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Publication numberUS2023687 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 10, 1935
Filing dateFeb 23, 1933
Priority dateFeb 23, 1933
Publication numberUS 2023687 A, US 2023687A, US-A-2023687, US2023687 A, US2023687A
InventorsWalter Klein
Original AssigneeWalter Klein
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Process for manufacturing boxes from wood and box
US 2023687 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

W. KLEIN PROCESS FOR MANUFACTURING BOXES FROM WOOD AND BOX- Filed Feb. 23, 1953 Q Irv/anion W 71%;

Patented Dec. 10, 1935 PATENT OFFICE PROCESS FOR MANUFACTURING BOXES FROM WOOD AND BOX Walter Klein, Colcgne-on-the-Rhine, Germany Application February 23, 1933, Serial No. 658,119

6 Claims.

This invention relates to a new process for manufacturing boxes of thin strips or sheets of wood or the like, and to boxes manufactured by this new process.

In the processes as hitherto used wooden'strips or sheets are laid transversely one upon another and at the bottom they are united by means of clamps. The extending parts are then bent upwards and the bent edges connected by metal strips laid across them. If it is required to have the adjacent edges tightened they are connected by metal strips pressed or clinched into the adiacent parts or they are joined by a strip of textile fabric or paper stuck across them.

According to this invention all means of connection such as clamps, clinching irons, strips of metal or textile fabric etc. are avoided. This has the advantages that not only the process of manufacture will be far simpler, quicker and cheaper but also the product will be rendered cheaper and more satisfactory and it will become absolutely tight, automatically and without any further means or addition.

According to the new process of manufacture the boxes are made from thin sheets, plates or strips of wood or the like, especially of plywood. The strip or sheet is out to the necessary dimensions and all such parts which are superfluous while the side-walls are being bent upwards to close the box are cut away out of the sheet. But the cutting is executed in such a manner that a small quantity of wood is left over at the edges beyond that which is required for closing the box and causing the edges of the bent side-walls to touch one another in order to be joined.

In the accompanying drawing Fig. 1 is a perspective view of a handpress, Fig. 2 shows the plywood blank fiat and in dotted lines folded, Fig. 3 is a complete box. I is the stamp of the press, 2 the mould in which the stamp enters when descended, 3 the blank plywood sheet and la is the wood strip put around the stamp, if the box shall be more stable which strip is fixed to the walls of the blank when folded whilst pressing.

The sheet of plywood is then moistened in order to facilitate bending and it is then laid cedure to form side walls which with their edges are pressed against one another. The stamp also must be heated.

By this manner of procedure the sheet of plywood is-brought into the desired form of box. The cut edges of the sheet will abut one another. But as there is a small surplus of material at the cut edges these will not only abut one another but they will be fitted into each other, i. e. they will become matted and welded together and lo forced into each other to a certain degree by the pressure of the stamp so that the finished article will show no seam but only smooth corners, and it will have the appearance as if the box had been made out of a single piece of wood and the 15 side-walls were integral with one another at the corners. The stamp is then retired and the box can be taken out of the mould and is at once ready for use.

The walls of the box being of plywood are thin. 20 If therefore, it is required to stiffen or thicken the walls of the box it may be lined inside with the same or a similar additional material. In this case another sheet or strip of thin wood is laid around the stamp. The lower surface of 23 this sheet is provided with a paste or adhesive matter. Then the stamp when descending presses this additional sheet into the hollow of the main part and against its inner walls where they become tightly joined and stuck together. 33 The dimensions of. this additional sheet may be the same, or a little smaller or a little higher than those of the main sheet. In the latter case the edges of the walls of the additional or inner part will project above the edges of the walls of 33 the main or outer part in the finished box. The moisture contained in the paste and in the plywood evaporates by the heat of the block and of the stamp so that when the finished article is M taken out of the mould it is ready for use.

What I claim and desire to secure by U. S. Letters Patent is:

1. Process for manufacturing boxes from a sheet of plywood which consists in placing the sheet suitably cut-out and moistened upon a heated moulded block and pressing it by means of a heated stamp into the mould in such a manner that the edges of the sh et are bent upwards to form sidewalls which are then pressed against 53 the inner walls of the mould and with their edges touching one another.

2. Process for manufacturing boxes from a sheet of plywood which consists in placing the sheet suitably cut-out and moistened upon a 55 heated moulded block and pressing it by means of a heated stamp into said mould in such a manner that the edges of the sheet are bent upwards to form side-walls which are then pressed against the inner walls of the mould and with their edges touching one another, providing the edges of the sheet with a small surplus of material when out and forcing them into each other by the pressing.

3. Process for manufacturing boxes from a sheet of plywood which consists in placing the 7 sheet suitably cut-out and moistened upon a heated moulded block and pressing it by means of a heated stamp into the mould in such a manner that the edges of the sheet are bentupwards to form side-walls which are then pressed against the inner walls of the mould and with their edges touching one another, an additional sheet of wood being laid round the stamp and pressed by the same procedure into the interior of the main part of the box and against its inner walls to be united therewith.

4. A box from a sheet of wood suitably cut out and pressed into the desired form in a mould by a stamp, the edges of the sheet when cut being provided with a small surplus of material so that they are forced into each other by the pressure and smooth corners of the finished box are obtained.

5. A box from a sheet of plywood suitably cut out and pressed into the desired form in a mould 5 by a stamp, the edges of the sheet when out being provided with a small surplus of material so that they are forced into each other by the pressure and smooth corners of the finished box are obtained, the interior of which being lined with 10 ail-additional sheet of a similar material.

6. A box from a sheet of wood suitably cut out and pressed into the desired form in a mould by a. stamp, the edges of the sheet when out being provided with a small surplus of material so that 5 they are forced into each other by the pressure and smooth corners of the finished box are obtained, the interior sidewalls of which being lined with an additional sheet of a similar material, the dimensions of this additional sheet being a little 20 higher than the sidewalls so that in the finished box the edges of the walls of the additional inner part will project above the edges of the walls of the main or outer part.

WALTER KLEIN. 25

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5484378 *Jul 14, 1994Jan 16, 1996Braithwaite; Norman S.Sheet folding method
US5678618 *Nov 18, 1994Oct 21, 1997Lindhe; CurtProcess for producing hard elements of wood
Classifications
U.S. Classification493/167, 144/330, 493/133, 217/2, 144/380
International ClassificationB27D1/00, B27D1/08
Cooperative ClassificationB27D1/083
European ClassificationB27D1/08B