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Publication numberUS2022363 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 26, 1935
Filing dateMar 14, 1931
Priority dateMar 14, 1931
Publication numberUS 2022363 A, US 2022363A, US-A-2022363, US2022363 A, US2022363A
InventorsVertuno Anthony J
Original AssigneeVertuno Anthony J
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Wall facing and wall-facing anchoring means
US 2022363 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 26, 1935. A. J. vERTUNo ,I

WALL FACING ANDv WALL FACING ANCHQRING MEANS F11ed' March 14, 1931 2 sheetssheet 1 Nov. 26, 1935. A. .L vERTUNo 2,0?2,363

WALL FACING AND WALL FACING ANCHORING MEANS Filed March 14, 1931 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 www M01/Hup.

Patentecl Nov. 26, *1935 UNETED STATS ATENT OFFICE WALL FACING AN?) VALL-FACING ANCHORING MEANS The inventionrelates to improvements in wall facings of the type in whichseparate facing units simulating bricks, tiles and the like of any sizes and shapes, are secured against either a skeleton or complete wall, mortar joints being usually provided between the facing units so that the complete structure effectively simulates a solid wall of conventional construction, even though it is in reality only al veneered structure.

It is the primary object of the invention to provide a new and advantageous construction in which vmetal lath of sheet form is provided with laterally projecting supporting members for the facing units, the metal lath being provided either with flexible backing or without such backing, as

desired. The metal lath sheets may be quickly and easily secured to old walls, to furring strips, or to studs or the like and constitutes an effective backing carrying all of the facing units, and permits said units to be tenaciously cemented or secured by other plastic to said lath, providing means in addition to the inter-engaging means of the lath and facing units, for securing the latter in place.

By the term metal lath, I refer not only to conventional expanded metal lath, but to lath fabricated from separate wires or the like, relatively secured in any desired spaced relation. Various forms of the inventionare shown in connection with different types of metal lath, in the accompanying drawings.

Fig. 1 is an outer side elevation showing one form of the invention and illustrating the manner in which the supporting members for the facing units uniformly space them to provide for the formation of mortar joints, which joints may be raked, ush or of any other desired type.

Fig. 2 is a vertical secti-onal View on line` 2-2 of Fig. 1.

Fig. 3 is a fragmentary perspective View of the metal lath and its backing shown in Figs. 1 and 2, clearly illustrating a number of the facing unit supports with which the lath is provided.

Fig. 4 is a fragmentary sectional View of the parts shown in Fig. 2 but showing a slightly dif ferent construction.

Fig. 5 is an elevation showing a different way of providing the metal lath with suppo-rts for the facing units.

Fig. 6 is a detail sectional View on line 6 6 of Fig. 5, a number of the facing units being shown in dotted lines.

Fig. 7 is a View similar to Fig. 5 but showing a still further variation.

Fig. 8 is a sectional View on line 8 8 of Fig. 7.

Figs. 9 and 10 are views corresponding to Figs. 7 and 8 but showing a variation thereover.

Fig. 11 is a fragmentary perspective View showing a still further way of providing vthe metal lath with the facing unit supports. 5

Fig. l2 is a fragmentary elevation showing expanded metal lath Varied in accordance with the invention, whereas the preceding views all embody metal lath fabricated from crossed wires.

Fig. 13 is an edge View of a portion of the i0 structure shown in Fig. 12.

Fig. 14 is a View similar to Fig. 13 but showing a slight change thereover. f

In Figs. 1 to 4, metal lath is disclosed composed of vertical andhorizontal wires i5 and i6 rela- 15 tively secured in any desired way, said metal lath being provided with a backing il of conventional nature which may be secured to said lath in any .appropriate manner, for instance by the stitching wires i8. Arched supports i9 for fac- E20. ing Iunits 2Q, are provided for engagement with the metallath. These members may beformed from wire or from sheet or strip metal bent into arched form, and their legs 2| are received between the horizontal wires iS and the backing l l, 2.5i said legs being provided with kinks which form seats 22 for engagement with said Wires i6. These kinks are preferably near the upper ends of the legs 2 l, and above said kinks, the members i9 are bent laterally to provide supports 23 for Si) reception in grooves 2li in the facing units 20. These supports 23 are preferably inclined from the plane of the metal lath, as shown, but it is possible that they could extend in other directions successfully. The grooves 2H which receive these D supports 23, are of much greater size than said supports andsaid grooves preferably extend from end to end of the casing units 20, although this is not absolutely essential. The upper sides 25 of the grooves are inclined when 4the supports 23 areV inclined and hence an effective interlock is provided between the supports and grooves.

In applying the construction so far described, the metal lath and its backing are suitably secured to .a complete Wall, tofurring strips or to l5 studs or the like, and the supporting members IiiY are then `placed at proper positions. Suitable plastic is then slushed against a restricted lower portion of the support-equipped lath and one of the units 2G is buttered except on its front face, 5C with the plastic. This unit is then engaged with one of the supports 23- and forced downwardly and inwardly, during which movement excess plastic is forced through the lath and into the groove 24, the plastic being indicated at 26 in 55? tional mortar joints.

Fig. 2. The downward and inward forcing of the facing unit 20 is limited by the member 23 coming to rest against the groove side 25 and by the rear side of said unit contacting with the vertical wires i5. Hence, if the metal lath be initially placed truly and the supporting members I9 be accurately constructed and placed, it will be insured that the face of the completely veneered wall will be in the required plane.

After placing one of the units 2i! above described, the same operations are repeated in connection with the others, the steps being very similar to those used in laying brick under conventional methods. In so placing the other units, the mortar 26 between them assists in securing said units in addition to simulating the conven- Not only are the units effectively secured to the metal lath by the interlock between them and the supporting members I9, but they become further secured by the plas- `tic and it will be observed that this plastic effectively keys into the grooves 24.

Fig. l shows a construction identical with that above described, with the exception that the supporting member I9EL shown therein, is provided with no kinks, the seats 22a for engaging the wires i5, being merely formed by the forward bending of the upper ends of said member.

In Figs. 5 and 6, the metal lath is formed from vertical wires 27 and horizontal wires 28 suitably secured together, and a backing 29 is shown suitably secured to said lath. To provide supports for the facing units, the horizontal wires 28 are outwardly stamped at intervals as shown at 3l), providing the required supports which may be at any desired angle to the plane of the lath.

In Figs. 7, 8, 9, and 10, backed metal lath is shown formed of vertical wires 3| and horizontal wires 32, and to provide supports for the facing units, spaced portions of said vertical wires are outwardly stamped as shown at 33. 'Ihese supports 33 may of course be at any desired angle to the plane of the lath, In Figs. 7 and 8, the wire portions 33 alone constitute the supports for the facing members, but in Figs. 9 and l0, additional horizontal wires 34 are secured upon said portions 33, co-acting therewith in supporting the facing units.

In Fig. 1l, suitably backed metal lath is shown formed of vertical wires 35 and horizontal wires At intervals, the vertical wires 35 are cut as seen at 3l and the wire portions immediately below the cuts are bent laterally at suitable angles to provide supports 38 for the facing units.

In Figs. l2, 13 and 14, expanded metal lath 39 is shown having horizontal cuts 40 at suitable intervals. The metal immediately below the cuts is bent laterally outward to provide supports 4I for the facing units, which supports may be inclined to or perpendicular to the plane of the lath, as will be seen by a comparison of Figs. 13 and 14.

All forms of the invention are rather simple and inexpensive and hence can be manufactured at small cost. All of them however provide for expeditious veneering of old or new, complete or skeleton walls, and insure that the completely veneered job shall effectively simulate a solid wall formed of separate building units (bricks, tiles or the like) with mortar joints between. In certain cases however, it will be understood that the veneered wall may not be a simulation of a solid wall. It may merely constitute a more perfect form of a known veneered wall. For instance, if the facing units be tiles similar to those as illustrative only for it is obvious that within the scope of the invention as claimed, numerous variations other than those herein disclosed could well be made. Obviously, the size of the facing units may vary from the size of regular commercial brick to large slabs, either of plain surface or simulating a number of bricks. The units can also simulate marble slabs, or slabs or pieces of other material or materials. One or more of the projecting .supporting members may be used to support each facing unit according to the size of the latter.

I claim:-

1. Openwork metal lath of sheet form provided with laterally projecting facing-unit-supporting members, and facing units for application again fresh plastic applied to said metal lath, said facing units having recesses to receive said laterally projecting supporting members.

2. Openwork metal lath of sheet form provided with laterally projecting facing-unit-supporting members, and facing units for application against fresh plastic applied to said metal lath, said facing units having recesses to receive said laterally projecting supporting members, the latter being positioned to space said units apart sufficiently to form mortar joints between them.

3. Openwork metal lath of sheet form provided with laterally projecting facing-unit-supporting members, and facing units for application against fresh plastic applied to said metal lath, said facing units having recesses to receive said laterally projecting supporting members, said recesses being of much greater size than said supporting members whereby they may receive some of the plastic to additionally secure said units.

fi. Openwork metal lath of sheet form provided with laterally projecting facing-unit-supporting members which incline from the plane of the lath sheet, and facing units for application against fresh plastic applied to said metal lath, said units having plastic receiving grooves in their sides much larger than said supporting members and adapted to receive the latter, said grooves having inclined horizontal upper sides adapted to rest on said supporting members.

5. Openwcrk metal lath of sheet form provided with-spaced rows of laterally projecting facingunit-supporting members, said facing-unit-supporting members of any row being spaced apart in the direction of said row and being staggered with respect to those of the next adjacent row.

6. Metal lath of sheet form, a exible backing secured to said metal lath, and arched facingunit-supporting members having their legs received between said metal lath and said backing, the upper portions of said arched members being disposed at the outer side of said metal lath and bent laterally for engagement with facing units.

7. A structure as specified in Vclaim 6; said legs of said arched members having kinks forming seats engaging portions of the metal lath.

8. An arched facing-unit-supporting member whose legs are substantially uni-directional from their free ends to the crown portion of said member, said crown portion being bent laterally from the plane of said legs for connection with a facing unit.

9. An arched facing-unit-supporting member whose legs are substantially uni-directional from their free ends to the crown portion of said member, said crown portion being bent laterally from the plane of said legs for connection with a facing unit, said legs having kinks providing lathengaging seats.

i0. Metal lath of sheet form having numerous openings and metal por-tions between said openings, some of said metal portions having horizontal cuts, said metal portions being laterally bent directly under 'said cuts to provide facing-unitsupporting members.

11. A facing-unit-supporting member having an attaching portion in a single plane for insertion between metal lath and a supporting structure, said facing-unit-supporting member having a facing-unit-supporting portion projecting obliquely `from the plane of said attaching portion for reception in a facing-unit recess.

12. Metal lath of sheet form, and arched facing-unit-supporting members having their legs positioned behind said metal lath, the upper portions of said arched members being disposed at the outer side of said metal lath and being bent laterally for engagement with facing units.

13. A structure as specified in claim 12, said legs of said arched members having kinks forming seats engaging portions of the metal lath.

lll. Metal lath of sheet form, a flexible backing secured to said lath, and facing-unit-supporting members having vertical portions received between said metal lath and said backing, said supporting members having projecting portions extending beyond the outer side of said metal lath for engagement with facing units.

l5. A structure as specified in claim 14, the first named portions of said supporting members having kinks forming seats engaging portions of the metal lath.

16. Metal lath of sheet form secured against a flat support, and facing-unit-supporting members having attaching portions inserted between said lath and said support and lying in a plane parallel with said lath and support, said facingunit-supporting members having facing-unitsupporting portions projecting forwardly through said lath.

17. Metal lath of sheet form secured against a at support, and facing-unit-supporting members having attaching portions inserted between said lath and said support and lying in a plane parallel with said lath and support, said facingunit-supporting members having facing-unitsupporting portions at the upper ends of said attaching portions and projecting forwardly through said lath, said attaching portions having kinks forming seats resting upon horizontal portions of the lath.

18. In a wall, openwork metal lath of sheet form provided with laterally projecting facingunit-supporting members, plastic applied to and imbedding said openwork lath and said supporting members, and facing units applied against and imbedded at their rear portions in said plastic, said facing units having recesses receiving said facing-unit-supporting members and part of said plastic.

19. In a wall, a supporting structure provided with spaced rows of horizontally spaced facingunit-supporting members, said supporting members of any row being staggered with respect to bers of any row being staggered with respect to those of the next adjacent row, plastic applied to said supporting structure and irnbedding said facing-unit-supporting members, and horizontal rows of facing units applied against and imbedded at their rear portions in said plastic, said facing units having recesses receiving said supporting members and some of said plastic, said rows of facing units'being spaced apart, and the 20 facing units of each row being spaced apart horizontally and staggered with respect to those of the next adjacent row, thereby exposing sufcient of said plastic around all of the units to constitute mortarl joints.

21. In a wall, openwork metal lath of sheet form provided with spaced rows of horizontally spaced facing-unit-supporting members, the supporting members of any row being staggered with respect to those of the next adjacent row, plastic applied to and imbedding said openwork metal lath and said supporting members, and horizontal rows of facing units applied against and imbedded at their rear portions in said `plastic, said facing units having recesses receiving said supporting members and some of said plastic, said rows of facing units being spaced apart, and the facing units of each row being spaced apart horizontally and staggered with respect to those of the next adjacent row, thereby exposing sufficient of said plastic around all of the units to constitute mortar joints.

22. Metal lath having a plurality of strands, and cuts in single strands at intervals, the portions of the cut strands directly under said cuts being bent laterally to provide facing-unit-supporting members.

23. Metal lath comprising straight vertical wires spaced apart horizontally, and horizontal wires spaced apart vertically, said horizontal wires having upwardly and laterally bent portions between said vertical wires to provide facing-unit-supporting members.

24. Open-work metal lath comprising straight horizontal wires spaced apart vertically and vertical wires spaced apart horizontally, said vertical wires having upwardly and laterally bent arched portions between said horizontal wires and constituting facing-unit-supporting members, both the upper and the lower sides of said facing-unit-supporting members being inclined in substantially the same direction, said upper sides being at acute angles to the plane of the lath.

25. A structure as specified in claim 24, together with additional straight horizontal wires secured to the outer ends of said facing-unit-supporting members.

26. In a wall, a supporting structure, openwork lath with laterally projecting facing-unit-supporting members, plastic applied to said openwork lath, and facing-units applied against and imbedded in said plastic, said facing-units having recesses receiving said facing-unit-supporting members and part of said plastic.

27. In a wall, a supporting structure, openwork lath of sheet form, facing-unit-supporting members adapted for attachment to said open- Work lath, said supporting members having projecting portions extending beyond the outer side of said lath, and facing-units having recesses receiving said projecting portions of said facingunit-supporting members.

28. In a wall, a supporting structure, metal lath of sheet form secured to said supporting structure, facing-unit-supports carried solely by said metal lath and projecting from the outer side of the same, facing-units engaged with said acing-unit-supports, a backing sheet secured to said metal lath and engaging said supporting structure, and plastic confined between said backing sheet and facing-units for anchoring the latter.

29. Metal lath having a plurality of strands, and cuts in single strands at intervals, portions of the cut strands being bent laterally to provide facing-unit-supporting members.

30. Metal lath of sheet form having numerous openings and metal portions between said openings, some of said metal portions having cuts, said metal portions being bent laterally at one side of said cuts to provide facing-unit-supporting members.

31. Metal lath having a plurality of strands and cuts in one or more strands at intervals, portions of the cut strands being bent laterally.

32. In a Wall, a supporting structure provided with laterally projecting facing-unit-supporting members, plastic applied to said supporting structure and said facing-unit-supporting members, and facing-units applied against and embedded in said plastic, said facing-units having recesses receiving said facing-unit-supporting members and part of said plastic, said facingunit-supporting members being positioned to so space said facing-units as to leave mortar joints between them.

33. In a Wall construction, an open' lattice work support structure comprising spaced relatively rigid supporting portions, plastic applied to the support structure, and recessed facing units applied in spaced relation against and embedded in said plastic, the supporting portions of the support structure being received Within the recesses of the facing units whereby to support the latter, and the plastic extending into the recesses and between the facing units.

34. In a wall construction, an open lattice work support structure comprising spaced relatively rigid supporting portions, plastic applied to the support structure, and recessed facing units applied against said plastic with the supporting portions of the support structure received Within the recesses of the facing units, said recesses being substantially larger than the received supporting portions to permit substantially perpendicular application of the facing units to the support structure, the plastic extending into the recesses.

35. In a Wall construction, an open lattice work support structure comprising spaced relatively rigid supporting portions, plastic applied to the support structure and recessed facing units applied against said plastic with the supporting portions of the support structure received within the recesses of the facing units, said recesses being substantially larger than the received supporting portions and having pockets formed at their upper portions adapted to directly receive the supporting portions whereby the facing units may be hung in locked relation upon the support structure with the plastic extending into the recesses.

ANTHONY J. VER'I'UNO.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2821850 *Jan 21, 1955Feb 4, 1958Adelt Carl WWall facing construction
US3077059 *Oct 31, 1958Feb 12, 1963Robert K StoutBrick veneer construction material
US3148482 *Oct 14, 1958Sep 15, 1964Neale John DComposite floor structure and reinforcing, aligning and mortar gaging mat assembly therefor
US4856246 *Dec 31, 1987Aug 15, 1989Nihon Kenkou K.K.Tile assembly
US4920716 *Jun 9, 1988May 1, 1990Coffey Jess RVeneer construction and method of achieving same
US5785904 *Mar 27, 1997Jul 28, 1998R.A.R. Consultants Ltd.Method of securing and architectural finish element to a surface
US7743569 *Apr 28, 2005Jun 29, 2010Chester SchwalenbergSupport panel for thin brick
US8387326 *Oct 12, 2011Mar 5, 2013Progressive Foam Technologies, Inc.Insulating siding system
US8720142 *Aug 23, 2012May 13, 2014Sacks Industrial CorporationStabilized lath and method of manufacture
US20140053495 *Aug 23, 2012Feb 27, 2014Sacks Industrial CorporationStablized lath and method of manufacture
DE1153048B *Sep 12, 1957Aug 22, 1963Richard Weidle Dipl IngVorgefertigte Betonplatte zum Herstellen oder Reparieren von Betonstrassen
EP0390547A1 *Mar 29, 1990Oct 3, 1990Inax CorporationTiled wall assembly
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/386, 52/454
International ClassificationE04F13/08
Cooperative ClassificationE04F13/0803, E04F13/0801
European ClassificationE04F13/08B, E04F13/08B2