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Publication numberUS2022936 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 3, 1935
Filing dateMay 24, 1935
Priority dateMay 24, 1935
Publication numberUS 2022936 A, US 2022936A, US-A-2022936, US2022936 A, US2022936A
InventorsKip Jr Carola
Original AssigneeKip Jr Carola
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Jewelry
US 2022936 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

C. KIP, JR

JEWELRY Dec. 3, 1935.

Filed May 24, 1935 I IENVENTOR (arola ATTORNEYS v Patented Dec. 3,- 1935 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE 8 Claims.

This invention relates to jewelry functionally and structurally improved and in its more specific aspects aims to provide units suitable for use as jewelry and for general personal ornamentation. It will be understood, however, that the teachings of theinvention might be otherwise advantageously employed.

It is an object of the invention to furnish a display article and which will have an extremely novel and desirable appearance, this article being capable of manufacture at relatively nominal expense and presenting, in its finished appearance, effects which, on one hand may be quite startling and which, at the other extreme will be pleasing to a person of most conservative taste.

A further object of the invention is that of furnishing a jewelry unit which is especially suitable for personal ornamentation and which may be provided to include any number of different designs which will be especially harmonious with various ensembles affected by the wearer.

A still further object is that of furnishing an article which may include one or a given number of jewels or similar units which are of certain and relatively small weight; the completed article, however, appearing to the uninitiated eye to include a far greater number of jewels and/or a jewel, or jewels, of much larger size than the ones which are actually employed in the fabrication of such article.

An additional object is that of providing a unit of ornamentation and in which the brilliancy of the jewels or similar units may be extremely intensified, aside from the fact that the present invention also contemplates, by simple and inexpensive structures, the providing of ornate patterns and novel color schemes.

With these and other objects in mind, reference is had to the attached sheet of drawing illustrating practical embodiments of the invention and in which Figure 1 is a fragmentary perspective view of one form of bracelet which may be provided;

Fig. 2 is a perspective view of a brooch face or a unit which may form a part of a larger article;

Fig. 3 is a perspective view of a unit having characteristics similar to that heretofore described in connection with Fig. 2;

Figs. 4 and 5 are views similar to Fig. 1, but show radically different forms of a bracelet which may be provided in accordance with the teachings of the present invention;

Fig. 6 is a sectional side view of the mounting plate or unit of a ring, and

Fig. 7 is a perspective view of the parts as shown in Fig. 6.

In its more generic aspects, the present invention contemplates multiplying by reflection the facets or bodies of one or a number of jewels so 5 that the illusion is created of a far greater numher or higher weight stones being present than is actually the case. Also, by means of the present invention, various simple or intricate patterns may be furnished, aside from the fact that one 10 or a number of jewel units may appear to have their brilliancy and/or weight enhanced.

Thus, referring to Fig. 1, there has been indicated at ID a band of metal or other material which has its outer edge or face in the form of steps or surfaces II and I2 which extend angularly with respect to each other and in such manner that the observer will be able to simultaneously view pairs of these faces and a relatively large number of such pairs. Each of the surfaces l I has inset into it a member which is highly reflective as, for example, a strip of mirror l3,'and the surfaces I2 may mount or have recessed into their faces gems I4. Of course, in lieu of mirror strips l3, the body of the member I 0 may be high- 1y polished or otherwise treated to provide a highly reflective surface, and the gems l4 may either be presented as individual elements or may have associated with them to a greater or lesser extent structures of a nature similar to those shown in Figs. 2 and 3.

In the first of the latter figures which shows generally the display surface of a brooch although as just brought out it may actually present what is merely a unit of a larger ensemble, there has been indicated at [5 a body which presents reflecting surfaces I6 and I7 extending angularly with respect to each other and which surfaces are either provided by polishing, plating, or insetting mirrored strips into the body I5. The lower edge of this body is in the form of a beading or strip l8 which mounts jewel units I9 and the upper edge of which may either be defined by baguette strips 25 or transparent or reflecting strips individually presenting angularly extending faces which are mirrored in the surfaces l6 and I1. Adjacent the point of juncture of these latter surfaces the beading |8 may be extended outwardly at angles to its end portions and upon the pedestal thus provided a mount may be built up to present facets 2| and 22, these facets having their lower edges defined by the baguette or similar strips, their upper edges being preferably likewise defined. Into the facets 2| and 22 which obviously present a pyramidal aspect, additional gems 23 5 may be inset, or these gems may of course be otherwise suitably mounted upon these surfaces. Additionally, it Wil be appreciated that the baguette strips may be of different colors, but in any event, a substantial portion of the ensemble will be reflected in the surfaces I6 and El and these surfaces will act as somewhat interdependent reflecters to, in turn, multiply the entire assembly.

In the form of structure shown in Fig. 3, the body 2 3 has a lower flange portion 25 and an upper flange portion 2b which latter may function somewhat in the nature of a shadow box. A mirrored surface Ell is furnished to extend adjacent the inner face of the flange 25 and at an angle thereto such that the front wall of the body 2 will be reflected therein. In such front wall a jewel 28 may be mounted in any suitable manner. The flange 25 has anumber of angularly extending surfaces and associated with each of these surfaces are reflecting strips or else the inner surfaces of these strips are polished to provide for such reflecting. In this manner it will be appreciated that the jewel 28 will be reflected by each of these surfaces and that the entire multiplication of reflection will be rendered fully visible by the mirrored surface 21. This surface is arranged at an angle such that the reflection will be clearly visible to persons in the same general horizontal plane as that of the unit. With a view to enhancing the general effect thus achieved each one of the mirrored angularly extending surfaces of the flange 25 may be covered or bent to provide a convex surface 29, this in turn materially magnifying the reflections of the gem 28. Of course this magnification effect may also be achieved in connection with the units heretofore described as well as the units hereafter referred to.

In Fig. 4 the body 3% is formed of a material bent to provide inwardly and outwardly extending portions and presenting upon its outer face a mirrored surface. The concave surfaces 3| thus furnished will tend materially to concentrate any image reflected therein while the surfaces 32 will tend to magnify any such reflection. The body 373 may be pierced at points substantially midway between its apexes and base portions and through such piercing there is threaded a mounting member 33 which serves to properly support a number of jewels 34. The brilliancy of the reflection of the latter will be materially enhanced by the concave surfaces and their dimensions will be enhanced by the convex surfaces 32. Similar to the convex portions existing in the structure heretofore defined in Fig. 3, the concentrating portions existing in Fig. 4 may be utilized in numerous other structures than the one generally illustrated.

In Fig. 5 a structure similar to that of Fig. 4 is presented, except that instead of the body 35 being bent to present generally wavy surfaces, it

' is bent to furnish surfaces 36 which are highly reflecting and which extend at definite angles to each other so that the jewel mounting unit or strip 31 piercing the same is reflected in these surfaces.

In Figs. 6 and '7 a ring mounting 38 has been shown and which presents at its crown portion a reflecting strip or panel 39. A gem 40 is suitably mounted above this panel and the facets of this gem are multiplied and the entire brilliancy of the jewel is enhanced by this mounting. As heretofore brought out, the reflecting surface 39 may embody characteristics such that like concentration may follow this, resulting in an extremely pleasing effect.

is used in its generic sense.

From the foregoing it will be appreciated that by means of the present invention an article is provided which is extremely pleasing in appearance and which article may, if desired, embody an extremely novel and, in fact, startling effect. 5 By suitably arranging the components of the article, a conservative effect can likewise be achieved and in either event patterns and designs may appear to exist which are actually not present, this being achieved by simply providing the funda- 10 mental designs of such patterns and depending upon the reflective effects to achieve the desired result.

7 Additionally it is to be understood that employing certain structures within the teachings of the present invention and especially where concentration and reflection of the jewel image occurs, an extremely novel effect is achieved. In other words, in a room where only a minimum of illumination is present, the jewel or jewels will appear to glow with light. In conclusion, it will be appreciated that in the foregoing specification and in the appended claims the term jewel In other words, while of course a precious gem or gems might be employed, semi-precious or imitation stones might likewise be utilized and, in fact, in certain instances in lie-u of a stone any similar and ornamental article might be provided.

Thus, among others, the several objects of the invention as specifically afore noted are achieved, but in conclusion it will be understood that while the invention is primarily dedicated to personal ornamentation and jewelry, its teachings might be applied in numerous other respects without departing from the scope of the invention as defined in the claims.

Having described my invention, what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. As an article of manufacture a mounting 41 member providing a reflecting surface, a jewel associated with said mounting member and disposed adjacent said surface, and means associated with said surface to concentrate the image reflected therein. 45

2. As an article of manufacture a mounting member providing a reflecting surface, a jewel associated with said mounting member and disposed adjacent said surface, and means associated with said surface whereby the latter is caused 5 to reflect concentrated and enlarged images of such jewel.

3. As an article of ornamentation a mounting member presenting a plurality of reflecting surfaces extending angularly with respect to each other, a jewel assembly secured to said mounting member and disposed adjacent such surfaces, such assembly including a fragment embodying the fundamentals of a given design and such reflecting surfaces creating the illusion'of continua tion of such assembly to furnish a complete design, and means associatedwith at least certain of such surfaces for magnifying the reflected image.

4. As an article of ornamentation a mounting member presenting a plurality of reflecting surfaces extending angularly with respect to each other, a jewel assembly secured to said mounting member and disposed adjacent such surfaces, such assembly including a fragment embodying the fundamentals of a given design and such reflecting surfaces creating the illusion of continuation of such assembly to furnish a comv plete design, and means associated with at least certain of said surfaces for concentrating the image reflected thereby.

5. As an article of ornamentation a body to encircle the member of a wearer, a series of angularly extending surfaces providing the outer face of said body, members to be displayed mounted by said body and said surfaces being of a reflective nature and mirroringthe mounted article.

6. As an article of ornamentation a body to encircle the member of a wearer and including a series of angularly extending surfaces providing the outer face of said body, articles to be displayed mounted on certain of said surfaces and the adjacent surfaces being of a reflective nature to mirror such displayed articles.

7. As an article of ornamentation a body to encircle the member of a wearer, said body being bent to provide angularly extending surfaces furnishing trough and apex portions, the outer surface of said body being of a reflective nature, and a plurality of articles extending between adjacent surfaces of said body and. spanning the trough portions thereof, said articles being mirrored in the outer surface of said body.

8. As an article of ornamentation a body to encircle the member of a wearer, said body being bent to provide angularly extending surfaces furnishing trough and apex portions, the outer 10 surface of said body being of a reflective nature, 1 and a plurality of articles extending between adjacent surfaces of said body and spanning the trough portions thereof, said articles being mirrored in the outer surface of said body, such apex 15 and trough portions being curved whereby to magnify and concentrate the images of the articles reflected thereby.

CAROLA KIP, JR.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2517758 *Oct 21, 1946Aug 8, 1950F H Noble & CompanyContainer for articles of jewelry and the like
US2573812 *Feb 19, 1948Nov 6, 1951Henry Schroeder JohnRear-vision means for auto vehicles
US4944164 *Jul 26, 1989Jul 31, 1990Butler Janis YConvertible earring
US6000240 *Aug 27, 1998Dec 14, 1999Noda; SatoshiJewels for live or artificial tooth or teeth
US6324869 *Aug 27, 1999Dec 4, 2001Vanli Kuyumculuk Sanayi Ve Ticaret Limited SirketiSystem and method for enhancing the viewed brightness of precious or semi-precious stones
Classifications
U.S. Classification63/15, 63/26, 428/156, 428/7, D11/34, D11/35
International ClassificationA44C15/00
Cooperative ClassificationA44C15/00
European ClassificationA44C15/00