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Publication numberUS2024478 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 17, 1935
Filing dateDec 13, 1933
Priority dateDec 13, 1933
Publication numberUS 2024478 A, US 2024478A, US-A-2024478, US2024478 A, US2024478A
InventorsShort Robert J
Original AssigneeProcter & Gamble
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Proportioning device for liquids
US 2024478 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

ec. 17, 1935. R. J. SHORT 2,024,478

PROPORTIONING DEVICE FOR LIQUIDS Filed Dec. 13, 1933 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR.

ATTORNEYS,

Dec. 17, 1935. R, J SHORT PROPORTIONING DEVICE FOR LIQUIDS 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Dec 15, 1953 INVENTOR.

ATTORNEY5.

Patented Dee. 17, 1935 PROPORTIONING DEVICE FOR LIQUIDS Robert J. Short, Cincinnati, Ohio, assignor to The Procter & Gamble Company, Cincinnati, Ohio,

a corporation of Ohio Application December is, 1933, Serial No. 702,266 9 Claims. (01. 137-164).

This invention relates to a device for delivering two or more liquids simultaneously in definite proportions to each other, which can be varied at will.

The object of the invention is to provide a device of this character that will be smooth, positive and reliable in operation, adjustable to deliver different proportions as desired within reasonable limits, and which will stop all flow automatically if for any reason any one liquid stops flowing or exceeds predetermined proportions.

- In manyindustrial operations it is desirable to continuously mix two or more liquids in deflnite, and sometimes variable, proportions. The continuous proportioning of molten kettle soap and silicate of soda or sal soda solution in soap making, of crude vegetable oil and caustic soda solutions for use in the continuous refining of vegetable oils, or of petroleum oils and sulfuric acid, are example of the use of this device, and many others might be mentioned.

Various devices have been proposed for accomplishing this object; some give a pulsating flow instead of a smooth continuous flow; some of the devices cannot be closely controlled or cannot be readily adjusted to change from one proportion to another, and none, as far as I am aware, will automatically stop the flow if the flow of one of the liquids becomes interrupted. These difficulties are all overcome in my improved device.

My device, in its simplest form, as applied to two liquids consists essentially in the use of a suitable differential whose primary shafts are caused to rotate by the now of the respective liquids and whose secondary member actuates a valve or other suitable control device controlling the flow of one of the liquids so that it will always flow in the desired proportion to the primary liquid, and furthermore, an electrically operated valve or other suitable deviceso arranged as to stop the fiow of the primary liquid whenever the secondary liquid stops flowing or exceeds predetermined proportions. The stopping of the pri mary liquid will automatically stop the entire device. Various modifications of this principle may be used; and for the purpose of an exemplary disclosure some of the preferred forms of the device and methods of applying same are more fully set forth herein. The accompanying drawings will make these parts and their interrelated action clear.

Reference is made to these drawings, wherein:-

Flgure 1 shows one form of my device.

Figure 2 shows a modified form thereof.

Referring to Figure 1, a pipe line through which the primary liquid is supplied is indicated at I. This liquid flows through a device 2, having a rotatable member which is caused to rotate in proportion to the flow of the liquid through it. This device may conveniently be a meter device of known typehaving a counter 3 to indicate the quantity of liquid passing through the device in a given time. The shaft 4 of the rotatable 5 member, which is caused to extend from the casin of the meter device, is connected to a shaft 5 of a variable speed transmission 6. The driven shaft 1 of the variable speed transmission carries a sprocket wheel 8 which is connected by a suit- 10 able chain 811, to a sprocket wheel 9 attached to one of the primary shafts ll of the differential mechanism It). The sprocket wheels 8 and 9 may be varied in their relative size .to obtain the required speed in the difierential with reference to the flow of the liquid. The variable speed transmission may be omitted and sprocket wheel 8 may be attached directly to the shaft 4 if it is not desired to provide for readily changing the proportions of the two liquids from time to time.

The variable speed transmission may be of any well known type.

I'I indicates a pipe through which the secondary liquid is delivered to the device. This liquid passes through a meter device l8 having a rotatable member, similar in construction to the device 2. It may be provided with a counter [9 for indicating the quantity'of fluid passing in a given time. 20 indicates the shaft of the rotatable member of device [8, or an extension of same, which is adapted to drive, either directly, or through suitable gear ,or chain and sprocket means the secondary primary shaft l2 of the differential Ill. A change-speed drive may also be v employed, if required, to give the required speed on the shaft I! of the differential, with reference to the speed of shaft II, when the secondary liquid is flowing at the desired rate.

The particular type of differential mechanism is not a limitation upon my invention. In my 0 specific embodiment, the first primary shaft ll carries a wide faced gear 23. The second primary shaft l2 of the differential is threaded as shown, the threads extending substantially from end to end thereof inside the housing of the differential. Mounted on said threaded shaft I2 is a gear or secondar member l3 threaded internally to match the thread on shaft 42, so that its axis is concentric with the axis 'of the threaded shaft l2. The teeth in gear l3 engage with the teeth of gear 23. The hub of gear I3 is grooved and fitted with a. collar provided with pins 24, so arranged that the end of a lever It must move longitudinally with the gear l3 around a fulcrum 26 upon an external support, not shown. The lever I4 is connected through a suitable linkage and lever to the stem l5 of a valve l6 which is located in the pipe line carrying the secondary liquid. 25 indicates diagrammatically an electrical switch or switches arranged to be moved by the lever ll, against abutments 2i and 22, so that an electrical contact will be made when the lever moves to an extreme position either to the right or to the left. The closing of these contacts can be made by known means to operate valves for stopping the flow of the liquids, and/0r suitable signals. For this purpose I have shown a switch 25 connected by leads 40 and H in one of which a source of current 42 is inserted, to the solenoid ll of a magnetically operated valve M in the outlet line 45 of the device. I have likewise shown a signaling means 46 connected in parallel with the solenoid. It will be noted that the valve 44 is in the line 4! beyond the point of entry of the delivery line II for the secondary fluid.

Figure 2shows a somewhat different application of my invention adapted to the proportioning of any number of liquids, three liquid delivery lines being shown. 3i represents a shaft driven by a motor or other suitable device 32, preferably a variable speed motor. 0n the shaft 3| are mounted bevel gears, II, 33, 33", each of which drives one of the two primary shafts in each of the differentials 34, 31', 34". These difl'erentials operate like those described and shown in Fig. 1. A separate differential is required for each liquid handled. The second primary shaft 35, 35' 35" of each of these differentials is driven by the rotatable shaft of a meter through which the respective liquid passes, 36, 38' and 36", as is explained above. The secondary member of each differential is attached to a lever, 31' and 31", operating a control valve 3!, 38' and 38", in the pipe line carrying the liquid connected with each respective differential, this operation being exactly the same as was explained under Fig. 1. In this arrangement the simplest way to change the proportions of the different liquids is to change the beveled gears 33, I3 and 33", which operate the respective differentials at suitable speeds relative to each other. Variable speed transmissions may also be used at these points.

Each of the levers 31, 31', 31" may bear a switch 39, 39" connected in parallel to leads 41' and 48, which in turn are connected to the solenoid 49 of a cut-off valve 50 in the delivery line 5|. There will be a suitable source of current as at 52 for actuating the solenoid and a signalling device 53 may likewise be connected into the circuit. I have shown in Fig. 2 pumps 54, i4, 54" actuated by motors 55, 65', 55" for feeding the pipes for the delivery of the controlled liquids to the delivery pipe ii.

The principle of operation of the device of Figure 1 is as follows, assuming two liquids are to be mixed:

The flow of the primary liquid causes the rotating member or meter 2 to rotate in direct relation to the amount of liquid flowing, and through the intervening sprockets, speed transmission device, etc., causes the first primary shaft ll of the differential to rotate at a certain speed. Likewise, the flow of the secondary liquid causes the second primary shaft ii of the differential to rotate at a certain speed, and by proper selection of the sprocket wheels, etc., the two primary shafts of the differential will revolve at the correct speeds with reference to each other, only when the flow of the two liquids is in the required proportion to each other. The construction of the differential shown is such that if these two primary shafts rotate at the required speed relation, the member 13 on the threaded shaft will maintain its position without longitudinal movement along the shaft II, but if the primary shafts fail to rotate at the required speed, then the difference in speed of rotation will cause the member ii to move in a longitudinal direction to the right or to the left along the threaded shaft, the direction depending 5 on which shaft is moving faster. The lever attached to this secondary member i3 is thereby caused to move in the same direction as the member l3 and through a suitable fulcrum will operate the stem of the balanced control valve to open 1 or close same as required, thus increasing or decreasing the flow of the secondary liquid through the rotatable member I! until the desired proportional rate of flow is again restored, whereupon the two primary shafts of the differential will 15 again rotate at the proper speeds, with the member l3 in a position of. equiiibium. By suitably adjusting the length or position of the lever arms,

a proper setting is obtainable so that with the secondary member of the diflerential in a central 20 position on the shaft If, the control valve i6 is opened to the degree required for delivering the secondary liquid in the desired proportions when the primary liquid is flowing at its normal rate. The two liquids, after passing through the apg5 paratus through separate pipes, may then join into a common pipe for discharge to a mixing device, or may be delivered separately, as desired.

If the rate of flow of the primary liquid is changed by throttling at any point in the system, it is 30 obvious that the device will automatically compensate for this through the differential by causing the rate of flow of the other liquid to change correspondingly, so as to maintain the same proportions of the two liquids. Likewise, any 35 throttling of the discharge line carrying the mixed liquids will reduce the total flow without permitting the proportions of the two liquids to vary. If the flow of the secondary liquid is changed to an amount greater than can be compensated for 0 by the operation of the differential and its control valve, the electrical device will then so operate as to stop the flow of both liquids until the cause of the trouble is corrected.

It is, of course, possible so to design this type 45 of differential that the two primary shafts, instead of rotating at identical speeds, will rotate at diiferent speeds while maintaining secondary member I3 in its proper longitudinally stationary position of equilibrium. This could be the case, 50 for example, if the gear 23 were made with a different diameter and different number of teeth from secondary member it. Such a variation, however, would be considered equivalent to the differential as described for all intents and pur- 55 poses. It is also obvious that any other type of differential can be used than the one described, provided only that it has two driven primary shafts co-acting on a secondary member in such a way that the motion of the latter, whether on rotary or longitudinal, can be used tocontrol the secondary liquid. My invention is not limited to the use of the type of differential shown, but covers the use of any differential in substantially the manner described in connection with a suit- 5 able means of control. If the rotatable members 2 and I8 have any difllculty in driving the shafts of the differential without permitting slippage or leakage of liquid through same, torque ampliflers" of known type may be installed to supply 70 the power needed to drive the differential shafts, but this is not ordinarily necessary.

It is also to be understood that other means of power transmission than a lever or levers, as shown and described, may be used between the 76 secondary member of the. diflerential and the stem of the control valve or other control means. A- rotary screw motion or a worm and gear type of transmission may be used, or any other of the many known mechanical means for accomplishing this object. My invention is not limited to the use of the lever, therefore, but is intended to cover any means of transmitting motion from the secondary member .of the differential to the stem of the control valve or to the pump or to other control means in such a way as to control the flow of the liquid.

The relative proportions of the two liquids can readily be changed to any desired point within the limits of the apparatus by changing the variable speed transmission apparatus as desired. When'necessary to make changes outside the limits 'of thevariable speed device, the substitution of suitable sized gears or sprockets in the system will accomplish the result within any desired range. The relative sizes of rotatable inembers, or meters, pipe lines, and valves, will naturally be selected in accordance with the relative amounts of the diiferent liquids to be handled so as to obtain suitable speeds of rotation of the shafts within the desired range for use in this device.

Three or more liquids may be mixed or delivered proportionally under the arrangement shown in Fig. l by adding another differential and balanced control valve (etc.) for each additional liquid, together with another variable speed transmission if desired, and so arranging the apparatus that the primary liquid drives one primary shaft in each added differential in addition to driving a primary shaft in the original difierential, and the secondary primary shaft of each added difierential is driven from a rotatable member in the pipe line supplying said additional liquid, while the secondary member of each added differential controls a balanced valve in pipe line supplying said additional liquid.

It is also possible to operate as shown in Fig. 2 when any number of liquids are required to be delivered proportionally. Variable speed transmission devices may be used on each of the differentials in this system also, if desired. Furthermore, by the use of a variable speed motor in driving the main shaft, it is possible to increase or decrease the total quantity of liquidsdelivered,

within the limits of the motor, withoutchanging the proportions of any one liquid to another.

It is obvious that when the proportions of two or more liquids are permanently fixed, the use of a variable speed transmission device becomes unnecessary and in that case both primary shafts of the differential can be driven directly from the shafts of the rotatable members 2 and it (see Fig. 1) by suitable gears, or by a chain and sprocket, etc., as desired. Likewise in the arrangement of Fig. 2, when the proportion is permanently fixed, any number of liquids can also be delivered in the required fixed proportions.

In order to prevent the continued fiow of the primary liquid when the flow of the secondary liquid is interrupted for any reason, or when the required proportions cannot be maintained, a suitable electrical switch is provided. This may most conveniently be placed on the lever operating the balanced control valve, so as to operate as follows: If the flow of the secondary liquid stops or if its relative rate exceeds or falls below a desired point, the secondary member i3 of the enough to operate the electric switch, which will then, operate a suitable electrically controlled valve'stopping the flow of the primary liquid, or of both liquids; or it may be arranged to cut oil! the current supplying the motors which oper- 5- ate the pumps supplyingthe two fluids. Either method, therefore, stops the apparatus entirely and it will not resume operation until the trouble is corrected. This feature is important, and, vI believe, has never been accomplished in any prior 0 proportloning device.

This apparatus is easily constructed at moderate cost, is simple and positive in its action, gives a smooth flow of both liquids without pulsations, can-be readily adjusted to any desired propcrtions of two or more liquids, and will not permit any flow it the desired proportions for any reason cannot be maintained.

Liquids of practically any kind or degree of viscosity can be handled satisfactorily in this device. Even liquids containing suspended matter forming a so-called sludge will operate satisfactorily, provided the said materials will flow like a liquid.

Having thus described my invention, what I 01851111 as new and desire to secure by Letters Paten s: 1

1. In a device for proportloning the flow of liquids, means for delivering a controlling liquid, motive means actuated'by the flow of said liquid in said controlling liquid delivery means in proportion to said flow, means for delivering a controlled liquid, motive means actuated by the flow of said controlled liquid in said controlled liquid delivery means in proportion to said flow, an 1-23 equilibrium motion device having a plurality of primary driven parts and a secondary part adapted for movement upon the disturbance of a given relationship of motion of the primary driven parts, individual motion transmitting con- 40 nections between said motive means and said primary parts, a valve in the delivery means of said controlled liquid, a connection between said valve and said secondary part, and means actuated by said secondary part for stopping the flow of said liquids when said secondary part exceeds a given range of movement.

2. A device for controlling the flow of a secondary liquid in definite proportion to the fiow of a primary liquid and for stopping the flow of the primary liquid when the flow of the secondary liquid exceeds predetermined limits, comprising in combination a rotatable member in the line of fiow of each liquid adapted to rotate in definite relation to the amount of liquid flowing, a control 5 valve in the line of flow of the liquid to be controlled, a suitable diiferential, power transmitting means between the different elements; so arranged that each of the said rotatable members causes one of the primary shafts of the diiferential to rotate, said primary shafts being caused to rotate at such a ratio of speed to each other as will hold the secondary member in a stationary position when the two liquids are flowing in the desired proportions but will cause movement in the secondary member of said differential when the said ratio is disturbed; said movement in the secondary member of the differential being of such nature as to actuate the said control valve so as to permit the liquid under control to flow again in the desired proportion, and an electrical device comprising an electrical switch actuated by the movement of the secondary member of the difierential and an electrically controlled valve on a line carrying the primary 7! liquid: so arranged that when the flow oi the secondary liquid exceeds predetermined limits the movement of the secondary member of the diiierentiai will actuate the electrical switch causing an electric current to close a valve in the line carrying the primary liquid.

8. A device for controlling the flow of a secondary liquid in any desired proportion to the flow ot a primary liquid, comprising in combination a rotatable member in the line oi flow of each liquid adapted to rotate in definite relation to the amount of liquid flowing, a control valve in the line of flow of the liquid to be controlled, a suitable dii'ierential, power transmitting means between the dlflerent elements including a variable speed transmission between one of the rotatable members and the corresponding primary shaft of the diiierential; so arranged that each oi the said rotatable members causes one oi the primary shaits' oi the diiierential to rotate, said primary shatts being caused to rotate at such a ratio of speed to each other as will hold the secondary member in stationary position when the two liquids are flowing in the desired proportions but will cause movement in the secondary member of said differential when the said ratio is disturbed; said movement in the secondary member of the diii'erential being of such nature as to actuate the said control valve so as to permit the liquid under control to again flow in the desired proportion, the desired proportion being adjustable by means of the variable speed transmission; valve means in the line of flow of the primary liquid and means actuated by said secondary member for closing said valve means when said secondary member exceeds a given range of movement.

4. A device for controlling the flow of a secondary liquid in definite proportion to the flow of a primary liquid, comprising in combination means for combining said primary and secondary liquids, a rotatable member in the line of flow of each liquid adapted to rotate in deflnite relation to the amount oi liquid flowing, a control valve in the line of flow oi the liquid to be controlled, a suitable diiierential, power transmitting means between the diiierent elements; so arranged that each of the said rotatable members causes one of the primary shafts oi the diflerential to rotate, said primary shafts being caused to rotate at such a ratio of speed to each-other as will hold the secondary member of the diii'erential in a stationary position when the two liquids are flowing in the desired proportions but will cause movement in the secondary member of said diflerential when the said ratio is disturbed; said movement in the secondary member of the diflerential being of such nature as to actuate the said control valve so as to permit the liquid under. control to flow again in the desired proportion; valve means in the line of flow oi the combined primary and secondary liquids actuated by said secondary member 01' the differential for closing said valve means when said secondary member exceeds a given range movement.

' 5. A device for controlling the flow of liquids in definite proportions to each other, comprising in combination means for combining the proportioned liquids, a rotatable member in the line of flow of each liquid adapted to rotate in deflnite relation to the amount oi! liquid flowing, a control valve in the line of flow of each liquid, suitspacers able diilerentials equal in number to the number of liquids to be controlled, power transmitting means between the diflerent elements; so arranged that each of the said rotatable members causes one of the primary shaits of its respective 5 diii'erential to rotate while the second primary shaft of each of the diflerentials is caused to rotate by the application of power from an outside source, the two primary shafts of each differential being caused to rotate at such a ratio of speed to each other as will hold the secondary member oi the diilerential in a stationary position when the respective liquid is flowing in the desired proportion, but will cause movement in the secondary member when the said ratio is (115- turbed; said movement in the secondary member of the diflerential being of such nature as to actuate the respective control valve so as to permit the respective liquid to again flow in the desired proportion, valve means in the line of flow oi the combined liquids, and means actuated by said secondary member for closing said valve means when said secondary member exceeds a given range of movement.

6. In a device for proportioning and-combining liquids, delivery means for the combined liquids, delivery means for the liquids to be proportioned,

a plurality of equilibrium motion devices, one for each of said liquids, said devices comprising a plurality of primary driven parts and a secondary member adapted to be moved upon the disturbance of a given relationship of motion of the primary parts, motive means actuated by each of said liquids and adapted for motion in proportion to the flow of liquid therethrough, a motion transmitting connection between each of said motive means and one 0! said primary driven parts in the equilibrium motion device actuated by each of said liquids, valves in each of said delivery means for the liquids to be proportioned and a motion transmitting means between each of said valves and the secondary member of the equilibrium motion device associated with said delivery means for the liquids to be proportioned,

a prime mover, a motion transmitting connection between said prime mover and the other of said primary driven parts i each equilibrium motion device, valve means in e line of flow of the combined liquids actuated by said secondary member for closing said valve means when said secondary member exceeds a given rangeot movement.

7. In a liquid proportioning device having a member movable in response to variations from given liquid proportions, means activated by said member for stopping the flow of the liquids when the proportions of said liquids exceed predetermined limits.

8. In a liquid proportioning device having a. member movable in response to variations from given liquid proportions, electrical means activated by said member for stopping the flow of the liquids when the proportions of the said liquids exceed predetermined limits.

9.'In a liquid proportioning device having a plurality oi. conduits, means for causing liquid flow in each, a member movable in response to variations in proportions ot the liquid in each conduit, and means activated by said member to shut oi! the flow in both conduits upon movement of said member beyond a predetermined limit. 7

ROBERT J. SHORT.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2641271 *Feb 13, 1951Jun 9, 1953Bowser IncFluid proportioner
US2664907 *Jan 6, 1951Jan 5, 1954Proportioneers IncApparatus for proportioning flows of different materials
US2671756 *May 24, 1949Mar 9, 1954Blair Everson RoySystem for mixing a gas with a liquid
US2715610 *Feb 29, 1952Aug 16, 1955Standard Oil CoProportioner for chemical feed
US2735717 *Mar 19, 1952Feb 21, 1956 harman
US2737961 *Nov 16, 1950Mar 13, 1956Cornell Machine CompanyApparatus and method for supplying an accurately measured supply of fluid
US2858049 *Aug 1, 1956Oct 28, 1958Sun Oil CoMetering means
US2870776 *Jun 21, 1954Jan 27, 1959Sun Oil CoLiquid proportioning system
US4265266 *Jan 23, 1980May 5, 1981Halliburton CompanyControlled additive metering system
US4353482 *Jan 23, 1980Oct 12, 1982Halliburton CompanyAdditive metering control system
US4538221 *Apr 6, 1983Aug 27, 1985Halliburton CompanyApparatus and method for mixing a plurality of substances
US4538222 *Apr 6, 1983Aug 27, 1985Halliburton CompanyApparatus and method for mixing a plurality of substances
US4779186 *Dec 24, 1986Oct 18, 1988Halliburton CompanyAutomatic density control system for blending operation
US4916631 *Dec 24, 1986Apr 10, 1990Halliburton CompanyProcess control system using remote computer and local site control computers for mixing a proppant with a fluid
US5014218 *Jul 25, 1989May 7, 1991Halliburton CompanyUsing a remote control computer connected to a vocal control computer and a monitor computer
Classifications
U.S. Classification137/101.19, 210/101, 422/129.1, 210/87, 222/129, 251/229
International ClassificationC11B3/06, G05D11/00, C11B3/00, G05D11/13
Cooperative ClassificationG05D11/13, C11B3/06, G05D11/132
European ClassificationG05D11/13, C11B3/06, G05D11/13B2