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Publication numberUS2024511 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 17, 1935
Filing dateMay 10, 1935
Priority dateMay 10, 1935
Publication numberUS 2024511 A, US 2024511A, US-A-2024511, US2024511 A, US2024511A
InventorsDarling Frank L
Original AssigneeGlen Dar Can Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Vacuum sealing can
US 2024511 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dern 17, 1935. 4, F. I.. DARLING 2,024,511

` vAcUUM sEALN CAN Filed May l0, 1935 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 ELEVE- F z I 12 l l0 9 8 4 2r v-/ww 5 6 gmc/who@ De.; 11, 193s. F, DARUNG 2,024,511

VACUUM SEALING CAN l Filed May 1o, 1955 2 sneek-sheet 2 /5 NEGATIVE PnEssuHE 4 6 (mouw/z) SEALED :L -7- /0 Il 5 3, TQ/2 y( /3 WY' v l y /l r A T T f L 6 l( PoslTlvE PHEssUHE 9 (Jigs PouNps :H

vENTme.

/0ad .e 5 w L 7 Y l l /7 3! e POSITIVE PRESSURE Less THAN 5 Lbs) POITIVE PRE-SSUHE (OVER s PouN os) PLUG: BLOWN OFF Patented l 17,` 193.5

vVACUUM sEAmNe CAN Frank It.. Darling, Douglaston, 1S. Y., assigner, `by

mesne assignments, to Glen-Dar Can Co., a corporation of Delaware Application May 1c, 1935, serial No. 20,838

17 claims. (o1. 22o-44) struction that can be manufactured at a mini-l mum cost and will readily and fully serve its intended purposes. i v

Further, it is an object to provide a can with a .10 plug-type closure which can be used again as a temporary closure after it has been initially removed from the can in order to preserve the remaining contents of the can, should the contents not all be removed or consumed at the same Further, itis an object to provide a can with a plug-type closure held in hermetically sealed relation to the can body by the partial vacuum existing in the can.

.20 Further, it is an object to provide a can witha plug-type closure so attached to the can body that when once the closure has been .removed that fact will be 'clearly indicated, thereby enabling one to detect a can that has Vbeen tam- 25 vpered with.

Further, it is an obj-ect to provide a can with a closure having a plastic sealing compound held 1n a channel which cooperates with 'the cut edge of the iiange of the can that surrounds the can opening, in such manner that the suction-due to the vacuum within the can tends to Wedge the can flange into a tight hermetic seal.

Further, it is an object to provide a can with a plug-type closure having a plastic sealing ring,

plastic compound between the closure and the and so to design the closure that it may never seat down on the can so far that the mouth flangev of the can can cut entirely .through the plastic, but the ange must remain with its cut edge embedded in and protected by the plastic, regardless of the'degree of vacuum in the can.

Further, it is an object to provide a can with a plug-type closure having triangular points for Auniting the closure to the can when the closure is in place, the points being so located as not to require the use,v of more sheetmetal from which the-closures are stamped than is required for the ordinary circular discs, a portion of the former waste material being utilized for the triangular points.

Further, it is an object to provide a can with a closure of the plug-type, having points at its periphery for contacting with a bead on theca'n top, which bead surrounds-but is'spaced fromthe mouth flange of the can, the structure being in Figure 2.

such that the presence of a partial vacuum in the can is utilized to hold the points down in tight engagement with the can tops bead while the points are being united to the bead.

Further, it is`an object to provide a can with a Ig; top having an 'opening bounded by an upwardly and outwardly ared mouth ring or flange to be received in a, groove of a plug-type closure in which groove plastic sealing compound is carried in such manner that the compound Will interlcckm with the ange when the plug-type closure is in place.

Further, it is an object to provide a can with a Y closure which is so constructed that the can will be self-venting, should pressure be built up in the 15 can above a predetermined amount.

Further, it is an object to provide a can With a closure which, while permitting automatic venting of the can, will eiect a resealing of the can automatically when the internal pressure 20 falls below the predetermined amount.

Further, it is an object to provide a can with a plug-type -closure so designed as to act, Within` predetermined approximate limits, as a pressure releasing valve, and when an excess pressure 25,y

builds up the closure will be thereby detached from the can to open the can and prevent bursting thereof. Y

Other objects will in part be obvious and in part be pointed out hereinafter. 30 To the attainment of the aforesaid objects-and ends the inventionstill further resides in the novel details of construction, combinationandv arrangement of parts, all of which will be fully ldescribed in the following detail description, and 35 then be particularly pointed out in the appended claims, reference being had to the accompanying drawings, in which:-

Figure 1 is a vertical longitudinal section of a can to which the invention is applied. 40

Figure 2 is an enlarged detail vertical longitudinal-section on line 2`2 of Figure 3.

Figure 3 is a top plan view of the parts shown Figure 4 is a detail vertical section similar to 45 Figure 2 of a portion of the structure showing the positionbf the plug-type closure when first set into place and before it has been brought down to its final position.

Figure is a diagrammatic view showing how the closures are stamped from a strip or sheet of metal in an economical manner.

f Figures 6 to 9, inclusive, are views similar to Figure 2, showing a slightly modifiedform of the invention, and illustrating the different positions of the closure with respect to the can top.

While my invention has `been especially designed for use with cans for packaging coffee,

, malted milk and other granular or powdered substances, the invention may also be used wherever vacuum packed food stuffs are canned. 'I'he size and shape of the can may vary to suit the user.

In the drawings, in which like numerals of reference indicate like parts in all the flgures, I represents a can having a bottom 2 and a top 3,

A the latter having an opening or mouth bound by an upwardly andoutwardly ared flange 4. Surrounding the ange 4 and spaced a suitable dis-- -the edge of which extends a plurality (preferably three) of preferably diamond-shaped points I0 which overlie and rest on the bead 5 when the plug is in place.

When the closure plug I is placed in the hole in the top 3 of the can and is drawn down by reason of the partial vacuum in the can (or is forced down by pressure from above), the points I0 will be bent upwardly slightly as they contact the bead5 and, as is shown in Figure 2, the plastic .I4lwill be compacted in the V-shaped annular space between the wall I3 and the flange 4 (see Figure 2), and act somewhat as a wedge to eifect a tight or hermetic seal between the closure and the can top.

When the closure 'I is first placed in position the parts are located as indicated in Figure 4, but as soon as the pli@ is drawn in by reason of the vacuum within the can (forced in by atmospheric pressure from above) the parts assume the position shown in Figures 1 and 2. The depth of the supporting portion 9 ofthe plug is such that it will come to rest before the edge of the ilange 4 passes entirely through the plastic. This insures the edge of the flange being always covered and protected by the plastic compound and the .edge will never come into contact with the metal of the closure.

In practice the lid 3 and closure 1 are heavily tinned so that the points I Il may be united to the bead 5 attheir points of contact by spot heating treatment, heat being applied until the tin of the lid and that of the points flows together and thereby secures the closure to the can without the use of solder. Of course, solder may be used, if desired.

This renders the can safe against tampering with, for if the adhesion between the points I0 and the bead 5 be broken, that will indicate at once the fact that the can has been tampered with.

As the points I0 are preferably only secured at their extremities, they offer very little resistance to the renewal of the closure. To remove the closure it isonly necessary to insert the blade I5 of aknife between the rim or flange I I and the bead 5, and usethe blade as a lever to prize up the closure. The 'closure having once been removed from the can top opening, it may be replaced as a temporary closure in the event that all the contents of the can are not emptied out or used in the first place. The plasticity of the' compound I4 is such that it will yield to re-embed the flange 4 when the closure is pressed down.

To stamp the closures from sheet metal'they may be economically stamped out in the manner indicated in Figure 5, the points vl0 lying in what is usually waste metal when ordinary circular discs only are stamped out. Therefore it will require no more stock to make these plug-type closures with the points I 0,.than is required without them.

By reason of the facts that the ange 4 flares outwardly, the bottom of the plug lies below the plane of the top 3 when the plug is in place, and the wall I3 is slightly resilient, the plug will t the mouth or opening of the can with a snug frictional engagement that prevents the plastic I4 being sucked into the can by the vacuum.

Practice has demonstrated that fresh coffee, vacuum packed, does not hold the .vacuum because the gases given off by the coffee often build up a positive pressure within the can. Unless this pressure is relievedit causes the ends of the cans to bulge and sometimes results in theexplosion of the can. Ordinarily the pressure which builds up in canned fresh coffee does not go beyond the limits. of from three to ve pounds. The lower pressures are not harmful, but pressures around ve pounds bulge the can ends too much, so they will not set flat. By my construction the area of the plug opposed to internal pressure and the tenacity of the union between the points IG--I 0a and the bead 5 are so designed that only pressures above a danger point (say,

. nine pounds) will cause the plug to blow out and vure 7) has reduced the internal pressure to less than ve pounds.

The pressures above mentioned are illustrative only, as by varying the resiliency of the material of the closure points and the tenacity of their union to the bead 5 different pressure values may be taken care of.

The lform of the invention shown in Figures 6 to 9 inclusive differs from that shown in Figures 1 to 4 inclusive only in that i'n stamping the closure plugs the points I0a are stamped straight from the edge rim II instead of being bent over somewhat at an angle, as shown in Figure 4. The straight Apoints give greater resistance to the lifting of the plug in the can opening than the ben points do.

In Figure 6 is shown the normal position of the parts when a negative pressure (so-called vacuum) is established in the can.

. (i5 Figure 7 shows theapproximate position of the closure plug during slow venting when pressure in the can has been built up to, say, ve pounds.

termined maxminbild up in the can; the points in being pulled loose may be somewhat bent, as indicated.

By providing the channel at 6 betweenthe bead and flange'4, should some of the material vbe spilled in filling the can, this material will not collectl in the space between the flange 4 and the wall I3 of the plug. but will drop into the channl 6. Thus, none of the material will prevent a tight metal-to-metal contactv between the wall I3 and the bend ofthe flange 4 (see Figure 6) throughout the entire circumference of the wall I3, or between the compound and the cut edge of the can. Thus spilled material can not prevent an air-tight seal being effected. In the present day practice, where the cans are filled arid then the heads are put on by rolling, it frequently happens that some of the material gets rolled into the seam and when that occurs the can often leaks.. With my invention this objectionable feature is eliminated.

In virtue of my invention it will be seen that a simple, effective and inexpensive closure has been provided which is economical to manufacture and operate and will readily serve its intended purposes.

The cans can be made up complete with the closures separate, lled at the' place wherethe coffee, malted milk or other foodstuffs are put into the cans, and the closures put into place and sealed down by simple apparatus at the factory where the cans are packed, making it unnecessary to provide expensive seamrolling machines, as hasheretofore been the case.

From the foregoing description, taken in connection with the accompanying drawings,y it is Vthought that the complete construction and advantages of the invention will be clear to those skiued in the art to which it appertains;

What I claim is:

l. In a vacuum sealing can having a filling opening bounded by an upwardly and outwardly flared flange, a plug-type closure fitting into said opening and having an annular channel containing a. plastic sealing substance to t over" said flange and embed the edge of said flange in the sealing substance, and means to arrest the insertion of said closure before the edge of said flange can pass through the plastic sealing substance.

2. In a vacuum sealing can having a filling opening bounded by an upwardly and outwardly flared flange,.a plug-type closure fitting into said opening and having an annular channel -containing a plastic sealing substance to fit over said flange 'and embed the edge' of said flange in the sealing substance, said closure having an annular supporting portion surrounding said channel to engage the can before the edge of said flange passes Vthrough the plastic whereby said edge is always protected by the plastic.

V4.A In a vacuum sealing can having a flllingv opening bounded by an upwardly and outwardly' flared `flange, a plug-type closure fitting into said opening and having an annular channel-4 containing a plastic sealing substance to fit over said :Bange and embed the edgeof said flange in the sealing substance, said closure having anov annular supporting portion surrounding said channel to engage the can before the edge of said flange passes through the plastic whereby said edge is always protected by the-plastic, said can having an annular outwardly projecting bead surrounding said flange and spaced from the same, and said closure having a rim with points projecting therefrom, the points overlying said bead, and means-to unite said points and bead. 'Y

5. In a vacuum sealing can having a fllling opening bounded by an upwardly and outwardly flared cut-edge flange, a plug-type closure fitting into said opening and having an annular channel containing a plastic sealing substance to 20'v fit over said flange an'd embed the edgeof said flange lin the sealing substance, and means to arrest the insertion of said closure vbefore the edge of said flange can pass through the plastic sealing substance, said plug having an annular 25. wall fitting within said opening in proximity to saidflange and constituting with said flange a V-shaped plastic receiving channel for 'the purposes specified. n

6. In a .vacuum sealing can having a fllling 30- opening bounded by an upwardly and outwardly flared flange, a plug-type closure fitting into s'ald opening and having. an annular channel containing a plastic sealing substance to fit over said flange and embed the edge of said flange in 35;'

, said plug having an vannular lwall fitting within said opening in proximity to said flange and constituting with said flange a Vi-shaped plastic receiving channel for the purposes specied.

7. In a vacuum sealing vcan having a filling 45* opening bounded by an upwardly and outwardly flared flange, a plugtype closure fitting into said opening andhaving an annular channel containing a plastic sealing substance to flt over said flange and embed the edge of said flange in the sealing substance, said can having an' annular outwardly projecting bead surrounding said flange and spaced from thesame, and said closure having a rim with points projecting therefrom, the points overlying said bead, and means to unite said points and bead, said plug having an annular wall fitting within said opening in proximity to said flange and constituting with said flange a V-shaped plastic receiving channel for the purposes specified.

8. In a vacuum sealing can having a filling 'opening bounded'by an upwardly and outwardly flared flange, a plug-type closure fitting into said opening and having an annular channel containing a plastic sealing substance to fit over `said -flange and embedthe edge of said flange in the sealing substance, said closure having an annular therefrom, the points overlying said bead, and 76 means to unite said points and bead, said plug having an annular wall fitting within said opening in proximity to said flange and constituting with said flange a V-shaped plastic receiving channel Ifor the purposes specified.

9. In a can having a, filling opening bounded by an upstanding flange and having an upstanding annular bead surrounding but spaced from said flange to leave a bearing surface between the flange and the bead and to constitute with the flange a collection space for spilled material, a closure fitted in said opening and having a curved portion overlying said flange and having a seating annulus engaging said bearing surface to space said curved portion from the edge of said flange, a plastic sealing substance in said curved portion for embedding the edge of said flange and sealing the closure and can against passage of air between them.

10. In a can having a filling opening bounded by an upstanding flange and having an upstanding annular bead surrounding but spaced from said flange to leave a bearing surface between the flange and the bead, a closure fitted in said opening and having a curved portion overlying said flange and having a seating annulus engaging said bearing surface to space said curved portion from the edge of said flange, a plastic sealing substance in said curved portion for embedding the edge of said flange and sealing the closure and can against passage of air between them, and I'neans for lightly securing portions of said closure to said bead substantially as and for the purposes described. l

11. In a can having a filling opening bounded by an upstanding flange and having an upstand-l ing annular bead surrounding but spaced from said flange to leavea bearing surface between the flange and the bead, a closure fitted in said opening and having a curved portion overlying said flange and having a seating annulus engaging said bearing surface to space said curved-portion from the edge of said flange, a plastic sealing substance in said curved portion for em'bedding the edge of said flange and sealing the closure and can against passage of air between them, said closure having a rim provided with points that overlie said annular bead, and means to unite said bead and points.

12. In a can having a filling opening bounded by an upstanding :flange and having an upstanding annular bead surrounding but spaced from said flange to leave a bearing surface between the flange and the bead, a closure fitted in said opening and having a curved portion overlying said flangev` and having a seating annulus engaging said bearing surface to space said curved portion from the edge ofV said flange, a plasticsealing substance in said curved portion for embedding the edge of said flange and sealing the closure and can against passage of air between them, said closure havin'g a rim provided with points that overlie said annular bead, and means to unite said beadiand points, said -rim being spaced from the adjacent parts of the can to enable the insertion of a prying implement therebetween.

13. In a vacuum sealing can having a filling opening bounded by an upwardly and outwardly flared flange having a cut edge, a plug-type clo- U sure fitltmg into said opening and having an annular channel containing a plastic sealing substance to llt over said flange and embed the edge Aof said flange ln the sealing substance, said closure having points, and means to unite said points to said can for purposes described.

14. In a vacuum sealing can having a filling opening bounded by an upwardly and 'outwardly flared flange having a cut edge, a plug-type closure fitting into said opening and having an annular channel containing a plastic sealing substance to flt over said flange and embed the edge of said flange in the sealing substance, said closure having an annular supporting portion surrounding said channel to engage the can before the edge of 'said flange passes through the plastic whereby said edge is always protected from corrosion by the plastic.

15. In combination with a can having a metallic top provided with a filling opening, a plug-type closure for said opening, and non-stretchable flexible means operatively engaging and connecting the periphery of said closure to said metallic top to seal the can against ingress of air while permitting said closure itself to function as a pressure relief valve to relieve pressure up to a given degree and thereafter to reseal the can.

16. In a vacuum sealing can having a filling opening bounded by an upwardly and outwardly flared flange, a.plugtype closure fitting into said opening and having an annular channel containing a sealing element to flt over said flange and embed the edge of said flange in the sealing element, and means to arrest the insertion of said closure before the edge of said flange passes through the sealing element.

17. In combination with a can having ametallic top provided with a filling opening, a plug-type closure for said opening, a sealing element located between said top and said closure and means to secure said closure directly to the upper face of said metallic top in a manner in virtue of which said closure will by and of itself function as a pressure relief valve to relieve pressure up to a given degree and thereafter reseal the

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2619255 *Jan 13, 1948Nov 25, 1952Louise Bricout MarieSealed metallic container
US3022914 *Jul 27, 1959Feb 27, 1962Pyramid Rubber CompanyVented nurser
US3077409 *Jul 2, 1958Feb 12, 1963American Can CoCoffee package
US3759414 *Mar 1, 1971Sep 18, 1973Beard WSelf-venting vessel
US4228914 *Mar 1, 1978Oct 21, 1980Sanderson Roger SSterilized storage container
US4247517 *Apr 10, 1978Jan 27, 1981Roger S. SandersonSterilized storage container
US4478349 *Dec 23, 1980Oct 23, 1984Mirro CorporationInsulated dish and lid for microwave cooking
US5445291 *Sep 16, 1994Aug 29, 1995The Procter & Gamble CompanyPressurized package for a particulate material employing a venting member
US8286820 *May 21, 2007Oct 16, 2012Continental Automotive GmbhProtective device
US20080152771 *Dec 21, 2006Jun 26, 2008Vincent ScalisiMethod for producing a sensory-stimulating effect
US20090313910 *May 21, 2007Dec 24, 2009Continental Automotive GmbhProtective Device
US20110110750 *May 12, 2011Skw TrustDegassing container
WO1979000077A1 *Jul 26, 1978Feb 22, 1979R SandersonSterilized storage container and method
Classifications
U.S. Classification220/203.9, 220/359.1, 220/284
International ClassificationB65D81/20
Cooperative ClassificationB65D81/2015
European ClassificationB65D81/20B1