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Publication numberUS2027863 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 14, 1936
Filing dateAug 9, 1935
Priority dateAug 9, 1935
Publication numberUS 2027863 A, US 2027863A, US-A-2027863, US2027863 A, US2027863A
InventorsWinthrop Hall Elisha
Original AssigneeWinthrop Hall Elisha
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Ventilated buffing wheel
US 2027863 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jam. 14, 1936. w HALL VENTILATED BUFFING WHEEL Filed Aug. 9, 1935 .8. Fig.4.

lnvenToT. Elisha W. HoH

Fig

by kW ATTys.

Patented Jan. 14, 1936 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE VENTILATED BUFFING WHEEL Elisha Winthrop Hall, Scituate, Mass.

Application August 9, 1935, Serial No. 35,498

7 Claims.

for delivering currents of air from the central 1 portion of the 'wheel outwardly to the periphery thereof during the revolution of the wheel.

In the use of bufling wheels for finishing and/ or polishing articles the bufiing wheel is rotated at a very high speed and the work forced against it by the operator with such pressure as may be required to produce the desired result. A suitable abradant or polishing material usually intermingled with a suitable carrying vehicle, such as a lubricant, usually is applied to the periphery of the wheel. The friction produced by the contact of the rapidly rotating periphery ofthe wheel with the work produces very considerable heat which in some instances is suflicient to char the fibres of the buffing material at the periphery of the wheel and in some instances will cause the material of the bufling wheel to burst into flames, as the bufiing material is usually of cotton cloth or other combustible material. i I am aware thatheretofore attempts have been made to provide means for cooling buffing wheels by circulation of air between the sections of the bufling wheels by mounting the bufling wheel sections upon a hollow shaft having a port or 30 ports leading to the spaces between the sections of the bufling wheel, as disclosed in the'patent to Zucker No. 1,573,961, but in such constructions the sections of the builing wheel are so closely clamped together between collars upon of air is permitted to accomplish the desired result.

I am also aware that the cooling of the wheel has been accomplished by means disclosed in the patent to Myers and Murray No. 1,922,108 in which the buffing wheel comprises a series of annular buffing units which are gathered at their inner edges to produce radially extending folds or ridges, the inner circumference of the annular bufling strips being held by a ring-shaped metal the shaft that no sufiiciently rapid circulation action is discharged between the sections at the periphery of the buffing wheel.

This construction is objectionable for several reasons. The apertures in the buffing material necessarily limit the extent of use of the bufiing wheel as when it is worn down to the apertures .the defects inherent in such bufling wheels and which will permit a sufiiciently free circulation thereof properly to cool the bufling wheel. This is accomplished in the present invention by providing a bufiing wheel formed of a plurality of bufilng units having hubs of rigid material provided with alined apertures, with separator plates interposed between adjacent bufiing units having slots communicating with said apertures and extending through the periphery of the separator plates operable when the wheel is rotated at a high speed to permit air to be drawn into the apertures in the hubs and to be ejected therefrom through the slotsfinto the spaces'between the adjacent units from which it escapes at the periphery of the wheel.

Preferred embodiments of the invention are illustrated in the accompanying drawing, in

which,

Fig. 1 is an endview of the bufiing wheel assembly showing the preferred form of separator plate, the arbor upon which the bufilng'wheel is mounted being shown in section;

Fig. 2 is a diametrical sectional view on line 2-2 Fig. 1 of the assembled bufiing wheel shown in Fig. 1 including the clamping heads having apertures communicating with the apertures in the hubs of the bufling units, the arbor being shown in elevation;

Fig. 3 is a detail 'diametrical sectional view of one form of separator plates;

Fig. 4 is an enlarged detail sectional view on line 4-4 Fig. 1, showing the spheroidaldistortions in the separator plate adapted to be embedded under pressure in the hub of an adjacent unit; and, Y

Fig. 5 is a similar view to Fig.4 illustrating the use of a plurality of separator plates for spacing the bufling units more widely apart.

The bufiing wheel illustrated in Figs. 1 and 2 comprises a plurality, four being shown, of bufiing units assembled upon an arbor with separator plates between adjacent units and all clamped together upon the arbor of the buffing machine. Each of the buffing units comprises a cylindrical rigid hub I of any suitable thickness and any suitable material, such as fibreboard, wood, hardened plastic material, etc., having a central aperture which fits tightly upon the arbor.2 of the bufling machine.

The buffing material comprises a plurality of layers 3 of cloth which may be in the form of disks, but which preferably are bands gathered at their inner edges to fit upon the hub l and which are firmly secured thereto in any desired manner. Preferably the layers of bufling material are gathered upon the hub in the manner disclosed in my copending application Serial Number 30,885, filed July 11, 1935, by providing two annular bands of superimposed layers of cloth, the bands being united by overedge or jump stitching and gathered by a suitable tension, such as a wire encircling the lines of stitching, and drawing the same upon the hub or a suitable mandrel, the layers of cloth being thereby brought into radial relation to the wheel, stitched together, and the tension member then removed.

The layers of bufling material are united by a preferably circular line of stitching 4 which extends through the layers of buiiing material and through fibrous anchoring disks 5. Desirably the anchoring layers are secured to the hub by a circular line of stitching 6, and protective disks 1, of canvas, are secured by a suitable adhesive to the anchoring disks 5. The hubs of the buffing units are provided with alined apertures 8 which also extend through the anchoring and protective disks.

The bufling units thus constructed are assembled upon the arbor 2 with separator plates 9 interposed between the adjacent bufling units.

The bufling units thus assembled are clamped between suitable metallic heads or collars I0 and II, the collar I0 preferably abutting against a shoulder I2 upon an enlarged portion of the shaft, the collar I I being forced toward the collar III by a nut I3 mounted upon the screw threaded end of the shaft. The'collars I0 and II are provided with apertures l4 and I5 which register with the apertures 8 in the hubs of the buffing wheels.

The separator plates may be of any desired thickness and of any suitable material. Preferably the separator plates are formed of thin tough steel, approximately 3%" in thickness, and are provided with slots I6 which communicate at their inner ends with the apertures 8 in the bud-- ing units and extend through the periphery of the separator plates. The slots in the separator plates desirably extend radially with respect to the axis of the bufling wheel in order to minimize the weakening of the separator plates.

In the operation of the bufiing wheel, when run at high speed, air is drawn freely through the apertures I4 and I 5 of the hub into the apertures in the hubs of the buifing disks and is thrown therefrom by centrifugal force into the spaces I'I between the adjacent units of the buffing wheel. Inasmuch as the gathering of the layers of bufiing material about the hub produces plaits I8 in the buffing material, some of which extend to the periphery of the buiiing wheel and others of which extend in proximity thereto, and the outer layers of bufling material of adjacent disks are separated by the anchoring layers, the protective layers, and the separator plates, relatively large spaces I! are provided be- I tween the material of the adjacent buffing units at their inner peripheries, so that air is discharged from the spaces I! through the periphery of the bufling wheel with suflicient rapidity to insure proper cooling of the bufling wheel when run at any speed, as the circulation of air naturally increases with the increase of centrifugal force due to the rapidity with which the buffing wheel is rotated.

In view of the fact that the operator at times presses the work more forcibly against certain units of the bufling wheel than others, means desirably are provided for preventing relative movement between the bufling wheel and the separator plates, so that the alinement of the apertures in the bufling wheel units and the separator plates may be maintained. To accomplish this purpose the metal separator plates desirably are provided with means to interengage with the material of the hubs of one or more of the buffing units between whichtheyarelocated. A convenient means, which is illustrated in Figs. 4 and 5 of the drawing, comprises a plurality of spheroidal distortions I9 which may be produced by punching the separator plate from one side to produce a. spheroidal projection upon the other side which, when the bufling units and separator plates are assembled and forced together by the nut I3, will embed the projecting spheroidal portions in the hubs of the bufiing units. Such projections may be caused to extend either from one side or both sides of the separator plate. Alternatively, teeth may be punched from the separator plates in one or both directions to engage the hubs of adjacent bufiing disks, or the plates may be scored, or otherwise provided with frictional surfaces to engage the hubs of the bufling disk.

Where the buffing wheel is to be rotated at very high speeds, and requires greater amount of cooling, a plurality of separator plates may be em-- ployed and placed side by side, as illustrated in Fig. 5, intermediate of the adjacent bufilng units.

In such case the spheroidal projections I9 will nest with each other. If the spheroidally punched portions are the same in both plates, the adjacent faces of the plates will be slightly separated because the spheroidal portions of one plate will not completely fit into the complementary cavity of the other, so that the plates will be slightly separated and therefore capable of permitting an increased circulation of air from the apertures 8 into the spaces II between adjacent bufling disks.

By reason therefore of the present invention a ventilated bufling wheel is produced which will provide a suflicient circulation of air between the bumng units to maintain the buffing material sufficiently cool to avoid charring or burning of the bufling material irrespective of the speed at which the wheel revolves. The separator plates, if of metal, are of such rigid construction and so firmly anchored to the hubs of the bufling units that there is no likelihood of fracture or displacement. Inasmuch as the apertures through which the air enters the bufling units are located within the hubs of the units, the wheel may be used until it is worn down practically to the periphery of the clamping heads.

It will be understood that while the separator plates are herein described as preferably steel plates they may be made of any suitable material. Relative rotationbetween the bufling wheel units and the separator plates may be prevented in any desired manner to insure proper alinement of the apertures in the bufflng units, with the slots in the separator plates, the slots in the separator plates may extend in any desired direction toward the periphery of the wheel. Any suitable material may be employed for the bufiing units, whether gatheredas above described, or

hub and secured thereto, integral disks of rigid material forming separator plates interposed between adjacent buffing units having slots communicating with said alined apertures and extending therefrom through the periphery of said separator plates, and means for admitting air to said apertures.

2. A ventilated buffing wheel formed of a plurality of assembled bufilng units having hubs of l rigid material provided with alined apertures, a

plurality of annular layers of bufling material gathered at their inner edges to fit the respective hubs and secured thereupon, thereby providing outwardly extending plates of bufling material,

integral disks forming separator plates between adjacent bufllng units of larger diameter than said hubs and having air passages coinciding with said alined apertures and establishing communication between said hub apertures and the spaces between the plates of said butting units, and means for admitting air to said apertures.

3. A ventilated bufling wheel formed of a plurality of assembled buiiing units having hubs of rigid material provided with alined apertures, a plurality of annular layers of fabric gathered at their inner edges fitting upon and secured to the respective hubs, solid circular metallic separator plates interposed between adjacent bufiing units having slots communicating with said alined apertures and with the spaces between the outer fabric layers of adjacent bufling units, and clamping plates having apertures registering with the apertures in said hubs.

4. A ventilated bufiing wheel formed of a plurality oi assembled bufilng units having hubs of rigid material providedwith alined apertures, a plurality of annular layers of fabric gathered at their inner edges fitting upon and secured to the respective hubs, solid circular metallic separator plates of larger diameter than said hubs interposed between adjacent bufling units having slots communicating with said alined apertures and with the spaces between the outer fabric layers of adjacent buffing units, and provided with means 5 engaging the material of said hubs acting to prevent relative movement between the separator plates and hubs of the lending units, and clamping plates having apertures registering with the apertures in said hubs..

5. A ventilated bumng wheel formed of a plurality of assembled buiiing units having hubs of rigid material provided with alined apertures, a plurality of separator plates interposed between each pair of adjacent bufling units provided with registering slots leading radially from said hub apertures through the periphery of said separator plates, interengaging means upon each pair of separator plates acting to prevent relative movementttherebetween and between separator plates go and the hubs of said bufiing units, and means for admitting air to said apertures.

6. A ventilated bufllng wheel formed of a plurality of bufiing units having hubs of rigid material provided with alined apertures, flat metallic separator plates having radial slots communicating with said apertures and extending through the periphery of said plates, each of said separator plates being provided with small spheroidal deformations, relatively thick solid circular metal clamping plates engaging the faces of the outermost buffing units when placed upon an arbor and provided with apertures communicating with the apertures in said hubs and operable when clamped together thereon with the bufling units as therebetween to embed said spheroidal deformations in the material of the adjacent bufiing unit hub.

7. A ventilated bufling wheel formed of a plurality of units each having a hub of rigid 'ma- 4o terial and provided with a plurality of strips of textile material gathered at their inner edges to fit said hub,anchoring disks of larger diameter than said hub secured to said strips by a line of through-and-through stitching, protective disks adhesively secured to said anchoring disks, the hubs of said series of units beingprovided with alined apertures, solid circular metal separator plates between adjacent buffing units having slots communicating with said apertures and extend- 60 ing through the periphery of said disks, an arbor upon which said disks are mounted, metal clamping plates upon said arbor having apertures registering with the apertures in said hubs, and means for forcing said clamping disks toward each other to clamp the assembled bufling units therebetween.

ELISHA WINTHROP HALL.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2417645 *Aug 24, 1944Mar 18, 1947Hall Elisha WRotary abrading tool
US2479941 *Jul 29, 1948Aug 23, 1949Kummer Charles JAir-cooled buffing wheel
US2497497 *Oct 3, 1944Feb 14, 1950Hall Elisha WRotary cylinder abrading tool
US3023550 *Nov 4, 1958Mar 6, 1962Westinghouse Electric CorpBuffer wheels
US4882880 *May 17, 1988Nov 28, 1989Schaffner Manufacturing Company, Inc.Ganging of buffing wheels
US5560744 *Jan 27, 1994Oct 1, 1996Schaffner Manufacturing Co., Inc.Buffing
US7766718 *Aug 17, 2006Aug 3, 2010Shoot The Moon Products Ii, LlcRotatable flexible disk toys
US20070281581 *Aug 17, 2006Dec 6, 2007Rago Paul SRotatable Flexible Disk Toys
DE856727C *Sep 1, 1949Nov 24, 1952Albert HaugPolierscheibe nach Art einer Schwabbelscheibe
Classifications
U.S. Classification15/230.1, 15/200, 15/230
International ClassificationB24D13/00, B24D13/18
Cooperative ClassificationB24D13/18
European ClassificationB24D13/18