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Publication numberUS2024203 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 17, 1935
Filing dateJun 14, 1932
Priority dateJun 14, 1932
Also published asDE646926C
Publication numberUS 2024203 A, US 2024203A, US-A-2024203, US2024203 A, US2024203A
InventorsJohn L Berger
Original AssigneeArmstrong Cork Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method and apparatus for manufacturing molded inlaid linoleum
US 2024203 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 17, 1935. J. BERGER 2$324,203

METHQD AND APPARATUS FOR MANUFACTURING MOLDED INLAID LINOLEUM.

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METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR .MANUFACTURING MOLDED INLAID 'LINOLEUM Filed June 14, 1932 s sheets-Sheet 2 J. L. BERGER Dec. 17, 1935.

METHOD-AND APPARATUS FOR MANUFACTURING MOLDED `INLAID LINOLEUM Filed June 14, 1952 5 Sheets-.Sheet 3 Patented Dec. 17, 19.35

nire!) rer ori-ics METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR MANUFAC- TURING MOLBED INLAID LINOLEUM Application .Func 14, 1932, Serial N0. 617,165

46 Claims. (Cl. 154-26) This invention relates to the manufacture of inlaid linoleum and is particularly adapted for the production of inlaid linoleum molded directly upon a suitable backing.

According to the usual practice molded inlaid linoleum is manufactured by the application of granular linoleum mix through stencils beneath which the backing is progressed in equal intermittent steps. The granular mix is ordinarily strickled by operators who brush the mix throughthe stencil openings with metal blades. According to my invention, the hand -strickling is obviated and a uniform amount of color is automatically applied during successive stenciling operations at each stencil. It is an object of my invention to eliminate the variations inherently present in hand strickled molded linoleum.

My invention may be better understood with reference to the accompanying drawings illustrating a preferred embodiment in which:

v distribute the color through the stencils.

Referring to Figure l there is shown a color applying mechanism comprising buckets 2 mounted on rollers 3 which contact with tracks 6l for progressive travel across a stencil 5 which is mounted on side rails 6 of a molding table. A detailed description of the molding table is deemed unnecessary in View of its common occurrence in linoleum manufacture. The table comprises a suitably supported bed i which may be as much as 120 feet long. A slat conveyor 8 moves across the bed i and conveys a backing 9 on which the linoleum mix is molded. Extending longitudinally substantially the entire length of the machine are the side rails 5 which are arranged for vertical motion in order that the stencils 5 which are mounted thereon may be raised during the forward motion of the partially finished linoleum and lowered for the application of color to the backing.

The buckets 2a, 2b, 2c, 2d, 2e, 2f, 2g, 2h, and 2i are moved successively across the stencil by chains I to which the buckets are secured at both sides of the machine. The chains are mounted on sprockets II and I2 the latter of which are driven by a motor I3 through a suitable speed reducing drive Ill. Y

A measured amount of color is deposited in the path of the buckets prior to their travel across the stencil by means of a measuring device. The measuring device comprises a plurality of radial vanes I5 mounted on a shaft I6 for rotation with- 10 in a cylindrical shell I 'I. The shell I1 has an intake opening I8 substantially coincident with an opening in the bottom of the hopper I0, and a lower opening I8 substantially equal to the peripheral distance between adjacent vanes whereby color carried between adjacent vanes is dropped as a unit charge in the path of the buckets prior to their travel across the stencil. Rotation of the feeding mechanism is effected byV star wheels mounted on either end of the 20 shaft I6; the star wheels being rotated by lugs 2I spaced on the chains. Each lug is so positioned on the chain that it acts to discharge only the color carried between two adjacent vanes. The amount of color composition discharged by the feeding mechanism may be controlled within rather narrow limits by determining the amount of color composition necessary for filling the stencil openings for each particular pattern element and then attaching the requisite number of lugs 2I to the chain so that the feeding mechanism will discharge the required amount oi color composition for the particular stencil being filled. In order to insure that all of the stencil openings will be lled, an excess of color is usually supplied to the stencil. It will be noted that the feeding mechanism is not rotated after the rst bucket arrives at a position beneath the measuring and feeding mechanism. The required amount of color for filling all of the openings is placed in front of the first or distributing bucket 2a. Y Y

Color composition is discharged into the hopper i9 and is evenly distributed therein by a screw conveyor provided with right hand blades 22 and left hand blades 23 mounted on a shaft 24. The blades carry the color composition toward the ends and away from the center where the color is fed into the hopper. The screw conveyor is driven from the shaft of the Sprockets I I by a sprocket 25 which is mounted on the shaft of the sprockets Ii and drives a sprocket 26 by means of a chain 2. The conveyor distributes the color inthe hopper so that the measuring and feeding apparatus upon rotation delivers a uniform amount of color from each vane-bound pocket. The amount of color composition placed on the stencil in the path of the scrapers is, therefore, substantially uniform transversely of the stencil plate. It is desirable to have a uniform distribution of colo-r composition through the stencils in order to avoid uneven densities in the. nnished product and also to avoid color misses.

The discharged color is spread onto the stencil and through the openings therein by means of scraper blades 28 attached to the buckets. The blades are preferably made of exible metal. I have found that blades made of 20 gauge bronze will work satisfactorily. In Figure 6 the progressive action of the blades is diagrammatically shown. The direction of travel of the blades is indicated by the arrow. The distributing blade 2a. of the bucket 2a is spaced from the stencil about 1/4" and spreads an even layer of linoleum composition over the stencil plate and through the openings therein. The mix employed in the manufacture of molded inlaid linoleum has pecu- The granules or particles tend to cling together. They will not flow like dry sand will flow,` for example. It will be noted by reference to Figure 6 that the entire stencil opening is not lled by the distributing blade. The linoleum composition due to its sticky nature has a tendency to bridge and a portion of the stencil opening is unfilled at a point adjacent the edge of the stencil which faces away from the oncoming scraper. The unfilled openings are indicated at B in Figure 6. A series ofV scraper blades arranged at decreasing angles with respect to the stencil plate are provided to force the composition to completely fill the stencil openings. In the embodiment illustrated in Figure 6 the distributing blades 2a and 2h are set at a 30 angle to the stencil plate. These two blades distribute the composition evenly over the stencil and into the openings. The filling blade 2c is set at 20 and the filling blades 2d.' and 2e are set at 15. These three blades 2c', 2d and 2e' force the linoleum composition into the unfilled openings B. It will be noted (Figure 6) that after the blades 2a', 2b', 2c', 2d', 2e have passed over the stencil, the openings over which these iive blades have passed will be completely filled with linoleum composition. These blades by reason of their position with respect to the surface of the stencil plate serve to some extent to compress the composition in the stencil openings. If desired, the linoleum composition may be further compacted in the stencil openings. This produces a final product in which the lines of juncture between adjacent pattern elements are sharp and clear. (In the usual strickling process the color composition is sifted through the stencil openings but is not compacted therein, and wavy, irregular lines of juncture are obtained). The blades 2f and 2g are', therefore, set at a 10 angle with respect to the stencil plate and compress the linoleum composition in the stencil openings. The linoleum composition is resilient and tends to reexpand after the pressure is released. In order to insure there being a uniform thickness of color composition in each stencil opening and in order to remove any excess linoleum composition which may rest on the stencil plate, a scavenger blade 2h is provided which is set at a 90 liar properties.

angle to the stencil plate. This scavenger blade serves to remove the excess color composition from the face of the stencil plate and also removes any color composition which may lie in the stencil openings, but, by reason of expansion,

extend above the plane of the surface of the stencil plate.

Angle plates 29 extend substantially the entire width o-f the machine and serve to hold the rollers 3 from rising when the scraper blades engage 5 the face of the stencil plate to force the color through the openings therein.

The buckets to which the scraper blades are attached are provided primarily to convey excess color composition away from the stencil. A 10 minor amount of color may be carried by the buckets to whichdistributing, filling and compressing blades are attached. The scavenger blade usually picks up considerable composition and for that reason it is preferably provided with 15 a discharging bottom, whereby the color composition carried thereby may be discharged directly into the hopper I9. The other buckets may also be provided with dumping bottoms if desired, but since they usually carry only small 20 amounts of color composition, I prefer to form them with solid bottoms and discharge the color as the buckets are turned around the sprocket Il. In this way the color is discharged into the metal guard 30 from which it is carried forward 25 by the scraper blades together with the color discharged by the feeding mechanism.

Figure 5 shows the scavenger bucket with a. dumping bottom. The drawing is broken away and shows one end of the bucket. Both ends are 30 similar in construction. The bucket comprises side frame members 3|. A rear angle 32 is secured to the side frame members 3l and one web of this angle serves as a rear wall of the bucket. The bottom 33 is secured to the other web by 35 means of hinges 34. A front frame member 35 is secured to the end frame members and contacts with the bottom 33. The front wall of the bucket is formed by the front frame member 35 and thev scraper blade support 35. The support is adjust- 40 ably secured to the front frame member 35. 'Ihe blades 28 are attached to the support 36 by screws 37 which pass through holesin the scraper blade andy are secured in tapped portions of the support 36. The blade and support are adjustably 45 secured to the frame member. A bolt 38 passes through a slot 39 in the blade and support and through a hole drilled in the frame member 35.

A winged nut (not shown) secures the blade and holder in position. The blades may be conven- 50 iently adjusted by loosening the winged nuts and raising or lowering the blade and support in the slots 39. After proper adjustment is had, the winged nuts are drawn up and securely hold the blade and support in position. 55

The amount of pressure applied to the linoleum composition during the stenciling operation depends to some extent upon the area and size of the openings in the stencil. For example, when stenciling an interliner wherein the area of the 60 openings is but a minor portion of the stencil and the openings are relatively long and narrow, it is desirable to apply only a small amount of pressure to the composition. If excessive pressure is applied by the blades, the color composi- 65 tion has a tendency to adhere to the models M which are attached to the under side of the sten` cil. As a consequence when the stencil plates are raised, the color composition adhering to the models is pulled away from the backing and an 70 incomplete pattern is produced. When the area of the openings is relatively large, it is desirable to apply a relatively high compression to the material in the stencil openings in order to obtain compact, self-sustaining molded elements which when adjacent color areas are applied will form clear, sharp lines of demarcation between the various elements. It is desirable, therefore, to provide adjustable blades which 'can be conveniently raised or lowered so as to apply the desired amount of pressure depending upon the type of pattern elements being stenciled.

There are two rollers 3 on either end of each bucket which contact with the tracks 4. A roller carriage is provided for each roller and serves to secure the rollers to the bucket side frames and to the chain. Two roller carriages are provided on either end of each bucket. One roller carriage is immovably secured to the side frame 3I and the other roller is free to move in a slotted boss 40 so as to permit movement of the roller to compensate for flexing of the chain. The roller carriages comprise (Figures 4 and 5) a stud 4I provided with a shoulder 42 which stud passes through the roller 3 and drilled bosses 43 and 44 of the bracket 45. A nut 46 draws the boss 44 into contact with a shoulder 41 thus holding the bracket 45 in xed relationship on the stud and permitting the wheel 3 to rotate on the stud. Links 48 attached to the bracket 45 are provided for securing the buckets to the chains I8.

A latch 49 holds the bottom 33 in contact with the front frame member 35. The latch 49 is operated to discharge the color composition into the hopper I9 by means of a plunger 50 which when compressed retracts the latch 49 and permits the bottom 33 to fall. (Figure 5 shows the bucket in scraping position. The bucket is inverted when in dumping position).

Referring again to Figure 1 there is provided a curved sheet metal guard 5I which prevents the color composition carried by the buckets from being spilled. The arc of this guard (see Figure l) is preferably concentric with the arc of the sprocket I2 and is spaced so that the scraper blades engage the curved surface of the guard and force the color composition into the buckets as the buckets are carried upwardly around the sprockets I2. The color composition which is carried by the scavenger bucket is discharged directly into the hopper I9. A slide block 52 is mounted on the frame. and is so positioned that the plunger 50 of the latch mechanism is engaged thereby. As the bucket travels over the hopper I9, the plunger 59 is forced upwardly by the slide block 52; retracting the latch 49 and permitting the bottom 33 to drop. The 'color composition falls by gravity into the hopper I9. A plate 53 is mounted above the tracks 4 and is spaced therefrom a distance equal to the diameter of the rollers 3. This plate serves to hold the bucket rmly in place on the track while the latching mechanism is being operated. The bottom of the bucket is raised into engagement with the latch 43 by means of a roller arm 54V attached to the hopper frame. as it travels around the sprocket I I and is forced into engagement with the latch.

In the preferred embodiment illustrated in Figure 1 there is shown a blade 2i which contacts with the edge of the stencil plate 5. This blade prevents any color composition which may iind its way out of the buckets from traveling down the curved guard 5l and into the stencil openings. The blade 2i is mounted on a bucket frame and is so positioned on the chain that it rests adjacent the forward edge of the stencil (as viewed in Figure l) when the machine is in a non-operative position. This blade serves as a guard rather than a scraper and may be The bottom is raised upwardly made of wood or metal. Its sole function is to prevent color composition from traveling down the guide 5I and into the stencil openings when the side rails 6 are raised and the backing with the molded elements thereon is being moved for- 5 ward. If desired the blade may be so positioned on the chain that it serves both as a scavenger and guard blade.

A sheet metal guard 55 is provided above substantially the entire stencil. This guard or table 10 catches any loose color composition which may fall from the buckets. 'I'his guard may be cleaned from time to time by the machine operator but I prefer to use a brush 56 which sweeps the composition from the guard directly into the 15 hopper on each cycle of the machine. The brush is provided with Va tilting or reversing mechanism in order to prevent interference of the brush with other parts. An arm 57 is mounted on the frame of the machine and engages a tilting plate 58 se- 20 cured to the brush. As the chains travel around the sprockets, the tilting plate 58 is engaged by the arm 5'I and the brush swung out of operative position. A spring latch (not shown) holds the brush in raised position as it travels over the 25 stencil. Ank arm 59, provided on the opposite end of the machine, engages the tilting plate 58 and reverses the brush, forcing it downwardly into engagement with the face of the guard 55.

In order to be fully automatic in operation, my 30 machine is provided with automatic starting and stopping switches contained in switch boxes respectively 68 and 6I (Figure 1). The switch effective for starting the motor I3, contained in the switch box 69, is provided with an operating arm 35 62 which operates to start the motor when raised with respect to the starting box 60. The stopping switch (connected in series with the starting switch), contained in switch box 6I, is provided with a roller operating arm 63 which is 40 effective for openng the switch and stopping the motor I3 when it is raised with respect to the switch box 6I. Automatic operation of the starting switch is obtained by provision of a pivoted latch 64 held in spaced relationship to the bed 'I 4 during the raising and lowering of the strickling mechanism. When the table is raised, the oper,- ating arm 52 rides upwardly bodily with the switch while the latch 64 pivots. When the mechanism is lowered, the latch blocks the down- 50 ward movement of the varm 62 causing it to be raised with respect to the starting switch which is being lowered, thereby starting the motor I3.

The latch 64 is maintained in fixed relation to the bed 'I by means of a plunger 65 which is 55 held in contact with the bed 'I- by means of springs 56. An adjusting stud 61 on the end of the plunger provides adjustment determining the point of starting as the mechanism is being lowered. 60

Stopping the motor I 3 is effected by raising the roller operating'arm 63. This is done by means of a bracket 38 mounted on one of the bucket carriages. The carriage selected will depend upon the position of the switch box 5I, it being desired 65 to stop the mechanism when the guard blade 2z has completed its travel across the stencil 5.

The switching mechanism described is independent of external circuits. It is therefore possible to remove my automatic strickling mechanism bodily from the main frame of the molding table or shift it about as desired. In order to properly align the mechanism with respect to the stencil with which it is to operate, I provide legs 69 drilled to accommodate dowel pins 10, the 75 dow-el pins being secured to end angles 1I of the stencil plate, the doWel pins being common in all stencils to which my machine is applied. Adjusting bolts 72 and 'I3 serve to space the stencil with respect to the backing. These adjusting bolts are usually provided on the stencils for this purpose.

My strickling mechanism is adapted to be used with the molded inlaying machines now commonly in use. An individual strickling unit as above described may be applied to each stencil on the machine or some of the colors may be strickled by hand. For example, in producing a pattern having ten major color elements and two or three inset figures, automatic strickling units may be provided for the major color elements and the inset figures may be strickled by hand through a single stencil which is suitably divided into compartments. The strickling unit may be conveniently transferred from one stencil to another and the delivering, feeding and compacting mechanism may be readily adjusted to suit the conditions incident to the stenciling of the particular pattern element.

By means of my strickling mechanism, the comminuted inlaying composition is forced into the stencil openings and compacted therein. Any excess which lies above the plane of the stencil openings is removed by the scavenger blade and the resulting inlays are of substantially uniform density and thickness and are compressed. The lines of demarcation between contiguous color patches are clearly defined because each unit of color is compacted in its stencil opening before the next contiguous color patch is applied. 'The completed pattern made up of the various inlays may be nally compressed in the usual manner by means of hydraulic presses and thereafter stoved or cured if necessary.

In the preferred embodiment of my invention I have disclosed flexible scraper blades made of bronze. In place of these bronze blades, steel or other iexible metal or rubber blades may be used or the feeding may be carried out by means of a brush which distributes the color over the stencil and in the openings. Where well compacted inlays are required, the compacting blades should preferably be relatively rigid in order to compact the composition in the stencil openings.

While I have described certain specic preferred embodiments of my invention, it will be understood that the invention is not limited to the form shown and described but may be otherwise embodied and practiced Within the scope of the following claims.

I claim:

l. In an inlaying machine having a stencil plate, means for progressively feeding comminuted inlaying composition to the stencil openings and means for compacting the composition in the stencil openings.

2. In an inlaying machine having a stencil plate, means for progressively feeding comminuted inlaying composition to the stencil openings and means for progressively compacting the composition in the stencil openings.

3. an inlaying machine having a stencil plate, means for delivering comminuted inlaying composition to the stencil plate, means for progressively feeding the composition to the stencil openings and means for compacting the composition in the stencil openings.

4. In an inlaying machine having a stencil plate, means for delivering a predetermined amount of comminuted inlaying composition to a stencil plate, means for progressively feeding the composition to the stencil openings and means for compacting the composition in the stencil openings.

5. In an inlaying machine having a stencil plate, means for delivering comminuted inlaying composition to the stencil and means for progressively feeding and compacting the composition in the stencil openings.

6. In an inlaying machine having a stencil plate, means for delivering comminuted inlaying composition to the stencil, means for progressively feeding and compacting the composition in the stencil openings and means for removing excess composition from the stencil.

'7. In an inlaying machine having a stencil plate, means for delivering comminuted inlaying composition to the stencil, means for progressively feeding the composition to the stencil openings, means for removing excess composition from the stencil and guard means preventing composition from dropping on the stencil after the excess composition is removed.

8. In an inlaying machine having a stencil plate, means for delivering comminuted inlaying composition to the stencil, means for progressively feeding and compacting the composition in the stencil openings, means for removing excess composition frcm the stencil and guard means pre.- venting composition from dropping on the stencil after the excess composition is removed.

9. In an inlaying machine having a stencil plate, a hopper for holding comminuted inlaying composition, means for discharging composition from the hopper to the stencil, a plurality of yielding means for successively feeding the composition to a stencil opening and means for compacting the composition in the stencil opening.

10. In combination with an inlaying machine having a stencil plate, a hopper for holding comminuted inlaying composition, means for discharging composition from the hopper to the stencil, means for feeding the composition to the stencil openings, means for compacting the composition in the stencil openings and means for removing excess composition from the stencil.

1l. In combination with an inlaying machine having a stencil plate, a hopper for holding comminuted inlaying composition, means for discharging composition from the hopper tothe stencil, means for feeding the composition to the stencil openings, means for compacting the composition in the stencil openings, means for removing excess composition from the stencil and means for conveying excess composition back to the hopper.

12. In combination with an inlaying machine having a stencil plate, means for holding comminuted inlaying composition, means for discharging composition from the holding means to the stencil, means for feeding the composition to the stencil openings, and means for compacting the composition in the stencil openings, said feeding and compacting means comprising ilexible blades.

13. An inlaying mechanism for use with an inlaying machine having a stencil plate, said mechanism including strickling means effective for feeding and compacting comminuted inlaying composition into the stencil openings, said strickling means comprising a plurality of yielding blades set at decreasing angles of incidence to the stencil plate.

14. An inlaying mechanism for use with an inlaying machine having a stencil plate, said CTI mechanism including strickling means effective 75 for feeding and compacting comminuted inlaying composition into the stencil openings, said strickling means .comprising a plurality of yielding blades, and means for maintaining the strickling means in fixed relationship with respect to the stencil.

e 15. In combination with an inlaying machine having a stencil plate, hopper means for holding comminuted inlaying composition, means fo-r evenly distributing composition in the hopper, means for discharging composition from the hopper to the stencil and means for forcing the composition into the stencil openings.

16; In combination with an inlaying machine having a stencil plate, means for applying a predetermined amount of comminuted inlaying composition to the stencil plate, means for progressively feeding the composition to the stencil openings, means for compacting the composition in the stencil openings and means for removing eX- cess composition from the stencil.

17. In combination with an inlaying machine `having a stencil adapted to be intermittently moved into and out of operating position, strickling means movable across the stencil and eiective for forcing comminuted inlaying composition into the stencil openings, carrying means effective for moving the strickling means across the stencil, and control means effective for starting the carrying means, said control means being responsive to the position of the stencil.

13. In combination with an inlaying machine having a stencil adapted to be intermittently moved into and out of operating position, strickling means movable across the stencil and effective for forcing comminuted inlaying composition into the stencil openings, carrying means effective for nio-ving the strickling means across the stencil, control means responsive to the position of the stencil and effective for starting the carrying means and control means responsive to the position of the carrying means and effective for stopping the carrying means.

19. In combination with an inlaying machine having a stencil adapted to be intermittently moved into and out of operating position, strickling means movable across the stencil and effective for forcing comminuted inlaying composition into the stencil openings, carrying means effective for moving the strickling means across the stencil and control means effective for starting the carrying means While the stencil is befing moved into operating position.

2G. In an inlaying machine having a stencil plate, a hopper for holding comminuted inlaying composition, a discharge valve for delivering inlaying composition from the hopper to the stencil and a plurality of. yielding blades effective for feeding and compacting vthe inlaying composition in the stencil openings.

21. In an inlaying machine having a stencil plate, a hopper for holding comminuted inlaying composition, means for delivering a predetermined amount of inlaying composition to the stencil, a plurality of yielding blades set at decreasing angles of incidence to the stencil and effective for feeding and compacting the inlaying composition in the stencil openings and a scavenger blade eective for removing excess composition from the stencil.

22. In combination with an inlaying machine having a stencil adapted to be intermittently moved into and out of operation, a. plurality of yielding means movable across the stencil and effective for forcing inlaying composition into the stencil openings When said stencil is in operating position, a plurality of receptacles to Which said yielding means are secured, carrying means effective for supporting the yielding means in their travel across the stencil, means for driving the carrying means and means associated with said carrying means eifective for discharging composition on the stencil in the path of the blades.

23. In combination with an inlaying machine having a stencil adapted to be intermittently moved into and out of operation, a plurality of yielding blades movable across the stencil and eifective for forcing inlaying composition into the stencilA openings, a plurality of receptacles to which said yielding blades are secured, carrying means effective for supporting the blades in their travel across the stencil, means for driving the carrying means and means associated with said carrying means effective forv discharging a uniform amount of composition transversely of the stencil in the path of the blades.

24. In combination With an inlaying machine having a stencil, a plurality of receptacles having yielding means adjustably secured thereto and effective for forcing inlaying composition into the stencil openings.

25. In an inlaying machine having a stencil plate, a plurality of yielding means effective for feeding comminuted inlaying composition to the stencil 'openings 26. In an inlaying machine having a stencil plate, a plurality of yielding means effective for feeding comminuted inlaying composition to the stencil openings and means effective for moving the yielding means across the stencil.

27. In an inlaying machine having a stencily plate, a plurality of yielding means eiective for feeding comminuted inlaying composition to the stencil openings and yielding means effective for compressing the composition in the stencil openings.

28. In combination With an inlaying machine having a stencil, a plurality of receptacles having yielding blades adjustably secured thereto, said blades being set at decreasing angles of incidence to the stencil and effective for forcing inlaying composition into the stencil openings.

29. In combination with an inlaying machine having a stencil adapted to be intermittently raised and lowered, a hopper for holding inlaying composition, means for distributing the composition in the hopper, a plurality of receptacles having yielding blades adjustably secured thereto, said blades being set at decreasing angles of incidence to the stencil, carrying means to Which the receptacles are attached, .means for driving the carrying means, means associated with the carrying means effective for discharging a predetermined amount of composition on the' stencil in the path of said blades, means for maintaining the blades in xed relationship with respect to the stencil, means for removing excess color composition from the stencil, means for discharging said excess composition into said hopper, control means eifective for starting the driving means, said control means being responsive lto the position of the stencil and control means responsive to the position of the carrying means and eiective for stopping the driving means.'

30. In combination With an inlaying machine having a stencil plate, means for feeding inlaying composition to the stencil openings, means for compacting the composition in the stencil openings, means for removing excess color from the stencil, a guard spaced above the stencil and effective for preventing composition from dropping on the stencil and means for removing composition from the guard.

31. In the method of stenciling inlaying cornposition, the steps consisting in progressively feeding comminuted inlaying composition to the stencil openings and simultaneously compressing the composition in the stencil openings.

32. In the method of stenclling inlaying compositions, the step consisting in progressively feeding and progressively compressing inlaying composition by means of yielding blades into a stencil opening.

33. In a method of stenciling inlaying compositions, the steps consisting in delivering an excess of comminuted inlaying composition to the stencil, feeding the composition to the stencil openings, compressing the composition in the stencil openings and thereafter removing the excess composition away from the stencil plate.

34. In the method of stenciling inlaying compositions, the steps consisting in delivering a substantially uniform amount of comminuted inlaying composition transversely of the stencil, feeding the composition to the stencil openings, and progressively compressing the composition in the stencil openings by means of a plurality of yielding blades.

35. In the method of stenciling linoleum compositions, the steps consisting in feeding an excess of comminuted linoleum composition to the stencil openings, compressing the composition in the openings and then removing the excess composition which extends above the plane of the surface of the stencil.

36. In an inlaying machine having a stencil, a plurality of yielding blades effective for feeding comminuted inlaying composition to the stencil openings.

37. In the method of stenciling inlaying compositions, the steps consisting in progressively forcing comminuted inlaying composition into 'the stencil openings until said openings are completely filled and then passing a yielding blade over said openings, thereby compressing the composition in the stencil openings.

38. In an inlaying machine having a stencil plate, means for feeding comminuted inlaying composition to a stencil opening and successively acting means for compacting the composition in the stencil opening.

39. In combination with an inlaying machine having Ia stencil plate, hopper means for holding comminuted inlaying composition, m'eans for evenly distributing composition in thehopper, means for discharging composition from the hopper to the stencil and a plurality of successively operating means for filling an opening in the stencil.

40. In a method of stenciling inlaying compositions, the steps consisting in delivering a predetermined amount of inlaying composition to a stencil and progressively forcing the composition into a stencil opening by moving a plurality of inclined blades across the opening.

41. A Amachine for inlaying granular compositions of the linoleum type comprising a stencil plate having a pattern opening therein, means for supporting beneath the stencil plate a backing to receive granular composition applied through the opening, a plurality of blade members and means for advancing them successively over the pattern opening.

42. A machine for inlaying granular compositions of the linoleum type comprising a stencil plate having a pattern opening therein, means for supporting beneath the stencil plate .a backing to receive granular composition applied through the opening, a plurality of blade members, at least one of which, when in operative` position with respect to the stencil, has a portion which is arranged at such angle to the plane of the stencil that it constitutes an upwardly and forwardly inclined compressing blade, and means for advancing the blades successively over the pattern opening.

43. A machine for inlaying granular compositions of the linoleum type comprising a stencil plate having a pattern opening therein, means for supporting beneath the stencil plate a backsupporting beneath the stencil plate a backingto receive granular composition applied through the openings, a plurality of blade m'embers disposed at angles less than normal with respect to the plane of the stencil and extending transversely of substantially the entire Width of the stencil openings and means for moving the blades successively over the stencil openings with their trailing ends closer to the stencil than their leading ends. f

45. A machine for inlaying granular compositions of the linoleum type comprising a stencil plate having pattern openings therein, means for supporting beneath the stencil plate a backing to receive granular composition applied through the openings, a plurality of yielding blades secured to carrying means, means for driving the carrying means in a closed path and for advancing the blades successively over the stencil openings, at least one of the blades positioned with its trailing end closer to the stencil than its leading end when in operative position with respeci; to the stencil.

46. A machine for inlaying granular compositions of the linoleum type comprising a stencil plate having a pattern opening therein, means for supporting beneath the stencil plate a backing to receive granular composition applied through the opening, a blade secured to carrying means, and means for driving the carrying means in a closed path and for moving the blade over the stencil opening.

JOHN L. BERGER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2969828 *Aug 1, 1957Jan 31, 1961Armstrong Cork CoStenciling machine
US3101241 *Nov 3, 1960Aug 20, 1963Armstrong Cork CoMethod of preparing particles of thermoplastic composition
US8152710Feb 28, 2008Apr 10, 2012Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Physiological parameter analysis for an implantable restriction device and a data logger
Classifications
U.S. Classification264/112, 101/115, 425/130, 264/162, 101/129, 264/120, 425/115, 425/811
International ClassificationD06N7/00
Cooperative ClassificationY10S425/811, D06N7/0028
European ClassificationD06N7/00B4