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Publication numberUS2026082 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 31, 1935
Filing dateAug 31, 1935
Priority dateAug 31, 1935
Publication numberUS 2026082 A, US 2026082A, US-A-2026082, US2026082 A, US2026082A
InventorsCharles B Darrow
Original AssigneeParker Brothers Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Board game apparatus
US 2026082 A
Abstract  available in
Images(7)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

. Dec.'31, 19375. u C, B DARROW 2,026,082

4 BOARD GAME APPARATUS l f Filed Aug. 51, 1935 7 Sheets-Sheet 1 a 29 ws/ a2 63 54 65 l v (59 I IVNIAV luana as" il MJS A,"

,man

Dec. 31, 1935.

C. B. DARROW BOARD GAME APPARATUS Filed Aug. 31, 1935 7 Sheets-Sheet 3 Hauses oos /00.00 eac/1 Mofels/oaoo plus 4000505 V' popeme' s o 000 color ane o/gefrenfisda 1(0 mm1/andr property only) all 00,000/ 'es one calor are enf/Llc dwtzedn ummpmd pau/newly any) Hauses cas# ,6200.00 eac Dec. 31, 1935.

C. B. DARROW lBOARD GAME APPARATUS Filed Aug. '31, 19:55

7 sheets-snee; 4

PENNSYLVA NIA R. R.

7e/ff l $25.00 1f Ziff/1?@ are auf/n 50.00

engage Va /ue /0000 READING RAILROAD /yorifgage Va/de /0O.00

B159. RAILROAD lyomfgge Va /l/e /00. 00

SHORT LINE R. R.

n70/@age Van/e 100.00

ELECTRIC COMPANY fyorfgage Va/ue 157.6'. o0

WATER WORKS 17o rfgage Kg/ue i 7.91 oo Dec. 31, 1935. c; B. DARROW 2,025,082

BOARD GAME APPARATUS A Filed Aug. s1, 1935 7 sheets-sheet 5- Dsl, 1935. A C. B, ARROW 2,026,082

BOARD GAME APPARATUS Filed Aug. 51,l 1935 7 sheets-sheet 6 Ina/ew 5.023.' 4 vzaes-arrow Dec.'3l. l1935` c. B. DARRow f BOARD GAME ARPARATUS Filed Aug. 31, 1935 7 sheets-sheet '7 l 'Patented Dec." 31, l1935 UNITED STATESv PATENT oFFIcE Parker Brothers, Inc. tion of Maine l Salem, Mass., a corpora- Application August 31, 1935, Serial N0. 38,757

9 Claims.

-men in the Patent Oice Rules of Practice;

Fig. 2 is a view in elevationof symbols or tokens that are used by the several players respectively and which are shaped in representation of diversitied objects;

Fig. 3 is a I`perspective `viewv of some of the Houses that are used by the players who acquire Real Estate locationsas designated by many of the spaces or areas;

Fig. 4 is a similar view of certain of rthe Hotels that are similarly used;

Fig. 5 represents in perspective the dice used to determine the extent or length of the moves o the players along the path or course;

Figs. 6 and 7 represent twenty-two cards which constitute the Title cards of the respective Real Estate holdings, spaces or areas indicated on the board of Fig. 1;

Fig. 8 represents a set of six cards, four' of which gi've the rental and mortgage values of the four Railroads indicated by four certain spaces or areas on the board, and the other two of which indicate the rental and mortgage values of certain Utilities represented at two of the spaces or areas of the board;

Fig. 9 represents sixteen so-called Chance cards which are to bedrawn from individually by every player who moves onto a Chance space or area of the board; y

Fig. 10 is a similar view of sixteen Community Chest cards which are drawn from by each player who moves onto a Community Chest area or space indicated on the board; and

Fig. 1l is a view of the play or scrip money used in denominations of 1, 5, 10, 20, 50, 100 and 500 dollars.

Before describing the game in detail, I will set.

forth certain ofthe salient features thereof and the general purpose of the game which is privmarily one of barter. Much of the interest in my invention involving real estate areas or locations, it is to be understood that in its broader aspect my invention is not limited to the representation or simulation (among other features) of real estate areas or locations, with or Without building improvements thereon, inasmuch as other types of properties are comprehended within the scope thereof, and other privileges or benefits than rentals would in such cases be provided for in such other forms of my invention. As'wlll be hereinafter set forth, there are, in the represented embodiment of the invention, twenty-two Real Estate areas or locations designated upon the board, and, according to the throw of the dice or other chance-determining element, the players may move onto some one or another of the Real Estate locations which they then acquire `or may acquire through purchase from the Banker, who is preferably one of thev players. 'I'he players then seek to develop their said Real -Estate locations by erecting buildings thereon which are, in this embodiment of the invention, Housesand Hotels. Each of the players at the commencement of the game is furnished with a certain amount of game or scrip money, say, l$1500 per player, and each player, as his symbol or token is moved, according to the throw of the dice, about the path or course repeatedly so long as the game continues, will, in

. accordance with thethrow of the dice, land at times upon one of the Chance areas or one of the Community Chest areas, instead of upon a Real Estate area, whereupon hemust draw a card from theappropriate one of the two piles of Chance and Community Chest cards, which cards indicate some financial or other penalty or benet whereby his capital is augmented or diminished. Or he may land upon one'of the four Ra lroad properties which, if not already con-v trolled (acquired) by some other player, he may himself acquire; or he may land upon the space marked Income Tax, whereupon he will have to pay to the Bank a substantial portion of his capital, or upon the space marked Luxury Tax. Other financial benefits and penalties will be fully set forth in the ensuing specific description of the selected embodiment of. the invention, to which, however, my invention is not limited exc'epting as hereinafter set forth in the claims. Y

The board as a whole is indicated at l in Fig. 1. Inasmuch as the game is known upon the market as Monopoly, that name is indicated at 2 on the board in the central space, whereon at 3 and I are indicated the places where the set of Chance cards and the. set of Community Chest cards are 2 A 2,026,082 respectively piled,`preferably face down., .Any Interspersed among the said twenty-two Real player who is compelled by the rules of the game to draw a Chance or Community Chest card takes the top card from the pack indicated and after following the instructions printed thereon returns the card face down to the bottom of the pack or set of such cards.

- The path or course made up of the forty spaces or areas, extends entirely about the board, thus constituting a continuous path, course or circuit about which the symbols or tokens f the players are moved according to the throws of the dice as long as the game continues. In this respect the game markedly diil'ers from one where a path or The four corner spaces 5, I5, 25 and 35 arel certain special spaces. The starting space 5,

marked Go, is also marked Collect $200.00A

salary as you pass", meaning that upon each successive circuit of the board each player as he lands upon or passes the said space 5 draws $200 from the Banker. The second corner i5 is marked Jail", the purpose of which will be more fully set forth hereinafter, and the diagonally opposite corner 35 is marked Go to Jail", thus indicating what the player is to do who lands on the said corner space 35. The remaining corner 25 is marked ."Free Parking, thus indicating that no rent can be charged against any player landing thereon and no penalty is imposed.

Twenty-two of these spaces are Real Estate areas or locations, and each of them bears a name as of a street or avenue or place, all clearly marked upon Fig. l. Moreover, the said Real 'Estate areas are suitably marked incolor.l The l Real Estate areas are herein shown as arranged in several groups, each group being indicated by a distinctive color. Thus a single group will include a. certain number of Real Estate areas which in the present example of the invention are two ore-three respectively thus each group is very readily' recognized as such in the playing of the game.

L Thus, readingjrom the corner starting space 5, it will be seen thatl the two areas 6 and 8 constitute one Real Estate group and are both colored purple at the inner end thereof. The spaces I l, I3, Il constitute another Real Estate group and are colored light blue at the inner end thereof. Upon the left side of the board viewing Fig. 1 the Real Estate spaces I6, i8, i9 4constitute a single group and are colored pink at the inner end thereof. The next Real Estate spaces 2 I, 23, 24 constitute a group and are colored brown at the inner end thereof. Upon the top side of the board viewing Fig. `1 the Real Estate spaces 26, 2B, 29 constitute a group-and are colored red at the inner end thereof. The Real Estate spaces 3l 32, 34 constitute a single group and are colored Estate areas are certain other areas which are,

in this example of the invention, Community Chest, Chance, Railroads, Utilities, Income Tax and Luxury Tax, respectively. These may be 5 arranged as desired and the number thereof may be varied within the scope of the invention. Desirably, however, .they are substantially lessl in total number than the Real Estate areas among which' they are distributed. In the dis- 10 closed embodiment of the invention, there is a Railroad area midlengthv each of the four sides of the board, namely, at l0, 20, 30, 40. There are. herein provided three Community Chest areas and three Chance areas, the former being 15 the areas 1, 22, 38, and the latter being the areas i2, 2l, 4I. There are also two areas for Utllties, namely, Electric Company at I1, and Water Works at 33. There are two Tax. areas, namely,

`Income Tax area 9, the penalty for landing on' 20 the invention is not limited to any particular 25 number of areas of any of these various types of tangibleproperties. Preferably, however, the Real Estate areas predominate, and there are other areas the landing upon which involves in this embodiment of the invention a nancial penalty or a financial benefit, all as set forth in detail by the cards of the two groups of socalled Chance cards and Community Chest cards.

The number of players is not fixed. Any reasonable number can play but four to nine players have been' foundto be most desirable; One of the players is chosen as the Banker or Agent or otherwise designated person having charge of the money that is not distributed among the 40 f players at the start and who also handles on that purpose 'will be provided with an equal sum 45 of money and in all ways will participate in the game with the other'players.

A symbol or token is provided for the players respectively, and I have herein represented in Fig. 2 at 45 to 50 inclusive, six tokens wh'ch are 50 respectively a thimble, a cannon, a flat iron, a hat, a shoe and a battleship. Other distinctive symbols or tokens may be provided if desired.. or if a greater number of players participate than there are symbols or tokens, a coin or key 55 or any other suitable article may be used. Desirably said symbols or tokens represent in miniature diversified objects, and thus not only result in the ready identification of eac'h symbol or token with the particular player using the same, but interest is added to the game owing to the usev of tokens having special individuality cr characteristics as is evident from an inspection of Fig. 2. Thus the playing piece of each player is differentiated from that of any opponent in form.' and constitutes a symbol representing the player.

It will be understood that the game money or scrip dollars indicated in 1l at 5l to 51 inelusive, -in denominations of 1, 5, 10, 20, 50, 100 70 and 500 dollars, is in charge of the Banker who, at the commencement of the game, provides each of the players, including himself, if he so participates, with an equal sum, for example, $1500 in suitable denominations. If more than ve bonds.

players participate, each player 'might be given $1000 in scrip and a bank credit of $500 to be drawnl upon when required. As stated, the Banker holds in the bank all the money that belongs to the bank. He also holds all the 'Iitle cards representing the Real Estate property, the Railroads and the .Utilities, all of which are tangible things as contrasted with stocks or The realty-Title cards are those represented in Figs. 6 and 'i at 58, beingtwenty-two in number, and therefore corresponding with the number of Real Estate spaces or areas on the board l.A The same names of avenues, places, streets.,etc. appear respectively upon the said Title cards and the same coloring is indicated on those cards as on the corresponding Real Estate areas on the board I. In addition, each card sets forth the rent to be charged any player thereafter landing upon a Real Estate space that has been acquired previously by another player. Said rental values differ as indicatedy in Figs. 6 and 7 just as in actual conditions rents diier in different localities of a town or city. Not only does each card indicate the rental value of the space when unimproved, as, for example,

, $22 for Atlantic Avenue, but each card gives the rental value when the Real Estate area has been improved with one House, then with two Houses,

then with three Houses, then with four Houses and finally with a Hotel. Thus, the Atlantic Avenue property when improved by erecting one House thereon has the rental value of $110. If it has been improved to the extent of erecting two Houses thereon, the rental value is $330. With a mortgage value specified thereon such, for ex-- ample, as $130 for the Atlantic Avenue property. This mortgage value is a basis by which the cost of a Real Estate area is xed and at which ascertained cost the player rst landing upon that area may acquire the property. For example, if the mortgage value is '$130 as for Atlantic Avenue, the player first landing upon that property has the option of buying that property from the Bank at twice its said mortgage value. If the player elects to buy such property he pays the Bank in scrip for that property and receives the Title card pertaining to that property. Hethen places such Title card in front of him until he sells that property. If such player should prefer to decline the option of purchasing the property upon which ship.

In addition, each Title card states the cost of a House, four of which may be erected on a single property providing that the other property of that group is equally improved; the card also indicates the cost oi the Hotel which may be acquired by turning in the four Houses and also paying the sum specified, as, for example, $150 for the Atlantic Avenue site or location. -The Title card also contains the further notation that if all the. Real Estate areas of one color (that is, all the areas o! a single group) are owned by the same player, the rent is doubled, but only on unimproved property. Thus it will be seen that under certain conditions groups of areas or properties are increased in value, and therefore advantageousprivileges are given to anyplayer 5 Y, possessing all theproperties constituting a com-- plete group. This same idea of increased privileges may be carried out in other embodiments ot my invention, and in such other cases not involving the'simulation or vthe use of the idea of 10 real estate, the further privileges, instead of being increased rentals, would or might be a privilege having some special signicance in the matter that is simulated or the idea that is used.

That is to say, the values printed or otherwise l5- designated 'in connection with the spaces of the respective groups are increased by the acquisition of all the spaces constituting such a group by any one player, thereby making it possible for the .possessor to exact greater beneiits or penalties 20 by any opponent resting or trespassing thereon.

The idea of acquiring unimproved Real Estate property and erecting buildings thereon whereby' the value of a property is improved or augmented,

is further carried out by the provision of build- 25 ings herein indicated as a group of Houses 59 and a group of Hotels 60. Desrably I provide thirtytwo Houses and twelve Hotels which are distinctivelycolored, the Houses being indicated as green in color and the Hotels red, being twice the size of the Houses.

Any suitable chance-determining element or means may be provided, such, for' example, as the two dice represented at 6i in Fig. 5. Instead, any other suitable chance-determining element or device may be employed, as, for example, an arrow or pointer pivoted to be spun, all of which-are comprehended within the term dice or equivalent indication. A

The Title cards representing the Real Estate 4G property have been described at length, and brief reference has been made to the Title cards representing the Railroads and the Utilities, which latter will now be more completely described.

In Fig. 8, the rst four cards indicated at 62 45 are the Railroad Title cards and the two lowermost cards indicated at 63 are the Utility Title cards.

Referring to the cards pertaining to the Railroads, each of them states the rental value,`here shown as $25 for the single space on the board corresponding to that particular card. If, however, two Railroad spaces or properties are acquired by the same player, he charges a rental value of $50 against any other player landing 55 upon such space or area. In the event that he owns three Railroad properties, he charges $100 rental, and if he owns all four Railroad properties he charges $200 rental. The mortgage value is I indicated as $100. Such iigures are indicative merely of those preferably used in accordance with the rules, and the invention is in no Wise limited to any particular values or rules.

The two Utility Title cards 63 also give full information concerning the rental that may` be 65 charged by the holder of the spaces corresponding to these cards and also the mortgage values thereof.

Reference has also been made to the so-called Chance and Community Chest cards, which, broadly speaking, are mainly cards indicating the imposing of a nancial penalty or the obtaining of a financial-benefit. The said Chance cards are shown as a complete set in Fig. 9 at 64. They are desirably sixteen in number and the character. of g5 the financial penalty or financial benefit or somemovement along 4the board -imposed upon the player, is clearlystated'thereon, and need not be here set forth in full. as obviously they may be widely varied withinthe scope of the invention.

'Ihe set of so-called Community Chest cards are all shown in Fig. at 65. Theyl also are shown asrsixteen in number and the financial benefits ance with the throw of the dice and hence become subject to rental charges if they land upon property held by other players. If unable to meet a rental charge and the player concerned is unable to raise money by disposing of any property which he holds, to the Bank or other players in accordance with the rules of the game, he is considered bankrupt and must quit the game, taking up his symbol or token' from the board. He must, however, dispose of any property which he may still hold in' accordance with the rules of the game. The Banker collects all fines, taxes, purchase p rice of Houses and Hotels and all penalties, etc. and pays all salaries, bonuses, premiums, etc. He

' holds all money not in the possession of the individual players, and the Title cards, Houses and v Hotels until they are acquired by the players. He also handles all mortgages which will be more specifically referred to hereinafter. .'I'he amount -of play or scrip money is, ofcourse, variable within the* scope of the invention. It is desirable to have enough scrip money to provide each of five players with $1500 each, and as previously stated if a larger number of players participate, they can each be given at the commencement of .the game some smaller amount, as, for example,

$1000 and a credit is arranged with the Bank for the remainingr$500 or any other amount agreed upon.

One of themost important land characteristic features of the game is that of the Real Estate areas upon which the Houses and Hotels may be erected. The Houses and Hotels are to be bought only from the Bank and may not be built" until a single player owns a complete set of one-color property, referred to as a group, and he may then build only on that complete` color group. For example, if a player owns Kentucky Avenue, Indiana Avenue, and Illinois Avenue', 26, 28, 29, he may build Houses on such property.

If he owns said three properties and also Baltic i Avenue but not Mediterranean Avenue 6, the

`For example, if he owns Pacific Avenue, North Carolina Avenue and- Pennsylvania Avenue, 36,

31, 39, one house may be put (erected) on any one of the. saidv three spaces or real estate locations, andthe other tworproperties collect double rent from any player landing thereon. The next house bought by such player must be built on one of the unoccupied spaces orlofs and not on the the preferred rules of the game.

aoaaosa space or lot on which the player built the'first house. A player may build (acquire) as manyhouses at one time as his judgment dictates and; his financial standing in the gamewill allow, but he is required to build evenly according, to 5 For example, he builds a first house, then the next house on an unoccupied property of the same color group, and

-in the event that there are three spaces or areas of 'the same color, constituting one group. the 10 third house must-be built on the third and unoccupied property or space. The next house may be built or placed upon any space` of the same color having one house already built thereon, and so on,'but a player cannot build one house on one' 15 piece of property and three houses on another. According to thewreferred rules of the game,

a player must have four houses on each piece of property of agroup of the same color before he is entitledto build a hotel.r `According to the to any player in the game'for any amount that the owner can get from any other player. It will be noted that the purchase price of a house or a hotel is printed on the 'Iitle cards pertaining there` to. When a player is buying a hotel he must pay in advance the purchase price printed on each Title card and he must also return tothe 30 Bank the four houses which he has previously erected on that property. According to the preferred rules of the game, a player must not have both houses and hotels on the same piece of property. If a player is in financial difficulties, in his play of the game, he has the right to sell a house or hotel back to the Bankfor one half of the purchase price. If the Bank has no houses to e lsell, players wishing to build must wait for someother player to turn back or sell his houses to the 40 Bank before building. If the number vof houses and hotels available at any time is very limited andl two or more players wish to b uy them, the houses and hotels should be sold at auction to the highest bidder. The rules may provide that a player who has sold houses or hotels back to the Bank may repurchase them. Obviously, however,

rate of interest is ten per cent, payable when the mortgage is lifted or paid off. If any mortgaged property is transferred, the new owner may lift the mortgage at once if he wishes, but must in any event pay ten per cent interest. If the play- 30 er fails to lift the mortgage, he, according to the preferred rules of the game, pays the ten per cent interest, and when at a later period in the game the mortgage is lifted anadditional ten per cent interest is paid. According to the preferred rules465 of the game,`a player may not mortgage houses or hotels. All buildings (houses or hotels) must, in accordance with the preferred rules of the game, be sold to the Bank before any property can be mortgaged. In order to mortgage property upon Awhich there is a house or houses or a hotel, a playernmustriirsasell such buildings back to the Bankwhich will according to the preferred rules "bf the game pay` him one of what he paid 7 therefor.

Preferably provision is made for. rebuilding a house on mortgaged property. The owner of the property is required to' pay the Bank the amount of the mortgage plus .the ten per cent interest charge and to buy the house or houses back from the Bank at the full purchase price thereof. A.

player who is bankrupt in the game (that is, one who owes more than he can pay) is required to turn over to his creditors all that he has of value and retire from the game. In making such settlement, however, if the player owns houses or hotels, these are returned to the Bank in exchange for scrip to the extent of one half the amount paid for them. and this cash is given to the creditor. If a bankrupt player turns over to his creditor property that has been mortgaged, the new owner must at once pay the Bank the amount of interest on the loan and at the same time he may lift the mortgage by paying the principal. In case the player pays only theinterest and at a later time lifts the mortgage, he is then required to pay the principal plus an additional interest charge of ten per cent to the Bank. If a player owes more rentthan he can pay in cash with the game or scrip money, he may pay the creditor partly in cash and partly in property. Should a player be unable to raise enough scrip money to pay his taxes by selling the houses and mortgaging his property. the Bank will take over his assets and sell them to'the highest bidder. In that event the player must take up his token or symbol and quite the game.

In starting the game, the several players throw the dice and the one throwing the highest plays first. The play is then in rotation toward the left. Each player as he lands upon a space or area as the result of his throw of the dice places his symbol or token upon such space or area, even though the token of another player is on that same space. Of course, the first player acquiring any space or area requires the next player landing thereon to pay rent, but if he should fail promptly todemand the rental he forfeits the same. As already stated, the rentals are printed on the face of all Title cards, and the fact that one player owns a complete color group doubles the rent of unimproved property that he may demand. The rent is paid directto the player who has acquired any particular space or area'. Any player may', however, sell property to any other player for a price agreeable to both of them, with the exception that the houses and hotels may be sold by and to the Bank o'nly. Property with the exception of houses and hotels may be sold at auction but may be mortgaged only through the Bank. el

When a player lanlls lon a space or property owned by another player, the owner of .that space may collect the rent only if the property is unmortgaged. Mortgaged property is designated by the player owning and mortgaging the same, turning face down the Title card representing that property.

If a player draws a Chance card and thereby is sent to some certain property, for example,l the Reading Railroad, I0, owned by another player,

the rst mentioned player must pay rent to the,

' player.

Tax is figured as ten per cent of the players total worth in the game; that is to say, it is figured on his cash on hand plus the mortgage value of property, whether mortgaged or not, and the cost price of any buildings that he may own. 5 Preferably the rules provide that if in passing the corner area 5 marked Go, a player ony the same move lands on the Income Tax area 9, the $200 which he has theoretically just collected as salary\ from the Bank, is included in his total l worth.

Reference has been made to the corner space I marked Jail. According to the preferred rules of the game, when a player is sent to Jail", I5, from the Go to Jail.space 35, or when he l5 is sent to Jail by drawing a "Go to Jail Chance card, shown in Fig. 9, or by throwing doubles three times in succession, the player does not collect the $200 indicated at the Go" space or,

corner 5. If, however, a player draws some other card from the Chance cards or Community Chest cards instructing him to go to' some certain space or area other than the Jail, I5, such, for instance,

as a Railroad, Utility or other property4 in such case the player goes to the point designated by moving the piece forward along the track. If in so doing he` crosses the space marked Go", 5,

he does collect the $200.

According to the preferred rules of the game,

the -fact that a player lands in the Jail space I5 30 I at the end of a move in the ordinary course of play, incurs no penalty and such player on his next turn moves ahead in the usual manner. Once a player lands in the Jail space I5 he is released if he throws doubles"; otherwise he has the option of staying vin Jail until his third turn, or of purchasing a Get out of Jail free" card from another player (see Chance card at the bottom o f'Fig. 9) at a price agreeable to both players, or such player may pay a $50 ne to the Bank and 40 thus get out of Jail upon his next turn. According to the preferred rules of the game, a player must come out of Jail on his third throw of the dice after his confinement therein, and unless he throws doubles, he is required to pay affine of to the Bank. It is unnecessary to give further details as to the moves required by the rules concerning the Jail space I5. Obviously they may be widely varied within the scope of the invention. From the foregoing description, 50 it will be realized that the invention comprehends a game board apparatus including in combination a board having marked spaces constituting a path or course extending about the said board, certain of said spaces being distinctively designated by color or design, so as to constitute an easily recognized group, there being a plurality of such groups each differing from the others, the values printed or otherwise designated in connection with the spaces of one or more of the groups being increased by the acquisition of all the spaces constituting such a group by any one player, and making it possible for the possessor to exact greater payments or penalties from any opponent resting or trespassing thereon. It

` will further be realized that in the case of the several groups they are increased in value and give advantageous privileges to any player possessing all of the properties constituting a single group. Preferably this feature of increased 'I0 value or additional privileges extends to each group whereof all the'v property is acquired by one It will also be realized that as an important feature of the game, I use one or more sets of cards, including cards indicating respectively orties, said cards to be drawn from by players as 4a result of reaching certain spaces in play or by the throw of4 dice.4

Itwill be appreciated from the foregoing description that the game board apparatus herein disclosed presents business situations very closely simulating those occurring in actual business lii'e and the game is therefore one that develops interesting and perplexing situations. The length oi a game, of course, varies, but with a relatively large number oi players it may b e played during the course .of a single evening. Often the developments of the game are such that the situation is rapidly cleared up during the last half hour or so of play and all players excepting the successful one are quickly required tov surrender their tokens and quit the game, thus bringing the game to a conclusion. I Having thus'described one illustrative embodiment of the invention, it is to be understood that although speciiic terms are employed, they are used in a generic and descriptive sense' and not for purposes `of limitation, the scope of the invention being set forth ln the following claims.

I claim: j

1. In a board gam apparatus a board acting as a playing-held having marked spaces constituting a path or course extending about the board, said path aording a continuous track for the purpose of continuity of play, certain'of said spaces being occupancy, by opponent players, of spaces of one or more such groups, which rentals are subject to increase by the acquisition of an additional space or spaces oi vthe same group by the same individual player, therebymaking it possible for the possessor to exact greater payments or penalties from any opponent resting or trespassing thereon.

2 In a board game apparatus a board acting as a playing-field having marked spaces constituting a path or course extending about the board.,

said path -aiording a continuous track for the purpose of continuity of play, certain of said spaces being designated as by position or color so as to constitute a' distinguishable group, there being a plurality of such groups each diiering from the others and each having its spaces adjacent on the same side of the board,.the apparatus havlng indications oi the rentals required for the use and occupancy, by opponent players, of spaces of one or more such groups, which rentals are subject to increase by the acquisition of an additional space or spaces-of the same group by the same individual player, thereby making it possible for i the possessorto exact greater paymentsor penalties from any opponent resting or trespassing thereon, the apparatus also including one or more sets of cards containing cards eilecting advantages or disadvantages for the player receivingv one or more of such cards, said cards tol be drawnthe purpose of continuity of play, certain oi' said' spaces being designated as by position or color s as to -constitute a distinguishable group, there being a plurality oi such groups each having its spaces adjacent on the same side of the board, the apparatus having indications of the rentals required for the use and occupancyby opponent 5 players of spaces of one or more suchgroups, `which rentals are subject to increase by the acquisition` of an additional space or spaces of the same, group by the same individual player,

thereby making-it possible for the possessor to exactl greater payments or penalties from any opponent resting or trespassing thereon, the apl paratus also including one or more sets ot cards containing cards eiIecting advantages or disadvantages for the player receiving oneor more of such cards, said cardsd to be drawn by players 4 as determined by'chance, a special set of c ards bearing indication as by color or title showing that these cards respectively relate in the play of the game solely to denite, similarly indicated spaces^ upon the board, a set oi pieces to represent buildings tor the purpose of purchase and placement on spaces on the board owned by the purchasing player, a set of playing pieces for the purpose oi' registering movement. each dinerentiatesL from 25.

the other, and dice or the like to control certain movements in the game.

`4. A board game apparatus including, in com-y bination, a board having marked spaces or areas,

constituting' a path or course extending about 80 the said board, said spaces or areas having. respectively, designations for real estate locations. railroads, utilities, chance, community chest and penalties; dice or the like to determine the -extent of the players movements along said path or course; a set of miniature buildings adapted when acquired by players to be placed on said real estate locations: a set of title cards having data thereon expressing values applicable to said real estate locations respectively; a set of cards having. re- 4 spectively, data thereon concerning said railroads and utilities; a set oi' chance cards to be drawn from by players arriving at said chance areas, said cards having data of imposed penalties; a set oi community chest cards having data of nancial I benefits; and a set oi' tokens or symbols shaped in representation of diversified objects, and constituting the playing pieces.

5. A board game apparatus including, in combination, a board having marked spaces or areas, so constituting a path or course extending about the said board, said spaces -or areas having, respectively, designations for real estate locations, railnroads, utilities, chance, community chest and penalties; dice or the like to determine the extent of the player's movements along said path or course; a set oi miniature buildings adapted when acquired by players to be placed on said real estate locations: a set oi' title cards having data thereon expressing values applicable to said real o0 estate locations. respectively; and a set of tokens or symbols shaped in representation of diversied objects, and constituting the playing pieces.

y 6. A board game apparatus including, in coinbination, a board having marked spaces or areas, constituting a path or course extending about the said board, said spaces or areas having, respectively, designations for real estate locations; dice or the 4like t'o determine the extent of the players' movements along said path 70 or course; a set oi' miniature buildings adapted when acquired by players to be placed on said real estate locations: and a set o! tokens or symbols shaped in representation of diversiiled objects, and constituting the playing pieces.

7. A board game apparatus including, in combination, a board having markedspaces or areas constituting a path or course extending about the said board, said spaces or areas having designations indicative of real estate locations; dice Aor equivalent means to determine the number oi spaces or areas that the respective players shall move along said path; articles simulating buildings to be erected at said real estate areas; said articles being of a plurality of sizes to indicate as many diierent characters oi buildings; and a sexies of pieces to indicate respective players and adapted to be moved by said players in accordancewith the throw ot the diceor equivalent indication.

8. A board game apparatus including, in combination, a board having marked spaces or areas constituting a path or course extending about the said board, certain of said spaces or areas having designations indicative of real estate locations and havingother designations indicative of penalties or benefits; one or more sets of cards having penalties or benefits specified thereon, and to be drawn from by players arriving at one of said designations of penalties or benets; dice or the like to determine the extent ot the players' movements along the said path or course; and a set of articles representing buildings to be erected at acquired real estate spaces or areas.

9. A board game apparatus including. in combination, a square board having marked spaces or areas extending along the four edges thereof so as to constitute a continuous path, and including four marked corner areas, one of which constitutes the starting area; said board having. among the said marked spaces or areas. certain that are marked to indicate real estate locations; certain o'f said spaces being designated as by position or color so as to constitute a 4distinguishable group, there being a plurality of such groups eachahaving its spaces adjacent on the same side of the board; said apparatus containing notations setting forth comparative values pertaining Ato said real estate locations; a single playing piece for each player -to be moved in accordance with the rules oi the game; means for determining by chance the length or extent of each playing movement of each player along the saidpath; and a set of articles representing buildings to be erected or positioned by players moving to real estate areas in accordance with the rules of the game.

CHARLES B. DARROW.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification273/256, D21/350
International ClassificationA63F3/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63F3/00072, A63F3/00006
European ClassificationA63F3/00A6F