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Publication numberUS2028599 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 21, 1936
Filing dateNov 22, 1934
Priority dateNov 22, 1934
Publication numberUS 2028599 A, US 2028599A, US-A-2028599, US2028599 A, US2028599A
InventorsLillian Goodman
Original AssigneeMitchell Brothers Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Undergarment for women
US 2028599 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jam 21, 1936. GOODMAN v UNDERGARMENT FOR WOMEN Filed Nov. 22, 1954 INVENTOR. ULLIAN GOODMAN ATTORNEY.

Patented Jan. 21, 1936 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE UNDERGARMENT FOR WOMEN.

Application November 22, 1934,, Serial No. 754,290

4 Claims.

This invention relates to undergarments for women.

In its specific aspect, the invention is directed to the provision, substantially as an integral element of certain types of undergarments, such as slips, chemises, or the like, which are worn immediately beneath the dress, and support for which is derived substantially entirely from means carried from the shoulders of the wearer, and whose function, to a minimum degree, isto fit snugly against the body, of means having moisture-shedding or moisture-impenetrative roperties, this means to function for guarding the dress from moisture derived from the body as in the nature of perspiration, eliminating the need for positioning the customary shields in direct association with the dress itself. When the word, slip, is used hereinafter, it is intended to refer to a garment of the type hereinbefore described, that is, one which is suspended from the shoulders and hangs thus of its own, substantially entire, weight. It is an object of the invention, therefore, to provide undergarments of this type, having therewith, substantially permanently, devices for guarding against the advent of moisture from the body to a dress worn together with such undergarment.

Rubberized or similar water-impenetrative fabrics or material in sheet form may be used in the production of constructions such as herein set forth. However, for certain other purposes, it has been found highly desirable to utilize a fabric coated, impregnated, or otherwise processed, with a compound having none of the undesirable properties of rubber, but still being hostile to the penetration of moisture through the fabric. Thus, the odor, the inability to launder, and many of the other undesirable properties, of rubber-processed fabrics, are avoided, even though the fabric prepared as herein set forth functions for moisture-shedding or moisture-pentration-preventive purposes just as successfully, if not more so. It is an object of the invention to provide a shield in an association such as here described in which the shield includes a fabric having moisture-shedding or moisture-penetration-preventive properties which fabric may be derived from a. base fabric identically the same as used in the rest of the garment, and when prepared as herein set forth, has no marked or noticeable difference from the fabric which constitutes the major portion of the garment and is not so prepared for moisture-shedding or moisture-penetration-prevention.

By assembling such a prepared fabric to provide, say, at the arm-pits of the wearer, a shield together with the undergarment, there is provided, as a single unit, a single garment useable with any one of a large number of dresses, elimi- 5 hating any need for providing, in each individual dress, such shield or shields. Also, when the ordinary shields are sewed into dresses, owing to the increase: of bulk and the natural reduction in the flexibility of the garment at that section as a result from the rubber-coated members used, which, to a large degree, are not as flexible, or as form-conforming, as the fabric itself, distortion of the dress results. In the construction here, all such distortion of the dress itself is avoided, and, in fact, eliminated, by placing the shield upon the slip or similar undergarment, immediately adjacent the dress, and between the dress and the body, but not upon the dress.

While, for certain. of its purposes, the moisture-shedding or moisture-impenetrative means may be removably assembled in connection with the undergarment, it is an object of the invention to assemble such means substantially permanently with the undergarment and in such a manner that it will not interfere with the functioning of elements thereof, such as the support members, as, for instance, where the garment is privided with thin shoulder straps. It is an object of the invention to provide a system of straps for supporting. a garment of this character with which has been associated a moisture-shedding device of the character described, by which the Weight of the garment is not transmitted wholly through the moistureshedding element, but, in part, at least, directly to an edge of the fabric of the garment itself. Such straps, in addition to thus distributing the load, would, especially in the case of a substantially low-cut undergarment, function to maintain the means properly extended beyond the garment and into a proper association, as, for instance, with the arm-pits, in order to guard against the transmission of moisture to the dress, the means being made of a proper length to extend into the sleeve and thus assisting itself in the formation of the assembly,

Other objects of this invention will hereinafter be set forth, or will be apparent from the description and the drawing, in which are illustrated garments constructed to carry out the invention. 1

The invention, however, is not intended to be. restricted to any particular construction or arrangement of parts, of any such garment, or to any particular application of such construction, or to any specific manner of use, or to any of various details thereof, herein shown and described, as the same may be modified in various particulars, or be applied in many varied relations, without departing from the spirit and scope of the claimed invention, the garments herein illustrated and described being merely types, showing some of various forms the invention might take for practical purposes.

On the drawing, in which the same reference characters refer to the same parts throughout, and in which are shown such garments:

Fig. 1 is a perspective view of a garment incorporating certain features of the invention, shown as worn, part of the garment being broken away to disclose the method of association of a moisture-repelling device therewith;

Fig. 2 is a side elevational view, to a larger scale than Fig. 1, of a'portion of the garment there shown, illustrating the arrangement of the device in the garment; and

Fig. 3 is a vertical sectional view, substantially medially of Fig. 2, illustrating the arrangement and the formation of the device and its supporting elements.

A garment If), such as shown in Fig. 1, may be constructed from a plurality of fabric pieces, defining, for the garment, rear and front sections l2 and I4. While the pieces used in constructing sections l2 and [4 may take any desired form, in the garment here disclosed, a pair of fabric portions 16 are cut to define the body of the garment, being secured together along their coincident edges l8. To define the low-cut edges 26 for the garment and also the contouring of edges 22 below the arm-pits of the wearer, a plurality of fabric portions 24 are cut out to have lower edges 26 to fit upon and be secured to the upper otherwise unsecured edges 28 of portions 16.

Each portion 24, in order to define an edge 22, is cut with a peak 30 rising from the downwardly directed section 32 of edge 20 and from edge 22. When edges 34 of two immediately adjacent portions 24 are secured together, adjacent peaks 30 cooperate in the construction of a built-up shoulder portion 36, bringing the upper edge of the garment, at that location, more closely into line with the opening of the sleeve of a dress worn with the slip or similar undergarment.

At each edge 22 is to be defined what will here be termed a moisture-shedding element 38. Element 38 may be made up from a plurality of cuttings 40 of fabric, some or all of which cuttings may have been prepared in the manner here to be described. Edges 42 of the cuttings are intended to conform to the contouring of edge 22. The cuttings are of sufficiently extended form to provide a protective surface between the dress and the body at the arm-pits.

The element may be constructed, as shown, to define separate flaps 44 and 46, a pair of cuttings 40 being sewed together in superimposed relation, and then being turned inside out as in the formation of a pocket, leaving the edges of the cuttings within the pocket. After a pair of such flaps have been prepared, the edges of the fabric at the open-mouths of the flaps are brought into overlapping relationship, and, as a unit, are positioned to coordinate with edge 22. By means of piping 48, covering over the edges,

all these edges are then sewed down together by a line of stitching.

However, in garment Ill, element 38, as shown in Fig. 3, is constructed in a manner appreciably different from the foregoing. But one flap 46 is formed by stitching together, at coincident edges, superimposed cuttings 58 and 52, and then turning the same inside out. The other flap 44 is defined by built-up shoulder portion 36 to which is stitched a cutting 54, preferably at the outside face of portion 35. Then the free edges of cuttings 5i! and 52 are positioned immediately at edge 22, and these edges, together with edge 22 and the edge of cutting 54, are encompassed in piping 48 by means of which all are secured together.

Now there will be left free, at the outer face of the garment, flap 48. In use of an element 38 such as here described, after the garment has been donned, as shown in Fig. 1, flap 46 is turned upwardly and outwardly, to extend beyond edge 22. In such an arrangement, there are exposed to the flesh of the wearer at the arm-pits, only rounded surfaces of the piping, having no annoying or irritating effect. At the same time, flap 4%, which is designed to be of a sufficient length, is retained to bridge from the garment and extend into the sleeve of a dress beneath which garment i0 is worn. Thus, without the necessity of securing element 38 directly to the dress, and without any discomfort to the wearer, it guards the sleeve of the dress against soiling or wetting from moisture on the arm.

For cuttings G8, a fabric of exactly the same character as that used for the pieces of sections l2 and !4 may be used. However, before the garment, as a whole, may be considered complete, at least one of the cuttings 40 will have been made substantially moisture-impervious. -The desirable method for this purpose has been found to be the impregnation of the cutting or cuttings before they are cut into the patterns desired for element 33. While any desired method of waterproofing may be followed in preparing the cuttings for the use specified, one which, in no way, or, at least, to no appreciable or noticeable extent, changes the properties of the fabric is indicated. Thus, when such cuttings are assembled with the garment fabric, there is no distinction, undesirable or otherwise, between the cuttings and the normal garment fabric. For this purpose, one process indicated is involved with the impregnation of the fabric with a composition comprising the acetates of metals such as aluminium. The product of such impregnation has been found to be just as flexible and pliable as the fabric in its original state. No odor at all can be detected as originating from the impregnating medium, as would be the case if the pieces had been coated with rubber or similar waterproofing materials. Thus, When element 38 is assembled into garment I8, an uniformly appearing effect is derived from the assembly without any suspicion of the presence of a foreign substance.

Piping 48 is extended beyond and free of edge 22, being closed by a line of stitching 56. The free ends of the piping are tacked at the peaks 58 of edge 29. Edge 20 may also be piped, if so desired. Free portions 60 of piping 48 become effective as part of the supporting devices 62, which function, when the undergarment is worn, to sustain fiap 46 in its dress-protective position, but also and at the same time,

to provide support for the garment itself. Devices 62 further may include bridge straps B4, engaging portions 60. Thus, each portion 60 is positioned wholly either in front, or in back, of the wearer, transmitting supporting force from bridge straps 54 which pass between portions 55 and over the shoulder of the wearer. Between strap 64 and edge 22 is thus defined a passage for the arm of the wearer.

It will be noted that piping 48 provides a band extending continuously between peaks 58, and also providing a connection between each pair of peaks 3!) and. 58, at the. same time defining upper edge 22. With strap 54 engaging portions 60, portions 60 will, when the garment is worn, be caused to assume'a relationship to the body by which edge 22 will be pulled up toward the arm-pit of the wearer. In that relationship, flap 46 will be found actually to be extended into the sleeve, and there sustained against all movement of the arms tending to displace it. The force directed through piping 43, for causing such movement of edge 22 and flap 56, is derived in great part from the weight of garment l5, acting through the piping 48 attached at peaks 58. This force, of course, is converted practically entirely into an upwardly biasing force upon peaks 30, acting thereafter for tensioning flaps 46 out into the sleeves of the dress.

For more effectively accomplishing the results just specified, straps 64 may have means for providing a loose engagement with portions 5%. In this case, at each end of each strap fit, there is provided a loop 66 through which portions 59 pass. In one case, strap 64, after passing through loop 66, is turned back upon, and has an end. 68 secured to, itself. Its other end 78 is passed up through a friction loop 12, then through the other loop 56 on the other portion Bi], and finallyback to loop [2, there to be secured. In this manner, adjustment is provided to adjust the length of straps 64 for the comfort of the wearer and also to position straps 54 properly for directing a proper sustaining force to flap 45 as the weight of garment l applies a force to piping 48 at peak 58 to be transmitted to peak 38. It has been found that the weight of the garment is effective at peaks 58, drawing upon piping 4B and causing peaks 38 to rise and thus impart a desired contouring to flap 56, as shown in Fig. 1. This efiect can be effected even more positively by properly adjusting the length of bridge straps 64 so that, as shown in Fig. 1, edge 22 is snugly associated with the arm-pit of the wearer. The formation of the extended flap, as shown, is automatic under these circumstances, requiring no arm bands to retain it in that relation.

In this manner, provision is made for the association of moisture-repelling elements with garments such as slips and the like, which do not closely hug the body, but are yet in position to associate such moisture-repelling elements in order to guard against access of moisture from the body to dresses worn in association with such undergarments. At the same time, such undergarment is made available for use with any number of dresses without the necessity of providing separate moisture-repelling elements for each such dress. The assembly of the shielding element with the undergarment is such that the convenience of the user is served, and her comfort, in no way, interfered with.

In making up element 3.8,. as has herein previously been described, built-up shoulder portion 36 constitutes one layer of. the element. It will be noted, further, that. this portionv of element 38 is preferably not processed to prevent moisture penetration. Howeven. cuttingsv 5i) and 54, forming, respectively, opposed faces of element 38, one of them, that is, cutting 54, being sewed directly to built-up shoulder portion 35, and the other, that is, cutting 50, being assembled with cutting 52 for defining flap 45, are processed to make them moisture-repellant. Cutting 52, on the other hand, may be left without processing of this character.

Built-up shoulder portion 36 and cutting 52 will, as can easily be understood, be brought into contact with, or be in immediate adjacency to, the body. By failing. to make them moisture-repellent, their moistureabsorbent. properties remain effective. To a large degree, therefore, they will function to prevent moisture on the: skin from further movement b yond element 38 and into: undesired contact with a dress worn with the undergarment. Cuttings 55 and 54 will be immediately inguarding relationship to the parts of the dress to be protected.

Thus, by the use of but three additional fabric layers, only two of which need be processed for water-repellent purposes, the garment is useful in its customary fashion as a slip; at the same time, it eliminates the necessity for using, with each dress, a different set of shields, yet with provision made for moisture-absorption by the shield without endangering the dress. By its simple strap construction, the element eliminates any bands or other devices for retaining flap 45 extended into the sleeve of the dress worn 'with the garment. The weight of the garment itself is utilized in assuring the positive positioning of the element Within the dress sleeve without, in any way, hampering the normal construction of such undergarment, especially in the case of the low-cut types.

Many other changes could be efiected in the particular garments designed, and in the methods of use and construction set forth, and in specific details thereof, without substantially departing from the invention intended to be defined in the claims, the description being merely of garments illustrating certain phases of the spirit of the invention.

What is claimed as new and useful is:-

1. An integral undergarment structure for wear by women, the garment structure comprising a slip to be Worn beneath the outer dress of the woman for imparting to the dress certain properties and characteristics, the garment structure including means for supporting the slip in a predetermined relationship to the arm-pits of the wearer and cooperating with top edges of the slip to define passages for the arms of the wearer, the slip including fabric sections located at the portions of its top edges normally brought into association with the armpits, the fabric sections being prepared for preventing the passage of moisture through the sections, the fabric sections being positioned between the skin and the dress, the fabric sections extending beyond the upper edge of the slip, the supporting means including means extended from the slip to an extended fabric section, and a strap slidably receiving the extended means and passing over the shoulder of the wearer.

2. An integral undergarment structure for wear by women, the garment structure comprising a slip to be worn beneath the outer dress of the woman for imparting to the dress certain properties and characteristics, the garment structure including means for supporting the slip in a predetermined relationship to the armpits of the wearer and cooperating with top edges of the slip to define passages for the arms of the wearer, the slip including fabric sections located at the portions of its top edges normally brought into association with the arm-pits, the fabric sections being prepared for preventing the passage of moisture through the sections, the fabric sections being positioned between the skin and the dress, the fabric sections extending beyond the upper edge of the slip, the supporting means including a pair of bands each having an end engaging the top edge of the slip and the other end engaging the same fabric section, the two bands engaging the fabric section at spaced apart points, and a strap having its ends provided with means for slidably receiving the bands, the strap passing over the shoulder of the wearer.

3. An integral undergarment structure for wear by women, the garment structure comprising a slip to be worn beneath the outer dress of the woman for imparting to the dress certain properties and characteristics, the garment structure including means for supporting the slip in a predetermined relationship to the armpits of the wearer and cooperating with top edges of the slip to define passages for the arms of the wearer, the slip including fabric sections located at the portions of its top edges normally brought into association with the armpits, the fabric sections being prepared for preventing the passage of moisture through the sections, the fabric sections being positioned be- .tween the skin and the dress, the fabric sections extending beyond the upper edge of the slip, the supporting means including a pair of bands each having an end engaging the top edge of the slip and the other end engaging the same fabric section, the two bands engaging the fabric section at spaced apart points, and a strap having loops at its ends, the bands passing slidably through the loops, the strap passing over the shoulder of the wearer.

4. An integral undergarment structure for wear by Women, the garment structure comprising a slip to beworn beneath the outer dress of the woman for imparting to the dress certain properties and characteristics, the garment structure including means for supporting the slip in a. predetermined relationship to the armpits of the wearer and cooperating with top edges of the slip to define passages for the arms of the wearer, the slip including fabric sections located at the portions of its top edges normally brought into association with the arm-pits, the fabric sections being prepared for preventing the passage of moisture through the sections, the fabric sections being positioned between the skin and the dress, the fabric sections extending beyond the upper edge of the slip, the supporting means including a pair of bands each having an end engaging the top edge of the slip and the other end engaging the same fabric section, tho two bands engaging the fabric section at spaced apart points, and a strap having loops at its ends, the bands passing slidably through the loops, the strap passing over the shoulder of the wearer, the strap applying a force to the bands to cause the latter to support certain fabric sections as a flap extending beyond the top edge of the garment and into proximity to the arms of the wearer to provide a shield against the downward percolation of moisture from the arms of the wearer.

- LlLLIAN GOODMAN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US6138276 *Feb 1, 1999Oct 31, 2000Asciutto; Cathy L.Underarm perspiration shields
US20120291175 *May 17, 2011Nov 22, 2012Gregory Michel LawrenceDisposable underarm perspiration pad
Classifications
U.S. Classification2/73, 2/54
International ClassificationA41B9/00, A41B9/06
Cooperative ClassificationA41B9/06
European ClassificationA41B9/06