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Publication numberUS2022520 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 26, 1935
Filing dateJul 7, 1934
Priority dateJul 7, 1934
Publication numberUS 2022520 A, US 2022520A, US-A-2022520, US2022520 A, US2022520A
InventorsJoseph Philbrick
Original AssigneeParsons Ammonia Company Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Bottle
US 2022520 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

J. PHILBRICK Nov. 26, 1935..

BOTTLE Filed July '7, 1954 f o mmfgm A'r'roRNE S Patented Nov. 26, 1935 UNireo s-rAr-ifs PATENT oFFlcE Application .lilly` 7i, 1934, Serial No. 734,121

3 Claims..

The invention is an improvement in glass bottles and consists in a novel conformation rende:- ing the bottle less likely toy slip when grasped in the hand, especially a wet or soapy hand; and having at the same time the further advantage that it can be producedv on a quantity basis without eXtra cost for either labor or material, and particularly without increasing the weight of the bottle with reference to its liquid capacity. Various bottle configurations have been heretofore` proposed for preventingl slipping, but such designs are, for the most part open to theobjection either .that they are not capable of economic quantity production, generally because of the complication required in the molds therefor, or else the friction grip surface is not adequate for its purpose, or is produced only at the sacrifice of bottle capacity or lightness of weight. Many of the prior designs are objectionable in that the parting line of the mold sections occurs on the nat face of the bottle, leaving an irregular ridge which interferes with the application of labels thereto in the automatic label-applying machine; while others have the objection that the friction projections are subject to injury and chipping by collision with other bottles and others have still other objections rendering them impractical or undesirable for one reason or another.

The present invention provides a practical non-slipping bottle of attractive appearance which avoids these various objections and which can be produced in quantity at no increase of cost whatever and with the same weight-capacity ratio asI if the bottle were made without the nonslipping features, and at the same time with unusually eiiicient security against slipping in a wet hand.

Fig. l represents a front elevation of the bottlc, partly in section.

Fig. 2 a side elevation.

Fig. 3 a cross section.

Fig. 4 a perspective detail.

The bottle shown has the shape customary for bottles which contain aqua ammonia, which is the particular use for which the present invention is designed. It is generally elliptical in cross section and its wide sides, marked i, carry the usual front and back labels, which are glued thereto, as customary, by an automatic labeller. For these reasons it is of utmost importance that these front and back walls be smooth and free of any irregularity, such as the ridge which is left by the parting line of the mold sections in which the bottle is blown. In the present case the parting line coincides with the major axis of theeltively on the narrow sides of the bottle and each 5 1 l! is constituted of a vertical series of horizontal or transverse ribs 3 with intervening transverse vshaped grooves, all located withinl or between two vertical or longitudinal grooves or creases ai,

recessed intothenormal elliptical section contour ofthe bottle, asfindicated.. in Fig. 3. The cross ribs terminate at these reentrant creases; their sloped end faces, marked 5, denne andV constitute the inner boundaries; thereof. Their apices are truncated so as to present narrow substantially flat surfaces for nger contact and preferably these surfaces are divided into four flat sections or facets, of vwhich the two marked i3 are substantially square and the two others, marked l, are rectangles, meeting each other at the parting line ridge 2. These facets are formed at such angles, as. shown in Fig. 3, that they are approximately continuous with the elliptical contour oi the bottle section. The terminal facets 5 have the shape of equi-angular trapezoids and are also flat. With the others and on account of their different angular relations, they add to the appearance and brightness of the bottle, while the parting line ridge 2, which is usually objectionable in bottles, is made inconspicuous by them and at the same time becomes useful in contributing to the friction qualities of the formation.

The truncated apices of the ribs thus formed constitute in the aggregate an effective frictiongrip surface. The combination of the cross ribs and the longitudinal grooves or reentrant creases 4, produce a surface which resists slipping in longitudinal as well as transverse directions; that `is to say, the cross ribs resist longitudinal slipping and the creases, aided bythe parting line ridge, resist lateral slipping. At the same time the linger contact faces of all of the ribs coincide with or at least do not project beyond the elliptical contour, as already stated,.which fact and the further fact that they are truncated tends to protect them against chipping from collision with other bottles in the handling machinery. In order to -further thisprotection the base of the bottle just below the friction grip surface is slightly extended to act as a bumper, as shown at 8, against the correspondingly extended bases of contiguous bottles (see dotted lines) not merely in the handling machinery, but also on the store shelf, therebyv guarding against injury to the i projecting members which when chipped are likey ly to cut thengers.

The bottle, as descrlbedjs susceptible of manufacture in a simple mold and it will be noted that the inner surface of theglass Ywall conforms to the ribbed and creased configuration, so that although some parts of the latter are reentrant, the total encroachment on the internal capacity is insignicant and the bottles can therefore be substituted for similar bottles not having the friction-grip features, thereby .enabling the manufacturer (of the'bottle contents) to adopt the friction-grip feature for his bottles without the expense of modifying his existing equipment.

Having described the invention, the following is claimed: j Y y l. A bottle having a generally elliptical transverse cross section comprising arcuate relatively, smooth front and rear faces and sides dened by longitudinally arranged grooves, the sides being provided with transverse ribs extending between the longitudinal grooves so that when the bottle is grasped in the handrof a'userthe transverse ribs will Vprovide'resistanceagainst longitudinal slippage of the bottle while the side defining lon.-l

gitudinal grooves will provide resistance against circumferential slippage of the finger tips about theV elliptical bottle surface beyond the respective f side wail areas.

f 2. A bottle having a generally elliptical trans- Verse' cross section comprising arcuate relatively smooth front and rear faces, longitudinally arranged'grooves defining narrow sides each of which sides is provided with a series of vcross ribs and intervening Vcross groovesV extending entirely between the respective side deiining longitudinal grooves with the corresponding ends of the'ribs being arranged at angles which form the inner Y sides of the respective longitudinal grooves so that the transverse ribs resist longitudinal slippage of the hand of a user while the longitudinal grooves resist circumferential slippage, and a base extending outwardly beyond the ribs on said narrow sides to provide bumper means for pre- Y venting similar bottles contacting against the ribs when a plurality of bottles are closely packed.

3. A bottle having a generally elliptical transverse cross section comprising arcuate relatively smooth front and rear faces, longitudinally arranged re-entrant grooves defining narrow sides each of which is provided with a series of cross ribs and intervening cross grooves extending between the respective re-entrant grooves, the VoppositeV ends of the ribs being sloped to denethe inner walls of the respective longitudinal grooves andthe apices of the ribs being truncated to presentrnarrow flat facets forlnger contact, said lribs being formed to cause the facets to generally followvthe elliptical surface of the bottle so thatr .Y

the ribs resist longitudinal slippage of the lingers of a user while the longitudinally arranged grooves resist circumferential slippage, and a` base extending outwardly beyond the ribsV on said narrow sides to provide bumper means for preventing similar bottles contacting against the ribs when a plurality of bottles are closely packed.

JOSEPH PHILBRICK.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
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US5148930 *Nov 14, 1990Sep 22, 1992Yoshino Kobyosho Co., Ltd.Biaxial-orientation blow-molded bottle-shaped container having opposed recesses and grooves for stable gripping and anti-buckling stiffness
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Classifications
U.S. Classification215/384, 215/382
International ClassificationB65D23/10
Cooperative ClassificationB65D23/102, B65D2501/0081
European ClassificationB65D23/10B