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Publication numberUS2024325 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 17, 1935
Filing dateFeb 24, 1932
Priority dateFeb 24, 1932
Publication numberUS 2024325 A, US 2024325A, US-A-2024325, US2024325 A, US2024325A
InventorsCharles I Allen
Original AssigneeCharles I Allen
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Leg splint
US 2024325 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

C, ALLEN LEG SPLINT Dec. 17, 1935.

Filed Feb. 24, 1932 3 Sheets-Sheet` 1 NN@ MFN www. NUN

Dec. 11, 1935.

c.` l. ALLEN LEG SPLINT Filed Feb. 24, 1932 3 Sheets-Sheet, 2 v

AME/w c. l. ALLEN LEG SPLINT Dec. 17, 1935.

Filed Feb.' 24, 1932 3 Sheets-Sheet 1':y

Patented Dec. `17, 1935 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE i LEG SPLINT i Charles I. Allen, Wadesboro, N. C.

Application February 24, 1932, Serial No. 594,795

10 Claims.

'I'his invention relates to a splint to be used in fractures of the lower extremity.

Usually when a bone of theV lower extremity is fractured the pull of the muscles, which are under constant tension, causes an overriding of the ends of the fractured bone. This, in turn, causes shortening of the leg combined with lateral, anterior or posteriordisplacement of the ends of the fractured bone. The aim of treatment is to correct this deformity in every direction and to hold the ends of the fractured bone in this corrected position until union of the ends of the fractured bone takes place. Ordinarily this overriding of the ends of a fractured bone is overcome by applying adhesive straps to the leg to which are attached weights which gradually tire out the muscles and in four or ve days overcome the overriding of the fractured bone. It would be to the advantage of the patient if this overriding could be corrected at once, but if sufficient weight is applied to the adhesive straps to accomplish this, the adhesive straps will pull off of the leg as it will not stand a trac'tive force greater than forty pounds. It usually requires a much greater tractive force than forty pounds to accomplish this. After the overriding of the ends of the fractured bone has been corrected a constant tractive force is still necessary to keep the fractured ends from overriding again until union takes place. But it does not require as great a tractive force to hold the position after it is corrected as it does to do the initial correcting.

This splint provides means for applying any amount of tractive force that may be necessary to overcome any overriding of the ends of the fractured bone, separate and apart from the adhesive straps. After the overriding is overcome by this means, then weight is applied to the adhesive straps to hold the bones in the corrected position until healing takes place.

Means are also provided to correct any lateral, anterior, or posterior displacement that may be present. f

Means are also provided -so that, in any case.

(Cl. 12S-85) tion can be corrected and held until union takes place.

Means are also provided in connection with the ring of this splint whereby the patient is-prevented from turning the splint over, By having 5 the ring so fixed, the foot end of the splint can be swung from an overhead frame, and it is not necessary to haveany support at the foot end of the splint to prevent the patient from turning the splint over. Any attachment at the foot vend of the splint for this purpose prevents the swinging of this end of the splint by overhead means, which is the ideal way to do.'

'I'he non-turning means also by resting on the bed interferes with changing the bed linen. Arrangement is made so that the rod on inner side of the splint can be turned down toward the foot and permit the use of bed pan Without having to unscrew the rod.

This splint also provides means for holding the 2o ends of the adhesive tape at the foot, and by being adjustable, can be adjusted to any width of foot so that adhesive tapes will not press on ankle bones. It also provides means for attaching tractive means to the adhesive tapes.

This splint also provides cus which slip on the lateral bars and have means for securely holding the webbing which supports the leg, means for easily adjusting this webbing, and also means for applying lateral, anterior and posterior pressure to any part of the leg. f

This splint also provides a foot piece which holds the foot up, prevents the foot drop, it also prevents the foot from turning to the right or left,

thus keeping the foot in proper alinement with the leg at all times. It further prevents the bed cover from resting on patients toes.

This splint can be used for right orleft leg by simpl-y turning ring over. By the use of rings of varying circumferences and lateral bars of varying lengths, a splint of suitable size can be assembled for any patient, as all parts are standardized for the rectangular bars.

' Some of the objects of the invention uhaving been stated, other objects will appear as the description proceeds when taken 'in connection'with the accompanying drawings, in which- Figure 1 is a side elevation of my improved leg splint;

Figure 2 is a lplan view of Figure 1;

Figure 3 is a cross sectional view taken along the line 3-3 in Figure 2;

Figure 4 is a perspective view of a support adapted to be secured to each of the longitudinal members of the splint; .f/

Figure 5 is a cross sectional view taken along the lines 5-5 in Figure 2;

Figure 6 is an enlarged view taken along the line 6-6 in Figure 1;

Figure 7 is a view of the adhesive holding means;

Figure 8 is a cross sectional view taken alon the line 8-8 in Figure 7;

Figure 9 is an enlarged detailed view partially in cross section of a portion of the ring and the means for preventing turning of the splint;

Figure 10 is a plan view of the left hand end of the structure shown in Figure 2,` but showing the initial traction applying means;

Figure 11 is a view taken along the line I I-I l in Figure 10;

Figure 12 is a view showing the web supporting buckle secured in one position;

Figure 13 is a perspective view of a wrench for operating the mechanism shown in Figure 10;

Figure 14 is a perspective view of member 18;

Figure 15 is a plan view of the central portion of my splint showing means for' applying pressure on the bones in the leg;

Figure 16 is a side elevation looking from the lower side of Figure 1'5;

Figure 17 is an enlarged detail view of one of the members for supporting the bone-piercing members shown in Figure 15;

. Figure 18 is a transverse sectional view taken along the line I8-I8 in Figure 17;

Figure 19 is a perspective view of the turnbuckle for spreading the leg piercing pins apart from each other;

Figure 20 is a view of the bone piercing member made integral and having the same general outline as the sectional pin in Figure 18.

Referring more specifically to the drawings, the numeral I0 indicates a ring adapted to t around the base of the leg and this member I0 has projections I I and I2 projecting from one side thereof and also projections I3 and I4 projecting from another side thereof and the ring IIl is covered with any suitable resilient material such as felt, cloth, leather or rubber and the like indicated by I5. By turning the ring I0 over, it can be used for right or left leg.

The members I I and I3 are threaded interiorly and have secured therein a member I6 which member I6 has threadably secured therein an extended rcd I1. The members I2 and I4 are rigid with relation to member I0 and are adapted to threadably receive an extended rod I8, the purpose of rods I1 and I8 being to prevent turning of the leg of the patient and the splint while the patient is reclining in bed. It also vpermits the foot end of the splint to be swung by a rope or other means from an overhead frame and still prevents patient from turning splint over. The purpose of having rod I1 turnably mounted as shown in Figure 9, is for swinging this rod out of the position shown in Figures 1 and` 2 where they occupy a parallel position to the dotted line angular position shown in Figure 2 so that this member I1 can be swung out of obstructive position when the patient desires to use a bed pan.

Ring member I0 has a bent portion indicated by reference character 28 which is adapted to fit the pubic bone. Ring member Ill has projecting therefrom a portion 2I pivotally mounted with a plurality of holes therein to which is adapted to be secured rectangular hollow side member 23 by means of a screw 22 piercing members 2I and 23.

Also a projection 24 extends from the other side of ring member` Ill and has pivotally mounted as at 25 a member 26 which has `a plurality of holes therein thru which a screw 21 may be passed, said screw also penetrating side member 5 28 which extends the same distance as side member 23 and forms the two main side members of my splint. Y

Adjustably mounted on the members 23 and 28 are a plurality of buckle members 29 which l0 buckle members 29 have a set screw 30 in the lower portion thereof adapted to be used for clamping the buckle member 29 onto the members 23 or the member 28 as the case may be. These buckle members 29 have slots 3| and 32 therein in an up- 15 wardly projecting portion 34, and this buckle member has laterally projecting portions 35 and 36 (see Fig. 12) having a -pin 38 therein in which is pivotally mounted a serrated clamping member 31. Ihese buckle ymembers 29 are adapted to sup- 20 port suitable web material 40 or any other suitable material for supporting the leg between the side members 23 and 28` When used as an ordinary support, the piece of fabric 40 is buckled by means of buckle member 25 31 and it pases thru the lower slot 32 and beneath the leg and thru slot 32 on the other buckle member and passes under the serrated clamping member 31 to secure the lsai-ne as an ordinary support. 30

If lateral traction is desired to be applied to the leg where the bone is out of alinement so as to bring the ends of the bone into alinement to cause j a proper reknitting of the bone at the fractured point, then the web 40 (see Fig. 3) is secured 35 under the outside buckle 29 and is passed beneath the leg and thru lower slot 32 in the inside buckle back thru the upper slot 3I of the inside buckle andagain beneath the leg and around on top of the leg and over the top of projection 34 o'f 40 inside buckle and secured in position by the serrated clamping means on the inside buckle whereby lateral traction will be applied `to pull that portion of the leg inwardly toward the other leg, whereas, if opposite lateral traction is-desired to 45 be applied, the webbing 40 would be placed around the leg in the opposite direction.

A suitable foot board 4I is adapted to be secured to the side members 23 and 28 by means of cuffs 42 and 43 being adjustably secured by 5o means of set screws 44 and 45 on members 28 and 23 and these members 42 and 43 have upwardly projecting spaced lugs 46 and 41 for lug 42 and 48 and 49 for lug 43 and a suitable bolt 50 is passed thru the portions 48 and 49 and another 5:, suitable bolt 5I is passed thru portions 46 and 41 thru slots 52 and 53 respectively to secure foot board 4I in position.

Foot board 4I has a plurality of slots 54 on one side thereof and another set of slots 55 on the 60 other side thereof thru which supporting means 56 maybe secured and passed around the upper portion of the foot of the patient for holding it in' upright position and preventing the foot r from turning to right or left. The foot board 4I has a downwardly projecting central portion '51 which is narrow enouglr to allow the pieces overlapped at its edges, in which overlapping portion the member 63 is adapted to have a sliding iit.

Member 64 has a slot 65 therein and member 63 also has a slot 66 therein which is pierced by a bolt 61 having a thumb nut 68 thereon which bolt is shouldered as at 69 and has a hook 10 thereon which is adapted to be engaged by a cord 12 which is adapted to be passed over a pulley 13 secured in brackets 14 and 15 secured as at 1B and 11 to cross member 18 which is secured to ends of members 23 and 28 by means of thumb nuts 19 and 80 respectively.

The ends of members 23 and 28 are plugged and are interiorly threaded to threadably receive the thumb nuts 19 and 80. Thumbnuts 19 and 80 penetrate elongated slots 83 and 84 in member 18 whereby the distance between the ends of members 23 and 28 may be adjusted. The cord 12 extends downwardly and has a suitable weight 8| secured thereon to which may be added any desired additional weights 82 to supply a steady tractive force to the leg with the splint.

A conventional method of suspending the end of the splint is by means of suspending it from the bed, ceiling, and the like, but if desired, I

may support the ends of members=23 and128 byV having a. plate 85 to' whichis secured a bracket 86 which has an upturned inturned portion to which is pivotally secured a member 81 by means of bolt and thumb nut 88, said member 81 having a plurality of holes 89 therein, wherein a cuff 98 may be adjusted by means of thumb bolts 9| and 92 and the opening 93 is adapted to receive the member 23 or member 28 as the case may be as one o'f these arrangements as shown in Figure 4 will be disposed on each of the members 23 and 28 for supporting the leg of the patient in elevated position if desired, and the angle of elevation may be regulated by means of holes 89 and the cuff 90.

In order tol apply any amount of tractive force that may be necessary to overcome the overriding of the fractured ends of a bone, or to reduce a dislocation of a bone, I have devised attachment shown in Figure l0. This will apply any amount of tractive force necessary for this purpose, separate and apart from the adhesive straps which are to carry the continuous traction until union is secured, for usually these adhesive straps will pull off of the leg if suicient traction is applied to them to produce immediate reduction of overriding or dislocation. By partially loosening bolts 80 and 19, this attachment is slipped on and held to end piece 18 by tightening bolts 88 and 19. Then pieces of webbing 95 and 96 are looped around lower end of leg as shown at 91 and 98.

The above described initial traction is applied after the adhesive is applied to the leg as these straps or webbing 95 and 96 are passed thru a slot 99 in a round member |00 rotatably mounted in a U`shaped bracket |0| which bracket is secured to end piece18 by thumb screws 19 and 80, and one end of round member |08 has mounted thereon a ratchet wheel |02 with a pawl |03 pivoted as at |04 and spring pressed by spring |05 to cause it to ride against ratchet |02 at all times.

The member has a squared portion |06 over which the squared hole |01 of wrench |08 is adapted to be fitted and after the web members 95 and 96 are passed thru slot 99, rotation can be imparted to member |00 and any desired degree of pull can be applied to the leg because the pull is not being exerted on the adhesivev but directly to the leg.

' After the required amount of force has been applied to overcome any overriding of the ends of the fractured bone, then the member composed of portions 63 and 64 can be placed in position as shown in Figures l and 2 and the elastic 58 and 59 is passedthru buckles 6| and 62 and secured as shown in Figure 2 and the Weight can be attached thereto and after this is done the tractive force exerted by round member |00 and webs 95 and 96 can be released and thus the bone can be properly set and aligned immediately after treatment is begun without waiting several days for the pulling force of the weight or a spring exerting a force below thirty ve pounds to cause proper alinement of the bone.

In Figures to 20 inclusive, is shown an attachment on bars 23 and 28 which can be used for reducing and holding the fractured ends of a bone in those cases having extensive injuries to the soft parts, which would prohibit the use of adhesive ror other straps for applying the tractive force, or for any other cause where the fracture could not be reduced and held by external tractive measure.

Figure-#.15 shows the carrying cuffs ||0, which are more fully shown in Figure 17.

Each member ||0 is adapted to be secured in adjusted position on members 23 and 28 respec-tively by means of a thumb nut ||4 appearing in the botom of each of said members. Each of said members has a portion ||5 which has a passageway therethrough similar to the passageway of port-ion 29 of the buckle adapted to have a. sl'ding fit on members 23 and 28 respectively.

On the upper portion of each of these members ||0, vertically disposed slots I' occur and these are adapted to receive the squared portions ||1 of threaded members ||8 or ||9 as the care may be, said member ||9 having a squared opposite direction so that the pair of members i ||0 may be spread apart from each other.

The upper portion of each of these members |||l has a transversely disposed slot |22 therein and a threaded bolt |23 is mounted in vertical relation and has a nut |24 mounted in slot |22. The bolt |23 projects downwardly and is pierced at its lower end by one of the pins |25 which pin has vertical movement in vertical slot |29, said pin having a shoulder |26 thereon into which is threadably secured the piercing pin |21 which pierces the bone of the leg and this pin |21 has a hele |28 therein thru which a small pin or nail may be placed for engaging the same to pull the pn |21 from the leg when it is desired to move the pin from the bone of the leg.

Portion |25 is threaded and has mounted thereonanut |30 by means of which the portion |25 with its shoulder |26 may be advanced against the bone for exerting lateral pressure thereon. The pc-rtion |25 also has a hole |3| therein thru which a pin or other suitable means may be inserted for withdrawing this from the esh portion of the leg when it is desired to disassemble the parts from the leg after the bone has healed andthe treating operation is over.

If desired, the piercing means can be made all in one piece as shown in Figure 20 where portions |21a and |25a are integral and have a shoulder portion 26a; integral therewith. One reason for making this piercing pin in two parts is that it can be separated and withdrawn from the bone without drawing exposed portions of the pin thru the bone.

In the drawings andspeciflcation, there has been set forth a preferred embodiment of the invention, and although specific terms are employed, they are used in a generic and descriptive sense only and not for purposes of limitation, the scope of the invention being set forth in the appended claims.

I claim,

1. In a leg splint having a limb encircling member and side members secured at one end to said limb encircling member, means on said side members for applying longitudinal, lateral, posterior and anterior traction to the fractured leg, comprising a pair of bone piercing members adapted to pass entirely through the two portions of the fractured leg, means adjustably mounted on the side members for supporting said bone piercing members, means for movingl said bone-piercing'members longitudinally of the leg, means for moving said bone piercing members vindependently of each other posteriorly and anteriorly of the leg and means for moving said bone-piercing members independently of each other laterally of the leg.

2. Means for applying longitudinal, lateral, posterior and anterior traction to a fractured limb which comprises a pair of side bars disposed on each side of the limb, a pair of spaced cuffs slidably mounted on each side bar, each of said cuffs having a vertically disposed slot therein,

each of said cuiis also having a vertically disposed guideway in the sides thereof Aoccupying a position above the side bar, a vertically disposed threaded member mounted in each cuff, a nut on each threaded member for adjusting said threaded member vertically with relation to the culi, a bone piercing member slidably mounted in said threaded member at one end and being mounted in an opposed cuff at its other end, a shoulder iixedly mounted on the bone piercing member adapted to fit against the bone, means for adjusting the position of the bone piercing member laterally with relation to the threaded member, expansible means mounted in said guideways and connecting the cuffs on a side bar for adjusting the position of said cuffs on said side bars.

3. In a leg splint having side bars and transverse supports secured to the bars for supporting the leg of a patient, means mounted on the bars for imparting lateral, longitudinal, posterior and anterior traction to the two portions of a fractured leg, said means comprising a pair of cuffs mounted on each bar with means for adjusting the position of the cuffs on said bars with relation to each other, bone piercing means mountedin each of said cuffs on one bar and extending through the bone to a cuff on the other side bar, means for adjusting the position of said piercing members with relation to said cuffs, the bonepiercing members having a fixed shoulder thereon for fitting against the bone.

4. In aleg splint having a limb encircling member' and side bars secured to the said member, a pair of projections on opposedportions of said member, said projections being hollow and being interiorly threaded, a threaded member mounted in said projections, each threaded member having a. transverse interiorly threaded hole therethrough, a rod/'threadably secured in said transverse hole whereby said rod may be swung with said projection as a pivot.

5. Means for applying universal traction to both portions of a fractured bone comprising means for supporting the limb of a patient, a pair of members adapted to be passed entirely through the bone and the leg, means supported by the means for supporting the limb of the patient and associated with the ends of the members for supporting and moving the ends of the members relative to each other in both horizontal and vertical planes, each of said members having a fixed shoulder thereon for engaging said bone.

6. Means for applying traction to fractured bones in limbs of patients comprising a pair of members adapted to be passed entirely through the bone on opposite sides of the break, means for supporting the members and the limb of the patient, means on the ends of the members for moving the members relative to each other, each of said members having a fixed shoulder thereon for engaging said bone.

7. Apparatus for setting fractures in bones in limbs of patients comprising a pair of separated members adapted to be passed through the leg and bone, means for supporting the members and the als limb of the patient, means on both ends of the separated members for moving the separated members and the bone pierced thereby independent of the other of the separated members, each of said members having a fixed shoulder thereon E for engaging said bone.

8. Means for applying traction to a fractured bone in limbs of patients comprising a pair of piercing members adapted to be passed through the bone on opposite sides of the fracture, means 4 for supporting the members and/the limb of the patient, means on both ends of the bone piercing members for adjusting the bone piercing members relative to each other, each of said members having a fixed shoulder thereon for engaging said4 bone.

9. Means for applying traction to a fractured bone in the limb of a patient comprising a pair of bone piercing members adapted to be passed entirely through the bone on opposite sides of the fracture, means for supporting the members and the limb of the patient, means on at least one end of the bone piercing members for adjusting the bone piercing members relative to each other, each of said members having a fixed shoulder thereon for engaging said bone.

10. The method of repairing a fractured bone which includes the steps of piercing the soft parts surrounding the fractured bone with a plurality of drills and driving said drills through the bone and the soft parts at points on opposite sides of the fracture so that said drills protrude from the .soft parts at both ends, providing means directly engaging the bone to prevent axial slipping of said drills through the bone, manipulating said drills to bring the sections of the fractured bone into abutting registry, and mechanically holding said drills in adjusted positions to hold said bone sections in such abutting registry throughout a knitting period.

CHARLES I. ALLEN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2435850 *Jul 16, 1945Feb 10, 1948Siebrandt John RSplint and guard construction
US2440123 *Oct 7, 1946Apr 20, 1948Smith Chester HRemovable bone plate
US2443845 *Oct 24, 1945Jun 22, 1948Wandel BronislawMassage apparatus
US3299888 *Oct 18, 1965Jan 24, 1967Muckinhaupt Frederick HFracture setting device
US3355978 *Oct 7, 1965Dec 5, 1967Lo Dense Fixings Rugby LtdNail
US3461864 *Aug 1, 1966Aug 19, 1969Coss Raymond LTraction device
US3756227 *Sep 23, 1971Sep 4, 1973Sager JEmergency traction splint
US3878842 *Sep 10, 1973Apr 22, 1975Goldberg David PTraction appliance permitting mobility
US4079734 *Dec 3, 1976Mar 21, 1978Orthopedic Equipment CompanyTraction device for use with a Thomas splint
US4174709 *Dec 20, 1977Nov 20, 1979Maddux Richard HExtensible splint
US4834073 *Feb 20, 1987May 30, 1989Medical Technology, Inc.Passive motion exerciser
US5162039 *Jan 21, 1992Nov 10, 1992Dahners Laurence ESurgical device for setting fractures
US5314426 *Apr 14, 1993May 24, 1994Pohl Anthony PExternal bone fixation device
US5669908 *Jan 16, 1996Sep 23, 1997Gracilla; R. V.Cast brace for femoral shaft fractures in children
US7147640Dec 10, 2003Dec 12, 2006Acumed LlcExternal fixator
US7192410 *Jun 2, 2004Mar 20, 2007Rodgers Darell EOrthopedic rehabilitation mechanism
US7507240Mar 18, 2005Mar 24, 2009Ron Anthon OlsenAdjustable splint for osteosynthesis
US7575575Mar 18, 2005Aug 18, 2009Ron Anthon OlsenAdjustable splint for osteosynthesis with modular components
US7588571Mar 18, 2005Sep 15, 2009Ron Anthon OlsenAdjustable splint for osteosynthesis with modular joint
US7731738Dec 9, 2005Jun 8, 2010Orthopro, LlcCannulated screw
Classifications
U.S. Classification602/23, 606/54, 411/435, 606/56, 411/923
International ClassificationA61B17/64, A61B17/86
Cooperative ClassificationA61B17/6408, Y10S411/923, A61B17/86
European ClassificationA61B17/64B