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Publication numberUS2023526 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 10, 1935
Filing dateMay 2, 1933
Priority dateMay 2, 1933
Publication numberUS 2023526 A, US 2023526A, US-A-2023526, US2023526 A, US2023526A
InventorsWilliam Hoberg
Original AssigneeWilliam Hoberg
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Anchoring means for decoys
US 2023526 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Deco M 1935: w. HOBERG ANCHORING MEANS FOR DECOYS Filed May 2, 1933 Patented Dec. 10, 1935 UNITED STATES ANCHORING MEANS FOR DECOYS William Hoberg, Green Bay, Wis.

Application May 2, 1933, Serial No. 669,038

1'7 Claims.

This invention relates to water anchors of the type used to moor floating objects, and has particular reference to a construction suited for use in connection with duck decoys and the like.

The essential objects of the invention are the provision of a construction of compact form which will not be readily dislodged or allow drifting of the moored object and means associated with the anchor for carrying the attaching line. In its application as a decoy anchor, provision is also made whereby the anchor may be conveniently secured to the decoy for transportation purposes.

In the accompanying drawing I have illustrated one embodiment of my invention incorporating novel features of construction and wherein:

Fig. 1 is a top plan view;

Fig. 2 is a side view particularly illustrating the position of my anchor as the attaching line is played out therefrom;

Fig. 3 shows the manner in which my anchor may be associated with the neck of a decoy;

Fig. 4 illustrates my anchor in operative position; and,

Fig. 5 is a fragmentary view of a modification.

The anchor proper will be formed of lead or iron, as conventionally, and made squat and substantially of cone shape. Whereas, however, the usual mushroom construction includes a spherical rounded undersurface which will cause the anchor to seat generally upright in the soft bed under water, I propose to make my anchor ill with an undersurface which is rather squat and cone-shaped, providing a peripheral edge I I at its upper extremity. The purpose in this connection is to cause the anchor to tip as shown in Figure 4, so that the edge portion II will exercise a gripping engagement with the water bed, thus to prevent the anchor from sliding along and allowing drifting of the object moored thereby. To further prevent side slip of the anchor, its undersurface can be'made of irregular contour comprising a plurality of circumferential areas between its top and bottom of different slope. An outstanding circumferential rib I2 may be included. Such a surface, particularly when the anchor is on a soft bed, will tend to resist lateral movement and, because of the inclined nature of the surface, the peripheral edge will be brought into a position where it will tend to dig into the bed when the floating object moored by the anchor tends to drift.

When used in association with decoys, anchors are usually secured thereto by an attaching line which fastens to a screw-eye or the like on the underside of the decoy so that the attaching line will not appear above the surface of the water. Since the depth of water varies so considerably it is essential that provision be made whereby the length of the line attaching the decoy to the an- PATENT OFFICE chor can be varied. To accomplish this purpose I propose to provide a reel in association with the anchor upon which the line may be wound when the anchor is not in use and from which it may readily be played out merely by dropping the an- 5 chor and decoy into the water. As soon as the anchor reaches the bottom the playing out of the line will stop and any surplus line will remain conveniently in position on the reel. To prevent accidental further unwinding of the line, means is provided whereby after the desired length of line has once been determined the line may be secured.

Associated with the upper side of the anchor is a framework preferably comprising stiff but resilient wire, the lower ends of which may be embedded in the anchor element ll]. Such framework is formed to provide portions serving difierent functions as will be described. Adjacent the anchor the wire frame is formed with spaced parallel portions I3 which will provide a reelupon which the attaching line I4 may be wound as shown in Figures 2 and 4. While it is not essential that the reel portion of the frame be located immediately adjacent the upper surface of the anchor, this is desirable as it will provide a side for the reel. 2

The frame also provides an enlarged open portion I5 which, as shown in the drawing, may be located adjacent the reel portion, the two sides T of the wire being bent outwardly beyond the reel portion I3 as shown. Preferably, the portions I6 incline away from the reel so as to permit the ready unwinding of the line from the reel in the manner shown in Figure 2. The enlarged loop portion l5 of the frame is completed by bending the wire sides inwardly at I8. The purpose of the enlarged loop is to enable the anchor to be secured to a decoy by slipping the same over the neck ll of the decoy as illustrated in Figure 3. The loop I5 will be formed of such size and shape as to readily slip over the neck of the decoy. Preferably, and as shown, it will be of elongated character so that it may be slipped over the neck and then turned through ninety degrees to bring the narrower portions of the loop into resilient clamping engagement. In Figure 3 the position of the anchor when the loop is slipped over the neck of the decoy is illustrated in dotted lines. By rotation the narrower portions of the loops I 6 and I8 are then brought into clamping engagement with the neck I! of the decoy which is conventionally of elongated character.

In the construction shown the line will not tend to play out from the reel after the anchor has once assumed the position on the bottom shown in Figure 4, since the side portions I6 of the loop I5 will tend to snag the line. However, it is desirable that the attaching line engage the frame at some distance above the anchor Misc 60 that any tendency of the decoy to drift will tend to cause the edge of the anchor to dig more firmly into the bottom. To this end the wire frame is twisted into a small loop l9. This will provide a point for securing the extremity of the line in fixed position. When all of the line is unwound from the reel and in use, the line will extend directly upwardly through the water from the loop l9. Again, where only part of the line is unwound from the reel and in use, the line extending upwardly from the reel may be snagged by a half-hitch around the loop, as shown in Figure 4. By thisarrangement the line is positively held against accidental unwinding from the reel and the connection between the decoy and the anchor is .sufliciently :far removed from the anchor :as' to cause a digging in action of the anchor edge when the decoy moves laterally.

Instead of snagging the line from the reel at the connection between the loops and 19 as shown in Fig. 4, the 'loop is may be modified to serve the same purpose and enable the line to the decoy to be quickly adjusted to any desired length. Thus as shown in Fig. 5, :the loop 21 may be provided with a depending tongue 22, about which a loop or knot in the line may be readily formed and removed at will.

It will be understood that the embodiment of my invention herein shown and described is merely illustrative and that the invention is capable of a considerable range of modification, equivalency and rearrangement of 'partswithout departing from the scope thereof. I therefore do not intend to be limited in the practice of my invention further than may be required by the appended claims. a I

I claim: 1. An anchor having .a sloping undersurface and being of greater thickness at its center than at its edge portion, the undersurface being divided into a, series of successive concentrically arranged bands wherein one band is angularly arranged to the next band so as to provide an irregular contour and resist lateral movement of the anchor over a softsurface.

2. An anchor having its sloping undersurface provided with continuous circumferentially extending projections adapted to resist lateral movement of the anchor over a soft surface;

3. An anchor having a sloping undersurface and being of greater thickness at its center than at its edge portion, 'saidanchor having an undersurface provided with one or more circumferentially extending ribs adapted to-exercise gripping engagement witha soft surface.

4. An anchor having a squat cone-shaped undersurface provided with one or more circumferentially extending ribs adapted to exercise a gripping engagement with asoft surface.

"5. An anchor having a squat generally coneshaped undersurface of gradual slope, said undersurface having circumferentially extending continuous portions 'of varyingslope between its upper and lower limit to provide :an irregular contour which will resist lateral sliding movement of the undersurface over a soft surface.

6. An anchor presenting 'a'flat' upper surface and a tapering 'undersurface and having line attaching means secured to its upper side providing a reel upon which surplus line can be supported and including line engaging means adapted to prevent unwinding of line from the reel.

'7. An anchor presenting a flat upper surface and a tapering undersurface, and having line attaching means secured to its upper side comprising an upstanding wire frame providing a reel upon which line can be wound.

8. An anchor presenting a fiat upper surface and a tapering undersurface, and having line attaching means secured to its upper side comprising an upstanding wire frame, said wire frame providing a reel upon which line can be wound and having a line engaging loop at its upper end.

9.. .An anchor .for decoys including an anchoring portion having an upstanding'frame extending upwardly .from its upper side adapted to slide over and engage the neck portion of the decoy.

10. An anchor for decoys including an anchoring portion having an upstanding resilient wire frame extending upwardly from its upper side adapted to slide over and resiliently engage the neck portion of the decoy.

11. An anchor for decoys including an anchoring portion having an upstanding resilient wire frame extending upwardly from its upper side, said frame having an enlarged portion adapted to slide over and engage the neck of the decoy.

12. An anchor for decoys having an upstanding resilientwire loop connected with its upper surface, said loop being elongated to allow the same to be freely slipped over the neck of the decoy and adapted to be turned when in position so that the narrower portions of the loopwill resiliently engage the decoy and secure the anchor in association therewith.

13. An anchor for decoys having line engaging means secured to its upper side, said means including a reel upon which line may be wound and an enlarged wireloop adapted to slide over 7 and engage the neck of the decoy.

1.4. An anchor for decoys having an upstanding wire frame providing a reel upon which an attaching line may be wound and having an enlarged portion'in' the form of a loop adapted to slip over the neck of the decoy.

15. An anchor for decoys having an upstanding wire frame providing a reel upon which an attaching line may be wound and having an enlarged portion in the form of a loop adapted to slip over the neck of the decoy, and a small loopformed at the upper end of the wire frame constituting line engaging means.

16. An anchorfor decoys having an upstanding wire frame secured to its upper surface, said undersurface is divided into successive concentric zones, the'inclination in one zone differing from thatin'the next zone.

WILLIAM HOBERG.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2520233 *Nov 17, 1945Aug 29, 1950Buehl John LDecoy anchor
US2555815 *Dec 12, 1946Jun 5, 1951Rawlins Herbert LAnchor for decoy ducks
US3050895 *Nov 21, 1960Aug 28, 1962Bratland Gustave CAnchor for decoys
US4616790 *Jul 26, 1984Oct 14, 1986Beltran Delfin JExcess tubing retainer for a fluid or gas delivery system
US5640920 *Jun 14, 1996Jun 24, 1997Dorr; Rodney C.Pyramid shaped mooring anchor
US6543176 *Oct 1, 2001Apr 8, 2003Mcghghy HughDecoy anchor system and method of use
US7257921 *Jun 7, 2006Aug 21, 2007Hellmann Paul FDuck decoy anchor
US20110094142 *Oct 23, 2009Apr 28, 2011Ayers Charles DRubber decoy anchor
Classifications
U.S. Classification43/3, 242/405.1, 114/300
International ClassificationA01M31/06, A01M31/00
Cooperative ClassificationA01M31/06
European ClassificationA01M31/06