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Publication numberUS2027029 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 7, 1936
Filing dateDec 12, 1931
Priority dateDec 12, 1931
Publication numberUS 2027029 A, US 2027029A, US-A-2027029, US2027029 A, US2027029A
InventorsClarence R Eckert
Original AssigneeBarrett Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Self-spacing siding
US 2027029 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

c. R. EcKER'r SELF SPACIYNG SIDING Filed Dec. 12, 1.951

`Fan.. 7

Patente-cli Jan. 7, 1936 2,027,029 y sELF-sPlacTNG smiNG Clarence R. Eckert, Englewood, N.IJ., assignor to The Barrett Company, New York, N. Y., a corporation of New Jersey Application December 12, 1931, Serial No. 580,659

5 Claims.

This invention relates to wall, roof, or other surface coverings, and more particularly, to flexible shingles designed for covering and protecting roofs, walls, or other surfaces. The term shingle is used in the claims in a generic sense and is intended to include siding elements, strip shingles, individual shingles, and other elements utilized for protecting or covering roofs, walls, or other analogous surfaces. y

One object of this invention is to provide a ilexible shingle which may be readily and conveniently applied to an inclined or vertical surface. The shingle is designed so that it may be temporarily or permanently supported in the desired overlapping relation with respect to an underlying element and so that one or both ends do not require support from the workman while nailing the elements. This permits the Workman to .use both hands in nailingthe shingles throughout their application, and consequently, materially shortens the time required to apply the elements in desired overlapping relation and results in more accurate positioning of the elements with respect to each other.

Another object is to provide a durable, Weatherproof shingle, capable of ready and accurate placement in overlapping courses, of artistic kap-` pearance and enhanced architectural value.

Other .objects and advantages of this shingle will appear from the following detailed description.

Heretofore, felt baseshingles and siding elements have been provided with aligning guides in the transverse edges to assist in laying the elements in proper relation to each other. In applying an overlying course of elements, the` workman held one end with one hand in the desired position while nailing the other end with the other hand. The workman, thus, could use one hand only for the initial nail placed in the shin.- gle and in order to insure proper positioning of the shingles had to ascertainthat both ends were properly positioned before nailing one end. Applying strip shingles of considerable overall -length in this manner frequently resulted in the improper nailing of the shingles and damage thereto due to securing nailing of one end while the other end was not properly positioned, and

then forcing the other end into the desired overlapping relation with consequent impairment of the fibrous base.

This invention overcomes the above and other disadvantages of existing shingles and siding elements. In accordance with this invention, the covered or unexposed portion of ilexible shingles designed to be laid in overlapping courses, the individual elements in each course being laid inl abutting relationship, are provided, preferably near the transverse edges and spaced from the upper edge, with means for engaging a portion 5 of the underlying element to secure the overlying element in desired overlapping relationship with respect to the underlying element during the nailing of the overlying element. The means may be in the form of an interior slit, slot or pro- 10 jection or a projection and complemental recess on the transverse edges which not only function to properly space elements in contiguous courses but also serve to align contiguous elements in the same course. Hence, the shingle requires no sup- 15 port from the workman and he may use both hands in nailing or otherwise securing it.

In the accompanying drawing, forming a part of this specification and showing, for purposes of exemplication, preferred forms of this invention 20 Without limiting the claimedinvention to such 'illustrative instances- Fig. 1 is a plan view of a shingle;

Fig. 2 is a vertical section on an enlarged scale taken in a plane passing through the line 2i-2 of 25 Fig. 1; v

Fig. 3 is a fragmentary plan view of a number of shingles of tjhe type shown in Fig.- 1 arranged in overlapping relationship;

Fig. 4' is a plan view of a modification of the 30 shingle of this invention;

Fig. 5 is a plan view of another modied form of shingle; and

Fig. 6 is a plan view of still a further modified form of shingle.

In the preferred embodiment illustrated on the drawing, the invention is shown incorporated in a strip shingle having rectangular tabs disposed along one longitudinal edge thereof and the present description will be confined to the present ll- 40 lustrated embodiment of the invention. It will l be understood, however, that the novel features and improvements are susceptible to other applications, such for` example as siding and shingle elements without tabs or with tabs of dierent 45 shapes, or elements not made from a felt base but other exible base. Hence the scope of this invention is not confined to the embodiment herein described. y

In 4the drawing, with particular reference t0 50 Figs. 1 and 2, reference numeral l I indicates afelt base which may be made from rag ber, paper stock, with or without fillers, as is well known in the roofing art, and then thoroughly saturated and impregnated with waterproofing material, 55

such as asphalt or other bituminous compositions. The felt base is coated in known manner on both sides with waterproofing material, such the slots defining the tabs.

as asphalt, to form the coating layers I2, I3. Coating I2 completely covers the face of the element and layer I3 completely covers the rear of the element. A talc or mica dust layer Il is applied to coating I3 to render the back of the element non-cementitious.

One longitudinal edge of the body portion I5 is formed with rectangular tab I6 separated by narrow slots I1. The tabs I6 are completely covered with coarse granular material I8 of one color or a blend of colors, the granular material being partially embedded in the coating layer I2 therebeneath. The coarse granules completely cover the tabs extending from the lower edge of the elements to a depth equal to that of slots I1. The coarse granules may be crushed rock, slate or other grit employed for surfacing roofings. As one example of the mesh characteristics of the coarse granular material suitable for covering the tab portions, the following is given:

Per cent (approximately) Retained on the 6 mesh screen 0 Retained on the 8 mesh screen 19 Retained on the 10 mesh screen 67 Retained on the '14 mesh screen 12 Retained on the mesh screen 1.5 Retained on the 28 mesh screen 0.5

'I'he body portion I5 is preferably surfaced with granular material I9, such as crushed rock or slate, or other grit, preferably materially finer than the granules I8. Granules I9 may be of a dark color, as blue-black, which is less expensive than the red, yellow, or other light colored granules utilized for surfacing the tab I6. One example of the mesh characteristics of fine granular material suitable for surfacing body portion I5 is as follows:l

It will be noted that the major portion of granules I8 covering the tabs is retained on a 10 mesh screen whereas the major portion of the fine granules I9 covering the body portion passes through a 35 mesh screen. The use of granular material of such extremes in mesh characteristics for surfacing the body portion and the tabs of the elements results in the tab portions having the appearance of substantially greater thickness than the body portion.

In the embodiment of the invention shown in Figs. 1 to 5, transverse edge 2I is straight while the other side edge is formed with what might be considered a rectangular projection 23. This pro` jection is provided by the cutting of slot 24 in the extreme right edge of the element. Contiguous shingles in the same course are laid as shown in Fig. 3 with projection 23 abutting against side 2I of a contiguous element, the lower portions of the contiguous elements defining the slot 25, which is substantially identical with slots I1 in the elements. The overlying elements are placed with the forward edges spaced from the upper edges of the tabs; i. e., the upper edges of Per cent Thus, a narrow strip tively, application of the elements, as shown in Fig. 3, results in the stripes 26 and portions exposed through slots I1 and 25 simulating mortar disposed about the brick appearing portions I8. In other words, the elements when laid as shown in Fig. 3 impart to the observer the appearance of a brick wall.

Horizontal interior slits 21 are spaced from the upper edge ot'. the shingles of Figs. l and 2, near the transverse edges thereof. These slits serve as guidesl to indicate the laying position of the overlying element with respect to the underlying element. Further, they permit depression of part of the body portion indicated by the reference numeral 28 to form a ledge 29, which engages the upper edge as indicated at 3| (Fig. 3) of the underlying element. Hence, the overlying shingle is temporarily held in desired position by ledge 29 engaging the upper edge of the underlying element and the roofer is free touse both hands in nailing the overlying element inposition.

The modification of Fig. 4 diifers from that of Fig. 1 chiefly in that instead of having horizontal slits 21 in the body portion I5, the interlocking projections 32 are formed therein. These projections are made by cutting horizontal slits 33 and intersecting the slits 33 by spaced interior vertical slots 34 which define the tongues or projections 32. By flexing tongues 32 so that they extend beyond the back of the shingle, the elements of Fig. 4 may be laid with tongues 32 passing under the upper portion of an underlying element. Thus, the overlying element is held in position on a vertical wall or inclined roof or other sur- -face by the upper edge of tongue 32 resting on the upper edge of the underlying element. As an alternative procedure, the free end of tongue 32 may be caused to rest on the upper edge of the underlying element, which thus holds the underlying element in desired nailing position.

If tongue 32 is intended to pass down beneath the upper portion of an underlying element, it is spaced from the lower edge such that when tongue 32 is forced home, the forward edge of the tabs occurs somewhat above the tops of the slots of the underlying elements to dene the mortar strips 26. If on the other hand it is desired to have the forward edge of the tongue rest on the upper edge of the underlying element, then the tongues are positioned closer to the upper edge a /distance equal to the length of the tongue 32 so that when the tongue of one element rests on the upper edge of an underlying element, the forward edge of the overlying element is positioned somewhat from the tops of the recesses or slots of the underlying element to define the mortar strip 26. The shingle of Fig'l 5 differs from that of Fig. 1 in that an interior open recess or slot 31 is utilized instead of the slits 21 of Fig. 1. This construction permits the roofer to insert a knife or other tool through slot 31 and positions the tool behind the upper edge of the underlying element to temporarily support the overlapping elements in desired overlapping relation. After nailing the elements the knife or other tool is withdrawn.

In the modiilcation of Fig. 6, side edge 38 is provided with a recess 39 having a side 4| substantially parallel to thev longitudinal axis of the element. A slit 42 extends into the body of the shingle.V This slit forms an extension of the line defining side 4| of recess 39.

The other transverse edge of the shingle of Fig. 6 is formed withv a projection 43 complemental to recess 39. Slit 44 forms an extension of line 45 defining one side of projection 43. In

the laying of the shingle of Fig. 6, contiguous elef ments in the same course are laid with the projections of one element entering into the recess of a contiguous element. The overlying elements are laid by first exing either the portion of the element above slit 44 or 42 or both and causing the lower edge of the portions flexed to engage the upper edge of the underlying element. Thus, the overlying element is supported by the underlying shingle and the roofer is Vfree to nail the elements, utilizing both hands.v As in the case of the other modifications, the interlocking projections and recesses are so disposed that the forward edges of the element are properly aligned with respect to the underlying elements to obtain a mortar line effect between adjacent courses.

It`will be notedthat the shingle of. this invention does not require support from the roofer during nailing. Further. the supporting slits or projections serve to align the forward edges of the overlying elements with respect to the underl lying shingles, and this in a simple and eflicient manner. In the case of brick siding elements, asvdisclosed herein,- the projections position adjacent courses so as to obtain the effect of mortar about the brick colored tab portions.

The surfacing of the tab portions with granular material considerably coarser than that applied to the body portionimparts to the tabs an appearance of thickness and rigidity and helghtens the brick wall effect since the mortar simulating portions appear to be depressed about the coniines of the brick as in actual brick wall construction. j

Since different embodiments of 4the invention could be made without departing from the scope of this invention, it is intended that all matter contained in the above description or shown in the accompanying drawing shall be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense.

I claim:

1. A exible shingle arranged to be laid with `other like shingles in overlapping courses and -edge of an underlying shingle to temporarily support the same in desired overlapping relation with respect to the underlying shingle.

2. -A 4sliding element arranged to be laid with other like elements in overlapping courses and having rectangular tabs disposed along one 1ong'itudinal edge of the body portion thereof, comprising a fibrous base coated on both sides with bituminous material, the tab portions being completely surfaced with coarse brick colored granular material and the body portion 'being completely surfaced with dark colored fine granular material, one sideedge of said element provided -upper edge of an underlying element to support 'the overlying element during Athe application with an` aligning recess having one side substantially parallel to the longitudinal axis of thel element, and a slit extending from said side into the body portion of the element, the opposite side of the element being formed with a projection com- 5 plemental to said recess and a slit extending from said projection into the body portion of said element, said slits permitting exure of the body portion of the element thereabove to engage the thereof to a surface in desired overlapping relation with respect to the underlying element.

' 3. A siding element arranged to be laid with other like elements in overlapping courses and having rectangular tabs along one longitudinal edge of the base portion thereof, said element being provided with an aligning recess in one transverse edge of the body portion, said recess having one side substantially parallel to the longitudinal axis of the -element, and a slit extending from said side into the body portion of the element, the other transverse side of the element being providedwith a projection complemental to said recess, a slit extending from said projection into the body of said element, said slits permitting iiexure vof the body portion of the element thereabove to engage the upper edge of the underlying element to support the overlying element' during application thereof to a surface in desired overlapping relation with respect to the underlying element.

4. A lsiding element having brick simulating portions along one longitudinal-edge of the body portion and composed of a saturated felt base having on the face intended to be exposed to the weather a single layer of waterproof coating maferial of substantially uniform thickness and a layer of granular material partially embedded in the said coating layer, the granular material on the brick simulating portions being materially coarser than that on the body portion so that the thickness of the brick simulating portions is substantially greater than that of the body portion, said element adapted to be laid with other like elements in overlapping courses with a portion of the ne granular surfaced body portion of each element exposed to the weather between adjacent courses of the elements so as to produce an'appearance of a depressed mortar line above the brick simulating portions, each element having slits located below the upper edge in the body portion thereof, the portions of the elements above the slits being designed to be depressedl to engage an upper edge portion of an underlying element and thussupport the overlying element in position with respect to the underlying element to expose to view said horizontal mortar line.

5. A siding element having brick simulating portions along one longitudinal edge of the body portion and composed of a saturated felt base having on the face intended to be exposed to the weatherV a single layer of waterproof coating material of substantially uniform thickness and a layer of granular material partially embedded in the said coating layer, the granular material on the brick simulating portions being materially coarser than that on the body portion so that the thickness of the brick simulating portions isv substantially greater than that of the body portion,

said element adapted to be laid with other like elements in overlapping courses with a portion/Y of the fine granular surfaced body portionoeach element exposed to the weather/between adjacent courses of the elements so as to produce an appearance of a depressed mortar line above the brick simulating portions, said siding element arranged to be laid with other like elements in overlapping courses and having in the portion intended to be overlapped by an underlying element a projection arranged to be flexed to extend back or the element and to engage the upper edge of an underlying element to support the overlying element in desired overlapping relation with respect to the underlying element.

CLARENCE R.. ECKERT.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3347001 *Mar 3, 1965Oct 17, 1967Cosden Bryan LRoof shingle with interlocking flanges and locator
US4333279 *Jan 3, 1980Jun 8, 1982Manville Service CorporationThree-tab shingle with staggered butt edge feature
US4527374 *Jan 3, 1980Jul 9, 1985Manville Service Corp.Three-tab shingle with staggered butt edge feature
US5542226 *Oct 13, 1994Aug 6, 1996Markovich; Joseph G.For use in retaining shingles on a roof
EP0010468A1 *Sep 27, 1979Apr 30, 1980André Théodore Charles VotteShingle-like synthetic covering elements and process for their realisation
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/526, 52/527, 52/105
International ClassificationE04D1/00, E04D1/26
Cooperative ClassificationE04D2001/005, E04D1/26
European ClassificationE04D1/26