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Publication numberUS2027452 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 14, 1936
Filing dateMay 10, 1934
Priority dateMay 10, 1934
Publication numberUS 2027452 A, US 2027452A, US-A-2027452, US2027452 A, US2027452A
InventorsGunnar Rusing
Original AssigneeGunnar Rusing
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Golf club
US 2027452 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 14, 1936. G. RuslNG GOLF CLUB Filed My 1o, 1934 2V Shees-Sheet l awww@ Jan. 14, 1936. G. RuslNG 2,027,452

GOLF CLUB Filed May lO, 1934 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Patented Jan. 14, 1936 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE GQLF CLUB Gunnar Rusing, Chicago, Ill.

Application May 10, 1934, Serial No. 724,851

8 Claims. (Cl. 273-79) This invention relates to adjustable golf clubs and has for its object the production of a club which can be adjusted and adapted to take the place of a large number of clubs considered necessary by a golfer at the present time.

Briefly stated, the club comprises a head and shaft, the head being adjustable with respect to the shaft so as to modify both its lie and loft. The shaft is adjustable in length so as to adapt it for use with various conditions of adjustment of the head on the shaft.

The invention will readily be understood from .the following description of a preferred embodiment thereof taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, in which Fig. 1 is an elevational view of a club embodying my invention;

Fig. 2 is a plan view of this club, showing diagrammatically the various directions of the shaft in different positions of adjustment, it being assumed that the head of the club remains immovable;

Fig. 3 is a sectional detailed view on a larger scale, taken on the line 3-3 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 4 is a fragmentary perspective view showing the adjusting rings and the associated parts of the head, in separated condition;

Fig. 5 is a plan view of the club head, looking down on the face 23 thereof;

Figs. 6, '7 and 8 are fragmentary views of the head and part of the shaft, showing the manner in which the loft is changed;

Figs. 9, 10, 11 and 12 are diagrammatic views intended to facilitate description of the manner in which the adjusting rings change the direction of the shaft with respect to the head; y

Fig. 13 is a sectional view through the upper part of the shaft, showing the manner in which the same is rendered adjustable in length;

Fig. 14 is a sectional detailed view taken on the line |4|4 of Fig. 13;

Fig. l5 is a similar view, showing the telescoping parts of the shaft in a somewhat different relation; and

Fig. 16 is a fragmentary view showing the manner in which the shaft can be convertedinto a walking cane, at the same time preventing the entrance of dirt into the threaded opening.

Referring to the drawings, the head of the golf club is indicated by the reference numeral 20. This head may be suitably made of metal and is provided with a at front face, the sweet spot being indicated thereon by the reference numeral 2|. At the side of the head 20, whereby it is attached to the shaft 22, there is formed thereon an annular seat 23. This seat is preferably located so that it will be at right angles to the shaft 22 when the shaft 22 is adjusted relative to the head 20, to give the loft and lie of a mid-mashie or No. 3 iron. The reason for this selection is 5 that the extreme irons Nos. Sand 9, corresponding to the niblick and putter respectively, represent extreme deviations with respect to loft on either side from the No. 3. This selection has no bearing upon the invention, since it will be obvious that the position of the seat 23 with respect to the general front plane of the head 2|) may be varied within very wide limits, without departing from the spirit of the present invention.

Within the annular seat 23, the head has an 15 upwardly directed hemispherical formation 24, which is provided at its apex with an opening 25. This opening ,25 is in communication with a bore 26, which extends upwardly from the heel of the head. This bore 26 is normally closed'by a 20 tight fitting plug 21. The upper end of the bore 26 provides a spherical seat 28 for a ball 29 carried on the lower end of a bolt 30. The opening is kept as small as possible while permitting suilicient orientation of the bolt 30 for al1 positions 25 of adjustment of the club. In order to prevent the bolt 30 fromturning when the shaft is being finally secured in a desired position of adjustment, I provide a kerf 3| in the lowest portion of the head 29, and I provide a rib 32 on the upper 30 end of the plug 21 so as to extend into the kerf 3|.

Clearance is provided between the rib 32 and the surfaces of the kerf 3| so as to permit the necessary free movement of the bolt 30.

I provide two rings 3| and 32 whichare adapted 35 to be placed around the bolt 30, in the manner best shown in Fig. 4. The ring 3| is wedge shaped, its upper surface and lower surface making together an acute angle, which in the embodiment of the invention illustrated is approximately eleven degrees. 'Ihe upper ring 32-is likewise wedge shaped, its upper and lower surfaces being inclined to each other at an angle of eleven degrees. The two rings 3| and 32, when placed together so as to bring the top face of the upper ring 32 parallel to the lower face of the ring 3|, constitute together a substantially hollow hemisphere, the upper portion of which gives into a cylindrical formation 33.

The interior spherical surface presented by the rings engages the hemispherical formation 24 of the head 20. The shaft 22 is provided at its lower end with a central axially threaded opening 34, which is adapted threadedly to receive the bolt 3B. The lower end of the shaft 22 is shouldered 55 as indicated at 3l so as to more effectively engage the cylindrical portion 33 of the ring 32, as best seen in Fig. 3.

Considering Figs. 3 and 4. it is obvious that when the shaft is mounted upon the head 23 in the manner shown in Fig. 3 its direction relative to the head 23 depends upon the relative positions of the rings 3| and 32 and that this direction can be changed by suitable relative manipulation of the rings 3| and 32.

For the purpose of facilitating the description of the change resulting from adjustment of these rings, I have provided Figs. 9, 10, 11 and 12 o'f the drawings.

Fig. 9 corresponds to the position of a No. 3 iron or mid-mashie. in which the upper surface of the ring 32 is parallel to the lower surface of the ring 3|. In this state of affairs, the vertical plane defined by the maximum height and minimum height of the ring 3| is coincident with the vertical plane deilned by the maximum height and the minimum height of the ring 32. The same is true with respect to Fig. 10, but there is this difference, that in the case of Fig. 9 the maximum height of the ring 32 is to one side and the maximum height o'f the ring 3| is to the other side, whereas in the case of Fig. 10 the maximum heights of both rings are to one side and the minimum heights of both rings are to the other side.

In the first case, the upper surface of the ring 32 is parallel to the lower surface of the ring 3|, and the resulting axis of the cylindrical portion 33 is at right angles to the lower face of the ring 3|.

In the case shown in Fig. 10, the upper surface of the ring 32 is located at an angle of twentytwo degrees with the lower surface of the ring 3|, and the resultingaxis of the cylindrical portion 33 is deflected twenty-two degrees to the right. It is also obvious that if the rings 3| and 32 are rotated through one hundred and eighty degrees the same situation will hold, with the exception that the axis of the cylindrical portion 33 is deflected twenty-two degrees to thel left. In other words, with the particular angle employed I am able to provide a variation of forty-four degrees, which is somewhat more than suillcient to take care o'f the maximum difference in loft required, which is of the order of forty degrees.

rFor ease of discussion, I have marked the point of maximum height of the ring 3|C and its point of minimum height D. I have marked the point of minimum height of the ring 32A and its point of maximum height B.

From a consideration of Figs. 9 and 11, it is obvious that if the upper ring 32 is rotated the axis of the cylindrical portion 33'will move away from the vertical. In Fig. 11 I have shown the high point B of the ring 32, and 'likewise the low point A of the same ring displaced from the position of Fig. 9 through an angle of ninety degrees. 'I'he result is that the high point of the combined ring 3|, 32 is located half way between B and C in Fig. 1l. Consequently, the axis of the cylindrical portion 33 is deilected out of the vertical away from this mid point. I prefer to move the shaft through most of its positions of adjustment in a single plane, as will be understood from Fig. 2, assuming the head of the club to be stationary. Consequently, I prefer to move from one position of adjustment to the next po'sition of adjustment in the manner indicated in ng.l2;thatis,limpartacertaindisplacementto one ring in one direction, and I impart the same displacement to the other ring in the other direction.

Thus, referring to Fig. l2, it will be noted that the ring 32 has been displaced through an angle of forty-five degrees in a co'unterclockwise direction from its position in Fig. 9 and that the ring 3| has been displaced the same amount in the opposite direction. 'I'he result is that the shaft is displaced from its original position to an amount depending upon the angular displacement of the rings. But as long as the angular displacements of the rings 3| and 32 are equal and opposite the plane in which the shaft is located is always the same.

I utilize this property o f the two ring adiustment because it enables me to reproduce all except one of the iron clubs-the putter-in a simple, orderly and progressive manner. For example, I may desire to have eight club adjustments having substantially uniform diiferences of loft and lie from one to another. I may also desire to have a putter which diiIers widely in both lie and loft from all the others. To flx ideas and without intending to limit the invention thereto, I give the following examples of club adjustments which I desire.

Loft in degrees Name Mashie B e mashie aghi@ n|hl|nk iblick sasasssszz I provide the rings 3| and 32 and also the face 23 with pin and socket connections so that these elements may be held against relative rotation to maintain a desired position of adjustment. In the embodiment illustrated I form openings 33 in the face 23 of the head and openings 31 in the lower face of the/ring 32. I provide a pin 33 on the underside of the ring 3| which is adapted to enter any of the openings 33 in the face 23. I also provide a pin 39 in the upper face of the ring 3| which is adapted to enter any of the openings 31 in the ring 32.

I provide lines 40 and corresponding numbers on the head adjacent the face 23 and lines 4| and corresponding numbers around and near the lower edge of the ring 32. the ring 32. The numbers correspond to the club numbers given in the above table. The locations of the lines and numbers I to 3 and the corresponding openings 33 and 31 are determined as follows: The line 4| of the ring 32, which corresponds to the No. 3 club when brought into alignment with the line 42, brings the upper face of the ring 32 parallel with the lower face of the ring 3|. 'I'he line 4I| on the head 23, corresponding to the position 3, is located so as to displacethe high point C of the ring 3| and the low point A of the ring 32, out of the plane which contains the sweet spot 2| and the center of the ball 23 and the axis of the face 23. The displacement is best illustrated in Fig. 5 where the line 43 is the line of intersection of this plane with the face 23. 'I'he point 44 at which the points A and C are located is displaced in the clockwise direction as viewed in Fig. 5 away from the line 43 for a'desired angle, for example for a matter of i I also provide a line 42 on about ten to fifteen degrees. It will readily be understood that when the ring 3| is displaced in one direction and the ring 32 is displaced in the other direction to an equal extent, theaxis of the shaft 22 will move in a plane defined by the diameter 45, which diameter is at right angles to the radius passing through the point 44. Owing to this displacement, progressive change of loft by equal and` opposite manipulations of the rings 3| and 32 will be'accompanied by a correspondingly progressive and small change of lie desired. The result of this displacement is readily seen in Fig. 2. The dash and dot line 46 defines the plane in which the end of the shaft 22 would lie, assuming that the length is unaltered, provided the points A and C had been placed in the line 43 instead of displaced to the point 44.

With the displacement referred to the ends of the shaft take the line 4l when the rings are adjusted from the positions i to 3 progressively. It will be seen that during such adjustment the lie or the angle between the shaft 22 and the vertical progressively decreases.

It will be understood that the numbers i to 8, lines 4|), 4I and 42, will be grouped together. I prefer to arrange the lines 49 on the front side of the head 2li. Club No. 9 is separate from this progressive series and the line on the club head 2U for this position of adjustment is best seen in Figs. 6 and 8. It will be noted that the spacing of the lines 4| is approximately double that of the lines 40, since the ring 3l carries the line 42 in the opposite direction to the direction of rotation of the ring 32 during any change of adjustment.

Figs. 6, 'I and 8 show the head and adjacent part of the shaft adjusted for clubs No. 8 (niblick), No. 3 (mid-mashie) and No. 9 (putter) respectively.

The length of the shaft can be adjusted to suit the head adjustment and also the individual player, as desired. I prefer to provide a shaft adapted for a particular player and to provide indicia whereby it may be adjusted in length for any particular head adjustment. l. may make the shaft 22 of two telescoping parts 48 and 49. The part 48 is a cylindrical steel shaft which has been formed with a longitudinal rib or step 59 which gives the rest of the circumference a cam or spiral form. The handle part of the shaft 49 is likewise tubular in form so as to receive the tubular member 48. The greater part of the tube 49 is substantially larger than the tubular member 48, but the lower portion of the tubular member 49 is reduced so as to provide a free sliding t for the tubular member 48.

This lower portion of the handle member 49 is likewise provided with a rib which gives the rest of the circumference a cam or spiral form. By reference to Figs. i4 and 15 it will be noted that when the ribs 50 and 5| are brought into contactA the parts 48 and 49 are freely slidable relative to each other in the longitudinal direction. When, however, the handle portion 49 is rotated in coun- 1 terclockwise direction, the members 4B and 49 are rigidly secured together by the jamming or camming configuration of their contacting surfaces. I prefer to provide numerals on the member 48 which correspond to the numbers ofthe club adjustments; that is, the numbers run from to 9 inclusive. When the appropriate number is brought into registry with the lower end of the telescoping part 49 and the parts 48 and 49 are cammed together, the adjustment of length is completed.

The upper end of the part 48 is provided with a rubber head 52, which slides in the enlarged portion of the telescoping member 49. This member is closed at the upper end by a suitable plug and is covered exteriorly with a suitable hand gripping material 53, which may be leather.

As' shown in Fig. 16, I may provide a button 54 provided with a threaded stem 55, which I may screw into the end of the shaft 22 after removing the head 20 and rings 3| and 32. This enables the shaft to be used as a cane and prevents dirt from entering the threaded opening in the shaft.

To adjust the club, the head is grasped in one hand and the telescoping part 49 of the shaft in the other. The latter is rotated in the clockwise or right hand direction. The first result of this turning is to release the cammng connection between the two portions of the shaft. The next result is that the shaft portion 48 unscrews from the bolt 30. This unscrewing is continued to provide the necessary free play for the rings 3l and 32.

These rings are then manipulated so' as to bring the line 42 into alignment with the line on the head and the line on the ring 32, which correspond to the number of the club adjustment desired, for example club No. 9 as illustrated in Fig. 8. The pins 38 and 39 are inserted in the appropriate openings 36 and 31 to maintain this relative location of the rings and head. The portion i8 of the shaft is now rotated in the counterclockwise direction so as to tighten up on the left hand threaded screw 39. The shaft parts 48 and 49 are still free for relative sliding movement. The upper portion 49 is slid longitudinally to bring the appropriate number, for example tfon the portion 48, adjacent its lower end. It is then rotated in the counter-clockwise direction with the result that the shaft is tightened on the bolt 3i! and the two parts 48 and 49 are cammed together to give a shaft of the appropriate length for the head adjustment.v

Although the invention has been described with reference to the specific details of a preferred embodiment thereof, it must be understood that the invention is not intended to be limited to said details except in so far as set forth in the accompanying claims.

Having thus described my invention, I declare that what I claim is:

l. A golf club having a shaft, la head mounted thereon adjustable relative to said shaft, and means providing said adjustability comprising a pair of spacing rings of Wedge shaped formation interposed between said head and the adjacent end of said shaft.

2. A golf club having a head, a pair of relatively adjustable wedge shaped rings, a shaft, and means securing the head to the shaft with said rings between them in any one of a plurality of positions of adjustment.

3. A golf club having a cylindrical shaft eleadjusted relation and means for holding said elements rigidly together.

5. A golf club having a head, a shaft, a pair of relatively movable wedge shaped rings, means for maintaining said elements against relative rotation, and means holding the rings and head and shaft rigidly together, said rings being capable of being adjusted to any of several positions relative to each other and to the head and shaft to vary the loft of the head.

6. A golf club having an adjustable head, an

'annular seat on said head for receiving shaft 7. A golf club having an adjustable head, a seat on said head for engagement with shaft elements. a bolt universally secured to said head. a pair of wedge-shaped members capable of adjustment relative to each other and relative to the seat on said head. and a shaft having a threaded end for receiving said bolt and having an end surface engageable with the face of one of said wedge-shaped members, thereby to clamp said members between the shaft and head in any selected one of a plurality of positions of adjustment.

8. A golf club having an adjustable head, a shaft, a pair of wedge-shaped rings between said head and said shaft, means for clamping said 15 wedge-shaped elements rigidly between said head and said shaft in any one of a plurality of pontions of adjustment, and additional means for preventing rotation of said rings relative to each other and relative to said head.

GUNNAR RUSDIG.

Referenced by
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Classifications
U.S. Classification473/246
International ClassificationA63B59/00, A63B53/02, A63B53/06
Cooperative ClassificationA63B2059/0085, A63B53/06, A63B2053/023
European ClassificationA63B53/06