 22, 1947Aug 5, 1952Sutherland Paper CoCollapsible cellular carton
US2648481 *Mar 1, 1950Aug 11, 1953Belsinger IncHeavy duty fiber container
US2678724 *Mar 30, 1953May 18, 1954Puritan Cordage MillsCordage package
US2678765 *Jun 9, 1950May 18, 1954Anderson Box CompanyShipping container
US2716477 *Jan 26, 1953Aug 30, 1955Walter E WhiteCoin operated dispenser
US2978099 *Dec 27, 1957Apr 4, 1961Corning Glass WorksShipping and display package
US3107039 *Mar 20, 1961Oct 15, 1963Painter Claude DOne piece collapsible and glueless egg carton
US3184141 *Sep 5, 1963May 18, 1965Riegel Paper CorpCollapsible cellular carton
US3659707 *Dec 4, 1969May 2, 1972Sikob Ab Svensk Ind KonstrukliDivisible transport package
US4193532 *Jun 21, 1978Mar 18, 1980Kinki Printing Company, Ltd.Container with an internal divider
US4600101 *Jan 22, 1985Jul 15, 1986Cooper IndustriesBulb packaging arrangement
US20150183548 *Jul 23, 2013Jul 2, 2015Han Yong ChoStackable artcle-packaging container
DE1077600B *Dec 14, 1956Mar 10, 1960Wilhelm Kugel K G PapiersackfaKarton zur Verpackung von empfindlichen, in getrennten Gefachen unterzubringenden Guetern, wie Eiern u. dgl.
EP0050394A1 *Oct 19, 1981Apr 28, 1982Hendrik Jan GrootherderEgg container
Classifications
U.S. Classification206/521.15, 229/149, 206/521.8, 206/558, 206/521.6
International ClassificationB65D85/32, B65D85/30
Cooperative ClassificationB65D85/325
European ClassificationB65D85/32E